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NURS 360 Psychiatric Mental Health

Psychosocial & Psychoeducational Group Template


Acute & Community
Psychoeducation and psychosocial interventions encompass a broad range of nurse led activities.
The primary therapeutic focus is for clients to learn practical and positive emotional and
behavioral skills to improve life adjustment, management of emotions and self-awareness.
Patients groups also serve to provide information about health and wellness, illness, treatment,
symptoms, resources and services.
A psychoeducation approach appreciates the importance of education in changing unhealthy or
negative emotional and behavioral patterns. In groups tools such as handouts, worksheets,
activities and games are helpful. In both the acute and community setting nurse led psychosocial
and psychoeducational groups provide clients the opportunity to learn life skills, feel
empowered, improve their health and effectively manage their illness.
Pre Group Planning
Group Facilitator Student Names: Kelsy and Graham
Title of Group:
Psychosocial or Psychoeducational: Psychoeducational
Rationale: To have self-esteem means to evaluate the self positively and hold the self in a high
regard. If these patients have an adequate self-esteem, then they will have confidence in their
own worth and abilities.
Goal(s): To have the patients understand what self-esteem is and why it is important.
Purpose: To promote adequate self-esteem.
Setting: Acute mental health unit
Target Population: Adolescents
Group Activity Steps: Activity 1: Each person gets a piece of paper and an envelope. On the
piece of paper, each person will write their name in a vertical position. They will then write
positive, appropriate, adjectives about themselves starting with the corresponding letters in their
name. After they are done, they will put this paper in the envelope and address it to themselves.
Activity 2: There is a piece of paper taped to everyones backs, and everyone has a pen. The
members will go around the room and write compliments on the papers. At the end, members
will look at the paper and read what others had to say about them.
Supplies Needed: Paper, markers, tape

Post Group Write up:


Number of Participants in Attendance: 5
Outcome: What worked, what didnt and why?
Overall, we believe that our approach to promote positive self-esteem was successful. All
participants in the group were engaged and focused on the activities; and their enjoyment was
evident by smiles, laughter, and constructive social interaction.
Suggestions for Improvement:
Upon the completion of our activities, weve identified considerable flaws within our design.
For example, we did not consider how a willing participant with post-traumatic stress disorder
might perceive, differently, the experience of having other participants repeatedly approaching
from behind to write a complement. Although seemingly innocent, these repeated approaches
from behind may perhaps be perceived as intrusive or threatening.
Another design flaw that weve identified in the same activity, is that it did not reinforce
the physical boundaries firmly established on the unit for the sake of the therapeutic milieu.
Again, we had appropriate intentions to promote positive self-esteem and the acquisition of
social skills; but with hindsight, we probably should have avoided proposing an activity that
facilitated close physical contact which could have been easily misinterpreted.
A simple solution would be to redesign the activity in a way that not only removes the
potential for anxiety development, but also in a way that reinforces the physical boundaries
established in the therapeutic milieu.
As a nurse engaged in patient education what was learned?
Through this patient education opportunity, my partner and I have furthered our experiences in
cooperative planning and lesson development. Initially, our ideas were very limited and our
personal schedules, very tight. Kelsy took a proactive lead and narrowed our attention onto the
theme of self-esteem promotion. In addition, she proposed several, solid delivery approaches.
From decision making, planning, executing, and evaluatingwe worked as a team. The concepts
of leadership and collaborative team work are two essential threads that make the fabric of
quality healthcare and so should not be overlooked. These are the most valuable takeaways from
our psychoeducational group project.

NURS 360 Psychiatric Mental Health


Psychosocial & Psychoeducational Group Template
Acute & Community
Psychoeducation and psychosocial interventions encompass a broad range of nurse led activities.
The primary therapeutic focus is for clients to learn practical and positive emotional and
behavioral skills to improve life adjustment, management of emotions and self-awareness.
Patients groups also serve to provide information about health and wellness, illness, treatment,
symptoms, resources and services.
A psychoeducation approach appreciates the importance of education in changing unhealthy or
negative emotional and behavioral patterns. In groups tools such as handouts, worksheets,
activities and games are helpful. In both the acute and community setting nurse led
psychosocial and psychoeducational groups provide clients the opportunity to learn life skills,
feel empowered, improve their health and effectively manage their illness.
Pre Group Planning
Group Facilitator Student Names: Chelsea and Kelsy
Title of Group: Pictionary
Psychosocial or Psychoeducational: Psychosocial
Rationale: Patients that work together increase their social skills while working on their problem
solving abilities
Goal(s): To have patients work together and collaborate to correctly guess the picture and win
points/prizes
Purpose: Patients interact with each other towards a common goal
Setting: Acute/residential adult unit
Target Population: Adults
Group Activity Steps: State the rules of the game. Split the unit into two teams and have them
sit on their respective sides of the white board. Have them come up with a team name. One
resident from each team will hold a dry erase marker and walk to coordinator of event who will
show them a word or phrase that they will need to draw. They will walk up to the board, and then
when coordinator says go they may start to draw on the board in order to get their teammates
to name the word or phrase that the person is trying to draw. The team that identifies the word or
phrase first wins a point. We will keep track of team points. The game will end once every player
has drawn on the board twice. Whichever team has the most points will win prizes.
Supplies Needed: White board, expo pens, timer

Post Group Write up:


Number of Participants in Attendance: 10
Outcome: What worked, what didnt and why? Some things that worked were the patients
abilities to draw and guess the given word, active participation from a couple of the patients, and
the positive feedback from the patients and staff that participated. Some things that did not go as
planned was the level of excitement, the unforeseen side effects of the patients medications, and
giving out snacks as prizes. They had just received their medications and were a little sleepy
during the activity. Because if this, some patients went into their rooms for a nap and opted out
of the activity. It was a little difficult to get the patients to volunteer for their turn to draw on the
board. We had to selectively call patients by their names to get them to participate. A few patients
only went once and a couple patients went several times. We did not divide the group into 2
teams and instead had everyone participate as individuals. Therefore, there were no team names
and we did not keep track of points. We did not utilize a timer because we wanted to open up the
guessing time. Creating a time limit would have made it very restricted and limited, which
wouldve led to less participation.
Suggestions for Improvement: If we were to recommend this activity to future students, we
would suggest their do this activity before medications are given. That way, the patients would
be more energetic. We also suggest checking with the staff ahead of time about giving snacks out
as prizes. Some patients are diabetic and there are certain restrictions on each unit.
As a nurse engaged in patient education, what was learned? What we learned is that group
activities are vital for social interaction. The activities help to facilitate their social interaction
skills and boost self-confidence. We also learned that adult patients are not as energetic as
adolescents. Especially after medications are given, adult patients are very sleepy and tend to go
into their rooms to lay down and nap.