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UNITED STATES PACIFIC FLEET

AND PACIFIC OCEAN AREAS

•**
.u . > - i - •-> ^ ­

OKINAWA GUNTO
SECOND SUPPLEMENT TO OKINAWA
GUNTO INFORMATION BULLETIN
NUMBER 161-44. 15 NOVEMBER 1944.
this

CINCPAC-CINCPOA

BULLETIN NO. 53-45

58 FEBRUARY 1945

MAP 19<5
CINCFAC-CINCPOA BULLETIN No. ' 5 3 - 4 5 ' | B Fob 7 1945

OKINAWA GUITTO

FOREvVORD

With the exception of defenses and troop dispositions,

which are completely revised and discussed, information con­

tained in this publication is supplementary to CINCPAC­

CINCPOA Bulletin No. 161-44 and is baaed on photographic

coverage since 10 October as follows:

-3PR4M5O - 31 December. 1944

. 3PR5M1 r- 1. January 1945

3PR5M3 - 3 January 1945

Sorties dated 21, 22 January 1945 by air

groups attached to CV-9, CV-10, CV-12,

CV-16, CV-I8, 07-1$, CVL-25, CVL-27,

CVL-28.

In the discussion of target areas, key numbers are the

same as those used in the above mentioned bulletin •with the

exception of new items which have been given new numbers.

Only items which are new, or which have changed since

photographic coverage of 10 October 1944, are included in

the discussion of the targot aroas.

• ^ 2 ! 1965

TA3L3 OF CONTENTS "

I. Summary 1

Principal Installstions Map 2

Southern OKINAWA Shima fcefonse Map . . . . . . . . 3

Southern OKINAWA Shima Defense Map, -Sheet 1,

Northern Section 4

Southern OKINAWA Shima Defense I-.Iap, Sheet

Southern Section . . . . . • 5

Northern OKlNAv/A Shima Defense Map 6

Northern OKINAWA Shima Troop Dispositions Map. . . 7

Southern OKINAWA Shima Troop Dispositions Map. . . • 8

II. OKINAWA Shicia and IE Shima ..."... 9-34

A. Estimated Disposition and Plan of Defense . 9-14 ( —

B. Airfiolds , 15-26

IE Shima Airfield Map 17

NAHA Airfield Photo' . , . IB

YOOTAN Airfield Photo 21

KAT)i;NA Airfield Photo 22

MACHINATO Airfield Photo 25

' YQHABA^Cr Airfield Photo , . . 26

C. Towns , 27-34 •

IT0I.-IAN Tov;rL and A i r f i e l d P h o t o f 27


TOGUCHI Town P h o t o . , . . - . . 2$
HAHA TQVUI P h o t o . • , . , , . . 29
S o u t h e r n OKINAWA Shiran B r i d g e L o c a t i o n s Kap ( l ) t • 35a
S o u t h o r n OKIITAV/A Shiaia B r i d g e L o c a t i o n s Map ( 2 ) . . 35^
I I I . KP^RAJVIA R o t t o • . 3 5 - 4 6

KERAMA R o t t o Man • . • . . 36

KERAMA R e t t o P h o t o s 37

A . S u m m a r y • . . . 3 5

B . E s t i m a t e d T r o o p D i s p o s i t i o n s . . « , . , • • 3 5 » 3 B

C . I n d i v i d u a l I s l a n d s . . 3 8 - 4 6

Y 0 K A 3 I Shima (YiiKAN ^Tixna) P h o t o • . , . , , 4 4

IV, KU1CE'Shima . . • , . . , . ; 4 7 - 4 8

KUKE Shima'Map , • , , . . . . • • • 4 7

P r i n c i p a l H i g h w a y B r i d g e s M a p . . . . . . . . . . . 4 7 a

V. AGUNI Shima, 4 9

VI, T O N A C K I S h i m a . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 0

VII, IZENA. S h i m a , . 5 1

VIII. K E I S A N SHO • . • > • * . . . . . • * * 5 2

SECOND SUPJPLELISRT

CINCPAG-CIKCPOA BULLETIN No, 53-45

I. SUMMARY;

(See Map - Principal Installations - OKINAWA GUNTO)

A new -airstrip is under construction near ITOlvIhlf - Town

on southern OKINAWA Siiirna, and an emergency landing area,

not previously reported by this activity, is on KUME Shima,

Construction on the Y0NA3ARU Airstrip apparently is dis­

continued. The other airfields in the G-unto, IE Shima, NAHA,

YONTAN, KATENA. and MACHIIUTO, remain operational, but some

damage has been done to their facilities. The report of

an airfield being under construction on IZSNA Shima of IHSYA

Retto is discredited by recent photographic coverage.

Recent photographic coverage confirms the report that

the final air strikes of 10 October 1944 caused widespread

damage and destruction by fire at NAHA Town, TOGUCHI (on

northern OKINAWA Siiiica) and ITQM^N T^wns also are damaged.

Air defenses are concentrated around the NAIIA, YONTAN,

and KATENA Airfields, Ground defenses are concentrated in

the YQ1CTAN-KATSNA area and the ILVKAGUSUKU V/an area.

Only ninor military activity is observed in the

Retto, arid little or no activity is observed on AG-UNI siiima,

TONACHI Shimay IZSNA Shiina, and the KEISAN Shu.

1
127
:£ir:^ .: rTT
^.L J .: r 7 Tr»T::- r 3 T 3: i • . iTTTi i • .

<t\-Sfrangha/
J JV P A N
Kagoihirp^ PRINCIPAL INSTALLATIONS
•::-::ii::::'-::::i
KEY M A P • /
NOTE: Defense cone ntration areas are shown thus:
.i i

• , /
Radar reported f-^^
IHEYA RETTO M^ Ih •y.i Jinx
n Madomor

2T

fii:
Minor supply depot
for small subma­
rines and PT boats.

Radio station

Spacious
anchorage

YONTAN
Airfield
Radio station
RDF
Oft, r y ^ • :' -^H
KATSKA
iinergency landing ground Airfield.
Radio weather station
Radar
NAHA (extensively damaged Potential fleet
Leading port of NAN3EI 3 anchorage.
Defense Command Hq.
Minor naval supply base OKINAWA JIMA
3 radio stations
Rffl

MACHINATO
Airstrip.

Y0KA3ARU
Airstrip under
construction.

KAHA Airfield
Radio station
5 RDF

f [Refuge anchorage
{j'leet anchorage

|3 radio stations!

IT01.IAN
A i r s t r i p under
construction
NANSEI SHOTO
O K I N A WA GU N T O

FROM HO. CHART NO. 5303

HEIGHTS IN FEET

ll'»

KANNA .,**,.*

V
Y7' \ AKASE SAKI

JV'=K: ^—^,'',, CHIMU SAKI

TRENCH AND
RIFLE PITS

NAKADOI

NAMORIDA SAKI

"'"".,„/ V**"1"*
:
- MINAMI UKIBARU
BANARE

M.KATCHIN HANTO
\ \
\

ANTI-TANK TRENCH

LEGEND

COSTAL DEFENSE GUN


COSTAL DEFENSE GUN EMPLACEMENT (EMPTY) ^ ^ NAKAGUSUKU WAN

SINGLE MOUNT DUAL PURPOSE


( GUN SIZE : 120 MM - 127 MM )

AUTOMATIC AA EMPLACEMENT (EMPTY


REVETMENT DIAMETER ( 8' — 16" )

ARTILLERY EMPLACEMENT
MACHINE GUN EMPLACEMENT KUTAKA SHIMA
( 13 MM OR UNQER )

RADAR
SEARCHLIGHT

t=] REVETTED BUILDING

COMMUNICATION AND FIRE TRENCH

NOTE DOTTED SYMBOLS INDICATE POSSIBLE V ^STALLATIONS \

fey
KE ISE SHIMA
\
>
V"
\OHMA
//
DEFENSE INSTALLATIONS OF \S >"% LIFU SHIMA ^

SOUTHERN
OKINAWA SHIMA
AND ADJACENT ISLANDS
NANSEI SHOTO \

AS OF 22 JANUARY 1945
\ O \ \^=^~^r-- OKINAN KAKU
APPROXIMATE SCALE IN YARDS CHIYAMU ZAKI "'" y '
WOO 0 1000 2000 3000 40O0 5OOO
SHEET I OF 2
t DEFENSE INSTALLATIONS
CO

OKINAWA
JIMA
SOUTHERN OKINAWA SHIMA
ad
' 26--3O- N NANSEI SHOTO
If \ ^HEET 1 AS OF 22 JANUARY 1945
APPROXIMATE SCALE IN YARDS
EET 2 0 1000 2000
H I

NOTE-­ BASE MAP FROM A.M.S. L 891

LE6EN0

-6­ MORTAR POSITIONS


& COASTAL DEFENSE GUN
COASTAL DEFENSE GUN (CASEMATED)
COASTAL DEFENSE GUN EMPLACEMENT (EMPTY)
SINGLE MOUNT DUAL PURPOSE GUN (120mm)
DUAL PURPOSE GUN EMPLACEMENT (EMPTY) (REVETMENT DIAMETER 22-36')
SINGLE MOUNT HEAVY AA (GUN SIZE 13mm-40mm)
§ HEAVY AA EMPLACEMENT (EMPTY)(REVETMENT DIAMETER I6'-2O')
$ SINGLE MOUNT AUTOMATIC AA (GUN SIZE 13mm-40mm)
AUTOMATIC AA EMPLACEMENT (EMPTY)(REVETMENT DIAMETER 8-16)
ARTILLERY EMPLACEMENT
ARTILLERY EMPLACEMENT (COVERED)
4­ BLOCKHOUSE
PILLBOX
MACHINE GUN EMPLACEMENT (13mm OR UNDER)
RIFLE PIT OR FOXHOLE
O EMPTY REVETMENT
Q COMMAND POST
H RADIO DIRECTION FINDER
-©­ RADAR
SEARCHLIGHT
RADIO TOWER
KIMMU WAN 0
OBSERVATION POST
UNIDENTIFIED INSTALLATION
COMMUNICATION AND FIRE TRENCH
ANTI-TANK TRENCH
ANTI-BOAT BARRIER
a UNDERGROUND ENTRANCE OF DUGOUT

NOTE: DOTTED SYMBOLS INDICATE POSSIBLE INSTALLATIONS

nisT^te-S­

5v°/ KANNA­
SAKI
NAKAGUSUKU WAN
O

JCPOA L" 50225-24 OKINAWA GUNTO. SECOND SUPPLEMENT. CINCPAC-CINCPOA BULLETIN 53-45. 28 FEBRUARY 1945.
MACHINATO/^AIRFJELD

NAKAGUSUKU WAN

AvYONABARU AIRSTRIP
UNDER CONSTRUCTION

SAKJHAI

YONABARU KO

NAHA AIRFIELD

SENEGA SHIMA CHINEN


OGUSUKU \ \ MISAK!

ITOMAN AIRSTRIP
UNDER CONSTRUCTION

SAKiBARU-SAKI

LEGEND
-6- MORTAR POSITIONS
COASTAL DEFENSE GUN
COASTAL DEFENSE GUN (CASEMATED)
COASTAL DEFENSE GUN EMPLACEMENT (EMPTY)
* SINGLE MOUNT DUAL PURPOSE GUN (120 mm)
DUAL PURPOSE GUN EMPLACEMENT (EMPTY) (REVETMENT DIAMETER 22'-36')
* SINGLE MOUNT HEAVY AA (GUN SIZE 13mm - 4 0 m m )
HEAVY AA EMPLACEMENT (EMPTY) (REVETMENT DIAMETER I6'~2O)
<i> SINGLE MOUNT AUTOMATIC AA (GUN SIZE 13mm - 4 0 m m )
AUTOMATIC AA EMPLACEMENT (EMPTY) (REVETMENT DIAMETER 8'-16')
ARTILLERY EMPLACEMENT
ARTILLERY EMPLACEMENT (COVERED)
BLOCKHOUSE
KOMESU ^ ^ PILLBOX
6 MACHINE GUN EMPLACEMENT (13mm OR UNDER)
SHEET 2 OF 2 i RIFLE PIT OR FOXHOLE
O EMPTY REVETMENT
. DEFENSE INSTALLATIONS
• COMMAND POST
SOUTHERN OKINAWA SHIMA IB RADIO DIRECTION FINDER
RADAR
NANSEI SHOTO SEARCHLIGHT
A RADIO TOWER
AS OF 22 JANUARY 1945 OBSERVATION POST
© UNIDENTIFIED INSTALLATION
APPROXIMATE SCALE IN YARDS
000 0 1000 2000 COMMUNICATION AND FIRE TRENCH
ANTI-TANK TRENCH
CHIYAMU ZAKI <AX
ANT-BOAT BARRIER
UNDERGROUND ENTRANCE OR DUGOUT

OKINAN KAKU NOTE'- DOTTED SYMBOLS INDICATE POSSIBLE INSTALLATIONS

JICPOA L-5O225-23 OKINAWA GUNTO. SECOND SUPPLEMENT. CINCPAC-CINCPOA BULLETIN 53-45. 28 FEBRUARY 1945.
' MILITARY ACTIVITY

LEGEND
SETAKE SAKI
$ COSTAL DEFENSE GUN EMPLACEMENT (EMPTY)

£) HEAVY AA EMPLACEMENT {REVETMENT WAMETER I6"X2O'}

(& AUTOMATIC AA EMPLACEMENT (REVETMENT DIAMETER 8' X 16") HK "= ADAGAA SHIMA

l ARTILLERY EMPLACEMENT

V ARTILLERY EMPLACEMENT ( COVERED )


^- PILLBOX
6 MACHINE GUN EMPLACEMENT ( UNDER 13 MM }
COMMUNICATION AND FIRE TRENCH

NOTE DOTTED SYMBOLS INDICATE POSSIBLE INSTALLATIONS

BISE SAKI
\JENNIYA

J BANNO SAKI

^KAYO

'J^>P$ ABUORU SHIMA

DEFENSE INSTALLATIONS OF
SESOKO*M\\-- SESOKO 'tyfsk NORTHERN
OKINAWA SHIMA
AND ADJACENT ISLANDS
NANSEI SHOTO
AS OF 22 JANUARY 1945
KUSHI WAN
APPROXIMATE SCALE IN YARDS
K>OO 0 IOOO 2 0 0 0 3000 4000 5000

RIFLE PITS

v% n
LEGEND
OUTPOST UNIT RANGING FROM SQUAD
SETAKE SAKI
TO A PLATOON

cb INFANTRY CO.

• INFANTRY BATTALION

•INFANTRY REGIMENT

MOTOBU

PENINSULA

BISE SAKI
f-JENNIYA

BANNO SAKI

SHI MA

f - ^ _ _ i i ^ # ABUORU SHIMA

ORA WAN

0 TROOP DISPOSITIONS MAP


SE SO KO '*\ !\ \r- SESOKO ' ' > ^
NORTHERN
MENNA
SHIMA OKINAWA SHIMA
AND ADJACENT ISLANDS
AREA A INCLUDES ENTIRE ^ NANSEI SHOTO
AREA COVERED BY THIS MAP AS OF 22 JANUARY 1945
( SEE MAP OF SOUTHERN SECTION
KUSH, WAN A pp R ox,MATE SCALE IN YARDS
FOR TOTALS ) KXX) 0 IOOO 2000 3000 4000 3000

UNC S^l! Ill

KANNA ^ /

^ ^ Q u Q ^ ' ' ' ' ' \ AKASE SAKI


5 CENTERS OF RESISTANCE
26 OUTPOSTS (I PLATOON
OR LESS)

IICHI BANARE

' OSUNOHANA

'"'c.

CHIMU WAN

KOGUSUKU
SAKI

- MINAMI UKIBARU
is BANARE
r; Uy /

OUTPOST UNIT RANGING FROM SQUAD


TO A PLATOON

INFANTRY CO.

INFANTRY BATTALION

INFANTRY REGIMENT

4 REGIMENTAL BATTLE P0S3TI0NS


NAKAGUSUKU WAN 4-l2cm CD GUNS ? /
2
ARFA P / POSSIBLE 20cm CD GUNS
2-12 cm DP GUNS

REGIMENTAL BATTLE POSIT


3 CENTERS OF RESISTANCE
4 8 - 7 5 m m HEAVY AA
105 AUTO AA
KUTAKA SHIMA

SEHiCHINBARO J

8 STRONG POINTS
6 OUTPOSTS
2 5 - 7 5 mm HEAVY A A
10-12 cm DP GUNS
TROOP DISPOSITIONS MAP
9 (POSSIBLY I!) CD GUNS
SOUTHERN 138 AUTO AA

OKINAWA SHIMA
AND ADJACENT ISLANDS
NANSEI SHOTO
AS OF 22 JANUARY 1945
( APPROXIMATE SCALE IN YARDS

• v^ j 1000 p 1000 8000 SOOO 4000 5 0 0 0 i Q Q o o

OKINAWA GUNTO SECOND SUPPLiCMENT

&OCTIJCPOA BULLETIN N O . 53-45 28 Feb. 1945

B. Ht FIELDS

5KIMA AIRFIELD MAD 26°43 f N. , 127°46 T E. (see map}

Jee CINCPAC-CirTCPOA Bulletin No. 161-44 pages: 68-69)

Location
The airfield occupies the western half of IE

Shima which is three miles west of BIS3 Saki

off the northwestern coast of OKINAWA Shima.

The airfield, which is a well developed opera­

tional field with good dispersal, covers an

area approximately 2-1/2 miles long by one mile

wide. • • •.

Runways
4,350' x l60Tf N/S, coral surfaced
5 , 1 0 0 ' x l60 NS/SW, coral surfaced
5 , 0 0 0 ' x 160' NE/3W, coral surfaced
4 , 4 0 0 ' /S, under construction, 50 per
cent complete
Facilities
No hangars are present, and only minor repair

facilities appear to be available.

Fifty-five aircraft revetments are connected

by 18,000 yards of taxlway 35' wide.

Defenses
Air defenses are totaled as follows:

2 automatic antiaircraft gun:.-;

id empty automatic antiaircraft positions

19 laachine guns

Remarks
The airfield remains essentially as it appeared

in photographic coverage of 10 October 1944

with the exception of the construction of a

north-south runway intersecting the easternmost

runway. The new runway is 4,400' in length

and is approximately 50 per cent complete.

NAtiA AIRFIELD HAD 2 6 ° 1 2 ' N . , I 2 7 ° 4 C ' S . ( s e e photo)


(See CIKCPAC-CINCPOA B u l l e t i n No. 161-44 p a g e s : 76-81)
Location:
This airfield is on the coastal plainj 4,000

yards west of NAE1A. Town, in southern OKINAV/A

Shima.

.ze
Operational, well) developed, and with good

dispersal facilities, the field occupies an

area approximately 1-1/2 by two miles.

Runways
1. /;.., 750' x 500' N/S, limestone surfaced

2. 3,950' x 500* NW/SS, limestone surfaced,

on completion of the third runway the

length will be 5,100*

3. 4,200* x 670' NE/SW, in final stages of

construction

Facilities
Emergency maintenance only is available, as

all hangars and shops are destroyed.

Dispersal:
Twenty-six fighter and 23 bomber revetments

together with three fighter shelters are

connected by 6,400 yards of taxiway 60' to

100 f wide. Two additional fighter shelters are

under construction.

Air
Air defenses totaled below include machine guns

Defenses
only when their use is primarily as antiaircraft.

4 dual-purpose guns

2 dua1-purpose ( empty)

13 heavy antiaircraft guns

6 automatic antiaircraft guns (twin mount)

93 automatic antiaircraft guns

12 empty automatic antiaircraft positions

11 machine guns

Hemaric
Principal changes shown by photographic cover­

age through 22 January 1945 are:

1. Destruction of facilities for repair and

maintenance, and of some for storage and

billeting.

2. Completion of the southeast taxi loop.

15
OKINAWA GUIITC SECOND SUPPLEMENT

CINCPAC-CIICPOA BULI2CTIN No. 53-45 28 FV& .

Changes and The following changes have occurred in the iT.'uJA

Additions: Airfield area, exclusive oi ground defenses.

For complete defense infer/nation, £.;ee defense

maps and discussion.

Target Area QK-5:

Op. Eastern dispersal' area taxiway 90 ' wide with

seven U-shaped fighter revetments 55' wide and

cix rectangular and seven U-shaped bobber

reveti/ionts 100 T wide. Southeastern taxi loop

nearly completed.

13. One additional automatic,antiaircraft gun added

to three previously reported.

• 16. ViiJ.age of about 100 dwellings 90 per cent

destroyed. •

19. One of three 30 f by B0 ? frame buildings in

explosives storage area and the five automatic

antiaircraft guns defending.the area are now

camouflaged.

26. One of five personnel quarters, the single

barracks building, latrines, rodio station, and

garage or fire station are destroyed.

• 27. ' Four "aircraft parts storehouses and repair

shops are destroyed.

28. Plane refueling pump and tank are destroyed.

29. Possiblu pilots' ready room is- destroyed.

30. One barracks and latrine destroyed.

32. Two barracks and a latrine destroyed. .

34. One barracks and a latrine destroyed.

35. Two barracks and a latrine- destroyed.

3b. Two hangars with light steel frames are

destroyed.

39. Air co/miand building and tower destroyed.

40. RDy tower destroyed.

49. One battery or nine automatic antiaircraft guiis

50. O.ae battery of three automatic antiaircraft gun:

51. Short taxiway to dispersal loop completed by

bridging two drainage ditches.

52. One battery of three .machine &uns.

53. One batt'ery of two machine pni>.

Target Area OK-6:

10. One building destroyed of £ix at Fii^aornien13

School.

11. Seventy per cent of 200 dwellings in this

portion of NAIIA Tov/n destroyed.

2L. Both fighter shelters are now completed.

25. Both warehouses and one ci.four storehouses

destroyed.

30. 'Both storehouses destroyed in target aivj J M ­

ing five barracks, kitchen, v/arehouse, .~^t?: i

pov/er plant, and probable undergrounci radio.

3i>. One battery of six machine guns.

3o. One battery of six twin-nount automatic anti­

__^_ aircraft guns. ­

37. One battery of five heavy antiaircraft guns.

38. One battery of six automatic antiaircraft guns

39. i'our cave entrances lor shelter or storage.

40. Twenty-two.slit trenches in an irregular

north-south line.

41. One battery of six automatic antiaircraft guns,

42. Camouflaged coast defense gun.

43 • One battery of six automat ic antiaircraft gun;.?.

fSj.(APPROX)

CUT 8 FILL OPERAT'ONS


RUNWAY BEING LENGTHENED

LEGEND

AUTOMATIC AA

AUTOMATIC AA EMPLACEMENT (EMPTY)

MACHINE GUN EMPLACEMENT

ARTILLERY POSITION

POSSIBLE ARTILLERY POSITION

PILLBOX

POSSIBLE PILLBOX

ARTILLERY EMPLACEMENT (COVERED)

FOXHOLE OR RIFLE PIT

ANTI-TANK TRENCH
IE SHIMA AIRFIELD
ANTI-TANK BARRIER
IE SHIMA, OKINAWA GUNTO
TRENCH

TRENCH WITH RIFLE PITS LAT. 26° 43'N., LONG. 127° 46' E.
C­ SEARCHLIGHT
AS OF 22 JANUARY 1945
M­ BURIED STORES

a UNDERGROUND ENTRANCE APPROXIMATE SCALE IN FEET

© UNIDENTIFIED INSTALLATION IOOO 0 1000 2000 3 0 0 0

m TOMB

^ REVETMENT (ABOVE GROUND)

•• BUILDING

TAX I WAY
1
— i — ' DRAINAGE DITCH

MAIN ROAD

***M* C O R A L REEF
NAHA AIRFIELD

Lat. 26°12'N., Long. 127°38'E.

Sortie 3PR5M3-2V-21BC

3 January 1945

18
Glftft'O SEUOND S J
Cl-NGPAC-CIIIiiPOA BULLETIN No. 53-45 28 Feb. 1945

Area

02. Tent and both storehouses in emergency plane

repair and spare parts area destroyed.

Taxi loop 95 T wide, one fighter shelter, and

three vehicle revetments completed. One addi­

tional fighter shelter 50 per cent completed

and construction for one started.

07. Both workshops or storehouses destroyed.

OS. Garage destroyed but vehicle shed remains.

10. Administration building destroyed.

11. Burrac&s-type building destroyed.

12. Two 30 T by 40 T storehouses replace three destroy­

ed warehouses. One 28 T by 40f storehouse still

present.

24. Sugar r,ill, previously listed as radio station.

27. Village of about 100 dwellings 50 per cent

destroyed.

30. Construetiou battalion buildings are destroyed,

but two storehouses 22* by 70 f 'replaced.

31. S i x e;.ip ty automatic anti aircraft positions.

32. One battery of six automatic antiaircraft guns.

33. Twenty-X'cur dispersed storage and barracks-

type buildings 30 f by 50'•

34. Radar-controlled searchlight (associated with

munber 36) .

35. One battery of six automatic antiaircraft•guns.

36. Radar-controlled searchlight (associated with

number 34) •

37. Possible RDF tower.

Y0NTAN AIRFIELD MAD 127 c 45 f fi- (see photo)


(See CINCPAC-CINCPOA Bulletin No. 161-44 pages: 70, 71)
Location:
The airfield is about 7.000 7,000 yards east-southeast

of ZAMPA Misaki in southern OKINAWA Shima.

Runway
1. 4,650' x 2 6 0 f NE/5W, coral surfaced

2. 5,10,0T x 170 f E/W, coral surfaced

3. 4,500* x 200 r N/S, coral surfaced

Facilities
No hangars &re observed. The administration

building, garage, barx%acjcs, and other build­

ings located near the southeastern side of the

field, and probably used in connection Vvith

it, have all been destroyed. An RD? building

if.-: 2,200 feet northeast of the airfield.

Dispersal
Nineteen concrete arch-type fighter shelters

are along 7,200 feet of taxiway which includes

portions of the main road north of the airfield.

Forty-six other open revetments are connected

by 32,500 feet of taxiway.

Defenses
Air defenses are as follows:

42 heavy antiaircraft guns

12 empty heavy antiaircraft positions

56 automatic antiaircraft guns

46 empty automatic antiaircraft positions

Changes and
The following are the important changes that

Additions:
have occurred within the Y0NTAN Airfield area

exclusive of ground defenses. For complete

defense information sue defense maps and

defense discussion.

Target Area
OK- 2:

07.
Two large and two small buildings are destroyed..

One large and five small buildings remain.

09.
The emplacements for this battery of six heavy

antiaircraft guns now appear to be empty.

19.
The emplacements for this battery of six auto­

matic antiaircraft guns now appear to be empty.

The three -storehouses that remained in this

area on 10 October 1944 are now destroyed*

19

CIHGPAC-CINCaPOA^BULLSTIN No*. ~$3-45 28 Feb. 1945

2£- All buildings in the southeast quarter of this

26. village are now destroyed.

29. The six heavy antiaircraft, emplacements now

appeal' to be empty.

33 • The si:-c automatic antiaircraft emplacements

now appear to be empty.

37,38,39,40,41,42. All buildings in this area,

including administration building, barracks,

garage and storehouses, are destroyed.

46, The main building is destroyed. A small

building remains.

61. Six empty automatic antiaircraft emplacements.

Two barracks are nearby to the north.

KATENA AIRFIELD MAD 2c°21 t N., 127°4btE*. (see trtioto)

(See CINCPAC-GINCPOA Bulletin ISio. 1.61-44 pages: 72-73)

Location:
Southern part of OKINAWA Sbima about 1,000 yards

southeast of the town of KATEITA.

Size of
Roughly 4,700 yards square.

Area:

Runways: .
There is a single coral surfaced runway, 4,500'

x 265 S oriented 5ETF0V&Y. A 2,000T extension

is under construction at the northeastern end.

Facilities:
No hangarc or repair facilities are apparent.

The buildings-north of the runway in area 24

probably are used in connection with the air­

field.

Dispersal:
Planes are dispersed in 32 revetments and live

parking bays along 22,500 feet of taxlways on

both sides of the runway. An additional 32,000

foet of dispersal taxiway is under construction

to the- southeast and east of runway.

Defenses:
Air defenses are as follows:

6 heavy antiaircraft guns

6 empty heavy antiaircraft positions

34 automatic antiaircraft ^UJIB

49 empty automatic antiaircraft positions

6 empty revetments

Changes and
Trio following are the important oh-in^c-p chat

Additions:
have occurred within the iC/iTiINA Airfield area

exclusive of ground defenses. For complete

defense information pee defense maps and

defense discussion.

Target Area OK-3:

01. Coral surfaced runway 4,500* ;c 265' orient ad

ENE/WSW. The airfield haw beon broadened and

lengthened since previously reported by a

graded area being added on either side, and on

the southwest end of the runway, making over­

all dimensions of 4,o00r z 3B0 f . A 2,200 foot

extension is being const.rue ted on tii'o northeast

end which will give tha field a luiigth of 7,000

foet when completed. Thero* also ha« beon t'eme

attempt to camouflage the field by. simulating

walls and shadowP with paint.

04. A dispersal loop 9,000 feet lonto: with 12 rovct­

ments. Nets have been placed over the revet­

ir.en.ts, and the short strips of taxiway leading

to them have been camouflaged.

05. Dispersal lane 2,800 feet lon£ with nine revet­

ments and live parking bays wliioh are partially

hidden by trees. An additional dispersal taxi­

way is being added to the end of this taxiway.

Nets have been placed over the revetments and

the short taxiways entering them have been toned

down or painted to resemble the surrounding

fields.

20
JICPOA L-SO222-3?

YONTAN AIRFIELD

Lat. 26°24!N., Long. 127°45'E.

Sortie 3PR5M3-2V, 3 January 1945

(Annotations as of 22 January)

!
k
; ­ .W"= 6
<{£^ !
N.APPROX.
C
* *mm 'ffVr
1i (
-%

/
f ^;
r*3 ' / 2 1j
A* ^\

*
1
%T ••

ft
g • •

w ^ •* J
t
s
— *
h # > • .

*<* i

I / / '

1 -.. ­ f • ^.^fii'*!
"."•

50
• &

i X

w& '• ­
V» -^T...

N: r ­ / \1
•f' ^ ' i if
i , « • •-/ i ti •
*^ .»».'' "^fe v *' •"" •*
*•* '"•• ^ * * ^ » \ —•• -S
*>" SC?*
I• A v *' • •"• * C

06 f
\ \

w
?^ :

—-0 :
•• v

1 52-i;.
.,0

i| j /
... ^-#­ -r

"••-• * * • !

X
/
i
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v>
*/
Itf.
M
s
M
vs l
. 'I
X
\ 4
\ \
x\
\ >
\\
L a t . 26

3 January 1945
KINAWA GCTPC^SECONB SUPPLEMENT

CINCPAO-CKTCPOA BULLETIN N o . 53-45 .28 Feb. 1945

06. Dispersal lane 1,500 feet long with three revet­

ments which have been covered with nets.

11. The six empty automatic antiaircraft positions

now appear to be occupied.

12. The,three automatic antiaircraft positions now

appear to be unoccupied.

17. The eastern half of this residential area has

been destroyed.

23. The control tower previously reported is not

apparent,

31. Six e.mp'cy heavy ant, lair craft emplacements

which were showing as six machine gun'positions

in the reference publication.

50. Additional 2,QQ0 "feet of coral surfaced taxi­

way compl&t ed.

51. A six-sun automatic antiaircraft battery.

52. 31,000 feet of additional dispersal taociway

under construction.

53. 1,200 fast of additional taxiway under con­

struction.

MA.GHINATO AIRFIELD FAD 26°15'II M 127°42 f E. (see photo)

(Sea CINCPAC-OINCPOA Puil^ttio ?lo. l$i-44 pages: 74-75)

Location:
This airfield lies en the coastal plain 5,000

yards northeast of NA!IA Town in southern

OKINAWA Shima.

Size:
The field occupies an area approximately 1,500

fcy 500 yards. It is operational but as yet

poorly developed.

Runway:
' 1. 4,500* x 150 f IJE/SW, limestone surfaced

|!
i ae i 1 it i e s:
None

Dispersal:
No prepared dispersal areas.

. Air
None are observed.

Lefjnses:

fv«ir;ar>:s:
Froia 10 October 1944 to 22 January 1945, the

principal changes in the area .are;

1. Runway surface finished and taxiway

surfacing 60 per cant completed.

2. Apparent dismantling of chemical plant

neir the airfield.

Changos and ^ As fellows:

Additions:

efc Area, OK-4:

0.1. Runway (formerly operational but rough surfaced)

now smoothed.

02. Taxiway extended $Q0' at south .end to join end

of .runway, with -new 'cross-taxiway at mid-field.

IixUei.;tono surfacing 80 per cent completed.

11. Possible searchlight, previously reported,

is not present.

12, Thru*- automatic antiaircraft positions under

construction previously reported are not

present.

20. Industrial Plant-

Location: South bank of stream entering sea,

just south of MACHINAT0 Airfield.

Identification: Chemical plant, type

unidentified.

Transportation: Railroad spur to processing

building; surfaced 1 2 f road to

highway from finished-product

storage buildings.; pipeline from

Beawater intake"60 yards offshore.

OKINAWA frlRtrO SECOND SUPPLEMENT

S f l t p BULLETIN No. 53

R a w Materials: Limestone quarry; coal or pc\t

storage pile; seav.'atea1; loooo

stores.

Structures: Boiler hauce oc kiln with tv.o tcJ.l

stacks; roof removed since 10 Oct.

1944. Probable distillation pl^ut,

with 16 upright cylindrical tarJts,

located eight in a double row on

either eidq oi' the boilor hous^;

roof removed siiic^ 10 Oct. 1944­

Ore square open settling tank east.

of distillators.

Oxio pone), fed by a canal from B.raail

stream.

Nune.rous small shed-type buildings.

Two square buildings 3.20T by 1 2 0 ? ,

and one 1 0 0 T by I o 0 f , a31 with saw­

• tooth roofs. Thoy are separate ±rom

the othot* structures, and cornice tod

by road to the oonstal highv?ay.

They arc probably usod for storage.

Activity: Apparently inactive, judring. frojij

following observations:

.Cc o 1 pile und ist- u r bo d.

Loose stones partially ronoved.

Piano partially disiiuaitlod.

Ho now construction.

28. Barracks-typo building, 2 0 f by 1 0 0 ' .

Y01TABARIT AIHI'TEL'D . (HLG u/c ) 26°13 f N., " 12?°46 '£. ( seo photo )

(See ClflCPAC-CIHCFOA.Bulletin N o . 161-44 pa^cs: 106-107)

Location: Thit; airfield lies 3,000 ye.rds northeast of

YOlJ/LBARlj Town, on the flat coastol plain of

.MAXAOASUKU W a n .

Remarks: Construction apparently abandoned. No change

from 10 O c t . 1 9 4 4 to 21 January 1945.

ITOMAN AlRriiSID (HLG) 6 2 ° 0 9 f 3 0 M N . , 127°40f3il. (3QJO photo)

Location: This airstrip undur construction is about 2^00

yards north of 1T0MAIT Town and about 2600 yards

south-southeast of the NAMA Airfield.

Runway: W h e n completed this strip will bo .possibly

o,100 f x"200*.

Facilities ' ITono are present, and thure is no indication,

A-. Dispersal: as of 22 January, of the construction of any.

Defenses: No air defenses are observed in thy immediate

vicinity of tho airstrip.

Potenti- This strip can be extended at loasl. 2 0 0 0 ! north

alities: and 4500* south to make a total length of 12000

feet. The southern half or the strip can be

expanded to a SCO foot width. Unlimited widen­

ing of -the northern half is possible.

Remarks: Construction of the airstrip began after ')1

December 1 9 4 4 , as coverage of this date showed ­

no signs of construction activity. A sugar

: mill stands 'on the southern end of the airstrip

and will have to be removed if completion of

construction along the entire 6,100 i\;et is

intended.

24
OKINAWA GUNTO. SECOND SUPPLEMENT.

CINCPAC-CINCPOA BULLETIN 5 3 - 4 5 . 28 FEBRUARY 1945.

JICPOA L" 50224-1

MACHINATO AIRFIELD

Lat. 26°15'N., Long. 127042

Sortie 3PR5M3-2V-21BC

3 January 1945

25
OKINAWA GUNTO. SECOND SUPPLEMENT.
CINCPAC-ONCPOA BULLETIN 5 3 - 4 5 . 28 FEBRUARY 1945.

JICPOA L" 5 0 2 2 4 - 5

YONABARU AIRFIELD

Lat. 26°13'N., Long. 127°46'E.

Sortie 3PR5M3, 3 January 1945

26
OKINAWA 6UNTO. SECOND SUPPLEMENT.

CJNCPAC-CINCPOA BULLETIN 5 3 - 4 5 . 28 FEBRUARY 1945.

ZAHANA

VILLAGE

ITOMAN

AIRSTRIP

U/C 1

NAHA

AIRFIELD

3 MILES

ISI APPROX.

Uncontrolled Mosaic
ITOMAN of ITOMAN Airstrip
TOWN and ITOMAN Town.
Sortie CV-19-80

21 January 1945

DESTROYED
AREA

JK5POA L-50222-3*

27
OKINAWA GUNTO. SECOND SUPPLEMENT.
CINCPAC-CINCPOA BULLETIN 5 3 - 4 5 . 28 FEBRUARY 1945.

JICPOAL-50282" 30

TOGUCHI Town

Sortie MR7-14PL

29 September 1944

(Annotations as of 22 January 1945)

28
i

OK 8
Kl
N
I |

/ i
\ S '
1 •
\i • • .•• t\ w
v
41
k
OK II
\s \
\

42­
\1
- — 1
—\ J
* ^
1
57- /< \
<* \
OKk / V­
#6
CO \ /
/
0
61 ~JT\ .1 *T>... * . .. **.
m

/
;
« • • " • • • \ • < •••. .

60 f J^

I /
f V ^
59 J
» . « * - i •'• • • • ' • % .
/ '
: :
^
OK 9
ilk • "•-•v ;fS,

X \ *^ f
••I.-. rj \ ^
OK

IT;

(s i \
\ ' 'sit«
S|
i J
\ -^ ^ L _ —08
w 1
\ i

. % !
T ? •j

i - :
A
... ' . e
i
w

I
1• > * ' • • ' — • • — — * «_ f

.• " * — — •» —1 M . _ _ _ !
|
n - - » 1
V

I '1 1
* j I
1 \\
• 1

•1
OK 13
1m
JKPOftL-50222-M

- S^: r
•A 1
Iff ••,^"'^ ~ 1 \ *1 » NAHATc>wn
1 1

|J
i
__• L a t . 2 6 O 1 3 « N . , Lc>ng. 127°41 I E.
S o r t i e 3PR5M3-2V, 3 January 1945
V-"IlilU wet u x U I l o 4x8 UI
O1
A/X
.TnniwiMir
vcuiuaxjr
T QAR^
XCTU/
•OKINAWA GOIJTO SECOND SUPPLEMENT. . •

CINCPAC-CINCPOA BULLETIN No. 53-45 • "' ' .28 Feb. 1945

:
C . T O W K S ' ••••••-•• ' •-•" - '

ITQMAN TOWN (See p h o t o ) . .. . . .

(See CINCPAC-OINCPOA BULLETIN 161-44 pages 96-97).

This town is about five miles south, of NAHA on the west­

ern coast of OKINAWA Shima. There were approximately 1500

houses in approximately SO acres as of 10 Oct. 1944*

About 10 per oent of the town has been destroyed. The

destroyed area is the eastern (inland) section of town, a

residential area. About 10 houses remain in the bombed

section which formerly consisted of approximately 70 houses.

No other damage is observed.

NAHA TOWN (See photo).

NAIIA Town, the principal port of the Gunto and capital

of the prefecture, is on the southwestern coast of OKINAWA

Shima. It had a population of 65,765 persons in 1940.

Approximately B0 per cent of the town is totally de­

stroyed and a small percentage of the remaining structures

are superficially damaged. In the areas destroyed all the

structures are razed to the ground. The port area is badly •

damaged, and the harbor is partially blocked by sunken hulks,

but the main piers are clear. The roads are clear and re­

construction is starting on bridges that are destroyed. It

is believed that the single-track railway servicing the port

is seriously damaged since no activity has been observed.

The railway station and yards are seriously damaged, and one•

electric power plant is destroyed.

Changes and additions. N A M town is divided into Tar­

get Areas, 0K8-0K14 as in the CINCPAC-CINCPOA Information-

Bulletin No. 161-44, pages 82 to 95. The following'are the

important changes that have occurred within those areas ex-'

elusive of ground defenses. For complete defense infor­

mation, see defense maps and defense discussion.

• Target Area No. OKS. There is little damage in this

area to important targets although 20 per cent of the built

up area is destroyed.

.- About 75 per cent of the TOivtafil hospital is

destroyed*. Part of the remaining buildings are damaged.

Target Area Ho. 0K9» No damage' observed in this area.

#08 - An open Adcock type RDF has been erected im­

mediately south of the OKINAWA prison.

Target Area No. QK10. About 55 per cent of the built

up area of this sectiun is destroyed•

#02 - Kumagi Elementary School is destroyed.

#07 - Kumachi Primary School consisting uf six build­

ings 20* x 25f is destroyed. ' , '

#12 - Naha Police Station is destroyed

•r

30
GECCIJD SUFPLiMNT

BULLETIN No. 53-45

#14 - Three warehouses- with a total flour area of 9,600

square feet are destroyed.

#15 - Two warehouses, 40 f x 82f and 22»' x 50 ! are

destroyed.

#17 - Naha Railway station consisting of a 20' x 90 f

passenger station, 12T x 120* platform, turntable, siding,

and sheds is badly damaged.

#19 - Warehouse 100* x 175 r is destroyed,

#20 - Group of commercial buildings covering an area of

110T x 310 T is destroyed,

#24 - Two-story building 50* x 6 0 f , probably the Okinawa

Evening-Newspaper office, is destroyed.

#23 - Kai Elementary School is destroyed,

#35 ~ Mill, office and warehouses of a lumber company,

and 15 industrial buildings are destroyed.

#36 - Thermo electric power plant of the Okinawa Elec­

tric Co, consisting of throe buildings averaging 45* x 95 f

and three stories high and a 12' x 125T water condensing

tank are all destroyed.

Target Area 0K11. This area is 80 p&r cent to 85 per

cent destroyed.

#09 - The Jimashira Municipal Office consisting of two

20* x 30 T buildings is destroyed.

#10 - The liana .School of Commerce is destroyed.

#12 - The thirty foot wide stone and concrete Shiu&o

Tidal, Bridge with a 45? span is" apparently undamaged.

#13 - Warehouses apparently undamaged. Some of the

stores are -possibly damaged,

#14 - Four small two-story buildings averaging 50 f x 70*

are all destroyed.

#15 - The 15 T wide Kiko Bridge which has a concrote span

of 55 * is undamaged.

#20 - The ivamjji Bridge, 13 T x 90f of stone, has a 20 T

wooden span center. The whole span is destroyed.

#22 - The Okinawa Regimental District Headquarters

Building, 35 ! x 100 ! , is destroyed.

#23 - 2j acre grounds of the Prefectural Hospital which

includes six buildings averaging 35 ! x 130', five buildings

averaging 20 1 x 4 0 T , and numerous smaller buildings. All

buildings arc-destroyed.

#26 - The Onari Bridge of masonry and concrete v/ith 32 f

between 'abutments, the center span of which was destroyed

but is now being repaired,

31
NT

CI^CPAC-CJKCPOA BULLETIN No. 53-45 " -23 Feb. 1945

#27 - The Matsuyama Elementary School covering 13,000

square feet is destroyed.

#33 ~ The girls high school consisting of three build­

ings averaging 20 * z 25' is destroyed.

#37 - The Naha Elementary and High School consisting of

two wings 2 7 ! x 100' of two stories, and four one-story wings

averaging 25' x 160 1 are all destroyed.

#41 - 6 Auto AA«

#42 - 6 Auto- AA.

Target Area 0K12. Approximately 90 to 95 per cent of

this area is destroyed* All the warehouses in the area are

destroyed, . *

- The Naha Wireloss office is destroyed.

f- The Naha Central Potit Office, covering an area of

130 f x 130 J is destroyed,

#17 - Public assembly hall 47V x H O 1 is destroyed.

# - The Naha City Hall is guttedi excepting the b^wer.

#19 - The Mat.suda bridge 12 f wide and 85f long is

destroyed, excepting the pylons.

#21 - The lie ha Market 42 f x 25O1 and a food warehouse

30' z. 1,50* are destroyed.

#25 - The Tsukima Bridge•> S feet wide, is destroyed.

j-26 - A triangular area of 37*000 square feet containing

an open lumber yard and four buildings, averaging 25 ! x 30 ! .

About 75 per cent of the area was covered with building

materials which all n.re destroyed.

#27 - Agricultural and industrial warehouse 105* x 230*

is destroyed. «

#35 - Pier #2, All the louse stores are dostroyc-d and

the facilities probably badly damaged.

#41 - Pier #1. Has 2,400T of wharf frontage and can

take vessels to 3000 tons. It is badly damaged.

#42 - The Merchant.Shipping Co. warehouses are all

destroyed.

#43 - Customs warehouse with a floor space of 43,000

square feot is destroyed.

#46 -r One-story buildings 25 T x 47 f and 22 T z 30 ! ~f

the port office are destroyed.

#47 - Eight sugar warehouses, averaging 32 1 x 90 f are

destroyed.

#43 - A boat building yard for craft averaging 50 f in

length is badly damaged.

32
CKI:JA7/A G1JITTC SSGOND SUPPLEMENT

CTN&ftftG-«[NGPfil(L BULLETIN No* >3-45 • 23 Feb... 194

'#50 - Miyeguoaku pier covering 9«2 acres and 40 per cunt­

built up with warehouses, is 95 per cent destroyed.

#53 - Ten acre open area storage with a 55* x 130* ware­

house and nine warehouses averaging I? 1 x 25'. The ro&t of

the area is about ,10 per cent covered with loose store.f..

The whole area is 95 per cent destroyed.

#57 - 6 empty auto AA positions.

#58 - 6 empty auto AA positions.

7^59 - 6 empty auto AA positions.

#60 - 4 empty ht*avy AA positions.

$61 - 6 auto AA. • • '

Target Area CK13. Numerous small boats wore sunk off

this area. The- built up area is 90 to 95 per cent destroyed.

^ - 36,000 square foot storage area which was about

5 per cent covered with loose stores which,are all destroyod.

§36 - Command post- and two auto AA arc probably darr-aced.

#37 - Two fuel tanks 25 feet in diameter. One is

destroyed and tno o&hcr is damaged.

tf3B - Steam powor p l m t 25 ! x 27 ! , :and a 25 T x 30* con­

crete generator piano, both are destroyed.

»/41 - Fisiiiaig Sxperiment Station is destroyed.

#43 - Small boat yard with buildin^ways is apparently

undamaged. One boat appears to be half complete.

;^44--Sixty buildings averaging 25 f x 30* including

warehouses, offices, stores and dvv ell ings. About 25 per cent

of this area is destroyed.

;//:-5 - Three-acre storage and warehouse area with 6,000

lineal feet wharf ing for small cre.fb. Fourteen warehouses

and sflops, averaging 20 ! x 40 ! and loose stores. 75 per cent


of this area is destroyed.

Taract Area OKI4. About f;4? to 60 per cent of tae built

up area is destroyed. No damage was. done to any listed tar­

gets.

TOGUCHI TOWN (See photo).

(See CIKCFAC-OIWCPOA Bulletin No. 161-44, pages .104-105).

This town is one uf the two leading sett lenient s of

northern OKINAV/A Shima. with a population of 20,000. It is

about 30 miles north' of NAIIA Town on the wostsrn coast of tiio

island at the mouth of the MANNA Kawa-. The town is ci^ssly

populated in an area of approximately 34 acres.

33
•OKINAWA GUNTO 52G0ND SUPPLEMENT

CIN(3?AC-CINOPOA BULLETIN No* 53-45 . -28 Feb. 1945

Approximately 60 per cent, of tire residential section of

the? town is destroyed. No damage to any other target is

observed. Five empty heavy antiaircraft positions are on

the wharf northeast uf the town. No other indication of air

defenses is observed.

Ten camouflaged buildings are in the eastern undamaged

section uf the town* The barracks (or school) southeast of

the town is partially camouflaged.

Y0IJA3AHU TOV/N

(Soe CINCPAC-CINGPOA }3uiletin No. 161-44 pages 98-99).

The town remains essentially as observed from photo­

graphic coverage of 10 October 1944*

SHURI TOWN

(See CINCPAC-Q1NGP0A Bulletin No. 161-44 pages 100-101),

The. town remains essentially as observed from photo­

graphic cuvorags of 10 October 1944•

CINCPAC--OINCPOA BUUJ5TIIJ Wo. >3~45 28 fob. 1945

III. KERAMA ,KSTTO


L a t . 2o" a T? t N. -Tfon«5-. •127°27 f -i5* J . •
( A p p r o x i m a t e c e n t e r of ,AKA I-XCKYO)

(See CINCPAC-CJNCPOA BULLETIN No. 1 6 1 - 4 4 , . p a « o s : . 56-58

A. SUMMARY
KERALA Retto is a group of small islands lying off

tne southwestern end of OKINAWA Siiima. The ialands, for

the most part, ere composed of uplifted material: 'sand­

stone, limestone, slate, etc. They rise as cliffs or steep

slopes; the four beaches of any length occur at trie mouths

of steep valleys or within small bays. With the excep­

tion of a few cultivated areas, the islands are covered

with.brush and tree;;. Snail mixes operate on YAJKABI Shina,

and KUBA Ghiua. A fringing reef of irrsgular width sur­

rounds each inland,

B. ESTHvIATBI) TROOP DISPOSITIONS


From a study of aerial photographs covering the KSRAMA

Retto dated 22 January 1945, there appears to be no mili­

tary installations and no military activity to dato on the

following islands: AKA, AMUHO, FJKASHI, GIStflBIJ, EERXJM4,

KOBA, and ZAMAMI.

Except for haze over two of the islands, the photo­

graphs were gonerally good and of a scale of i/5000. How­

ever, failure to observe activity or installations from

the photographs should not be construed to indicate com­

plete absence of military personnel. If thi usual prac­

tice of the Japanese Las been followed, there are prob­

ably coast watchers and lockouts stationed on each of tho

larger islands, numbering approximately 15-20 men pur is­

land .

On YAKAIJ, the westernmost island of tho r^tto, thore

is a radio station, in the vicinity of the mine, consist­

ing of a small building and two stick-typo masts. This

station is probably inannod by military or naval cornmimioiu"

tions personnel totaling epprozimatoly 20-30 men.

On T01OIS1IIKI back of the town of TOICASHIiOJ on the ;\.?st

coast, eight buildings which appear to be Kiska-typo bar­

racks iia^e boon constructed doep in protective ravines

and camouflaged. Ono group of four buildings are similar

in dimensions to naval barracks found at ElSKA and their

total capacity is estimated to be approximately 200 men.

Tho ether group of tour buildings are similar 'n dimen­

sions to army barracks found at KISKA and th;.jir total

capacity is osi/i'matcd to be approximat-ily 600 men. Ef­

forts to locate the gun installations and prepared posi­

tions for the troops- probably quartered in these' supposed

barracks have bo^n unsuccessful. One definite section of

firw trench was observed on 0TliIJA Mountain spproxiiuately

1600 yards south of and overlooking tho town of AWAKK.

This position, however, had only four foxholer? and a coin­

municction trench leading to a personnel shelter. Path

activity and scarred earth on the peak of tho high ground

inland from OIZUNO Saki and 1,000 yards north of the town

of TCKASHT.KI, on tho cast coast, indicate that field fort­

ifications r;ro possibly under construction there. Along

tho beach forward of the town of TOKASHIKU, which iy most

vulnerable to the barracks area, there is much path acti­

vity and scarred earth. This could be a natural .consequence

35
1090
3180

(1) (3) (4) (1)


Bridge Mo Spans A/ternatK Bridges
565 '^Ccausemay at n/orth
1O /7C/S/8 approach nordab/e None.
nitty considerable tvork
6O'embanked S approach
135'2O//6 / Fordab/e. with considerable,
30'opening I causeway work
Causetvays -N 75,'53/0 '-each /to
65'25//8 one cv'verf <y>en,ng,2boij' 7'iwd
12
River iS 450' /? C deck, on 14-OO'upstream is fogica/ site 5ing/e/ane bridge, one

trest/e foenta for orio'ge construction ­ in/and on fO'road

yridt/1 is 9O'
13 65*20/13 f? C beam and Ramped approaches ­
Asa to P.. Upstream fmU s/ab, trest/e. A/ 95'. S 180' Ttvo. upstream
width is 24O1 bent pier
RC beam & s/ab
.'4 65'26,;8 trest/e bent pier Can be bypassed, as
R C /on spring
/S 88' 29/1'6 arch on frest/e Several
MahaCana/ bents
t3A PC.Jeck, *r Approaches A' 3I5''35', S3I5* Road & bridges along inland
bent p:ers 35' into t-dai es'uary side oftidai estuary.
Mafia Harbor
ISO ck, frest/e Approaches -M. 235 * 35', S 28d See above On route selectee/
Kaha Harbor • 335 " 25/35 f4 bent o:ers *35', WM> tidal estuary by /O™ Army engineers.
300*25/30 3
17 max 35' Probab/y fordable at /on tide.
(Approximate.)
18 45*/O/2O R C or- Ms About O 6mi downstream

59 ' 25//O Mas- arch. Inland bypass.


3170
19'
Mukue R 3O'2S//2 /PC deck

19" 2OO'25//2 R C or Mas. A/one,


r~ili flume by bulldozing for
2O 40*2O//S R C or Mas ouick crossing.

23*20/3 Mas

Short a/stance up and


25*26/J2 R C. dec* downs tneam.
1
22' C deck

fil/ flume bv bu//dozing for


23 2O *20//0 Alone
tjuick crossing.
L' *9. bet abut R.C • Probable
Self W-ftto&tmOth rein 'breed cone Covers spproac*es, causeways,
explanatory explanatory Mas • Probab/e fords, ands?d:*ior>3l dsta Self etp'anatory
masenrv

N9TE 7><fse da a are essen sly •*/?« sa-ne as the tabulation dated !8 Jan 45, and
have been :rc!uded rvi * 'As mar to provide, a n->r-e usable docur^en*

OKINAWA SHIMA

BRIDGE LOCATIONS
IN
3160 SOUTHERN OKINAWA
64THENGRBN. USAFCPBC NO 4148 DEC. 1944

5000 0 5000 10000 15000 FEET

JANUARY 30, 1945 ETlTeam SHEET I

LEGEND

Prefecti.ral 'oads : 24~)


i-^portantsecondary roads(l6').
Ga.,roads narron guage
Towns. ...
11

SHEET INDEX

1090
1090 MOO II10
1080

3200
J200

(1) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7)


3" dge No L - H'/H Spans Type. Remarks A/temate Bridges

1 72*25/25 3(Est) R C or Mas Probable, ford - cut banks Alone.

73' causeway at NE appr


2 30'25/2O t(e*t) PC or Mas
Prebab/e ford upstream None

/65 causeway at N E appr.


3 65>25//O 2 f£st) /?C orMas
Probable ford upstream None­

3A 23 'I6//3 1 Mas Approaches 42'into stream A/one.

33 23 ' /6//O /rest) Mas Approaches 32' into stream Alarrom bridge 400 upstream

3C 46*/6//O 2 f? C deck Approaches 2O'into stream Alone,

4 65*23/22 /or 2 Mas


Qridge under construction
3 sha R O 7 mi. doivnstream
3 or S with Mas arch Possib/e. ponton sites adjacent Bridge, unde-r construction
32S ' 2S/22 tidal gates
disha R Max span 26' to bridge, considerable cut6 fill 0 7mi. downstream.
Several possible sites - 3OO"
Mas causeway
6 24O x 25/30 2 cu/verts Max span 26'
doivnstreamt requires None
roadway realinement
25 "25/2O R C deck 6r Causeway approaches­ None (Tunnel thru hog-backed
7 stream-95 Hide
1
irrigation darn N I7O', 5 265' ndge at N approach)
3!9C
8 80'25/16
1 Mas arch
35 'd/a open None.
Barrel type.
Retaining nail approaches- Bridge, 36 'I6/2O, ISO'
9 26'25/4O 1 RC deck N 34O', 5 4O' downstream
Culvert replacement for
24 23 '16/8 1 Mas arch. None.
Ouick crossing
R C. deck, trest/e
25 5O'/6/7 2
bent p/e-r None

L'ft. bet abut R C • probable,


Self
W= ft tote/ width Self reinforced cone
Coversapproaches^ causeivays,
Self explanatory
H-ft. water to explanatory
explanatory fords, S- additional data.
Mas • probable
aeck. masonry

NOTE: These data are essentially the same as the tabulation dateo 18 Jan 45, and
have been included with this map to pro,'ide a more usable document

OKINAWA SHIMA

BRIDGE LOCATIONS
SHEET INDEX
IN
SOUTHERN OKINAWA
LEGEND

6 4 TH ENGR B N . USAFCPBC NO. 4 1 4 8 DEC. 1 9 4 4


Prefectural roads (24'*)
Important secondary roads('(>').
Rai Iroad s, narrow guaoe
5000 0 5000 10000 15000 FEET
Tonns.
- 3190
3180 1090 1100
1080 JANUARY 3 0 , 1 9 4 5 ETlTeam SHEET 2
1 27­

KEY MAP

OKINAWA GUNTO

Possible

amphibious

tank base

wmam

OKINAWA GROUP

KERAMA ISLANDS

AND PASSAGES

FROM H. O. CHART NO. 1901


.hum SUirono Saki « Lat 26*12'56TS 1A>U>;' 127' 18 R F

HEIGHTS IN FEET ABOVE HIGH WATER OF SPRING TIDES

1
, SA<m

36
270° Approx.
1
1
1

00
^ B E A C H NO. 4 ' " ^ ^ ^

I __N^^ BEACH NO.3

Z GUSUKU-SHIMA BEACH NO. 2


3mall bay on east side
B of T0KASHIKI-3HIMA.
Terraced slopes and
CO small patches of culti­
vation are near
TOKA3HIKI Village.
1 Sortie WASP 393-22JAN45.

u
<
u
0
North end of TOKASHIKI-SHIMA

Steep rocky slopes covered

with brush and trees are

typical of KERAMA Retto.

uu
Sortie WASP 393-22JAN45.

2 7 o . p p r o , WKA
Q.

j 1 AKA-•SHIMA / ZAMAMI SHIMA

8 • • •••

I
\ ^SapSws** . .,....• ••-,.
. . .

TOKASHIKI-SHIMA
GISHIBE^ SHIMA
OJSNAWA (JUNTO .SECOND SUPPLEMENT

G^PAC-CINCPOA BULLETIN No. 53-45 .28 .Feb. 1945

of thvj beach being the landing area for the town and also

for '-ny materiel and supplies brought' in for the garrison.

However, though no installations were identified with any

certainty, it is probc.blo that fortification of this beach

is in progress. Two underground entrances flanking the

beach at each end, woll suited and well sited for anti­

tank gun or artillery shelter, were observed, further in­

dicating the construction of fortifications in this area.

Bc;sed purely upon the foregoing observations, it is

estimated that the troops in the KERAMA Retto total ap­

proximately 800-1000 men.

0. INDIVIDUAL ISLANDS

TOKASHIKI SIIIMA

TOKASHIKI: Shiraa is about six miles long, north-south,

including AWARA Saki at the southern tip, and 7/S to lg

inile.s wido. For tho most part, oho coast rises r.s cliffs

or steep slopes out by narrow ravines. The island rises

to heights of over 6*50 ft. and, with the exception of a

few cultivated areas, is severed with trees end brush.

There .«re two small town's, TOiCVSZilKI (approximately 210

buildings) ^nd AWARE (approximately 9? buildings), locat­

ed at the backs of sheltered bays. A 10* x 400 f break­

water protects the bay at TOICA.SKIKI. A fringing reef

surrounds the island.

On a steep slopo east of AKUGAl Saki are eight bar­

rack s - t ype bu i Id ing s.

There are many small snndy beaches $0 to 90 ft. wide

on TOKASHIKI Shiiaa. They are numbered on the- accompany­

ing map and described below:

•No. 1 - Length - 80 yds. At mouth of a small steep

canyon. Exit for troops difficult.

Approach ovwr roof.

No. 2 - Length - 170 yds. Backed by steep slopes and

cliffs. Exit for troops difficult.

Approach over reef.

No. 3 - Length - 270 yds. Backed by very steep slopes.

Exit for troops e.round weat end only.

Approach obstructed by largo off-ly­

ing rocks.

No. 4 - Length - 670 yds. Backed by town of TOKASHIKI

and flat cultivated field3. Exits

for all vehicles along southern .

halfi tracked vehicle3 at northern

half, A cr,rt track and trails lead

j.nland t o o ove r mo st o f i 31 and.

Approach south of GrUSUECU Shima into

bay protected by breakwater, then

over broad reef to'beach.

No. 5 - Length - 330 yds. Backed by small flat at

mouth of canyon &.nd steep hillsides.

Trail exit up canyon for troops

only. Approach over broad reef.

No. 6 - Length - 36O yds. Backed by cliffs. Exit

difficult for troops. Approach

over reef.

38
OKINAWA "GliNTO SECOND SUPPLEMENT

CUTCPAC-CINOPCA BULLETIN No. 53-45

No. 7 - Length - 150 yds. Bricked by stoop slopes

Exit lor troops only. Large-rooks at

edgo, reef be y ond.

No. 8 - Length - 3>0 yds. Backed by small flat and

a few cultivated fields .it mouth of vc.lloy.

Exit for possibly all vehicles after clear­

ing. Trail leads across island to AvvVJ-tE.

Southorn end of boaoh blocked hy off-lying ­

rooks. Approach over broud roof.

Ho. 9 - Length - 120., yds. Backed by stoep slopes.

Exit for troopa very difficult.. Approach

over broad reof through small off-lying racks.

No. 10 - Length * 720 yd..3. iCastern 3-00 yds. obstructed

by off-lying rocks and backed by steep slopes.

Western and backed by small flats at mouths

of two ravines. Trail to AWAFK may provide

exit for all vehicles after clouring. Ap­

proach over roof with scvnrrl rocks at w a ^ r ' s

edgo.

No. 11 -• Le ng t h - 160 yd s. Ba eke d by 1 ov;bra s 1 -o ove re d

slope, probrble exit for all vehicle'-1 after

clearing. Trail leaas to /3VARK. Approach '

ovyr wide shallow roof.

No.12 - Length - ')20 yds. Backed Ly'1ov/ brush-ooverod

slope. Probable exit for all vehicles aftor

oiouring. • n^raii loads to AWAfa?.. Approach

ovcu' broad reef.

No.13 - Length - 3.30 yds. Backed by rough draws and

atjop slox^Of;., exits for troops only. Koc::s

and coral heads off-plicre.

No. 14 - Length - 200 yds. Backed by io\* bank before

steop terraced fluids, and sxiial.1. cuitiv.?.twd

valley floor. Exit for troops only. Approroh.

ova-* larf;o coral heads in AW/JCHJ-KO.

No. 1$ - Le.i^th - 680 yds. Gontlo slop-- inland to fiat

cuitlvat'Kl valioy-bottcm aixd bo^n of i.VAxiE.

Sovoral trail exits to town probably suit­

abjj fc-r 'ill voiJclos. Rico paddies or.st

ar-d west uf town. ^Vpproach through AV/AKE-KO

ovor Jargo coral heads no^r beach.

No,16 - Length - ?0 yds. Backed by low brushy land.

Exit for "croops. Approach ever narrow roef.

No.17 ~ Smnli sand peckots botwoen rock outcrops.

Lerigtii - 60 to 3.00 yd,?.- each. Baokod by

steep slopes at ^-ortiiern,'end nigh brinks P/O

s'.:.ath^rn ond. Exit for troops difficult ui~

oopt for ono trail to AWARY.. #^t eztroLW south

end. ^.pprcach over narrow roof.

No.13 - Length - 760 yds. Backad by low sandy bank

in front of flat r:rea tit mouths of st^op

volleyr;. Thero are rice pv.ddies a short die­

tanoo inland in each valley, and four bar­

racks-typo buildings in a ravine. Sxits 1'roin

boacn for all vehicles,' bat trails away from

boach area to AWARS and TOJ^SHIKI suitable

for troops only. Approach ovor broad rea1\

No,19 - Length - 290• yds. Backed by smr.il flct areo.,

then stoop cliffs and ravines. Exit for troop.

on1 y. App r oa c i; cv0r re e f,'

No. 20 - Length - 310 yds. Backed by si^ali flats nt

bottom of steep slopes and ravines. Exit for

troops only. Approach over roe!1.

39
SECOND SUFPIEMEHT

A BULLETIN Nc. 53-45 . 28 Feb. 1945

No.21 - Longth 310 yds. Small rooks on beach rand

at water's edge. Backed by email cultivated

arec at mouth of steep ravines and at foot

of steep slopes. Zxlt for troops difficult.

A.ppro"ijh over narrow reef..

No.22 - Longth - 510 yds. Backed by flat area at

mouths or" stoop ravines. One small building

behind beach.. Exits inland for troops only.

Trail leads t-o T'OKASHlkl Village. Approach

over narrow reef, Ono largo rock on bench.

No.23 * Length - l?0 yds. Packed by steop ravine.

Exits frr troops onlyI Approach over reef.

No.24 - Longth - 470 yds. Backed by narrow flat at

foot of stoep slopes. Exit from flat for

troops only. Long law building at foot of

slope. Trail at- north end of beach leads'to

TOKASHIKI Village; one at center of beach,

to high grouxid inland. Approach over reef.

A xtotwork of trails cavers the island. A well-worn

oart track" runs southwest from TOKASKIKI Village, past

the barracks-type buildiagc, into an area from which the

timber appears "to ..ave fy*en out. Apparently some of this

timber wr.s hauled to ths b#excu at TQKASHIKI and some skid­

ded down a steop slope on fcho west side of the island be­

hind a place called TOKASIiIKU (Beach No. 1 8 ) .

GISIilES 3HIMA

GISHIBU Shima, one mile north-south, and £ mile wide

lie3 off the northern end of TOKASHIKI Shima, and is se­

parated from it by a shallow channel 200 yds. wide. The

island is rocky and rises steeply to heights of 350 ft.

There, are three sand beaches, the* longest being at the

southwest tip. lour small buildings are located at the

back of this beach. A reof surrounds the island.

JIT3UEU Shimi nnd JINO-JITSURU Shima are small rocks

off the northern tip of G-ISliIBE Shima.

FJKASE SHIMA

FUKtflB Sh.tm? lies .?tt the west coast of T0KASHIKI

SiJiiuc at the mouth of AK/.VE Ko f It is 7^0 yds, long, north-

south, and rises steeply to a maximum height of 90 ft.

GTJ3U10T SKIMA

GUS1JKU Shima is en the east side of TOKASHIKI Shima

at ths mouth of the bay at TOKASHIKI Village. It is about

460 yds. in diameter and rises steeply to a height of

300 ft. .

ZAM/^II SKIMA

ZAMJvTI Shinia Is 3i niles in length east-west, very

irregular in shape, and slopes steeply to heights of about

1+50 ft. Throe small villages and some rice and dry crops

occupy the few low flr-t ar-3as along tho soutnorn coast.

The rough'highlands are quite heavily wooded. A deep bay,

AGOKO Ur-ij cuts into thu south coast.

OKINAWA (JUNTO CSCOND SUPPLEMSITT

GTNCPAG-CINGPOA BULLETIN No. 53-45 28 Feb. 1

Tho northern coast r i s e s abruptly in most placos but.


has a few small sandy beeches bacicod by steep slopes or
cliffs. Tho e n t i r e island is surrounded by a fringing
reef of varying, •wirttr:• •
Tiiere aro several beaches on the southern coast. One
at AMA Village i s 420 y d s . ' l o n g , backed by low culu?vatod
land. At ZAI'iJ.-i.I Village a 5^0 yard beach i s backod by a
stone seawall. Fron FJRur-ZAMAMI, a beach curves 830 yards
to the southwest, i s interrupted by a ruck outcrop, thon.
continues 500 yards toward 31T1R0N0 CoKi. With the ozoep­
tion of the ncutiioast-arn end, t h i s beach slopes gently
back to c u l t i \ c t # d l.&nd. Along tho eastern :-nn -we a tern
shores of AGQ1M0 Jra there i s a t o t a l of 13-00 ycrds •:•£
beach divided into four sections by larger rook out or op J .
At ASA Village thy bisach i s backed'by 160 yards of Ltone
seawall-; th-i r-snrSr..<ier slopes gently to low brushy land
and cultivated f i e l d s . At tao southeastern end of tho
island are tv:o boaol.es; one c-60 ycrds, long1 facing south,
and cne 410 yorls long, facing east at the b:\ek of r. snail
bay. Both botcher; slopo gently to amo.il flat. are:is backed
by low hi 11s.

A cert tr^ck ruij,3 L-YOT high h i l l s botwoon the south­


eastern v i l l a g e s . Trus rent of thu island i s ^orvoci by
t r a i l s only.

Two stick iTi-Tista indicate c po:-:Riblo radio s t a t i o n


at ZAMAMI.

G.AJ3I Shimo. \3 a snail rocky knob 460 1001 in diamoter

with small hwochos on the eastern, nor thorn, and wot* torn

sides. It is o.:;.^iroly surround 3d by a 1'ringing roof.

There is ono small ovltivated patch on the southwestern

side, but n^; apparent habitation..

,\KENASHIK1 SH1UA.

AIQ3NASHIKI Shima is 630 yardn long north-south,' 230

yards witz, anc1. is low and flat with a reeky point at the

northern end. A fringing reef surrounds the iolaJ'.-d, and

a sandy beach rune along tho western side. The i^xend is

cultivated but uninhabitated.

AMUKO 3KJMA

AMURO Shiina is 1-3/8 mij.es long, north-nouth, and %

nile wide near the southern end. A steep rocky ridg-3 runs

down the narrow northern end, ending in c 300 foot hill

at the .southern bulge. There is a fringing reef around th

island. Of the several-bo^chss. along tiio coast, one in

the canter of trio casborn .side' is tho longest (580 yds.),

A few patches of cultivation rccupy the email fiat eror.s

along the coast but 2.0 hcbitr.ti.o:i is cbsorvod,

IJAK/iJA Shixaa is one of several rocks projecting

above the surface of tho water, const*itouting little more

than a hazard tu navigation.

41
-OKINAWA GUNTO SECOND SUPPLEMENT

G1NCPAOGINCPOA BULLETIN No. 53-45 28 Feb. 1945

ir

KA SKIMA

AKA Shima is irregular in shape-, measures 1-3/& miles

northweat-souther.st, and rises to heights of 500 to 600

ft. in tile central and northern portions. A small stream

runs into the se-'x near the northeast corner of the island.

With the exception of some low areas in the southern and

eastern part, the shoreline rises as cliffs or steep wood­

ed slopes. Only small pecket-beaohes occur along the steep

parts.of the coast, A line of rock outcrops extends 5/&

of a mile south from tho southern tip of AKA Shima. A

fringing reef surrounds the island. AKA Shima is separ­

ated from GERUMA Shima to the. south by a narrow shallow

channel.

Tho village of AKA Und some fields of rice and dry

crops cover the floors cf two small valleys at the south­

ern end of the island. A cart track leads from AKA through

the valley to the east to some small underground entrances

behind the beach on the eastern coast.

At AKA Village there is a 750-yard beach, most of which

is blocked by coral lodges juat off shure. The sandy point

extending south toward GERUMA Shina is comparatively unob­

structed, avt AKA a 165-yard stone seawall backs part of

the beach; the rest slopes up to the town itself.

Along the eastern coast north cf H A N T A Yaraa is a

620-yard be:-.eh, most of which is backed by a low grass-

covered riso. Three tracks eight ft. wide have been cut

through this rise and another angles over it; all of these

le??cl to a track parallel with the beach that serves the

mouths of numerous underground excavations, then winds

westward through the cultivated valley to AKA. In con­

junction with this, about ten 15 f x 8 f vehicles dispersed

in the area may indicate a possible amphibious tank base,

GERUMA SHIMA (KERUIvU SHIMA)

GERUMA Shiran, is nearly round and 5/B of a mile in dia­

meter. It rises in steep slopes and cliffs tc an eleva­

tion of 45^ ft. The village of GERUMA, at the southern

end of the island, is built on a snail flat, where two

short vrlloys reach the soa. The valley sides and bottoms

are planted in rice and other crops. Harrow shallow chan­

nels .separate GERUMA. Shima from AKA Shima to the north and

HOKA-JI Shiiia to the south. The island is nearly surround­

ed by r! fringing reef.

The only beac'fc of any size (170 yds.) lies along the

front cf GERUMA Village. It is backed by a stone seawall,

broken in the center where a trail leads to the town.

Two sma.ll beaches at the north end of the island ,.ave a

small channel through the coral to each of them. Behind

these beaches t^ere are many trails and soiaa small ex­

cavations.

EOKAJT SHIMA (FUKASHI JIMA)

HOICAJI Shina is about one riile ldng, north-south, and

a ,ialf-r.iile wide. It rises as a stoep sided nesa to heights

of about 200 ft. A few rough canyons cut into the rock and

there are several patches of cultivation along the higher

slopes of the northern and central part of the island;

tiie rest of it is wooded. There appears to bo no habita­

tion but trails lead to the fields from sone small beaches

along the northwestern tip. , 9

OKINAWA GUNTO SECOND SUPPLEMENT


CHTCFAC-CINCPOA BULLETIN No. 5 3 - 4 5 23 F e b . 1945

A fringing reef surrounds the island, which is se­

parated from G-ERUMA Shine, to the north by a shallow nar­

row channel. Two rock outcrops lie off ths so atnom tip

of HOKAJT •Shina, the most southerly being Jok.-wn as LIU.KA­

RAKIT Shim a.

0 SHIMA and MOLE ROCK

0 Shina anil MOLE ROCK are snail barren rocks lying

southwest of iroKAJl Sliimeu .

KtJRO SHIMA '

KURO Shima is a. oit, ivok 1100 yds. Icng, north-south,

and 500 yds. wile, rising to a height if about 300 ft.

The partial photo coverage shows no habitation. The top


of the reck is wooded and the' sides very stoop. A fring-
ing reef surrounds the island.

NAiCA 3KIHA and HATK SHBiv.


Three snail islands form a chain" running northeast

from the tip of tLJt! Shina. The southernnost of the so,

NAKA- Shina, is 750 yds. long north-south and 330 yds. wide.

HATE Shina, at the northern end of tho chain, is about

400 yds. in dianetor. The center island is 280 yds. in

diameter and is not naned.. All rise quite steeply and are

wooded or brush, covered on top. NiJcCA is the highest,

reaching 300 ft. They are separated'fron WJi Shine and

each other by shallow narrow channels. ImTL snowc sono

•signs cf cultivation. The group is surrounded by a fring­

ing reef.

LIAE SlUMA

MAE Shina is 1-7/B niles long, north-northeast-south­

southwest, and about 3/3 nilo wide. A razor-back ridge

runs the full length of,tho island, rising to heights of

300 to 400 ft. at each end. The snoll village of .MAE is •

Xn tho center of the oast coast. Tho island :as consider­

able cultivation, the heaviest concentration if fields

being terraced alor;£ the central eostern slope near the

village,

A beach about 1300 yds. long runs along tho contor of

the western coast. It is interrupted by .five rock out­

crops at ti;3 water's edge. Most of tliis boach is bached

by a high bank fullowed by a stosp slope. Ti:i3 slope .is

nost gentle where two trails cross a low saddle at. the

center cf the island.

A 300 yd. beach in part of tho village of l&Z is divid­

ed by a large olunp of rocks at the water's edge. . A -narrow

channel Las been cleared through off-lying coral heads.

The ground behind tho beacn is low.

There are two 400 to 500 yd. beaches, (:.ne along either

side of tho north tip of the island. They are both backed

by gontlo slopes that run back to a high hill. The entire

island is surrounded by a fringing reef.

43
OKINAWA GUNTO. SECOND SUPPLEMENT

CINCPAC-CINCPOA BULLETIN 5 3 - 4 5 . 28 FEBRUARY 1945.

Mine. YAKABI Shima, KERAMA R e t t o . JICPOA L - 5 0 2 2 4 - 6

S o r t i e YORK 257-22JAN45.
44
.OKINAWA Ol'KTO S&COND SliP]
CIIJ:3PAC-GINCP0A EUIXF.TItT No. 53~4? 28 F e b . 1945
\
. YAKABI SHT&tA (YAKAN JTMA) (see'photo)•
YAKABI Shijnr.. i s n e a r l y o v a l "In s h a p e , t h e n o r t h e a s t -
southwest axis bbing 1-1/8 miles. I t r i s e s in steep slopes
and c l i f f s to n-re si-an 600 f t . . Tho rough terrain i s cov­
ered by brush and t r e e s . In a snail valley, in the south-'
eastern part of the inland there i s a rii.no, a compact group
'...f builriinSs, and a few cultivated f i e l d s . A 350-ft. pier
extendc fron the southeastern t i p . The island is surround­
ed by a fringing reof. '
Excavation a Lave bssa. imdo in nany places ^n tho east­
ern f.iiid wet-tern «lop«s of the island. Most of the work
has boon clone iu tho up.por reaches of the snail valley on
tho southeastern,slope. .Many piles of t a i l i n g s , some
small .buildings, and jevoral tunnel ontrancec can bo seen
near tho head of the vs'lloy. A narrow trail," probably a
riarrovv-gauge railway, runs froa.load ing chutes around the
hillsi'-o to a group of connected buildings. This group
eppe.-rs to include a cr.ugii.iaig und /.tilling u n i t . A prob­
ablo narrow gauge rn.ilro?^ runs X'ror.i the lowest of these
buildings to the pi&r o.fc the tip of • tho'island. A j-'ipe
line or fiune carries a micifiy residue fron' t h i s building
to a point nerir ti:o bo&ch, v;hex*o 9 dolta-like deposit has
tesou i'cn.ie'I. TJ.O^C is a anall piivvdo?.* iiagazino on the '
h i l l s i d e bol^w the -nine.
At Ulie b.;wtcn of the vrlley there is a lar.^o building
cai"a;-uflagc painted, prcbribly a pewor i^la.ut. Two radio
nasts st'.:.nd part v;ay up the northorn Idilsirje. At the •
niouti: v.-f the vniloy, peer the boaoh, stands a conpact
gr'^up ( f buildings. Soiiu are apparontiy workers1 quarters
and '..ti:orn- to tuo suuth, possibly v/.M'chv-uses or storage
buiiuin^j. I t npp«3aro that a nuj.tLer of buili'-ings have been
destroyed at the northern and • f the settlement.
. The 35O-ft« pier- is b u i l t of stone* i s abnit 20 f t ,
wide oxia. supports a oran-j at itq outer ond. .A line -of'
poles'rang frua trie settl^i.ont Lirt- to the end of tile p i e r .
Sczvi o;,r^i has been drodgod along the pier and in a nar­
row channel thr-u^h the roef. ' • . '- •
What 6ippj?,rF bo be a hand-poworod narrow-gauge r a i l - .
road runs tho length of the pier, along the ooast, through
the Gfctuloraent and up to >\ sr.iall building attached to the
power ho',UK;. A br'.uich ^cos to tho possible n i l l ' buildings.
Trf.i.il.s crocL"; the island between the excavation sites,, but
,nc,no penotratc) the -northern end of tho island. •
There- are two beeches along tlio si-;rclino; one l i e s
just 3«.uth of a rv^cky point on tho v»-wst r.io.e. It is ^90
yds. long and backed by steop roiopes. • S'..xue t a i l i n g s from
the excavations arrive s p i l l dovm on the sand.. The other
b-juc}-, is. at the n<.uth^of the s/ir/Il vnlloy below the nine.
I t is 680 yd3. long, varying in v/id-U: -frori a few yards at
tuc nortj.ern end t,: 60 yds. in front of .the settlement.
Th-j be -oli is ciuttor-od with so.no smoll b«->uts, but exit to
th-3 tcviii would not be d i f f i c u l t . The southern part :.s
lined with middy reniduo fron the Milling processes cf the
nine..
OKINAWA GUNTO SECOND SUPPLEMENT

CINCPAO-CINgPOA BULLETIN No, 55-45 ?,8 Feb. 1945

KXJBA SHIKA (KOBA JIM A)

KIJEA Shima is lj miles long, -north-south, and about 1/2

mile wide. The entire coast is bounded by cliffs and steep

slopes. A mountain at the southern end rises to 800 feet,

while a small semiplateau at the northern end reaches about

300 feet in height. Bare, rocky crags characterize the

extreme southern slopes; the central part is voodod; and. on

the northern plateau there is some cultivation and a small

group of buildings". On the slope, at the center of the

western side of the island, there is a mine, and at the

water's edge, a 60 ft. pier. A fringing reef bounds all of

the island except the southwestern tip.

The group of buildings on the plateau includes a

camouflage-painted power house and another larger camou­

flaged building. Most of the other structures appear to

be workers1 quarters. From a small building on the east­

ern edge of the plateau a steeply inclined track rune •

down to a short beach. There is possibly a narrow gauge

rail line on the incline. A line of poles runs from the

power house, near this small building, and down the hill­

side to the ber.eh. A short distance south of the lower

end of the incline there is a building at.the beck of the

beach.

A line of poles also runs west from the power house

to some mine buildings on the western hillside, possibly

continuing to a pump or springhouse near the foot of the

slope.

From some tunnel entrances of the mine a trail runs

to a chute that empties into a building stuck on the hill­

side. Other buildings farther down the slope apparently

process material from lower tunnels and dump a fine white

material into a pile at the foot of the slope. The stone

pier (60 ft. x S ft.), apparently bearing a narrow gauge

railway, projects into the water at this point. The sea­

ward approach to the pier is through large coral heads.

A well-worn trail runs from the nine to the settle­

ment and east to the head of the incline. Other trails run

down the hill, neraiVithe incline, to the beach and from the

settlement a short distance up the hillside to the south.

There are only three beaches offering any possibility

of exit. They are at the eastern end of the incline (150

yds, long), on the north coast (150 yds. long) and just

north of MOTOSENO Saki on the western coast (210 yds. long).

All are backed by steep slopes; trails lead up the hill­

sides from the eastern and western beaches.

KUBACHI Shima is a snail rocky promontory at the north

end of KUBA Shina, separated from that island by a very

narrow strip of water. A line of rock pinnacles runs west

400-500 yards fron MOTOSENO Saki, on KUBA Shina.

46
OKINAWA GUNTO. SECOND SUPPLEMENT
CINCPAC-CINCPOA BULLETIN 5 3 - 4 5 . 28 FEBRUARY 1945.

TORI SHIM

KUME SHIMA
OKINAWA SHI MA

KERAMA RETTO

4 5
TARAMA
S '

MIYl&KO SHIMA

ISHIGAKI SHIMA

40' 50 127*

Possible observation

tower or lighthouse jProbable radar]

3 possible auto AA

3 possible auto AA|

6USHIKAWA

KITABARU

Nishime Saki

26° 26'
20' 20

6 possible auto AA

finergency
landing

ground

IRadio weather station!

50'
127'

JCPC» L-50224-3

OKINAWA GUNTO
KUME SMIMA
From H.O. Chart No. 38

47
r
/</a/ estuary­ Turns aTao»«ffcAji; £
*"$*e, tV t-Zirv ZO- OVo- 3 /aca/v& en alt nu

7~*/^0 dOh^/rrSrr GO r*7 0


a/tcfrxxt* r>oacas
st/-ajjpht and Je

dont/- <tcod- *VA*


a rod An is -Hoe,
- easy ciM~r^as - AV
of Mils ­ outs a.oa//
3
CO
UJ
u.
00

y means of czer/al pSio'foor-a.f^tiy /nte.'pr a/a/b


-0830 (-<})-/Z''O0,0OQ'}~J<UM&. SHIM*-REST-J-/CPO& T7SZLU

f irer-4/ca/
pAo<i&£ afa^<srrr>/'r)&c/ by pro/>orii/or> from l-es,ccc /naps ^pr/ar­ £o X>ca//rty /i'r>*u.\l
i aj/ co^e s excejst 8n<*je Ah- ?> <vA*y-
Lo<x&/r>j Ca.pa^/6y ­ The sAor-^i sf*ar> /er>j£h (/nan 33')y mcLSonry arch conj$r<jc£'on, cisaa/Zy saveraJ
of tf/ie .CLrch> bo& pa/nc'ad yv/^h varf/ny asnooniis of

PRtNC/PAL H/GtfWAY 6RID6E<S OF


ed Sy jET/rcourry ­ $CKTa.n- 'r^Sfhr O-C- ^. of POA

V. ,

PRINCIPAL HIGHWAY BRIDGES


MAP
of

KUME SHIMA

Refr: First Edition AMS Sheets 3425-1 NW


3426-11SE
3426- IISW
3426-IIISE
'OKINAWA GUI-TTO SECOND SUPPLEMENT

CtNCFAC-CINOPOA BULLETIN No. $3-45


• * • • • • • • " " " ' • • • • • #

28 Feb.

IV. KPMg SHIMA

26 U2O»N., I26 U 4? T E.

KUME ohicia isapproximately !5O miles west of OKINAWA.

The island is irregular in shape, tho longest dimension being

about eight miles northwest-southeast. The ave.rrj.ge width is

about four miles. Tho topography is rough, and most of the

coastline is steep and rccicy. There are relatively flat

coastal plains at GrJM.fi K G on tho southwest coast and at

SETMAJIRI Wan on the oast era coast. A lew saddle separates

these areas. Tho principal towns are GILIA. and. OTA, an the

southwest shor•••?., with about 300 and 200 buildings respectively,

and £110A in the east aeuitral part of tho island, with about

150 buildings.

Hadio Statjon• There ic- a probable radio-weather station

on a nigh ridge in tho north central part of the island. The

Gtstion consists of six soxall buildings and at least two masts.

Radar. A probable radar station ic approximately one

mile north of GIMA Town in tho contra! part"of the island.

Tho station conciRta o£ two email structures and a snail

chimney-typo grid.

ffncy Land lap; ffielcl. A flat area on tho eastern coast

near HIGA Town apparently its used as an emergency landing field.

No construction is observed, but there ic an inoperative single-

engine -plam; in tho area.

Lighthouse. There is a lighthouse or observation tower

on thu shore 01: GJMA Town.

Dcfonses. Inadequate photographic coverage precludes a

complete interpretation of defenses on KCJMK Shima.

2 automatic antiaircraft guns are adjacent

to the radio -station

5 possible automatic antiaircraft guns are

at SONi\ivll Zaki, the easternmost point of

thu island

3 possible automatic antiaircraft guns are

on the point northeast of the emergency

landing oroa

6 possib.lv o.utor.atic antiaircraft guns are

on 0 Shjjiia, a saall island east of. KDMS

0KINA7/A (JUNTO SECOND SUPPLEMENT


GINOTAO-OIITCFOA BULLSTITl 130. 53-4-5 *•$ " e b . 1945

V. AOUNI SEIMA

Lat. 2 6 ^ 3 P T N . , Lung. I27Q13fE.

See CINCPAC-CINCI'OA B u l l e t i n U<>. 161-44 ?U£o 62.­

Photo c o v e r a g e of AGUNI Shima. i s c o m p l e t e , of e x c e l l e n t


q u a l i t y and s m a l l s c a l e ; i t shows no d e f e n s e s . The ^ n l y
installation observed is a radio station with 5 stJc/c: rousts
at the. southeast ooriior of AGUWI village.

^GUNI 3hiim is a small pear-shapod i^3.ai)d, 2% miles lung

(in a northeast-southwest direction) and 1-3/4 lilies v/ide at

the v/idest (noroh^rn) part. It is composed uf uplifted c^r^l

formatiuus and is entirely surrounded by a fringing reef.

The reef is very cluse inshure c-.iong ail the- ct>aet oxotpt

the 6P.stern end, v'hort; it becumes quite br^ud.

iiluii^ the oestorn bul^c uf the inland thorc is a 550

yard .^ndy boach. Tim southern half cf tho boach is backed

by a steep grass-and brush c....-vo:?ed .sand dune, while t.> the

north, tho dune flattens 'jut t-j make tm exit n^ore foaaible.

The rest uf the oc-aat is bounded by n»ok i/utcrvps varying

in height frc-m -^ fov/ fcab at tho nvrthc»GS'o:;rii side t?> high

cliffs at tho .vestera end.

The twi> s.THi-^.11 tuv;ns of AG-UK1 and DiMA, on the s

coast, are cwrmocted by a go^d'road 8 tu 10 foet wide. The

rest of the isl:md is served by cart tracks and trails.

Along tho coast near the two t A/ns tncre are three places

where narrow channels have been cut through the rcof to

alluw very small boats to approach Iruiding platforms. The

channel and small cove at HAMA are protected by •:. s-Lvrt

breakwater.

The southern part of tho island Is inf.c-iise.ly cultivated,

the crops nil being uf the dry variety. On the r.i/rthorr.

half, the cultivation is broken b y strips and, in 3.;mc places

large areas of brush and low troos.

49
•OKINAWA GUIITO SHOOED SUPPLEMENT

L BULLETIN 1^-. 53-45 28 Fob. 1945

• VI. TONACHI SHIIvIA

Lat. 26°22'N., Long. 127°09 f E.

See CINCPAC-CINCPOA Bulletin 161-44 pages 60 to 61.

Excellent photo coverage of three-fourth of TONACHI

Shiran sh^w no defenses.

TONACHI Shima is twu miles long, north-south, rises to

a height of more than 500 feet and is surrounded, on all

sides but the south, by a br«-»a& fringing reef. Near the

northern end, the W.vii of TONAKI extends clear across a nar­

row neck of tho island, a distance of 3/3 of a mile.

The southern and northern ends rise abruptly out of the

ocean as r^ctry hills that slope down to a low saddle at the

Tuwn :>f TONAKI. The inner slopes and small valleys are

"terraced with rice paddies while the l^wer" flat land is in

dry crops. The rough, hilly area sloping to the sea on the

south is cover-ad with grass and brush.

There are t\Air b&cohos 1/4 -o 3/3 milos lv^ng, tv/o on

the west and two un the' eastern side of the island. Several

other smaller beaches occur, mostly on the west side. The

larger beaches are backed by brush and tr-se covered sand

dunes. The southern half of t.ho beach al^ng the west coast

at TONAKI is backed by a ruck ser.wall.

A 40'-fuot wide channel has been .out through the reef to

the beach at the western side of TONAKI Town. Three fishing

boats, 45 to 60 feet long, aro near the boach.

OKIrJAV/A GU1TTO SECOND SLTPLJftlENT

CIN0PAC-CIN0POA BULLETIN N v . 33-45 28 Feb. 194

VII. IZENA SHIMA

Lat.

No military installations are observed.. The possible

airfield previously reported is not present.

IZENA Siiimu is 2-7/3 nilos long, north-south and 1-7/B

miles wide. M./st of the island is flat and intensely culti­

vated. Several wooded hills rise to heights uf 300 to 400

feet. There are .four towns near the eastern, western and

soutnorn coasts. Boaches backed by luw ground are f.vund J H

all sides, uf the island. IZENA Siiima is ?»urr-vuncled by o

fringing reef.

•OKINAWA GUNTO SECOND


CIECPAC-CIUCPOA BOLtSECN Ncu 5>3*4? 26 Fe

SHO
Lat. 26°15IN.J Long. 127°33fE.

The KEISAN SHC ar* a small group of reef islands north­

east of KERAMA Retto. No defenses are observed on those

islands.

KAMIYAMA. SKBIA

Shima, the iarge.r of two low sandy islands


surrounded by a ^riagjUll y**^t, i s 800 yards long nortlieast­
southwest, very narrofif *% %k$ northern ead and widening to
400 yards near the sott&taiftt 90^• Spots of lov<; trees dot the
f l a t surface, and a peoA of water .may be saen in the center.
There are two shuoics «jj.^4g the southern shore and a .short
t r a i l leads inland.
The smaller adjacont isl&afl is 620 yards long east-west,
i s slightly higher than t&€> ctbft?, and is alaiost completely
covered by trees and brvafc.
KEUW SHBdA
KEUHJ Shima is a naxptM strip of sa/id about 600 feet

long east^west", An aye§ of vegetation in the oenter is

shaped much like a ship* TVJO circles of white stones 30

feet in diameter are &$$£ the ends ol this dark area. A

white cross is midway between the circles, Somo email pock

marks indicate that tfcis is probably a bombing range.

UNITED STAINS PACIFIC FLEET


'AND PACIFIC! OCEAN AREAS
MCH/ais HEADQUARTERS-. OF THEGOMMANDER IN CHIEF

26 F e b r u a r y 1945 - S e r i a l DJS-261450.
••From: ... „ ., Commander in Chief, U* S. 'Pacific;r F l e e t
arid Pacific. Ocean Areas..
•To: Distribution List, • . ••
-Subjec-t:.. CINCPAC-CINCPOA BULLETIN No. 5 3 - 4 5 ; . OKINAWA
'••' GUNTO.
Supplement•#2 t o CINCPAC-CINCPOA BULLETIN
;
No.. 1 6 1 - 4 4 .
1. •;: Subject Bulletin, forwarded herewith, need
not be reported and when, no -longer .of value should be de­

stroyed.. No report of destruction is necessary.

M". C. HAVIIATO,

By direction.

•End: .. '

; (A) Subject Bulletin.

DISTRIBUTION LIST:

ARMY: -' No. Copies

MIS Reading.Panelj WDGS, Washington, DC- - - - - - - 14

5 (Incl:MIS Cap.t Pers •& Matl Branch

•"••" .•• i MIS Training Center-,'Camp Ritchie, Md

~ •:'••: • .•Operations Div, V/DGS, Washington-, DC)'

C^-AiiF, At.tn.-r AC/AS. Intelligence, Washington, DC -•->•• .' 12

*- • (Incl:All continental AAF organizations),.

Chief*-of Engineers, ^rar Dept,•• Washingtonj DC'- - - - 5

Chief Signal Officer, War Dept, Washington, DC - 2

(IncTrCQ Arlington Hall-Station)" .

G-2 Western Defense Command, Presidio, -San Francisco 2

Gt-t. Adv CP,: Alaskan Dept, APO'980, Seattle - - - - - - 2

Comdt, Comfe'C-onStaff School, Ft Loavonworth, Kan - 2

US Army Unit, West Coast, PO Box' 651, TracyY Cal 2

Gomdt, .MIS Language School,- ft Sn-elling, Minn- ,- - - 2

ARMY, INDIA: '" " . ,.' • ••'

Dir .-Mil Intel,-'Gen" HQ, Nev/ Delhi, India- - - - - - - 2

Dir of Intel,; SEAC, APO 432, Now York- - - : ' A 2

BGS (Intol) Adv Kg. Eleventh ArmyGp,SEAC,APO 432,NY- 2

G-2 USAF Burma-India,'New Delhi, India -^ 2

A-2 XX.Bomber Command,- APO 493, Now York • 20

CSDIC,-Red-Fort, New DelAi -,-.- .- 2

ARMY,PACIFIC &. SVJPA;. . . Cv£ ^ m PACIFIC 8c SWPA(Con f d);

ComGenPOA, "APO. 958- - - - - 25 G-2 19th .Ai^md Gp,AP0 95^- 8

DIjAAFPOA, APO 953*- - 200 G-2 13th TaBes Gp,./lPO956- 2

• •(Incl:All Pacific (J\J) Island Cmdr, -APO 241 2

G-2 Tenth Army,'-APO, 357 25 District Cmdr; APO 960 2

Gr-2CenPadBaCom,AP0' 95S. - - 2 District Cmdr', APO 961 2

G-2 ArPoSerjCom, APO 455'- - 2 District Cmdr,. APO 962- - 2

G-2- Combaf Tr.Com,APO 957 2 G-2 APO 7 5

G-2 HawAAGom, iiPO 958. ' 2 G-2 APO 27-! 5

G-2 HawSeArtCom, APO 956 3 G-2 APO 77 5

G-2 XXIV Corps, APO'235 5 O 2 APO 81 5

G-2 XXIV Corps Arty,APO 235 2 G-2 APO 96- 5

G-2 4th Armd Gp,APO 957 - - 2 G-2 APO 98- - - .- 5

(Continued Reverse Side)

26 February 1945 - S e r i a l DIS-261450,

DISTRIBUTION LIST (Continued):

NAVY,PACIFIC & SWPA; Cys

2 ATIS- - - - . _ - - "n?
SEATIC 2

ComBatRonONE- - - - - . - - 2

G~2, GHQ,SWPA,APO 5C
ComBatRonTl'/O 2

COIC GHQ, SWPA,AT0'50v,- - ­


ComBatDivs- - - - - - -ea 1

DMI,Adv Aid Ld Hq,Brisb- ­


ComDesCruPac- - - - - 2

(IncliAust Mil Fes)


ComCruDivs- - - - - - - e a 1

DI AldAB1 SWTA, AFO 923


5 ComDesRons- - - - - - -ea 1

Ast D I AAF SWTA, APO 925 ­


5 ComDesDivs- - - - * - -ea 1

G-2 IISAFFE, ATO 501- - - ­


2 ComSubPac - - - - - - 2

G-2 USAF -SWTA,'ATO 500 - ­


2 ComlvTineCraftPac ~ 20

G-2 Sixth Army;APO 442


10 AdCominPac- ^ - - - - * - 3

G~2 SoPacBaCom,APO 502 - ­


2 ComCortDivs - - - - - -ea 1

COE, GHQ SWPA, ATO 500 - ­


4 ComMTBRonsPao - - - - 2

Aid Geog Scc,SWTA,Brisb- ­


3 ComTHIRD Fleet - - 2

NAVY: '
ComFIFTH Fleet- 2

COMINCH,Washington,DC- - ­
3
CoiftSEVEOTH Fleet 2

CNO,Washington,DC­
18
C0,7tM'leetlntelCtr 45

(Inc 1: DMI ,MI2 ,V/h i tclia 11


ComServPac^ - - - ^ r - - 2

DNI,Admty, V/hit ©hall)


DirAdvBase, ComServPac- - 2

CmdtjNavY/ar Coll, Newport- - '


ComSerRons 6, 8, 10, 12ea 2

Omdt,MTSCOL,Washington,DC-
ConFwdAreaCenPac- - - » - - • 2

Adv Nav Intel 'Sen, NYC


RepConiDosPacCenPaoFwd - - 2

ComThibTraPac, FPO SDiego-


RepC omDc sPacSoPac&7thFlt- 2

NACIOS, NAS', Quonsett r


Fleet V/cather Central - «- 2

ComOpTraPac, San Diego - .­


Adv Hqleather Central- - 2

CO, Naval Unit, West Coast


Fleet Radar Center, Pac - 2

CNAOpTra, Jacksonville - ­
Fleet Radio Unit, Pac - - 4

Hydrographer,\7ash,DC - - ­
Pacific Battleships - -oa 1

Pacific Cruisers- ~ - -ea 1

NAVY,PACIFIC & SWPA:


Pacific Destroyers- •* -ea J.

CINCPAC 1, 21- - " ^ - -ea


2
Coriil'liibForPao - - - ~ - - 5

:r:
AIC r CINCPAC Adv Hq- -. - -
3
CoinADComPhibsPac- - - - - 100

CcmSoPae - ^ - - - ~ ~ —
2
ConTHU^DPhibFor 5

ComNorlac- - - - - - - - ­
2
CoriThibGroups - - - - - e a 5

USNLO, Brit Pac Fee­


60
ConNavyFcs, Navy #3256- ~ 2

(Incl:COIS-BPF surface
MARINE CORPS:

'units & staffs exc.Air)


Condt, USMC - ^ - - - - - 2

DI,Royal Australian Navy -


3
CG,'USMC SchQols- 6

AICNorPao- » ^ - - - - - ^ .
.
2

0-2,- IMF Pac . 6

6 G THIRD Ihib Corps - - - 3

Advance Intelligence Office; GUAM- CG FIFTH Phib Corps „ - * .- .-, .- 100

CG each MarDiv- - - - - - 15

Advance Intelligence Office, ULITfll- 100

CornAirPac- .- - - -'- - - - - - --~'-— ~ - - - - - <<• - - 600

(For distribution, as appropriate, to CGAir FlVIFPac^ ComMar-*

FAirV/est, Com/iSCUPhibFor , ConCarTransRonPac , CoinAirSoPac,

ConAir7thF.leeti CotiAirNorSols, 'CorMar-Gil, CoinFAirVJest,

ComFAirAlaneda, CoraFAirSeattle, Co.aFAirshipsPac t'ComNATSPac ,

CoraCarTasFors, CoriEsCarFor, ConCarDivsj Carriers, CarAir­

'Groups, CirSquadrons, Seaplane Tenders, FleetAirWiAgs,

• 'Squadrons, MarAirWings, Mar Air Groups, Mar Squadrons, Bat-Cru

Aviation Units, NavAir & Seaplane Bases, InterPronTV/0) .

3 1695 00539 6700