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‘PATRIOTS DAY’AN ODE TO CIVIC LIFE WEEKEND JOURNAL PAGE 19 GOP’SCRUSADE EARLY REPUBLICAN WIN ON

‘PATRIOTS DAY’AN ODE TO CIVIC LIFE

WEEKEND JOURNAL PAGE 19

DAY’AN ODE TO CIVIC LIFE WEEKEND JOURNAL PAGE 19 GOP’SCRUSADE EARLY REPUBLICAN WIN ON HEALTH CARE

GOP’SCRUSADE

EARLY REPUBLICAN WIN ON HEALTH CARE REPEAL,

NATION PAGE 7

CONGRESS OKS BUDGET

WIN ON HEALTH CARE REPEAL, NATION PAGE 7 CONGRESS OKS BUDGET THE BEARCATS HOLD OFF DONS

THE BEARCATS HOLD OFF DONS

SPORTS PAGE 11

Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula

Weekend Jan. 14-15, 2017 XVII, Edition 129

www.smdailyjournal.com

County looks to in-laws for housing options

Supervisors ease regulations, consider ready-made design templates

By Samantha Weigel

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

In a growing toolbox of ways to address the region’s housing cri- sis, San Mateo County officials are looking to make in-law units more affordable and easier to build.

Like many jurisdictions throughout California, the county is updating its rules to meet new state mandates promoting second- ary units as a valuable source of housing in a region struggling to keep up with job growth. But instead of just meeting the minimum requirements that range

from alleviating parking restric- tions to allowing property owners to forgo public review, San Mateo County is looking to provide resi- dents with an even simpler path — ready-made architectural tem- plates. “We would provide some exam- ples, some design templates that,

with minimal or no tweaking, would be preapproved. It saves you from hiring an architect or a lot of the fees of an architect, and it saves you on design costs,” said Will Gibson, a planner with the county. “It doesn’t save you on construction costs, but … it does save a lot of the front end

costs for the applicants.” Officials will create templates unique to various unincorporated county neighborhoods, which are expected to be available by the year’s end, Gibson said. Those looking to build sooner

See IN-LAWS, Page 18

said. Those looking to build sooner See IN-LAWS , Page 18 SAMANTHA WEIGEL/DAILY JOURNAL Leena Leffler-Little,

SAMANTHA WEIGEL/DAILY JOURNAL

Leena Leffler-Little, 4, draws an outline of library assistant Cami Del Rio’s hand while exploring the Lookmobile in Half Moon Bay.Below: Del Rio shows the camera obscura exhibit in the mobile trailer created with help from the Exploratorium.

Lookmobile debuts San Mateo County

Libraries host mobile trailer made in collaboration with Exploratorium

host mobile trailer made in collaboration with Exploratorium By Samantha Weigel DAILY JOURNAL STAFF After partnering

By Samantha Weigel

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

After partnering with exhibition creators from San Francisco’s renowned Exploratorium, San Mateo County Libraries is bring- ing the interactive Lookmobile to communities across the region. The custom mobile trailer is making stops at the county’s vari- ous libraries to encourage people of all ages to learn more about their community and tinker with a variety of science- and art-based exhibits. The idea was prompted in part by

See LOOK, Page 24

The idea was prompted in part by See LOOK , Page 24 COURTESY OF COSTA BROWN

COURTESY OF COSTA BROWN ARCHITECTURE

An artist’s rendering of the proposed Hillsdale Terrace mixed-use housing project along El Camino Real in San Mateo.

Scaled-back housing plan under review

San Mateo council considers less dense Hillsdale Terrace redevelopment plan

By Samantha Weigel

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

The density of a controversial housing proposal for a stretch of San Mateo’s El Camino Real has been reduced after officials realized the city’s citizens’ initiative Measure P prohibits more than 68

units on a 1-acre site. On Tuesday, the San Mateo City Council will consider the Hillsdale Terrace project, which seeks to transform a vacant gas station and the former Taxi’s Hamburgers site into a transit-oriented mixed-use condominium development.

See HOUSING, Page 22

Millennials are falling behind boomer parents

By Josh Boak and Carrie Antlfinger

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SOUTH MILWAUKEE, Wisconsin — Baby Boomers: your

millennial children are worse off than you. With a median household income of $40,581, millennials earn 20 percent less than boomers

See BEHIND, Page 18

than you. With a median household income of $40,581, millennials earn 20 percent less than boomers
than you. With a median household income of $40,581, millennials earn 20 percent less than boomers
than you. With a median household income of $40,581, millennials earn 20 percent less than boomers
than you. With a median household income of $40,581, millennials earn 20 percent less than boomers

2 Weekend Jan. 14-15, 2017

FOR THE RECORD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Thought for the Day

“If you want to inspire confidence, give plenty of statistics — it does not matter that they should be accurate, or even intelligible, so long as there is enough of them.”

— Lewis Carroll (Charles Lutwidge Dodgson),English author

This Day in History

1967 The ’60s “Summer of Love” unofficial- ly began with a “Human Be-In,” a gathering of tens of thousands of young people for a counterculture event at Golden Gate Park in San Francisco.

In 1784, the United States ratified the Treaty of Paris end- ing the Revolutionary War; Britain followed suit in April

1784.

In 1814 , the Treaty of Kiel ended hostilities between Denmark and Sweden, with Denmark agreeing to cede Norway to Sweden, something Norway refused to accept. In 1900 , Puccini’s opera “Tosca” had its world premiere in Rome. In 1927, the Paramount silent romantic comedy “It,” star- ring Clara Bow (who became known as “The ‘It’ Girl”), had its world premiere in Los Angeles. In 1943, President Franklin D. Roosevelt, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and French General Charles de Gaulle opened a wartime conference in Casablanca. In 1952 , NBC’s “Today” show premiered, with Dave Garroway as the host, or “communicator.” In 1954, Marilyn Monroe and Joe DiMaggio were married at San Francisco City Hall. (The marriage lasted about nine months.) In 1963, George C. Wallace was sworn in as governor of Alabama with the pledge, “Segregation forever!” — a view Wallace later repudiated. Sylvia Plath’s novel “The Bell Jar” was published in London under a pseudonym less than a month before Plath committed suicide. In 1969 , 27 people aboard the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise, off Hawaii, were killed when a rocket warhead exploded, setting off a fire and additional explosions.

Birthdays

setting off a fire and additional explosions. Birthdays Movie writer, director Steven Soderbergh is 54. Blues
setting off a fire and additional explosions. Birthdays Movie writer, director Steven Soderbergh is 54. Blues
setting off a fire and additional explosions. Birthdays Movie writer, director Steven Soderbergh is 54. Blues

Movie writer, director Steven Soderbergh is 54.

Blues singer Clarence Carter is 81. Singer Jack Jones is 79. Actress Faye Dunaway is 76. Actress HollandTaylor is 74. Actor Carl Weathers is 69. Singer-producer T-Bone Burnett is 69. Movie writer-director Lawrence Kasdan is 68. Pulitzer Prize-win- ning columnist Maureen Dowd is 65. Rock singer Geoff Tate (Queensryche) is 58. Actor Mark Addy is 53. Fox News Channel anchorman Shepard Smith is 53. Rapper Slick Rick is 52. Actor Dan Schneider is 51. Actress Emily Watson is 50. Actor-comedi- an Tom Rhodes is 50. Rock musician Zakk Wylde is 50. Rock singer-musician Dave Grohl (Foo Fighters) is 48. Actor Kevin Durandis 43. Actress Jordan Laddis 42. Actor WardHorton is 41. Retro-soul singer-songwriter Marc Broussard is 35. Rock singer-musician Caleb Followill (Kings of Leon) is 35.

Rapper-actor LL Cool J is 49.

Actor Jason Bateman is 48.

Rapper-actor LL Cool J is 49. Actor Jason Bateman is 48. REUTERS Huge waves crash on

REUTERS

Huge waves crash on the San Esteban de Pravia seafront in the northern Spanish region of Asturias, Spain.

seafront in the northern Spanish region of Asturias, Spain. T he first trademark was granted in

T he first trademark was granted in

the United States to Averill

Chemical Paint Company of New

York City in 1870. The trademark was for a new line of house paint. *** The name “Coca-Cola” was trade- marked in 1893. “Coke” became a reg- istered trademark in 1945. *** Coca-Cola was invented in Atlanta, Georgia, by a pharmacist named John S. Pemberton in 1886. The drink was first sold to the public at the soda foun- tain in Jacob’s Pharmacy in Atlanta. *** Coke outsells Pepsi almost every- where in the world. *** Advertising slogans for Pepsi have included “The Pepsi Generation” in the 1960s and “Buy Pepsi, Get Stuff” in the 1990s.

*** Do you know what year Michael Jackson’s hair caught fire while film- ing a Pepsi commercial? It was the same year that Apple Macintosh com-

puters went on the market and “Ghostbusters” premiered in movie theaters. See answer at end. *** In 1940, Pepsi had the first advertis- ing jingle that was broadcast national- ly. The jingle was “Nickel Nickel,” in reference to the price of the soda. The song became a hit record. *** More than 1.2 billion buffalo nickels were minted from 1913 to 1938. Buffalo nickels are 75 percent copper and 25 percent nickel. *** Buffalos have a life span of 30 years, on average. A mature buffalo stands 6 feet high. ***

William Frederick Cody (1846-1917) was a Civil War soldier and U.S. Army scout that fought Indians while set- tling America’s West. He was also a buffalo hunter who earned the nick- name Buffalo Bill at age 22. *** Buffalo Bill produced and starred in an elaborate Wild West show called “Buffalo Bill’s Wild West and Congress of Rough Riders of the World.” Among other excitement, the show featured an Indian attack on an old stagecoach and Annie Oakley demonstrating her marksmanship. *** Buffalo Bill held his Wild West show next to the grounds of the Chicago World’s Fair in 1893. The strategic location made the show well known around the country, as the World’s Fair was attended by 27 million people.

*** The World Columbian Exposition of 1893, also known as the Chicago World’s Fair, celebrated the 400th anniversary of Christopher Columbus’ discovery of America. *** The organizers of the World’s Fair wanted a structure that would be more impressive than the Eiffel Tower, which awed the world when it was con- structed for the International Exhibition of Paris of 1889. They found it. It was the world’s first Ferris wheel.

*** The original Ferris wheel had 36 cars that each carried 60 passengers. The huge Ferris wheel took 20 minutes to make one complete revolution. *** Paris’ Eiffel Tower was officially opened March 31, 1889. That was the day the flag at the top of the 984 foot tall tower was hoisted. *** The Eiffel Tower was the world’s tallest building until 1930, when New York’s 1250 foot tall Empire State Building was completed. ***

There are 6,500 windows in the Empire State Building. ***

Answer: The year was 1984.

Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in the weekend edition of the Daily Journal. Questions? Comments? Email knowitall(at)smdailyjournal.com or call 344- 5200 ext. 128.

knowitall(at)smdailyjournal.com or call 344- 5200 ext. 128. THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by David L. Hoyt and

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

VOSHE

letter to each square, to form four ordinary words. VOSHE ©2017 Tribune Content Agency, LLC All
letter to each square, to form four ordinary words. VOSHE ©2017 Tribune Content Agency, LLC All

©2017 Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved.

KUHNC

Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved. KUHNC LEYCER XNBIOG Check out the new, free JUST
Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved. KUHNC LEYCER XNBIOG Check out the new, free JUST

LEYCER

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XNBIOG

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Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved. KUHNC LEYCER XNBIOG Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE
Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved. KUHNC LEYCER XNBIOG Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE
Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE app
Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE app

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer “ ” here: Jumbles: Yesterday’s Answer: (Answers Monday) FOAMY INEPT BETTER ADJUST They were
Answer
“ ”
here:
Jumbles:
Yesterday’s
Answer:
(Answers Monday)
FOAMY INEPT BETTER ADJUST
They were able to set up at the campground
after paying an — “ADMIT-TENTS” FEE

Lotto

Jan. 11 Powerball 1 3 13 16 43 24 Powerball
Jan. 11 Powerball
1 3
13 16
43
24
Powerball
Jan. 13 Mega Millions 10 44 58 74 75 11 Mega number
Jan. 13 Mega Millions
10
44 58
74 75
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Mega number
Jan. 11 Super Lotto Plus 8 15 20 43 44 23 Mega number
Jan. 11 Super Lotto Plus
8
15 20
43
44 23
Mega number

Fantasy Five

7
7
13
13
15
15
19
19
33
33

Daily Four

 
 
4
4
1
1
3
3
2
2

Daily three midday

 
9
9
8
8
2
2

Daily three evening

 
6
6
3
3
6
6
2 Daily three evening   6 3 6 The Daily Derby race winners are Lucky Star,No.

The Daily Derby race winners are Lucky Star,No. 2, in first place; Hot Shot, No. 3, in second place; and Winning Spirit,No.9,in third place.The race time was clocked at 1:48.34.

Local Weather Forecast

Saturday : Partly cloudy. Highs in the mid 50s. Northwest winds 5 to 15 mph. Saturday ni g ht: Partly cloudy. A slight chance of rain after midnight. Lows in the mid 40s. Northwest winds 5 to 10 mph.

Chance of rain 20 percent. Sunday : Partly cloudy. A slight chance of rain in the morning. Highs in the mid 50s. North winds 5 to 15 mph. Chance of rain 20 percent. Sunday ni g ht: Partly cloudy. Lows in the mid 40s. Martin Luther King Jr. Day and Monday night: Partly

cloudy. Highs in the mid 50s. Lows in the mid 40s. Tues day and Tues day ni g ht: Mostly cloudy. A slight chance of rain. Highs in the upper 50s. Lows in the upper

40s.

Wednes day and Wednes day ni g ht: Breezy

in the upper 40s. Wednes day and Wednes day ni g ht : Breezy Rain. The

Rain.

The San Mateo Daily Journal

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Publisher: Jerry Lee

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Editor in Chief: Jon Mays jon@smdailyjournal.com

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THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL/STATE

Weekend Jan. 14-15, 2017

3

Man gets 80 years for murder

San Bruno man shot girlfriend in the back of the head in 2013

Police reports

Some drivers just need to wake up

An arrest was made after someone was found passed out at the wheel in a run- ning Mercedes on El Camino Real in South San Francisco before 10:34 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 5.

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO

Reckl es s dri v i ng . The driver of a silver Subaru was driving erratically and speeding near Westborough Boulevard and El Camino Real before 10:49 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 6. Fo und pro perty. A bag with miscella- neous items was found on Hermosa Lane before 5:07 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 6. Parki ng hazard. A blue truck was block- ing the crosswalk near Hillsdale Boulevard and Claremont Avenue before 10:55 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 6. Vandal i s m. Avehicle’s window was broken at Denny’s on Airport Boulevard before 10:27 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 5.

SAN MATEO

Acci dent. A driver collided with a tree and sustained injuries near Alameda de las Pulgas and Fernwood Street before 7:01 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 1. Di s turbance. A man was harassing people

near the ice rink on East Fifth Avenue before 2:41 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 1.

Sus pi ci o us

its contents were found on Vanessa Drive before 10:05 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 1. Di s turbance. Someone was pushed by an employee after entering the store before it was open at Home Depot on Chess Drive before 9:03 a.m. Sunday, Jan. 1.

ci rcums tances . A wallet and

By Anna Schuessler

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

A San Bruno man convicted of murdering his girlfriend in 2013 was sentenced to 80 years to life in prison Friday, according to the San Mateo County District Attorney’s Office. Albert Antonio Trejo, 53, who had two previous felony convictions, was convicted in June of 2015 of first-degree murder for shooting his then 36-year-old girlfriend Cecilia Zamora in the back of the head. Zamora’s body was found at a Pacifica apartment complex two months after her mother first reported her missing. Trejo, Zamora and several other people lived together in a San Bruno residence and the two were romantically involved. On Feb. 20, 2013, Zamora’s mother reported her missing to the police and a search was launched in both San Francisco and San Mateo counties because she was thought to possibly be at a cousin’s home in the city.

Residents last reported seeing Zamora the morn- ing of Feb. 13, 2013, in the home with Trejo. Another occupant report- ed that Trejo called him, possibly crying, and talking about his gun having gone off. When the other residents got

home, Trejo reportedly was doing laundry and told them Zamora left after the pair had an argument, according to the District Attorney’s Office. Victim impact statements describing how the loss of Zamora affected them were given by Zamora’s mother and her mother’s partner at Trejo’s sentencing, said District Attorney Steve Wagstaffe. Trejo’s defense attorney John Forsyth said he believes Trejo is innocent and his client experienced severe prejudice in the argu-

ments made against him by the prosecution. “We believe that the search of his cell-

the prosecution. “We believe that the search of his cell- Albert Trejo Cecilia Zamora phone without

Albert Trejo

“We believe that the search of his cell- Albert Trejo Cecilia Zamora phone without a warrant

Cecilia Zamora

phone without a warrant was illegal. The download of information from his cellphone without a war- rant was illegal,” he said. Forsyth said testimony of an expert witness pre- senting cellphone track- ing information would never pass scientific

muster, and that he plans to appeal the judge’s sentence. Wagstaffe said he was pleased with the judge’s sentence, adding he has been to prison twice. “The wheels of justice moved very slowly here. Eighty years to life made the wait worth it,” he said. “Society gives people chances. We’re a country of second chances. This defendant took the chances we gave him and tossed them in the gutter. It’s an important message to society at large on how we will respond to unjustified violence such as this.”

Sanders backers look to sway Democratic politics from inside

By Michael R. Blood

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOS ANGELES — Maybe Bernie Sanders can change politics from the inside. The Vermont senator’s loyalists helped engineer a show of political muscle in Democratic Party elections in California last week, months after Sanders promised that the populist political movement he inspired would endure beyond his failed 2016 presidential campaign. Nurses and other liberal activists, many faithful to Sanders, flooded local elections for over 1,100 party delegate slots as part of a national push to influence party lead- ership and advance his populist agenda in the era of Donald Trump. “There is an opportunity here, when a state reorganizes, to create change from the inside,” said Shannon Jackson, execu- tive director of Our Revolution, the Sanders-inspired group that said it sent out over 150,000 emails and texts urging party members to participate in the California contests. “We are going to continue to do this around the states,” Jackson said. National Nurses United, which endorsed Sanders in the 2016 campaign, and its affiliate, the California Nurses Association, said nurses and other liberal

activists claimed a majority of the slots up for grabs, though the tally had not been final- ized by party officials as of Friday. The California elec- tions took place as Democrats, still stunned by Hillary Clinton’s

defeat in November, look for a way forward after the Republican sweep of the White House and Congress. The independent Sanders, 75, has not ruled out another presidential run in 2020. Part of the struggle will play out in the fight for control of the Democratic National Committee. Meanwhile, Sanders’ influence is being witnessed in places like New Jersey, where Assemblyman John Wisniewski is run- ning a Sanders-inspired campaign for governor, and Iowa, where Our Revolution has endorsed Blair Lawton to lead the state Democratic Party. He’s also part of a broader Democratic effort to counter Republican efforts to scrap the national health care law, which includes rallies around the country just before Trump’s inauguration. Sanders, the former self-described socialist mayor of Burlington, Vermont,

self-described socialist mayor of Burlington, Vermont, Bernie Sanders has never been a seamless fit with the

Bernie Sanders

has never been a seamless fit with the party whose presidential nomination he sought last year. Positioned as an outsider, he spent months railing against Clinton’s ties to Wall Street and big banks and urged the party to embrace universal health care, free tuition at public universities and col- leges and stronger regulation on the finan- cial industry.

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4 Weekend Jan. 14-15, 2017

LOCAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Man gets three years for attacking pregnant girlfriend

A San Mateo man convicted in October of attacking his pregnant girlfriend after she threw his game console against a wall was sentenced Friday to three years in state prison, according to San Mateo County District Attorney Steve Wagstaffe. Charles Ambros Hightower III, 33, was arrested November 2015 after his landlord called police to report the sounds of a fight. He was convicted on one count of felony domestic violence and one count of felony assault for choking the woman, who was pregnant with his baby, throwing her to the ground and repeatedly kicking and punch- ing her. The woman was able to grab a large kitchen knife and stabbed Hightower twice, but she was unable to stop the attack, pros- ecutors said. She eventually escaped after he stopped hitting her, according to prosecutors. The prosecution had asked for five years in prison “in light of the violence and (Hightower’s) lack of remorse,” Wagstaffe said. He was given 200 days credit for time already served in jail.

Local briefs

Redwood City man struck, killed on 101

A pedestrian was fatally struck by a vehi- cle Friday evening in an apparent hit-and- run on southbound Highway 101 in San Carlos, according to the California Highway Patrol. The crash was initially reported just after 6:35 p.m. at southbound Highway 101 and Brittan Avenue. Officers said the 45-year-old Redwood City man walked into the No. 4 lane, and may have been under the influence of alco- hol. A Sig-alert was issued at 6:59 p.m., and the southbound off-ramps to Holly Street and Brittan Avenue are both closed. There was no estimate for when they will reopen. Officers are looking for a white Toyota with damage to the front end but are not yet certain what model Toyota was involved in the crash, which remains under investiga- tion.

Motorhome fire snarls 101

southbound

A

motorhome

fire

on

Highway 101 closed all lanes of traffic for two hours Friday afternoon while firefight- ers extinguished the blaze. The fire broke out about 2:45 p.m. and while the motorhome was on the right hand shoulder, two lanes were closed to allow fire crews to battle the blaze. It was extinguished by about 3:15 p.m. and the lanes were cleaned and reopened by 4:37 p.m., according to the California Highway Patrol.

Burglary suspect arrested after brief search

San Mateo County sheriff’s deputies on Wednesday arrested a man whom they sus-

pect of robbing a home in San Carlos. Deputies arrested 19- year-old Roger Pena of East Palo Alto after a neighbor reported seeing suspicious people run- ning from a home on the 900 block of Holly Street in San Carlos at

about 5:30 p.m., accord- ing to the Sheriff’s Office. The witness was able to provide suspect

Sheriff’s Office. The witness was able to provide suspect Roger Pena and vehicle descriptions and deputies

Roger Pena

and vehicle descriptions and deputies arrest- ed Pena in East Palo Alto a short time later. Two suspects are still being sought, sher- iff’s officials said. Anyone with information is asked to con- tact Detective Michael Arguel at (650) 363- 4192 or marguel@smcgov.org.

Man, 74, cited for punching woman in the face

A 74-year-old man police suspect of punching a woman in the face during a Daly City traffic dispute Monday has been cited on suspicion of misdemeanor assault, according to a police spokesman. The suspect, who was walking on the sidewalk of Mission Street near Price Street, allegedly punched the woman in the face through the open window of her car after he accused her of running into him, said Daly City police Sgt. Ron Harrison. The man, whose name was not released, left the scene but police were able to identi- fy and track him down Wednesday with the help of a tipster, Harrison said. He was cited and released and the case has been sent to the San Mateo District Attorney’s Office, which will decide whether to pursue the charge.

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THE DAILY JOURNAL

STATE

Weekend Jan. 14-15, 2017

5

THE DAILY JOURNAL STATE Weekend • Jan. 14-15, 2017 5 REUTERS Cesar Belvasco walks through a

REUTERS

Cesar Belvasco walks through a flooded road after his home was flooded by the overflowing Petaluma River.

Northern California officials assess heavy storm damage

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN FRANCISCO — It’s too soon to peg a damage estimate from days of rainy weather that turned streets into rivers and living rooms into swim- ming pools throughout Northern California, state and county officials said Friday. In San Benito County south of San Francisco, where dozens of people were rescued from flooding homes in a dramatic early morning operation this week, workers spent a dry day check- ing on damage including two streets and possibly a county bridge, said Kevin O’Neill, the county’s emer- gency services manager. About 50 houses along Lovers Lane in the small rural town of Hollister suf-

fered high water damage after a nearby creek overflowed but no estimate had been calculated on the cost of the dam- age. “No homes are in water anymore. There is still standing water in fields and stuff, and maybe some outbuild- ings are affected,” he said. “The sun’s out today, so that’s good.” The massive rain and snowfall that prompted a rare blizzard warning in parts of the Sierra Nevada was helping much of Northern California recover from a six-year drought. The series of storms has also added 39 billion gallons of water to Lake Tahoe since Jan. 1. Mountains near Big Sur in Monterey County registered more than 34 inches — nearly 3 feet — of rain since Jan. 2, according to the

National Weather Service. The rain toppled or damaged about 370 trees in San Francisco alone. A woman was killed by a falling tree while walking across a golf course in San Ramon, about 35 miles east of San Francisco. In Sonoma County, crews surveyed damage after the Russian River receded from its highest level in a decade. The water spilled into streets and into homes, forcing residents to travel by boat. Kelly Huston, a deputy director with the Governor’s Office of Emergency Services, said Friday that counties were just starting the process of tabu- lating costs. “It’s likely to take us a little while,” he said in an email.

likely to take us a little while,” he said in an email. Around the state California
likely to take us a little while,” he said in an email. Around the state California

Around the state

California attorney general nominee clears state Assembly

SACRAMENTO — The first chamber of the California

Legislature has confirmed U.S. Rep. Xavier Becerra to be the state’s next attorney general. Democrats in the California Assembly voted Friday to support the Los Angeles- area Democrat as the state’s top law enforcement official. Becerra has vowed to defend California’s immigration and climate change policies against the incoming Trump administration. He would be

California’s first Latino attorney gener-

al. Only one Republican, Assemblyman Rocky Chavez of Oceanside, voted to support Becerra. Others said they were not persuaded Becerra would uphold federal law and the Constitution. Gov. Jerry Brown nominated Becerra to replace Kamala Harris earlier this month after she was elected to the U.S. Senate. Both houses of the Legislature must approve Becerra. He faces hearings in the California Senate next week.

Legislature’s budget expert questions Brown deficit forecast

SACRAMENTO — The California Legislature’s nonparti- san budget expert says Gov. Jerry Brown’s state revenue projection is probably overly conserva- tive. Legislative Analyst Mac Taylor released his initial analysis of the gover- nor’s budget Friday. The Democratic governor has forecast a $1.6 billion deficit next year because of higher costs and a sharp drop in income tax revenue. Brown projected income tax revenue would grow by 3.3 percent. Taylor says

that contradicts history and is counter to the administration’s own economic out- look. He says revenue growth would typically ex ceed 5 per- cent without a recession or major policy change. He says he doesn’t understand Brown’s projection of rising stock

prices but slowing capital gains revenue. Taylor says California could have “considerably more revenue” next year than the governor forecasts. He previ- ously forecast a $2.8 billion surplus.

next year than the governor for ecasts. He previ- ously forecast a $2.8 billion surplus. Xavier

Xavier Becerra

next year than the governor for ecasts. He previ- ously forecast a $2.8 billion surplus. Xavier

Jerry Brown

next year than the governor for ecasts. He previ- ously forecast a $2.8 billion surplus. Xavier
next year than the governor for ecasts. He previ- ously forecast a $2.8 billion surplus. Xavier

6 Weekend Jan. 14-15, 2017

LOCAL/NATION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

S oobin Baik and Ki ana Lee , of Foster City, Sarah Chu, of Redwood City, Lauren

Daco rro and Juan De Al ba, of San Mateo, Ang el i na Lee and Ang el ene Wo ng , of Millbrae, Peter Ri chards o n, of Half Moon Bay and Rachael Wo ng , of South San Francisco, were named to the dean’s list for the fall semester at Bi o l a Uni v ers i ty. *** Li Li , of San Burno, graduated from Brenau Uni v ers i ty with a degree in occupational therapy. *** Tho mas So rtwel l , of San Mateo, graduated from the Uni v ers i ty o f Alabama.

*** Madi s o n Bo ri s o n , of San Mateo, was named to the honor roll at Gracel and Uni v ers i ty. *** Kel s ey Al l en, of Daly City, gradu- ated from Bo b Jo nes Uni v ers i ty . *** Stephanie Clements , of San Carlos, was named to the dean’s list at So uth Dako ta State Uni v ers i ty . *** Ethan Co hen, Meg an Ras h and Teg an Stanbach, of Menlo Park, Dani el l a Ko to wi tz , of San Mateo, Madel i ne Mi l l i g an, Emi l y Sprag ue and Cl ai re Wi l l i g , of Burlingame, were named to the dean’s list at Bucknel l Uni v ers i ty . *** Hanna Hag l er and El i zabeth Hurl ey , of Belmont, Camro n Ghari b, of Burlingame, Ry an O’Do nnel l , of Foster City, Alan Li , of Redwood City, Celeste Wo ng , of San Carlos, and Ethan Do no g hue, of San Mateo were named to the honor roll at Oreg o n State Uni v ers i ty. *** Tho mas Lunday , of San Mateo,

State Uni v ers i ty. *** Tho mas Lunday , of San Mateo, was named

was named to the dean’s list at Champlain College. *** A free heart screening for students is

slated to be held Saturday, Jan. 29, at

Menl o -Atherto n Hi g h

The event sponsored by the Sequo i a Uni o n Hi g h Scho o l

Di s tri ct and the Via Heart Project will take place from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. at the high school campus, 555 Middlefield Road, Atherton. ***

Vi l l ami Fuko fuka, of Redwood

City, graduated from Eas ter New

Mex i co Uni v ers i ty with a degree in criminal justice. *** Gabri el Co hen and Brandan Spillane, of Menlo Park, David

Scanlan and Sara Schi nas i , of

Hillsborough, were named to the

dean’s list at Lehi g h Uni v ers i ty . ***

Xi ao ke Huang , of Foster City,

Scho o l .

graduated from Kent State Uni v ers i ty with a doctorate of phi- losophy from the college of arts and sciences.

*** Mo rg an Taradas h , of San Carlos, was selected to become a member of the Nati o nal So ci ety o f Hi g h Scho o l Scho l ars . The organization recognizes those who demonstrate

outstanding leadership, scholarship and community commitment. ***

Arag o n, Hi l l s dal e,

high schools ranked among the 72 best public high schools in California, according to website Niche. com. The five San Mateo Uni o n Hi g h Scho o l Di s tri ct schools were also among the 28 best in the Bay Area, in the annual rankings determining qual- ity according to academic rigor, test scores, facilities, sports and other factors.

*** Ashley and Ty l er Utz , of Half Moon Bay as well as Fiona Benjamin, of Pacifica, won a $1,500 scholarship from the San Mateo Co unty Farm Bureau to pursue a degree in an agricultural field. *** Caro l Hernandez, of Sequo i a Hi g h Scho o l , won the Dream Act scholarship offered by the Uni v ers i ty o f Cal i fo rni a at

Merced.

Burl i ng ame, Mi l l s and San Mateo

***

The San Bruno Chamber o f Co mmerce hosted a reception hon- oring San Bruno Park El ementary Scho o l Di s tri ct teachers by offer- ing financial support to be used for classroom supplies. Nearly 80 teach- ers split more than $6,000 in cash donations from local merchants, along with $3,000 in additional sup-

plies provided by companies such as

Wal mart, CVS, Mo l l i e Sto ne’s ,

Lunardi ’s , Co s ta’s Jus t Thi ng s and Reco l o g y. Go o g l e sponsored the food served at Nuev e restaurant.

Class notes is a column dedicated to school news. It is compiled by education reporter Austin Walsh. You can contact him at (650) 344-5200, ext. 105 or at austin@smdai- lyjournal.com.

Around the nation

Top Trump aide in frequent contact with Russia’s ambassador

WASHINGTON — President-elect Donald Trump’s nation-

al security adviser and Russia’s ambassador to the U.S. have been in frequent contact in recent weeks, including on the day the Obama adminis- tration hit Moscow with sanctions in retaliation for election-related hacking, a senior U.S. official said Friday. After initially denying that Michael Flynn and Ambassador Sergey Kislyak spoke Dec. 29, a Trump official said late Friday that the transition team was aware

of one call on the day President Barack

Obama imposed sanctions. It’s not unusual for incoming administrations to have dis- cussions with foreign governments before taking office. But repeated contacts just as Obama imposed sanctions

would raise questions about whether Trump’s team discussed — or even helped shape — Russia’s response. Russian President Vladimir Putin unexpectedly did not retaliate against the U.S. for the move, a decision Trump quickly praised.

Immigrant groups to rally against Trump’s planned crackdown

WASHINGTON — Immigrant rights advocates are plan- ning demonstrations at dozens of rallies across the country this weekend in what they are calling a “first salvo” against President-elect Donald Trump’s pledged hard line on immi- gration. Union leaders and young immigrants are organizing more than 50 protests and cultural events from Philadelphia to Phoenix on Saturday with an aim toward highlighting the power of the immigrant rights movement. Immigrants liv- ing in the country illegally also hope the events will make it clear to the incoming administration that they don’t plan to leave the country despite Trump’s calls for a border wall, tougher immigration enforcement and mass deportations. “This is our first salvo to what may be a long, drawn out campaign,” said Jorge-Mario Cabrera, spokesman for the Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles. The protests mark the latest chapter in a movement that has evolved considerably since 2006, when more than a million people took to the streets to protest a Republican- backed immigration bill that would have made it a crime to be in the country illegally.

would have made it a crime to be in the country illegally. Michael Flynn Back or

Michael Flynn

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THE DAILY JOURNAL

NATION

Weekend Jan. 14-15, 2017

7

THE DAILY JOURNAL NATION Weekend • Jan. 14-15, 2017 7 REUTERS House Speaker Paul Ryan,center,walks to

REUTERS

House Speaker Paul Ryan,center,walks to the House Chamber to vote on Obamacare repeal, on Capitol Hill.

Early GOP win on health care repeal, Congress OKs budget

By Alan Fram and Andrew Taylor

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Ascendant Republicans drove a budget through Congress on Friday that gives them an early but critical victory in their crusade to scrap President Barack Obama’s health care overhaul. The vote trains the spotlight on whether they and Donald Trump can deliver on repeat- ed pledges to not just erase that statute but replace it. Demonstrating the GOP’s willingness to plunge into a defining but risky battle, the House used a near party-line 227-198 roll call to approve a measure that prevents Senate Democrats from derailing a future bill, thus far unwritten, annulling and reshaping Obama’s landmark 2010 law. The budget, which won Senate approval early Thursday, does not need the president’s signature. “The ‘Unaffordable’ Care Act will soon be history!” Trump tweeted Friday in a dig at the statute’s name, the Affordable Care Act. Trump takes the presidential oath next Friday. The real work looms in coming months as the new administration and congressional Republicans write legislation to erase much of the health care law and replace it with a GOP version. Republicans have internal divisions over what that would look like, though past GOP proposals have cut much of the existing law’s federal spending and eased coverage requirements while relying more on tax benefits and letting states make deci- sions.

Friday’s vote was preceded by debate that saw hyperbole on both sides and underscored how the two parties have alternate-universe views of Obama’s overhaul. Democrats praised it for extending coverage to tens of millions of Americans, helping families afford policies and seniors buy prescrip- tions, while Republicans focused on the ris- ing premiums and deductibles and limited access to doctors and insurers that have plagued many. House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., said the health care law was “so arrogant and so con- trary to our founding principles” and had not delivered on Obama’s promises to lower costs and provide more choice. “We have to step in before things get worse. This is nothing short of a rescue mis- sion,” Ryan said. “Our experimentation in Soviet-style cen- tral planning of our health care system has been an abject failure,” said freshman Rep. Jodey Arrington, R-Texas. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D- Calif., said Ryan was peddling “mythology” and said the GOP was moving toward worsen- ing health care for consumers. “They want to cut benefits and run. They

want to

cut access and run,” she said of

Republicans. “This is a sad day in the history of this country as Republicans begin the process of destroying health care in America,” said Rep. Hakeem Jeffries, D-N.Y., arguing that the GOP has no replacement in hand. “All you have is smoke and mirrors, and the American people are getting ready to get screwed.”

Obituary

Obituary James Edward Higgins August 29, 1935 – January 6, 2017 James Higgins passed away peacefully

James Edward Higgins

August 29, 1935 – January 6, 2017

James Higgins passed away peacefully at home on January 6, 2017. Dearly beloved husband to the late Cheryl Higgins for almost 50 years. Devoted father of Jeffrey Higgins and the late Chris Higgins. Cherished Grandfather of Brodie Higgins. Loving son to the late Mike and Kelma Higgins. Loving brother to Dennis, Karen, Barbara and Mary Katherine Higgins. A resident of San Mateo, James moved here in the early 60’s with his wife Cheryl. He served in the Navy Submarines during the Korean War. Then later, his true passion came to life flying for the Navy while serving in Vietnam. In 1965, Jim started his career as a pilot for TWA. His passion for traveling the world with his family was a big highlight for all of us. James later made it to the Rank of Captain and continued to fly globally for 30 wonderful years where he made life-long friends all over the world. James was very loved and connected throughout the Eichler Highlands community who have always been there for him and his family. You will be truly missed and always loved Captain James Higgins. Funeral Service will be held at 11am on Tuesday, January 17, 2017 at Sneider & Sullivan & O’Connell’s Funeral Home, 977 S. El Camino Real, San Mateo, CA. Interment at St. John Cemetery, San Mateo, CA. Reception to follow.

Personal IRS letters nudge uninsured to get coverage

By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — If you haven’t signed up for health insurance, you may soon be get- ting a not-too-subtle nudge from the taxman. The IRS is sending personalized letters to millions of taxpayers who might be unin- sured, reminding them that they could be on the hook for hundreds of dollars in fines under the federal health care law if they don’t sign up soon through HealthCare.gov. It’s an unusual role for a revenue-collection agency. Fines are one of the most unpopular parts of the 2010 health overhaul, and there’s a high likelihood they’ll get repealed by Republicans, even if other parts of “Obamacare” survive. The administration is counting on IRS reminders to help sign up as many people as possible before open enroll- ment ends Jan. 31. That’s soon after officials hand off President Barack Obama’s signature program to a Trump administration commit- ted to “repeal and replace.” Letters bearing the IRS logo will be sent to an estimated 7.5 million people who either claimed an exemption from the law’s require- ment that most Americans carry health insur- ance, or who paid a penalty for being unin- sured during the 2015 tax year. The coverage requirement was included in the law as a way to get healthy people into the insurance pool, helping to keep premiums in check. The penalty for this year could be $2,085 or more, depending on family size and income, says one draft version of the IRS let- ter. Another draft takes a somewhat different approach, leaving a blank space for the IRS to provide an individualized estimate of what the particular uninsured taxpayer might owe. The drafts were obtained by the Associated Press. Although the administration has made no secret of the IRS role in open enrollment this year, officials have not responded to

“People receiving these letters have already made up their minds about

Obamacare when they applied for an exemption or paid a

penalty

They

don’t want stock

letters.They want better health care choices and lower costs.”

— House Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady,R-Texas

requests for copies of the actual letters. Republicans say the whole thing is a waste of money. The campaign will cost about $4 million, say congressional aides. “People receiving these letters have already made up their minds about Obamacare when they applied for an exemption or paid a penalty,” said House Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady, R-Texas. “They don’t want stock letters. They want better health care choices and lower costs.” Supporters of the health care law say research has shown that many people who remain uninsured are still unaware that they can go to HealthCare.gov and qualify for government subsidies to help pay their pre- miums. Those subsidies were designed as tax credits, bringing the IRS into the picture. The IRS letters make the pitch:

“Most people who enroll in a plan through HealthCare.gov can find plans for $75 a month or less after financial help,” the let- ters say. “At HealthCare.gov, you can com- pare plans to find one that meets your needs and budget.” While such low-cost plans are available, many people actually pay more, and the $75 figure doesn’t take into account deductibles and copayments.

Obituary

Paul J Garcia

Obituary Paul J Garcia Passed away at the young age of 57, in Burlingame CA early

Passed away at the young age of 57, in Burlingame CA early New Year’s morning, 2017, after a long battle with diabetes and other medical complications.

Son of Roy & Elmira Garcia (deceased), brother to Paula Heckman and Charles Garcia (also deceased), and survived by his brothers Roy and Art Garcia, along with 1 aunt, many cousins, nephews, nieces, as well as great and great- great nephews and nieces.

Paul loved, and was loved by, all his family; he will be missed by everyone.

Paul was a bay area native, born in San Francisco, raised in Daly City, and lived most of his adult life in Burlingame. He was a truck driver by trade, but his passion was always music. He played guitar in a band with his friends in many local venues, and would sing any chance he got.

Family and friends are invited to attend his Celebration of Life beginning at 9:00 AM on Saturday January 21, 2017 at Duggan’s Serra Mortuary 500 Westlake Avenue Daly City, followed by Prayer Services at 10:00 AM, and burial in Olivet Memorial Park.

Serra Mortuary 500 Westlake Avenue Daly City, followed by Prayer Services at 10:00 AM, and burial

8 Weekend Jan. 14-15, 2017

NATION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Around the nation

Surge in traffic deaths outpaces increase in travel

WASHINGTON — Traffic deaths surged about 8 percent in the first nine months of last year, continuing an alarm- ing upward spiral that may be partially explained by more Americans on the roads due to the economic recovery, according to National Highway Traffic Safety Administration estimates released Friday. The sharp increase comes as drivers are putting more

miles on the road than ever, the government said. But the rise in deaths is outpacing the increase in travel. Vehicle miles traveled in the first nine months of 2016 rose about 3 percent. There were 27,875 deaths in the first three quarters of last year, compared to 25,808 deaths in the same period in

2015.

Experts believe the increased travel is mostly a result of an improved economy and low gas prices. But NHTSA’s data experts said increased travel and a better economy

alone can’t explain the rise in deaths. “We still have to figure out what is underlying those lives lost,” NHTSAAdministrator Mark Rosekind said. “If it was simple, we would already know that.”

Feds: Excessive force a big problem for Chicago police

CHICAGO — The Justice Department released the find- ings of its yearlong investigation into civil rights abuses by the Chicago Police Department going back years. The report found that the department has been violating people’s constitutional rights for years, emphasizing the use of excessive force and the killing of people who didn’t pose a threat. The federal agency and city officials will start negotia- tions on reforms to the Police Department. The talks will happen after President-elect Donald Trump has taken office, and his attorney general nominee, Sen. Jeff Sessions, has expressed concerns about the handling of such cases by the Justice Department under President Barack Obama’s administration.

Department under President Barack Obama’s administration. Friday’s action means the fleet of new cars will have

Friday’s action means the fleet of new cars will have to average 51.4 miles per gallon by 2025, up more than 18 mpg from the 33.2 mpg requirement in 2015, the most recent year available.

Obama’s Environmental Protection Agency moves to preserve gas mileage requirements

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — The Environmental Protection Agency moved Friday to cement strict fuel economy require- ments that force the auto industry to make new cars and trucks significantly more efficient, a decision that will be difficult for the incoming Trump admin- istration to undo. The EPA said in late November that it had completed a required midterm review of Corporate Average Fuel Economy standards put in place in 2012 and decided they should not be relaxed as requested by the auto industry. The

move in the waning days of the Obama administration brought protests from congressional Republicans and automakers, which accused the agency of playing politics with a rushed deter- mination. Friday’s action keeps in place pollu- tion reduction targets for the years 2022-2025. That means the fleet of new cars will have to average 51.4 miles per gallon by 2025, up more than 18 mpg from the 33.2 mpg requirement in 2015, the most recent year available. Acting EPA Assistant Administrator Janet McCabe said the agency deter- mined the technology is available to

meet the standards. The requirements are flexible and will automatically be reduced if consumers keep buying trucks and SUVs, she said. For example, when the standards were conceived in 2012, the fleetwide mileage target for 2025 was 54.5 mpg. But because more trucks and SUVs are now being sold, that num- ber was reduced to 51.4, the EPA said. In 2012, gasoline was $3.60 per gal- lon, compared with around $2.35 cur- rently. During several months last year, the SUVs and trucks captured a record share of the market. At year’s end near- ly six of every 10 new vehicles sold were trucks or SUVs.

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THE DAILY JOURNAL

NATION/WORLD

Weekend Jan. 14-15, 2017

9

Ordinary Cubans worry about end to U.S. immigration policy

By Andrea Rodriguez, Alicia A. Caldwell and Julie Pace

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

HAVANA — Ordinary Cubans worried Friday about the economic problems that could be caused for some people by the sud- den end to a once-easy pathway to life in the United States, saying many people who already left the island to take advantage of the earlier American immigration policy could wind up back home with nothing. President Barack Obama on Thursday ended the possibility of automatic legal res- idency for any Cuban who touches U.S. soil. Those people who were in the middle of trips to get to the United States could be the biggest losers, some Cubans said. “There are people who have sold houses, renounced everything, and today they are in limbo,” said Leonardo Serrano, a 47-year- old who works for a firm that operates with private and government investment. “They won’t be able to get there, and when they return they won’t have anything.” Average Cubans and opponents of the island’s communist leaders said they expect- ed pressure for reform on the island to increase with the elimination of a mecha- nism that siphoned off the island’s most dis- satisfied citizens and turned them into sources of remittances supporting relatives who remained on the island. The repeal of the “wet foot, dry foot” pol- icy went into effect immediately after a Thursday afternoon announcement. It fol- lowed months of negotiations focused in part on getting Cuba to agree to take back people who had arrived in the U.S. Cubans fearful of an imminent end to a special immigration status bestowed during the Cold War had been flocking to the United States since the Dec. 17, 2014 announce- ment that the U.S. and Cuba would re-estab- lish diplomatic relations and move toward normalization. About 100,000 left for the United States after the declaration of detente, many flooding overland through South and Central America and Mexico in an exodus that irritated U.S. allies and other immigrant groups and spawned bitter complaints from

other immigrant groups and spawned bitter complaints from A boy wears the U.S. colors in Havana,

A boy wears the U.S. colors in Havana, Cuba.

the Cuban government. “It was creating serious problems for the security of Cuba, for the security of the United States and for the security of our citi- zens left vulnerable to human trafficking, migratory fraud and violence as a result of the incentives created by these preferential policies,” said Josefina Vidal, Cuba’s top diplomat for U.S. affairs. Obama is using an administrative rule change to end the policy. Donald Trump could undo that rule after becoming president next week. He has criticized Obama’s moves to improve relations with Cuba. But ending a policy that has allowed hundreds of thou- sands of people to come to the United States without a visa also aligns with Trump’s com- mitment to tough immigration policies. “This was bound to happen at some point,” said Havana taxi driver Guillermo Britos, 35. “It could impose a more normal dynamic on emigration, so that not so many people die at sea, but it could also take an escape valve away from the government,

REUTERS

which was getting hard currency from the emigrants.” President Bill Clinton created the “wet foot, dry foot” policy in 1995 as a revision of a more liberal immigration policy that allowed Cubans caught at sea to come to the United States become legal residents in a year. The two governments have been negotiat- ing an end to “wet foot, dry foot” for months and finalized an agreement Thursday. “Effective immediately, Cuban nationals who attempt to enter the United States ille- gally and do not qualify for humanitarian relief will be subject to removal, consistent with U.S. law and enforcement priorities,” Obama said in a statement. “By taking this step, we are treating Cuban migrants the same way we treat migrants from other coun- tries. The Cuban government has agreed to accept the return of Cuban nationals who have been ordered removed, just as it has been accepting the return of migrants inter- dicted at sea.”

Around the world

Syria says Israeli missiles struck near military airport

BEIRUT — Syria accused Israel of firing missiles early Friday that landed near a major military base west of Damascus, in the third such reported attack in nearly six weeks to hit near the capital. The Syrian government was quick to respond, warning Israel of the repercus- sions of such attacks. But it refrained from saying whether it would retaliate. Damascus, preoccupied with the coun- try’s civil war for six years now, is unlike- ly to open a new front with Israel. Meanwhile, Israel has delivered the occa- sional message to Damascus by targeting shipments of weapons headed to the Lebanese Hezbollah group. The group is a main supporter of Syria’s President Bashar Assad in the civil war, and has sent thou- sands of fighters to fight alongside his army. There was no immediate comment from Israel on Friday to the Syrian claims of a strike. Israel is widely believed to have car- ried out a number of airstrikes on advanced weapons systems in Syria — including Russian-made anti-aircraft missiles and Iranian-made missiles, as well as Hezbollah positions — but it rarely confirms them.

Iraqi forces enter Mosul University in battling IS for city

MOSUL, Iraq — Iraqi special forces entered Mosul University on Friday in their latest advance along the eastern front as they battle Islamic State militants for con- trol of the city, according to senior Iraqi officers. The troops entered the university grounds in the morning hours and by afternoon, they had taken control of a neighborhood on the northeastern edge of the university compound and the technical institute with- in the campus, according to special forces Brig. Gen. Haider Fadhil and Maj. Gen. Sami al-Aridi. “We broke through the terrorists’ defens- es and we destroyed their lines and their units and their bases,” said al-Aridi, who was overseeing the assault Friday. The university is located in the eastern section of Mosul, Iraq’s second-largest city which is divided by the Tigris River into roughly an eastern and a western half.

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10 Weekend Jan. 14-15, 2017

BUSINESS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Stock indexes end mostly higher

By Alex Veiga

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Banks led U.S. stock indexes mostly higher Friday, propelling the Nasdaq composite index to its fourth record high this week. Investors welcomed quarterly earnings from JPMorgan Chase, Bank of America and Wells Fargo, all of which reported results that exceeded Wall Street’s expecta- tions. Financial stocks also bene- fited from an upward move in bond yields, which drives higher inter- est rates on loans. Real estate stocks were the biggest laggard. Shares in energy companies also closed lower as crude oil prices declined. Mixed data on U.S. retail sales weighed on department store stocks. Friday’s crop of company earn- ings kicks off several weeks of corporate earnings reports, giv- ing investors new insight into the health of Corporate America and the economy. “We all thought financials would do well,” said J.J. Kinahan, TD Ameritrade’s chief strategist. “Now how about the other areas of the economy?” The Dow Jones industrial aver-

DOW JONES INDUSTRIALS High : 19,952.03 Low : 19,849.38 Close : 19,885.73 Change : -5.27

DOW JONES INDUSTRIALS

High:

19,952.03

Low:

19,849.38

Close:

19,885.73

Change:

-5.27

OTHER INDEXES

S&P 500:

2274.64

+4.20

NYSE Index:

11,227.17

+23.02

Nasdaq:

5574.12

+26.63

NYSE MKT:

2352.69

+8.30

Russell 2000:

1372.05

+10.98

Wilshire 5000:

23,807.98

+69.10

10-Yr Bond:

2.38

+0.02

Oil (per barrel):

53.31

-0.53

Gold :

1,200.70

-2.20

age slipped 5.27 points, or 0.03 percent, to 19,885.73. The aver- age had been up by 61 points ear- lier in the day. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index gained 4.20 points, or 0.2 percent, to 2,274.64. The Nasdaq added 26.63 points, or 0.5 percent, to 5,574.12. The index has set a record-high close six times this year. Small-company stocks rose more than the rest of the mar- ket. The Russell 2000 index jumped 10. 98 points, or 0. 8

percent, to 1,372.05. The major stock indexes headed higher early on in the day, as investors reacted to earnings reports from JPMorgan Chase, Bank of America and Wells Fargo. The three banking giants deliv- ered quarterly results that exceeded Wall Street’s expectations, push- ing their shares higher. JPMorgan added 46 cents, or 0.5 percent, to $86.70. Bank of America rose 9 cents, or 0. 4 p ercen t , t o $ 2 3 . 0 1 . Wel l s Fargo gained 81 cents, or 1. 5

percent, to $55.31. Traders also reviewed the latest monthly snapshot of U.S. retail sales, which showed that sales rose 0.6 percent overall in December, mainly due to a pickup in online shopping and sales of autos and gasoline. “If you back out gasoline increasing and auto sales increas- ing, it’s not an impressive num- ber,” Kinahan said. The retail sales report weighed down shares of several department store chains and clothing brands.

By early afternoon, the market had begun to give up some of its gains. PVH Corp., home to Calvin Klein, Tommy Hilfiger and other clothing brands, slid $3.82, or 4.1 percent, to $89.31. Nordstrom fell 83 cents, or 1.8 percent, to $44.20. Gap shed 34 cents, or 1.4 percent, to $23.66. Traders also had their eye on companies that issued outlooks for their upcoming earnings reports. Pandora Media climbed 6.3 per- cent after the streaming music company issued a strong revenue forecast. The company also said it will cut about 7 percent of its jobs to reduce costs. The stock added 76 cents to $12.765. HomeStreet fell 6 percent after the real estate lender forecast dis- appointing fourth-quarter results. It took in fewer mortgage applica- tions as interest rates began ris- ing. The stock slid $1.85 to

$29.10.

GameStop tumbled 8.1 percent after the video game retailer said holiday revenue dropped because of discounts and weak sales of new “Call of Duty” and “Titanfall” games.

Wells Fargo profit falls after sales practice scandal

By Ken Sweet and Joseph Pisani

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Wells Fargo said Friday its profit fell 5 percent in the first full quarter after regulators said that bank employees opened millions of customer accounts fraudulently to meet sales goals. The scandal has kept new cus- tomers away, with the bank report- ing that new account openings plummeted last month. In September, regulators fined the San Francisco-based bank $185 million for opening more than two million unauthorized accounts. The scandal brought nationwide attention to the bank, leading to the resignation of the bank’s CEO John Stumpf in October. Earlier this week, the company announced a new pay plan for bank

branch employees that would eliminate incentives for opening accounts or meeting sales goals. “While we have more work to do, I am proud of the effort of our entire team to make things right for our customers and team mem- bers and to continue building a better Wells Fargo for the future,” CEO Tim Sloan said in a state- ment. New checking account openings fell 40 percent in December com- pared with the same month the year before. New credit card appli- cations fell 43 percent during the same period. In-house customer loyalty scores also fell. Notably, Wells Fargo dropped its so-called “cross-sale ratio,” which was a metric Wells used to calculate on average how many products a customer’s household had with the bank. The cross-sale

ratio became a toxic metric for the bank after the sales practices scan- dal. Overall, Wells Fargo reported net income of $5.27 billion, or 96 cents per share, in the three months ending Dec. 31, compared with $5.58 billion, or $1 per share, in the same quarter the year before. Wells Fargo said its earn- ings were lowered by 7 cents per share because of an accounting adjustment related to hedging long-term debt. Adjusted earnings came to $1.03 per share, beating the $1 per share analysts expected, according to Zacks Investment Research. Wells Fargo reported revenue of $23.24 billion in the period. Its adjusted revenue was $21.58 bil- lion, which fell short of the $22.42 billion that analysts expected.

Pandora shares up on strong 4Q outlook, job cut plans

NEW YORK — Pandora’s stock is climbing Friday after the online radio company provided a stronger fourth-quarter revenue outlook and announced plans to cut approxi- mately 7 percent of its workforce. Pandora said late Thursday that the job cuts, which would exclude Ticketfly, are being done to help trim overall operating costs. The Oakland-based company has been facing increasing competition from Spotify and Apple Inc.’s music service. Pandora anticipates beating its previously announced forecast for fourth-quarter revenue in a range of $362 million to $374 million, citing its strong advertis- ing performance. Its stock climbed 80 cents, or 6.7 percent, to $12.80 in morning trading Friday. Its shares are up 27 percent over the past year.

Business briefs

Oil pipeline safety rule scaled back after cost objections

BILLINGS, Mont. — President Barack Obama’s administration scaled back new safety measures for the sprawling network of fuel pipelines that crisscross the United States on Friday, following oil industry complaints that pro- posed changes would cost compa- nies billions of dollars. The long-delayed regulations cover almost 200,000 miles of pipelines that transport oil, gaso- line and other hazardous liquids. They will be subject to review by Congress and the incoming administration of President-elect Donald Trump, who was highly critical on the campaign trail of regulations that hinder energy development.

President-elect Donald Trump, who was highly critical on the campaign trail of regulations that hinder energy
President-elect Donald Trump, who was highly critical on the campaign trail of regulations that hinder energy
LOCAL ROUNDUP: SOUTH CITY GIRLS’ BASKETBALL USES 16-0 FOURTH-QUARTER RUN TO BEAT OCEANA 56-51 >>
LOCAL ROUNDUP: SOUTH CITY GIRLS’ BASKETBALL USES 16-0 FOURTH-QUARTER RUN TO BEAT OCEANA 56-51 >> PAGE 12
<<< Page 12, Giants re-sign
three to avoid arbitration
Weekend • Jan. 14-15, 2017

Mateo edges Aragon

By Nathan Mollat

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

First Friday-night quad of the season. Two rivals —Aragon and San Mateo — hooking up for the first time this year. It couldn’t possibly get any better than that, right? Well, when you factor in the way the game ended, no, it could not get any better. Down three with 12 seconds to play, Aragon got a couple looks from behind the 3-point arc, but the Dons couldn’t convert, allowing San Mateo to escape with a 46-43 victory. But that tells only tiny bit of the story. San Mateo (1-1 PAL South, 10-4 overall) rallied from a nine-point, early fourth-quar- ter deficit to stun Aragon (0-2, 6-8) down the stretch. The Bearcats finished the game on a 8-0 run, with Viraj Chandha draining a 3-point- er to give San Mateo a 45-43 lead with 2:07 to play. Jake Jeffries then hit one of two free throws to put San Mateo up 46-43 with under a minute to play to set up the game final frantic seconds. Chandha’s 3 capped a wild sequence. First, it was Da’Hareeha Allen making an acrobat- ic, blind, backward layup as he was fouled to cut the Aragon lead to 43-42 with 2:15 to play. He missed the ensuing free throw, but the Bearcats corralled the rebound and kicked it out to Chandha, whose trey nearly brought down the filled-to-capacity gym at San Mateo. “We didn’t want to settle for the 3,” said San Mateo coach Marvin Lui. “That was one of those shots where you go, ‘No! No! No! Yes!” It completed a comeback for San Mateo that saw the Bearcats turn the screws defen- sively over the final eight minutes, holding Aragon to just five fourth-quarter points. And those shots that the Bearcats were misfiring on in the first half, started to fall in the fourth quarter. “At the end of the third quarter, I chal- lenged them,” Lui said. “Who wants it more? Who wants to go after those 50-50 balls?” The Bearcats came up with seven steals in

See MATEO, Page 16

Bearcats came up with seven steals in See MATEO , Page 16 NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL San

NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL

San Mateo’s Josh Cobillas glides in for a layup during the Bearcats’46-43 win over crosstown rival Aragon Friday night.

CCSF 82, Cañada 79

Buzzer-beater sinks Cañada

By Terry Bernal

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

It was a painful dagger that floored Cañada College in a battle for first place Friday night against City College of San Francisco. With the game deadlocked 79-79 with one second remaining in regulation, CCSF — the No. 1 ranked team in the state — inbounded to a wide-open Adrian Rico and the freshman buried a 3-pointer as time expired to give his Rams a dramatic 82-79 victory. Just three games into conference play, the win thrusts CCSF (3-0 in Coast North, 18-1 overall) into sole possession of first place in the Coast Conference-North. CCSF and

Cañada (2-1, 14-5) entered Friday as the last two unbeaten teams in league play. “We’re disappointed,” Cañada head coach Mike Reynoso said. “We know we’re a better team than them. And that’s kind of the feeling in the locker

room is keep our heads high b ecause we know we beat ourselves. But also a lot of disappointment b ecause we don’t think they’re the No. 1 team in the state. We believe we’re a better team; and I know we are. We just didn’t play like it for the majority of the game.” Both teams ran hot and cold in the wildly physical game, with CCSF committing 22 turnovers — the most it had in a single game since the opening week of the season back on Nov. 10 against Monterey Peninsula. But it was the turnover that was- n’t that set up the game-winner for the Rams. Amid the tie and CCSF in possession with under 10 seconds to play, the ball got jarred loose near midcourt. Cañada forward Antony Navarrete sprinted towards the side- line in attempt to scoop it up but lost his feet and pushed the ball out of bounds.

it up but lost his feet and pushed the ball out of bounds. Adrian Rico See

Adrian Rico

See COLTS, Page 16

the ball out of bounds. Adrian Rico See COLTS , Page 16 TERRY BERNAL/DAILY JOURNAL Carlmont

TERRY BERNAL/DAILY JOURNAL

Carlmont senior Brett Fitzpatrick weaves a pass in the Scots’ 1-0 win Friday afternoon at Aragon.

Carlmont kickers top Dons

By Terry Bernal

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

It was the finish Carlmont forward Dro Avetian has been looking for all season. One of 12 seniors on the Carlmont boys’ soccer roster this season, Avetian has been refining the signature move of one of his heroes, Manchester United for- ward Zlatan Ibrahimovic. ‘The Ibrahimovic’ — a type of ninja kick off the outside of the foot, as Avetian describes it — proved clutch Friday as Avetian used it to convert Carlmont’s lone

score in a 1-0 win at Aragon. “That was a lot of fun,” Avetian said. “That was awesome.” The Scots (2-0 in PAL Bay, 5-1-2 over- all) are treading in awesome territory with their fast start to the season. Friday’s win, their second straight to open Peninsula Athletic League Bay Division play, comes on the heels of a statement win in Wednesday’s league opener as they blasted stalwart South City 6-2. Carlmont admittedly came out the blocks in some disarray Friday. Aragon, despite testing a new front line, got some

of its best chances in the opening min- utes. The Dons were without leading goal scorer Christian Torres and relied on the youth movement to fill the void with sophomore Sergio Zevala taking the start at defensive midfield and two other players shuffling toward the front. “We just didn’t have the finishing power today that we normally have,” Aragon head coach Gregory Markoulakis said. With Aragon (1-1, 4-4) setting the tone with a frantic pace, it was the Scots’ task

See SCOTS, Page 14

12 Weekend Jan. 14-15, 2017

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Giants sign trio to one-year deals

By Janie McCauley

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN FRANCISCO — Infielder Eduardo Nunez reached a $4.2 million, one-year agreement with the San Francisco Giants on Friday to avoid arbitration. Right-handed reliever George Kontos and left-hander Will Smith also received one- year contracts as the club announced all of its arbitration-eligible players had reached deals. The Giants acquired All-Star infielder Nunez, the projected starting third baseman going into 2017, from Minnesota ahead of

third baseman going into 2017, from Minnesota ahead of Eduardo Nuñez the trade deadline. But he

Eduardo Nuñez

the trade deadline. But he was sidelined for the final six games of the regular season and was unable to start in the playoffs against the Cubs because of a strained right hamstring. Unlikely playoff star Conor Gillaspie agreed

to a new deal Wednesday night and could compete with Nunez for playing time. The 29-year-old Nunez batted .288 with 16 homers and 67 RBIs between the Twins

batted .288 with 16 homers and 67 RBIs between the Twins George Kontos and Giants, hitting

George Kontos

and Giants, hitting .269 with four homers, 20 RBIs, nine doubles and three triples in 50 games for San Francisco. He earned $1,475,000 last season. Kontos, who earned $1.15 million last sea- son, was part of a bullpen

that struggled down the stretch and ultimately cost the Giants in their four-game NL Division Series defeat to the eventual champion Cubs. San Francisco squandered the game and series in the ninth

inning of Game 4 when the bullpen failed to hold a 5-2 lead in the ninth inning, with five reliev- ers unable to end it. And the Giants missed out this time in their every- other-year World Series quest after winning titles in 2010, ‘12 and ‘14.

Acquired from Milwaukee at the trade deadline, Smith went 1-1 with a 2.95 ERA in 26 appearances and 18 1-3 innings for the Giants. He earned $1,475,000 in 2016.

18 1-3 innings for the Giants. He earned $1,475,000 in 2016. Will Smith Local sports roundup

Will Smith

Local sports roundup

FRIDAY

Boys’ soccer

Crystal Springs 3, Woodside Priory 2

The Panthers were coming off a 9-0 loss to King’s Academy, yet found themselves leading the Gryphons 2-0 at halftime. But Crystal Springs scored second-half goals to pull out the West Bay Athletic League victory. Alex Lauescher scored twice to lead Crystal Springs (3-1 WBAL, 8-2 overall), finding the back of the net in the 45th and the game-winner in the 75th minute. Alex Berman tal- lied the Gryphons’ second goal in the 62nd minute. Max Deiger, Deji Agunbiage and Alex Hansman each recorded an assist for the Gryphons.

El Camino 3, Mills 1

The Colts scored twice in the second half to hold off the Vikings in a PAL Ocean Division match.

 

 
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CA 94070 www.libertytax.com   TEL 866.871.1040 Ivan Vargas gave El Camino (2-0 PAL O cean, 6-0-2

Ivan Vargas gave El Camino (2-0 PAL Ocean, 6-0-2 over- all) a 1-0 lead at halftime when he converted a pass from Gabe Gonzalez. Martin Hernandez scored El Camino’s second goal off an assist from Ivan Stus, while Christian Lupercio rounded out the scoring with an unassisted strike.

San Mateo 3, Jefferson 0

The Bearcats got a pair of goals from Juan Guzman and a goal and an assist from Vidhu Raj as to earn their first PAL Ocean Division win of the season. Raj gave San Mateo (1-0-1 PAL Ocean) a 1-0 lead at half- time off an assist from Aaron Baca. Raj then set up Juan Guzman for the second goal of the game and Guzman round- ed out the scoring off a pass from Liam Delaney.

Girls’ basketball

South City 56, Oceana 51

Down 49-40, the Warriors scored 16 unanswered points to pull out the win in a battle between teams expected to con- tend for the Peninsula Athletic League’s North Division title. Nevaeh Miller recorded a double-double for South City (2- 0 PAL North, 11-1 overall), finishing with a team-high 15 points and 11 rebounds. Brittney Cedeno added 14 and iced the game with five straight free throws. Oceana (2-1, 11-2) got a game-high 17 points from Sala Langi, while Keri La finished with 13.

Menlo-Atherton 59, Carlmont 32

The Bears jumped out to a 19-4 lead after one quarter and never looked back as they routed the Scots in a PAL South Division game. Greer Hoyem led M-A (2-0 PAL South, 13-1 overall) with a game-high 15 points. Ofa Sili added 13 and Stella Kailahi finished with 12. Alexa Bayangos led Carlmont (0-2, 8-6) with 11 points.

Mills 58, Burlingame 34

The Vikings got off to an incredibly fast start, scoring 29 points in the first quarter and holding the Panthers to just 23 points over the final three quarters of the game to stay

unbeaten in PAL South Division play. Mills (2-0 PAL South, 9-4 overall) was, once again, led by Aubrie Businger, who finished with 19. Kaela Stonebarger added 12 points for the Vikings.

Aragon 43, San Mateo 33

Katelyn Wong scored 12 of her team-high 16 points in the first half to help lead the Dons to the win over the rival Bearcats. San Mateo (0-2 PAL South, 2-10 overall) got 16 points as well from Alyssa Cho, who scored 11 in the second half. Aragon improves to 2-0 in league play and 8-5 overall.

THURSDAY

Wrestling

Half Moon Bay 60, El Camino 15

It was all or nothing for most of the matches during the PAL dual-meet season opener in South City as 10 of 14 matches ended in pins. Half Moon Bay got pins from: Tommy Sendino (106), Luis Alcala (113), Jonathon Mendez (126), Carlos Luna (138), Josh Mutto (145), Cade Duncan (170), Pedro Nic- Novelo (195), Gerardo Penaloza (220) and Ricky Camacho (HWT). El Camino recorded its one fall at 132 from Aaron-Joshua Lacap. Other El Camino winners saw Luis Angel Vasquez win by forfeit at 120 and Andrew Miranda posting a 10-7 decision over Jonathon Napoles at 160. Half Moon Bay’s Adrian Sanchez posted a 5-0 win over Vincent Blensdord at 152, while Jimmy Claitor won his match at 182 6-0 over El Camino’s Omar Valdez.

Girls’ soccer

San Mateo 5, Half Moon Bay 1

Olivia Williams erupted for four of the Bearcats’ five goals as they blew past the Cougars in a PAL Ocean Division match. Risa Wadhams accounted for San Mateo’s fifth goal. Vanessa Rangel, Sophie Calderaro and Wadhams each had assists for the Bearcats as well.

for San Mateo’s fifth goal. Vanessa Rangel, Sophie Calderaro and Wadhams each had assists for the

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

Weekend Jan. 14-15, 2017

13

Ace Gray, catcher Vogt reach deals with A’s

By Janie McCauley

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OAKLAND — The OaklandAthletics knew Khris Davis would command a hefty raise after a career year. He is seeking a $5 million salary for the 2017 season and the A’s are offering $4.65 million in numbers exchanged Friday. Other than the slugger, the rest of the club’s arbitration-eligible players reached new deals. Right-hander Sonny Gray agreed to a $3,575,000, one-year contract to avoid arbitration. Right-hander Liam Hendriks received a $1.1 million contract while Stephen Vogt got a $2,965,000 deal, leav-

ing left fielder Davis as the only one yet to settle as he comes off his best season with hopes of car- rying it into 2017. Davis batted .247 for a second straight year with career highs of 42 home runs and 102 RBIs in his first season with the low-

budget, last-place A’s. He earned $524,500 in 2016 and will get a sub- stantial bump after his performance high- lighted a losing year for last-place Oakland. Gray entered 2016 with huge expectations as ace of the A’s staff, then was scratched from his start opening day with food poi-

then was scratched from his start opening day with food poi- Khris Davis Sonny Gray soning.

Khris Davis

from his start opening day with food poi- Khris Davis Sonny Gray soning. He first spent

Sonny Gray

soning. He first spent a stint on the disabled list

with a strain in his upper back before missing time down the stretch on the

DL again with a strained

right forearm.

After getting hurt Aug.

6, the 27-year-old Gray

didn’t pitch again until

one inning of relief Sept. 28 at the Angels — an important step according to the team for him to go into the offseason on a positive note. Gray, a 2015 All-Star who made $527,500 last year, struggled to a 5-11 record after consecutive 14-win seasons and was limited

to 22 starts and 117 innings. Vogt batted .251 with 14 homers and 56 RBIs while playing in a career- high 137 games — one more than the previous season — in 2016. He earned $527,500 last year and has been a

key influence working with all of the young pitchers moving through the big leagues in recent years because of injuries. Hendriks, who earned $523,400 in 2016, went 0-4 with a 3.76 ERA in 53 outings for Oakland.

in 2016, went 0-4 with a 3.76 ERA in 53 outings for Oakland. Stephen Vogt Harper

Stephen Vogt

Harper and Nationals avoid arbitration with $13.6M deal

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON— Bryce Harper andthe Washington Nationals agreed to a $13,625,000 contract for 2017, avoiding arbitration andmore than doubling the slugging outfielder’s salary two years before he can become a free agent for the first time. The Nationals also reachedone-year deals with their three other arbitration-eligible players on Friday, the day players and teams were to exchange proposed salary figures ahead of hearings. Third baseman Anthony Rendon will earn $5.8 million next

season, right-hander Tanner Roark gets $4,315,000 and new catcher Derek Norris agreed to $4.2 million. Harper was paid $5 million by the NL East champion Nationals last season, when he struggled with injuries and took a big step back after becoming the youngest unani- mous MVP in baseball history in 2015. He hit only .243 with 24 homers and 86 RBIs in 2016, significant drop-offs from the .330, 42 and 99 of a year earlier.

Still only 24, Harper is already a four-time All-Star and he was the NL Rookie of the Year in 2012. One of the top topics of discussion with regardto the Nationals — andall of

Major League Baseball — moving forward will be whether the team will be able to sign Harper to a long-term deal. He can go into free agency, with the chance to sign with any club for hun- dreds of millions of dollars, after the 2018 season. “With every player that you acquire, it’s a possibility that you

every player that you acquire, it’s a possibility that you Anthony Rendon may lose them in

Anthony

Rendon

may lose them in their specific time frame. With Bryce Harper and every other player that has a contract expiring, youbetter make plans,” Rizzo said last month, when asked about preparing for the chance that Harper couldleave before the 2019 season. “Andit’s not just Bryce Harper; it’s everybody on the roster.” Rendon is coming off a bounce-back year in which he hit .270 with 20 homers and a

career-high 85 RBIs while appearing in 156 games; injuries limitedhim to 80 in 2015. The No. 6 overall pick in the 2011 amateur draft, Rendon is entrenched as Washington’s starting third baseman and made $2.8 million last season. Roark was Washington’s second-best starter in 2016, behind NL Cy Young Award winner Max Scherzer, going 16-10 with a 2.83 ERAin 33 starts, returning to the rotation after spending a year working out of the bullpen. He earned a substantial raise after making just under $543,300 last season. Roark ranked fifth in

the NL in wins, sixth in ERA and ninth in hits per nine innings. As of now, Norris is penciled in as the starting catcher for the Nationals, who acquired him in an offseason trade with the San Diego Padres. Norris is coming off a terrible 2015 at the plate: He batted only .186 with 14 homers and 42 RBIs and a hard-to- believe .255 on-base percentage. He made $2,925,000 last sea- son. Unless Washington goes out and adds another catcher, the 27-year-old would replace Wilson Ramos — who signed with Tampa Bay as a free agent — as the team’s everyday guy behind the plate.

Wilson Ramos — who signed with Tampa Bay as a free agent — as the team’s

Bryce Harper

Wilson Ramos — who signed with Tampa Bay as a free agent — as the team’s
Wilson Ramos — who signed with Tampa Bay as a free agent — as the team’s
Wilson Ramos — who signed with Tampa Bay as a free agent — as the team’s

14 Weekend Jan. 14-15, 2017

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SCOTS

Continued from page 11

to settle down the tempo. And after a score- less first half, Carlmont did precisely that with Avetian scoring the decisive goal in the 45th minute. “My guys, we play a much more com- posed game … not flinchy, panic ball,” Carlmont head coach Will Stambaugh said. “The first 40 minutes, we were panicking, and then we were able to calm them down.” The calm helped Carlmont exploit an Aragon defense that was compensating heavily to one side of the field. With the Dons sending three defenders to the west sideline, the Scots struck from the east as

senior forward Leo McBride pushed the action and served it into the middle for Avetian to exact a ninja kick from just out- side the keeper’s box. “[Avetian] happened to be in the right place at the right time,” Stambaugh said. Avetian has proven one of a trio of strong scorers in the fast Carlmont front this sea- son. Along with McBride and senior mid- fielder Brett Fitzpatrick, the secret to the Scots’ success has been keeping balance in the front line. “The beauty of this side is a lot of people are scoring,” Stambaugh said. But Aragon attempted to wrestle the game back into a frantic state in the closing min- utes and nearly succeeded. Playing from a goal behind, the Dons saw a majority of the possession time through the closing 15 minutes. With just over five minutes remaining in

regulation, Aragon senior midfielder William Laird had the best look as he took a pass over the middle from 25 yards out, but sent a booming kick high over the crossbar. Carlmont responded with a push upfield to nearly put the game away when senior mid- fielder Alexander Chernikov took a charge into the penalty box at a near 1-on-1 with the keeper, only to have Aragon senior Antonio Sandoval slide in for a tackle to clear the ball to the sideline. Otherwise, the Carlmont defense hun- kered down with strong 1-on-1 defense to rely on a physical presence as the Dons tried for several game-tying chance, all of which fell short. “Aragon is a big team,” Carlmont senior defender Diego Ronderos said. “They’re good and technical, so you have to stick your body in front of them or they’re going to get through. … So we were able to come

through and put up a strong performance.” For a young Aragon team, Markoulakis is looking to employ a similar strategy as Carlmont did Friday in persevering for a strong second-half effort. Only Markoulakis sees that strategy as more of a long-term one for Aragon to extend late into the season. “It’s the quality of play the entire season and it’s where we can go from now,” Markoulakis said. Carlmont, on the other hand, is thinking big from the here and now. The Scots have incurred just one loss this season, and that was a 2-1 battle at powerhouse Palo Alto. Carlmont followed that by tying Bellarmine 1-1, then defeating St. Ignatius 1-0 to start a four-game winning streak. “We definitely know we’re a contender for this league and to go far in [the Central Coast Section playoffs],” Ronderos said.

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SPORTS

Weekend Jan. 14-15, 2017

15

No.21 St. Mary’s takes on No. 5 Gonzaga Saturday

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SPOKANE, Wash. — Fifth-ranked Gonzaga typically doesn’t get test- ed much after West Coast Conference play begins. But the undefeated Bulldogs face one of their biggest remaining challenges when No. 21 Saint Mary’s visits on Saturday. The Zags (16-0, 4-0 West Coast) are the last remaining undefeated team in the nation, and they have romped through their first four con- ference games, winning by an aver- age of more than 25 points. Saint Mary’s figures to be a bit tougher. The Gaels actually dealt Gonzaga a rare home loss last sea- son. “That sticks with you,” guard Silas Melson said. “It hurts when somebody comes into your house and takes your win away from you.” But Melson admitted it is good to have a tough archrival in a league where Gonzaga often blows out opponents. The Bulldogs beat Loyola Marymount 93-55 on Thursday night for their 16th con- secutive win, the longest streak in the nation. “It makes it a lot more fun when you have a league game that’s hyped up this much,” Melson said. Gonzaga center Przemek Karnowski missed last season’s games against Saint Mary’s with injury, but the senior knows all about the rivalry. “It’s Saint Mary’s,” Karnowski said. “They’re either in front of us

or behind us — mostly behind — but the rivalry is there.” Added guard Josh Perkins: “This is definitely a game we circle on our calendars.” Saint Mary’s coach Randy Bennett is fielding perhaps his best team at the school. The Gaels (15-1, 5-0 WCC) beat Portland 74-33 on Thursday night. Gonzaga will visit Saint Mary’s on Feb. 11. There’s a pretty good chance the teams will meet a third time in the conference tournament in Las Vegas. While Saint Mary’s is a veteran team that returned nearly its entire roster from last season, Gonzaga started the season with a lot of new- comers. Three starters — Nigel Williams- Goss, Jordan Mathews and Johnathan Williams — are transfers who are in their first season playing for the Zags. Freshmen Zach Collins and Killian Tillie are key contributors off the bench. All five of those players have yet to lose in a Gonzaga uniform. Williams-Goss, who played his first two seasons at Washington, this week was named to the John R. Wooden Award Midseason Top 25 list. The award is presented to the nation’s most outstanding basket- ball player. Williams-Goss leads Gonzaga in scoring (15 points per game), rebounds (6.1 per game), assists (4.8 per game) and steals (1.7 per game).

NBA GLANCE

EASTERN CONFERENCE

 

Atlantic Division

 

W

L

Pct

GB

Toronto

26

13

.667

Boston

25

15

.625

1 1/2

New York

18

22

.450

8 1/2

Philadelphia

12

25

.324

13

Brooklyn

8

31

.205

18

Southeast Division

 

Atlanta

22

17

.564

Charlotte

20

20

.500

2 1/2

Washington

19

19

.500

2 1/2

Orlando

17

24

.415

6

Miami

11

30

.268

12

Central Division

Cleveland

29

10

.744

Milwaukee

20

18

.526

8 1/2

Indiana

20

19

.513

9

Chicago

19

21

.475

10 1/2

Detroit

18

24

.429

12 1/2

WESTERN CONFERENCE

 

Southwest Division

Utah

25

16

.610

Oklahoma City

24

17

.585

1

Portland

18

24

.429

7 1/2

Denver

15

23

.395

8 1/2

Minnesota

14

26

.350

10 1/2

Northwest Division

 

Utah

24

16

.600

Oklahoma City

24

16

.600

Portland

18

23

.439

6 1/2

Denver

15

23

.395

8

Minnesota

13

26

.333

10 1/2

Pacific Division

Warriors

34

6

.850

L.A. Clippers

27

14

.659

7 1/2

Sacramento

16

23

.410

17 1/2

L.A. Lakers

15

28

.349

20 1/2

Phoenix

12

27

.308

21 1/2

Saturday’s Games L.A. Lakers at L.A. Clippers, 12:30 p.m. New Orleans at Chicago, 2 p.m. San Antonio at Phoenix, 3 p.m. Philadelphia at Washington, 5 p.m. Orlando at Utah, 6 p.m. Sunday’s Games Minnesota at Dallas, 11 a.m. Milwaukee at Atlanta, noon New York at Toronto, noon Houston at Brooklyn, 3 p.m. Chicago at Memphis, 6 p.m. Oklahoma City at Sacramento, 6 p.m. Detroit at L.A. Lakers, 6:30 p.m.

NHL GLANCE

EASTERN CONFERENCE

Atlantic Division

 

GP W

L

OT Pts

GF

GA

Montreal

43

26

11

6

58

133

108

Boston

45

22

18

5

49

111

110

Ottawa

40

22

14

4

48

103

103

Toronto

40

19

13

8

46

124

118

Florida

44

19

17

8

46

102

119

Tampa Bay

44

20

20

4

44

123

132

Buffalo

42

16

17

9

41

97

119

Detroit

42

17

19

6

40

105

124

Metropolitan Division

 

Columbus

41

29

8

4

62

138

91

Washington 42

28

9

5

61

126

86

Pittsburgh

41

26

10

5

57

142

118

N.Y. Rangers

43

28

14

1

57

148

111

Philadelphia 44

22

16

6

50

129

137

Carolina

42

20

15

7

47

114

113

New Jersey

44

17

18

9

43

99

128

N.Y. Islanders40

16

16

8

40

112

121

WESTERN CONFERENCE

 

Central Division

 

Chicago

45

27

13

5

59

124

113

Minnesota

40

26

9

5

57

130

86

St. Louis

42

21

16

5

47

118

128

Nashville

42

19

16

7

45

116

112

Dallas

43

18

17

8

44

114

129

Winnipeg

45

20

22

3

43

125

137

Colorado

40

13

26

1

27

80

134

Pacific Division

 

Anaheim

44

23

13

8

54

119

114

Sharks

42 25

15

2

52

112

96

Edmonton

44

22

15

7

51

126

120

Calgary

45

23

20

2

48

118

123

Los Angeles 42

21

17

4

46

107

106

Vancouver

44

20

19

5

45

110

128

Arizona

41

13

22

6

32

90

131

Saturday’s Games Philadelphia at Boston, 10 a.m. Nashville at Colorado, noon N.Y. Islanders at Carolina, 4 p.m. Toronto at Ottawa, 4 p.m. Pittsburgh at Detroit, 4 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at Montreal, 4 p.m. Columbus at Florida, 4 p.m. Minnesota at Dallas, 5 p.m. Anaheim at Arizona, 5 p.m. Calgary at Edmonton, 7 p.m. Winnipeg at Los Angeles, 7 p.m. St. Louis at San Jose, 7:30 p.m. Sunday’s Games Philadelphia at Washington, 9:30 a.m. Minnesota at Chicago, 4 p.m. New Jersey at Vancouver, 4 p.m. St. Louis at Anaheim, 6 p.m.

WHATS ON TAP

SATURDAY Boys’ basketball Serra at St. Francis, 6:30 p.m. Boys’ soccer St. Francis at Serra, 11 a.m.

NFL PLAYOFF GLANCE

DIVISIONAL PLAYOFFS Saturday, Jan. 14 Seattle at Atlanta, 1:35 p.m. (FOX) Houston at New England, 5:15 p.m. (CBS) Sunday, Jan. 15 Pittsburgh at Kansas City, 10:05 a.m. (NBC) Green Bay at Dallas, 1:40 p.m. (FOX)

TRANSACTIONS

BASEBALL American League BOSTON RED SOX — Agreed to terms with INF Brock Holt,SS Xander Bogaerts,OF Jackie Bradley Jr., C Sandy Leon, LHP Robbie Ross Jr. and RHPs Joe Kelly and Tyler Thornburg on one-year contracts. Extended their Player Development Contract with Portland (EL) for an additional two years, through the 2020 season. CHICAGO WHITE SOX — Agreed to terms with 3B Todd Frazier, LHP Dan Jennings and RHPs Miguel Gonzalez, Zach Putnam and Jake Petricka on one- year contracts. HOUSTON ASTROS — Agreed to terms with LHP Dallas Keuchel on a one-year contract. Agreed to terms with INF Reid Brignac, C Juan Centeno and LHP C.J. Riefenhauser on minor league contracts. LOS ANGELES ANGELS — Agreed to terms with OF Kole Calhoun,2B Danny Espinosa and RHPs Gar- rett Richards and Matt Shoemaker on one-year contracts. SEATTLE MARINERS — Agreed to terms with OFs Jarrod Dyson and Leonys Martin,INFs Jean Segura and Danny Valencia,LHPs James Paxton and Drew Smyly and RHPs Evan Scribner and Nick Vincent on one-year contracts.Assigned RHP Cody Martin out- right to Tacoma (PCL). TEXAS RANGERS — Agreed to terms with C Robin- son Chirinos and RHPs Sam Dyson A.J. Griffin and Tanner Scheppers on one-year contracts. National League COLORADO ROCKIES — Agreed to terms with 3B Nolan Arenado on a two-year contract. LOS ANGELES DODGERS — Agreed to terms with RHP Josh Fields, C Yasmani Grandal and LHPs Alex Wood and Luis Avilan on one-year contracts. SAN DIEGO PADRES — Agreed to terms with RHPs Carter Capps and Brandon Maurer and LHPs Chris- tian Friedrich and Brad Hand on one-year contracts. CINCINNATI REDS — Agreed to terms with LHP Tony Cingrani,SS Zack Cozart,CF Billy Hamilton and RHP Blake Wood on one-year contracts.

49ers brief

49ers interview Cardinals VP Terry McDonough for GM

SANTA CLARA — The San Francisco 49ers interviewed Arizona vice president of player personnel Terry McDonough for their general manager’s job on Friday. Team CEO Jed York met with McDonough as part of his search for replacements for fired coach Chip Kelly and general manager Trent Baalke following a 2-14 season that tied the worst mark in franchise history. McDonough is the seventh candidate to interview for general manager, joining ESPN analyst Louis Riddick, Carolina assistant GM

Brandon Beane, Indianapolis vice president of football operations Jimmy Raye III, Minnesota assistant GM George Paton, Green Bay director of football operations Eliot Wolf and Packers director of player personnel Brian Gutekunst. McDonough has spent four seasons with Arizona and currently oversees the college and pro personnel departments and assists on con- tract negotiations. He has also worked for Cleveland, Baltimore andJacksonville during a 25-year NFLcareer. McDonough is the son of the late Boston Globe columnist and television reporter Will McDonough. His brother Sean is the play-by- play announcer for ESPN’s “Monday Night Football” and his brother Ryan is general man- ager for the NBA’s Phoenix Suns.

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16 Weekend Jan. 14-15, 2017

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

6 Weekend • Jan. 14-15, 2017 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL TERRY BERNAL/DAILY JOURNAL Colts sophomore William

TERRY BERNAL/DAILY JOURNAL

Colts sophomore William Green is guarded by CCSF’s Michael Wright Friday at Cañada.

COLTS

Continued from page 11

Reynoso contended Navarrete was pushed by a CCSF defender. But no foul was called. “The City kid pushed him out and that’s when the ball went out of bounds on us,” Reynoso said. “I thought it was a pretty obvious call.” But Cañada did plenty to hurt its chances. The Colts started red hot both at the outset of the game, and to start the second half. Freshman guard Marcel Burton was a perfect 6 of 6 from 3- point land, sinking three straight in the open- ing five minutes of the game to stake Cañada to an early 16-8 lead. Then trailing 40-33 at halftime, the Colts went on an 11-point run to start the second half, fueled by three more treys by Burton. “When my teammates screen for me, that’s what I do,” Burton said. “I just let it go.” The remainder of the Colts went ice cold from the outside though. After Cañada’s 16-8 open- ing, CCSF responded with a 16-4 run to take a

22-20 lead on a 3-pointer by sophomore Zach Copeland. Following Burton’s hot start, Cañada finished the half 0 of 10 from beyond the arc. “We did not shoot the ball well tonight other than [Burton],” Reynoso said. “[Burton] was on fire. … He let it fly and we moved the ball to him. And when we went away from ball move- ment and sharing the ball, we were bad.” CCSF guard Eddie Stansberry came off the bench to nearly single handedly temper Burton’s hot hand. The freshman was tasked with guarding Burton 1-on-1 and didn’t let him get another shot off in the first half. “He played good defense,” Burton said. “His coach was saying: ‘Face guard! Face guard!’ So, he wouldn’t let me get the ball. So, I credit him on his defense.” Stansberry’s defensive heroics earned him more time in the second half and it paid off big time on offense. After tallying just two points in the first half, Stansberry went on a second- half tear to finish with a team-high 17 points. Burton, who paced Cañada with a game-high 18 points, was one of four Colts to score in double figures. Sophomore point guard Mike Pickney finished with 15 points, while Navarrete and

sophomore guard William Green and freshman totaled 14 apiece. Late in the game though, Cañada’s tepid per- formance from the free-throw line proved a killer. The Colts were 10 of 18 from the line, and when Pickney made just 1 of 2 with 1:01 remaining in regulation, Cañada found itself clinging to a mere 77-76 lead. Copeland — who finished with 14 points for CCSF — responded with a clutch and-1 in the closing minute, giving the Rams a 79-77 lead after hitting an off-balance 10-foot jumper and drawing a foul in the process. He drilled the free throw to up the lead to 79-77. Cañada responded with a bucket by freshman Keith Dickerson, who came up with a loose ball in front of the hoop and finger-rolled it in to tie it 79-79. But CCSF responded with Rico’s dagger — just his third 3-pointer of the season in six tries — as the freshman found himself wide open to get the shot off just before Pickney andGreen arrived with the defense. “We slacked off on him just a little bit and got enough to see the rim and got it up,” Green said.

MATEO

Continued from page 11

addition to three other Aragon turnovers in the fourth quarter. And after scoring no more than 12 points in the first three quarters, the Bearcats had 16 in the fourth. But it almost wasn’t to be. It was one of those game in which San Mateo trailed most of the way. Every time the Bearcats reeled back in the Dons, Aragon would spurt ahead. “I was concerned we would run out of gas,” Lui said.

Given the opponent, circumstances and atmosphere, it was a legitimate concern for Lui. “The first three quarters of the game, we didn’t play with any composure. Our guys were so hyped,” Lui said. “The atmos- phere was amazing. The best I think I’ve seen it since I’ve been here. I think they (the San Mateo players) let [the crowd] take them out of what we wanted to do.” In the first half, the Bearcats were get- ting their opportunities, they just weren’t finishing them. If not for some sloppy play by Aragon, the Dons might have had a commanding lead at halftime, instead of the three-point lead they had at

the break, 21-18. Neither team shot particularly well from the field in the first two quarters, but Aragon’s rebounding limited second-chance opportunities. The Dons outrebounded the Bearcats 23-16 in the opening half, but that advantage was offset by 11 turnovers com- mitted by the Dons. Argon trailed 10-9 after the first quarter, but scored seven unanswered points to open the second period to lead 16-10. The Dons eventually built up a 19-12 lead when Aaron Balotro drained a 3 midway through the period. San Mateo got back into it with 3 of 4 free throws and a late Chandha 3 made it a three-point game at the half.

The Dons extended their lead to 26-19 early in the third quarter, but San Mateo responded with a 7-0 run to tie the score at 26. But Aragon end the period on a 10-4 run, with Joe Park nailing a pair of 3-pointers late to put Aragon up 36-30 going into the fourth quarter. San Mateo was led by point guard Josh Cobillas, who finished with a game-high 15 points. Chanha and Allen each finished with eight points. Aragon was led by Balotro, who scored 11 points. Davion Cox and Park each chipped in with nine points for the Dons. “A win is a win, but it’s good to get this win,” Lui said.

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THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

Weekend Jan. 14-15, 2017

17

Seattle (11-5-1) at Atlanta (11-5

Saturday, 1:35 p.m., Fox SERIES RECORD — Seahawks lead 10-6 LAST MEETING — Seahawks beat Falcons 26-24, Oct. 16 LAST WEEK — Seahawks beat Lions 26-6;Fal- cons had bye, beat Saints 38-32 in season finale AP PRO32 RANKING — Seahawks No.8,Fal- cons No.4 STREAKS, STATS AND NOTES -- Matt Bryant's 49-yard field goal with 8 seconds remaining

gave Falcons 30-28 divisional playoff win over

Seahawks on Jan.13,2013

Seattle RB Thomas

Rawls, who missed regu- lar-season win over Falcons with leg injury, rushed for franchise post- season-record 161 yards with TD against Lions last week.Without Rawls,Sea- hawks had only 72 yards rushing against Falcons Seahawks have only one postseason win with less

than 100 yards rushing under coach Pete Car-

roll

Russell Wil-

need two wins to reach Super

Bowl for third time in four years

son's 64 wins,including postseason,are most for starting QB in first five seasons in NFL his-

most for starting QB in first five seasons in NFL his- Thomas Rawls Seahawks tory.Wilson's 8-3

Thomas Rawls

Seahawks

tory.Wilson's 8-3 in 11 career postseason starts. He has thrown for 18 TDs with nine INTs in

Doug Baldwin has team-

those

record 50 postseason catches, including 11

TE Jimmy

Graham has eight TD catches in last 10 games

for 104 yards with TD last

WR

against

DE Cliff Avril had two sacks

last week

A

loss would end Falcons' 25-year

stay in Georgia Dome. New Mercedes-Benz

Atlanta's Dan

Quinn, former Seattle defensive coordinator, will be making postseason debut as coach in

Falcons 4-3 at

home in playoffs.Overall, Atlanta has lost five

of last six playoff games

passer rating led NFL and was fifth best in league history. Ryan set Falcons record with

second season with

Stadium to open next season

QB Matt Ryan's 117.1

4,944 yards passing to rank second in league.

WR Julio Jones sec-

ond in NFL with 1,409 yards receiving despite

missing two games with toe

Dwight Freeney's 10 career postseason sacks

DE

Second-

year LB Vic Beasley Jr.led NFL with 15 Ω sacks.

LB Deion Jones (106) and S Keanu Neal (105)

Devonta Free-

led NFL rookies in tackles

man ran for 1,079 yards, his second straight

1,000-yard season

held four of last six

opponents under 20 points.

Ryan is 1-4 in

tied for third among active players

RB

Atlanta

Green Bay (11-6) at Dallas (13-3)

Sunday, 1:40 p.m., Fox SERIES RECORD — Tied 17-17 LAST MEETING — Cowboys beat Packers 30-16, Oct. 16 LAST WEEK — Packers beat Giants 38-13; Cowboys had bye, lost to Eagles 27-13 in season finale AP PRO32 RANKING — Packers No.6 (tie), Cowboys No. 2 STREAKS, STATS AND NOTES — Eighth

meeting in playoffs for storied franchises,

Packers won

with Cowboys leading

last playoff matchup two years ago 26-21

in game famous for Dallas WR Dez Bryant's

Cowboys coach Jason

catch that

Garrett was backup QB when Dallas won

three straight playoff games vs. Green Bay in 1990s. Cowboys won two Super Bowls in

that

Packers, Cowboys tied with

Giants for most playoff appearances at 32. Green Bay averaging 30.4 points per game on road in playoffs since 2006, most

in NFL in that

Packers coach Mike

McCarthy has nine playoff wins, tied with Vince Lombardi and Mike Holmgren for most in club history. He has one Super

Bowl

QB Aaron Rodgers has four

TD passes in each of past three games, 19 with no interceptions during seven-game winning streak. Rodgers is one of four QBs with career postseason passer rating of at

one of four QBs with career postseason passer rating of at Aaron Rodgers FB Aaron Rip-

Aaron Rodgers

FB Aaron Rip-

kowski had rushing TD

last week in first career

WR Jordy

Nelson, who might not play because of rib in- jury, led NFL with 14 TD WR Randall Cobb tied franchise play- off record with three receiving TDs vs. Giants,

had eight catches for 116 yards in playoffs

LB Clay

playoff

least

against Cowboys two years

Matthews had sack, forced fumble last

week, has 11 career postseason sacks, tied

LB Julius Pep-

pers has 143 1/2 career sacks, fifth most

since

losses in divisional round, seeking first NFC championship game appearance since

1995

sional games, but lost last one to Giants in Dak Prescott will be first rookie QB to start playoff game for Cowboys.Won 13 games, tied with Pittsburgh's Ben Roeth- lisberger (2004) for most by rookie in NFL history. Prescott had lowest interception percentage (4 INTs, 459 attempts) for

rookie in NFL

RB Ezekiel Elliott

Dallas 11-3 in home divi-

for fifth most since

Cowboys, with four straight

led NFL with 1,631 yards rushing,third best for rookie ever.

Pittsburgh (11-5) at Kansas City (12-4)

Sunday, 5:20 p.m., NBC SERIES RECORD — Steelers lead 21-11 LAST MEETING — Steelers beat Chiefs 43- 14, Oct. 2, 2016 LAST WEEK — Steelers beat Dolphins 30-12; Chiefs had bye, beat Chargers 37-27 in sea- son finale AP PRO32 RANKING — Steelers No.5,Chiefs

No.3

STREAKS, STATS AND NOTES — The game

was scheduled to kickoff at 10:05 a.m. PST, but was changed to a night game because

Second postsea-

of an expected ice

son meeting after Chiefs beat Steelers 27-24

in wild-card round Jan. 8, 1994. Chiefs have

Steelers

not won home playoff game since

and Chiefs have com-

bined to lose once since

Steelers scored

franchise record 22 first-

quarter points in win over

Steel-

ers won four straight

divisional playoff games before losing at Denver

Le'Veon Bell

set Pittsburgh playoff record with 167 yards

rushing in win over Miami last

ran for 144 yards vs. Kansas City in October

in first game after three-game suspension for

Pitts-

burgh defense had five sacks against

Steel-

violating NFL's substance abuse policy

Dolphins,matching Heinz Field record

substance abuse policy Dolphins,matching Heinz Field record Le’Veon Bell Nov. Chiefs in last year RB Bell

Le’Veon Bell

Nov.

Chiefs in

last year

RB

Bell

ers All-Pro WR Antonio Brown had five catches for 124 yards receiving and two TDs vs. Dol- Steelers offensive coordinator Todd Haley was Chiefs head coach last time Kansas City hosted playoff game in January QB Ben Roethlisberger will tie Mel Blount and Terry Bradshaw (19) for most playoff games in

Steelers history

completions to pass Donovan McNabb (341) for seventh most in NFL playoff history. He needs 22 to pass John Elway (355) for sixth Roethlisberger threw five TD passes to four different targets against Chiefs in LB James Harrison needs 1 1/2 sacks to pass LaMarr Woodley (11) for most in Pittsburgh playoff history since sacks became official in Chiefs have lost four straight home playoff games, three in divisional

needs eight

Roethlisberger

Kansas City has lost four of last five to Pitts- Chiefs coach Andy Reid has 11 playoff wins, second to Patriots' Bill Belichick

Chiefs All-

Pro CB Marcus Peters had six interceptions, one behind Chargers' Casey Hayward for NFL lead. Peters has 14 picks in 31 career games. Chiefs' Travis Kelce led all TEs with 1,125

Kansas City S

yards receiving this

Eric Berry had two interception returns for

QB

TDs this season,giving him five for career

(23) among active head coaches

Alex Smith averaged 262 yards passing in five playoff games, three with Kansas City. He's thrown 11 TD passes against one intercep-

tion

this season,tied for NFL lead.

had plus-16 turnover differential

Chiefs

Texans (10-7) at Patriots (14-2)

Saturday, 5:15 p.m., CBS SERIES RECORD — Patriots lead 7-1 LAST MEETING — Patriots beat Texans 27-0 on Sept. 23, 2016 LAST WEEK —Texans beat Raiders 27-14;Pa- triots had bye, beat Miami 35-14 in season finale AP PRO32 RANKING — Texans No.12,Patri- ots No.1 STREAKS, STATS AND NOTES — Second postseason meeting between teams after Pa-

triots beat Texans 41-28 in divisional round Jan.

13,

Gillette Stadium. New England has won past

Texans coach

Bill O'Brien,Patriots assistant from 2007-2011,

Houston's

Patriots are 4-0 against Texans at

five meetings between teams

is 0-2 against mentor Bill Belichick

defense is allowing 301.3 total yards and 17 first downs per game, fewest in NFL in both

categories

Jadeveon Clowney had inter-

ception in his first career playoff game last week. Including playoffs, he has four tackles

for loss, three sacks, interception and forced

fumble in his past four

LB Whitney

Mercilus had two sacks and three tackles for

loss in last week's win over Raiders.He has five sacks and six tackles for loss in his past two

playoff

RB Lamar Miller rushed for

DE

touchdown last week. He is looking for fourth

straight game with rush-

In regular season

Miler ranked sixth in AFC

with 1,073 rush yards,sev- enth-most rush yards in single season in franchise

A.J.Bouye had

INTandfourpassdefenses

.Belichick will

coach his 14th divisional playoff game and tie

Don Shula for most in NFL history.He has 23 ca-

QB

Tom Brady will play in his 13th divisional play- off game, tying Jerry Rice for most in league

history

for quarterback in NFL history. He is also NFL postseason leader in career completions (738), attempts (1,183), passing yards (7,957) and

touchdown passes (56)

led NFL with franchise-record 18 rushing TDs during regular season. He has seven rushing TDs in five career postseason games and is looking for sixth game in row with rushing TD. … CB Malcolm Butler has INT,six pass defenses in his past three playoff games.

LeGarrette Blount

has 22 career playoff wins,most

reer postseason wins,most for any coach

history

has 22 career playoff wins,most reer postseason wins,most for any coach history Lamar Miller ing CB

Lamar Miller

ing

CB

last

week.

Brady

RB

has 22 career playoff wins,most reer postseason wins,most for any coach history Lamar Miller ing CB
has 22 career playoff wins,most reer postseason wins,most for any coach history Lamar Miller ing CB
has 22 career playoff wins,most reer postseason wins,most for any coach history Lamar Miller ing CB
has 22 career playoff wins,most reer postseason wins,most for any coach history Lamar Miller ing CB
has 22 career playoff wins,most reer postseason wins,most for any coach history Lamar Miller ing CB

18 Weekend Jan. 14-15, 2017

LOCAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

IN-LAWS

Continued from page 1

will find some red tape has been removed after the Board of Supervisors unanimously agreed Tuesday to update its ordinance to comply with state mandates. “We all know the Peninsula, San Mateo County, the greater Bay Area is feeling probably the worst of the housing crisis in the state and potentially … in the country. So our Board of Supervisors has focused and prioritized this. They see second units as a very good way of increasing housing sup- ply without really impacting neighborhood conditions the way a multi-family building would,” Gibson said. Secondary units provide an alternative to denser developments in smaller neighbor- hoods. For example, it’s unlikely develop- ers could buy up enough contiguous proper- ties to create apartments while neighbors may be less amenable to a larger housing complex as compared to a secondary unit, Gibson said. Board of Supervisors President Don Horsley agreed secondary units that don’t have substantial adverse impacts to neigh- bors’ quality of life — such as parking or

privacy — can be a benefit to alleviating the housing crunch. “I think what we passed was a thoughtful way to provide additional housing without having real negative impacts on neighbors. Because although people are supportive of additional housing, I just don’t believe they want their neighborhoods to become places where you have high rises and at the same time, we don’t have a lot of sp ace,” Horsley said. “We’re trying to look at every option we possibly can. We know we are a Peninsula, there’s only so much land, and we know that 70 percent is open sp ace, it’s protected open space and that’s something we place a high value on.” Under the new rules, single-family home- owners with large enough properties could go through a ministerial review instead of a public hearing if their proposal meets zon- ing regulations. Consistent with the state’s changes, an attached unit could be either 750 square feet or up to 50 percent of the main home but no more than 1,200 square feet. Detached units could be either 750 square feet or up to 35 percent of the main home size but no more than 1,200 square feet. The county previ- ously had a 1,500-square-foot absolute maximum and may return to that size if offi- cials determine state law allows it, Gibson said.

Single-story units no more than 16 feet tall must have at least 5-foot side and rear setbacks while taller two-story units up to 26 feet must have 5-foot side setbacks with at least 10 feet in the rear. Constructing new units requires at least one on-site parking space and three-bed- room units must provide two new spaces — although in-laws of that size are very rare, Gibson noted. One state mandate the county can’t avoid is that properties located near mass transit don’t have to provide addition- al parking. Demand for secondary units has also gone up from an average of two or five applica- tions a year, to the county receiving more than 10 requests last year, Gibson said. The proposed ready-made design tem- plates would be consistent with the coun- ty’s guidelines and Horsley suggested easily visualizing what’s possible may encourage interested property owners. “It would be nice to show them templates of what you can do that would architectural- ly fit with your home, that aren’t over-intru- sive, are respectful of your neighbors and at the same time create the opportunity for second units,” Horsley said, noting the additional space could be used to help house growing families, supplement a property owner’s income and provide additional options for those working in the county.

“We want people to start looking at if there are higher and better uses for proper- ties, especially along transit corridors,” he said. Another ongoing effort is to provide an amnesty period so owners of illegally con- structed or unpermitted units can make sure they’re safe. Although the extent of illegal units isn’t known, officials have anecdotal- ly heard there are a fair amount throughout the region, Gibson said. In response, the county may consider a yearlong grace period during which people can come forward and won’t be penalized. Instead, the county would work with owners to meet the bare minimum needed to make the units safe. The county is also consider- ing whether to provide low-interest loans that could help owners bring units up to par, Gibson said. The amnesty period is especially poignant after the deadly Oakland Ghost Ship fire killed dozens at a warehouse turned into an illegal housing compound. “We have these units that are on the ground, they exist, they’re someone’s hous- ing now. We don’t want to lose them, but we don’t want them to be unsafe,” Gibson said, noting with the looming housing crisis “I’m sure throughout the Bay Area people are kind of retooling their garage, or their shed or whatever into a living space.”

BEHIND

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did at the same stage of life, despite being better educated, according to a new analysis of Federal Reserve data by the advocacy group Young Invincibles. The analysis being released Friday gives concrete details about a troubling genera- tional divide that helps to explain much of the anxiety that defined the 2016 election. Millennials have half the net worth of boomers. Their home ownership rate is lower, while their student debt is drastically higher.

The generational gap is a central dilemma for the incoming presidency of Donald Trump, who essentially pledged a return to the prosperity of post-World War II America. The analysis also hints at the issues of culture and identity that divided many voters, showing that white millenni- als — who still earn much more than their blacks and Latino peers — have seen their incomes plummet the most relative to boomers. Andrea Ledesma, 28, says her parents owned a house and were raising kids by her age. Not so for her. Ledesma graduated from college four years ago. After moving through a series of jobs, she now earns $18,000 making pizza at Classic Slice in