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The Integration of Fu Zheng Gu Ben Theory and Master Tungs Acupuncture in Advanced-Stage
Oncology Patients Undergoing Metronomic-Dosed Chemotherapy
Darin J. Bunch, MTCM, L.Ac.

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Contents
Foreword

Introduction to Fu Zheng Gu Ben Theory and Its Application in Oncology

General Pattern Differentiation Guidelines of Fu Zheng Gu Ben Theory

Introduction to Master Tung

Advantages of Master Tungs Acupuncture

Master Tungs Location of Extra Points and Naming of the Points

Body Correspondence, Angle and Depth of Needle Insertion, and Needle Retention

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Master Tungs and Dr. Wei-Chieh Youngs Essential Needling Methods

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Traditional Chinese Medicine and the Etiology and Pathology of Tumors

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The Seven Emotions Damaging the Bodys Internal Environment

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Zang-Fu Organ Deficiency

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Dietary Irregularities, Toxic Foods, and Inappropriate Diet Regimen

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Metronomic-Dosed Chemotherapy

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Master Tungs Acupuncture in Advanced-Stage Oncology Patients Undergoing MetronomicDosed Chemotherapy

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Chinese Herbal Medicine in Fu Zheng Gu Ben Theory

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Chinese Herbal Formulas Used in Fu Zheng Gu Ben Theory

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Congees That Help Strengthen and Support Advanced-Stage Oncology Patients Undergoing
Metronomic-Dosed Chemotherapy

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Lifestyle, Qigong, Meditation, and Nutrition for Advanced-Stage Oncology Patients Undergoing
Metronomic-Dosed Chemotherapy

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Support Networks, Patients Mental Attitude and Conclusion

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References

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Foreword
Cancer is certainly a complex disease and no individual is untouched in the Western
world without knowing someonea friend, loved one, family memberwho has not been
diagnosed with some type of cancer. Certainly it is a disease not fully understood even with all
the technology that we have available today and all the brilliant scientists working to eradicate
the disease. I have always noted that the disease is brilliant in one way in keeping our scientists
still guessing about the origins, mechanisms and pathways of the disease process while also
being not so intelligent as to inevitably (in most circumstances) terminate its host which will end
even cancers proliferation.
This paper will address my decade of experience as an acupuncturist and Chinese
medicine practitioner for the Seattle Cancer Treatment & Wellness Center/Cancer Treatment
Centers of America known to specialize in managing advanced-stage oncology patients receiving
metronomic-dosed chemotherapy utilizing Fu Zheng Gu Ben Theory and Master Tungs style of
acupuncture in an integrated clinical setting.

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Introduction to Fu Zheng Gu Ben Theory and Its Application in Oncology
In what is commonly referred to as traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), Fu Zheng Gu
Ben or alternately, Fu Zheng Pei Ben refers to supporting the healthy Qi and optimizing the
bodys innate natural resistance to disease. In this paper, I will use Fu Zheng Gu Ben (FZGB).
Broken down, Fu Zheng translates as support the upright Qi of the body and Gu Ben translates
as consolidate the root to strengthen the resistance to illness (Pan, Cai, Chen, Webb, & Chen,
1992).

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Chinese medicine and allopathic medicine agree that cancerous tumors are a localized
manifestation of a pathology that exists in the entire body. This pathology can result from
exposure to toxins such as radiation or carcinogenic chemicals, or owing to exogenous
pathogens, a malfunctioning immune system or immunodeficiency, poor nutrition, hereditary
tendencies, weakness or damage to the organs, prolonged Qi and/or Blood stagnation, prolonged
Blood or Yin deficiency, emotional factors and more. Combinations of these factors may be
involved as well, such as hereditary tendencies combined with poor nutrition, or immune
deficiency with sufficient exposure to carcinogenic toxins. When applying FZGB theory, it is
essential to properly evaluate the patients constitution and differentiate the syndrome so that the
proper support can be executed. Treatment of symptoms should be subordinate to accurate
pattern identification in order to provide the best care to the patients in counteracting adverse
reactions to harsh allopathic treatment modalities and increase a patients quality of life before,
during and after such therapiespredominantly therapies such as, chemotherapy, radiation, and
surgery (Heuertz, 2006).

General Pattern Differentiation Guidelines of Fu Zheng Gu Ben Theory


FZGB theory when applied therapeutically to advanced-stage oncology patients should
be adjunct to primary allopathic oncology treatments. Firstly, it should address the underlying
constitutional root of the pathology. Secondly, it should address the clinical manifestations
directly or compensating for the imbalances and the clinical adverse reactions caused by
aggressive allopathic treatments (Heuertz, 2006).

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Two pairs of opposing principles, representing four of the eight principles of TCM
diagnosis are commonly used to determine underlying constitutional root in cancer patients. The
first category distinguishes between the opposing but interdependent principles of Yin and Yang;
the second between excess and deficiency. It is of utmost importance to make appropriate
distinctions. For example, deficient Yin is treated by nourishing the Yin using herbs of Yin
nature. Alternately, excessive Yin is treated with herbs of a Yang nature which either boost the
Qi, actively drain or dry, warm or invigorate the circulatory systemall of which are Yang
actions. Failure to distinguish between the Yin or Yang nature of the patients condition can
result in the selection of herbs that are counter-productive. This can be extended to acupuncture,
though typically it is considered by TCM practitioners that acupuncture is far more forgiving
than Chinese herbal medicine in that it is not putting a supplement into the body with complex
chemistry. This can be determined used as what is commonly referred to as the four
examination techniques used in TCM. They are as follows: (a) looking/inspection, (b) listening
and smelling, (c) asking/inquiring, and (d) touching/palpation. For example, if there is only
excess in the pulse, if the cancer is in the early stages, and the constitution is otherwise strong
with sufficient, smooth-flowing Qi, a focused, localized intervention is recommended. However,
if the pulse reveals some underlying weakness, such as Yin, Qi, or Blood deficiency, if the cancer
has already progressed beyond the early stages, or if the constitution shows immunodeficiency,
then it is best to include a formula and acupuncture treatment strategy that boosts or nourishes
the weakened energy in order to attempt to bring the body into equilibrium (Heuertz, 2006).
In addition to the underlying root of the patient, there is often a particular clinical
manifestation or several manifestations involved. These manifestations may be caused by the

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toxicity of the tumor, a malfunctioning immune system, the physical blockage resulting from the
tumor, or they can arise as an adverse reaction of the allopathic treatment. Often, a patient may
experience depression from the chemotherapy or diagnoses of cancer, loss of appetite, or the
physical location of the tumor may interfere with breathing, swallowing, or urination. These are
all considered branch symptoms. Adjunct FZGB can help alleviate the patients symptoms,
strengthen their body, enhance the effects of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and speed healing after
surgery. In my own clinical experience I have found that both acupuncture and Chinese herbal
medicine can greatly offset the adverse reactions of allopathic treatment modalities in patients
diagnosed with advanced-stage cancer (Heuertz, 2006).

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Introduction to Master Tung
The Tung family lineage of acupuncture can be traced back to the Han Dynasty (206
BCE - 220 CE). It was passed orally always from the father to the eldest son and never to a
daughter residing in the Tung family due to the implications that if she possessed the Tung style
of acupuncture and married, her new family would be taught the Tungs style of acupuncture,
thus breaking the lineage. Not until the 20th century where the last Master Tung, Tung Ching
Chang, then residing in Taiwan decided to train outside of his family in order to preserve his
familys acupuncture lineage to benefit future generations. The world was changing and so did
Master Tung Ching Chang. It is documented that through the rest of his life from July 1,
1962-1975, he trained 73 students (McCann & Ross, 2012, p. 11).

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Advantages of Master Tungs Acupuncture


Those that pursue the ongoing didactic and clinical training and practice of Master Tungs
acupuncture techniques know that the needling is conducted away from the diseased area(s).
One advantage of this needling approach is that local areas, which may be quite sensitive, do not
need to be needled directly. For example, often in the case of advanced-stage oncology patients,
the tissue may be inflamed and painful, or necrotic. TCM acupuncturists would not typically
needle the breasts either. However, they may surround the breast, adjacent to the necrotic tissue
which can be both painful and emotionally traumatic to the patient due to the erosive effects
tumors can have. Additionally from my experience, often the oncologist and nursing staff needs
access to the port placed below the clavicle, and the clinicians may need to palpate and examine
the site of disease during their acupuncture session. Acupuncture needles inserted away from the
site of disease is very logical for this reason when working in a multidisciplinary facility.
Various scholars of Master Tung have repeatedly enforced that contralateral needling from the
area of the disorder is done based on classical TCM channel theory. A general rule of thumb and
written in Dr. Wei-Chieh Youngs book, Lectures On Tungs Acupuncture Points Study states in
Biao You Fus poetry on Cross Channel Needling: Treat problems on the left with points on the
right. Treat local problems with distal points (to drain away the problem). Treat disorders on the
head with points on the feet (2008, p. 12).
Never underestimate the power of one needle! One of my mentors repeatedly said this
in various seminars I had throughout the years and I continuously remind myself of this
important lesson. Master Tung and his acupuncture points strategy uses fewer needles that have
often profound and quick results when done correctly. It is less invasive to the patient when

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using fewer needles away from the site of pain or disharmony and far less traumatic both from a
psychological as well as physical perspectives. For the acupuncturist, as one becomes more
skilled, they are able to select a treatment strategy that requires only a few needles to be
punctured on the body which will have a more focused treatment with greater therapeutic results.
Furthermore, many problems can be addressed by needling only one point. Having an extensive
understanding of Channel theory, classical acupuncture texts, and Master Tungs applications of
points will allow for the selection of less points to be used with a far more extensive and potent
acupuncture treatment.

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Master Tungs Location of Extra Points and Naming of the Points
In the Master Tung acupuncture system, there are over 740 points located on the hands,
arms, feet, legs, ears, head and face. A system was developed to help organize and locate the
points. Points on the fingers are defined as 11.00, point on the hand are 22.00, points on the
forearm 33.00, points on the upper arm 44.00, points on the plantar side of the foot 55.00,
points on the medial and dorsal side of the foot 66.00, points on the leg 77.00, points on the
thigh 88.00, points on the ear 99.00, points on the head and face 1010.00, points on the
back DT.00, and points on the chest VT.00 (Wang & Vasilakis, 2013, p. 20).
Master Tungs points have never been named using their own name by any of the Tung
lineage nor senior practitioners of Tung-style acupuncture. For example, Master Tung did not
name point FuKe (11.24) as Tungs Gynecology Point. It is named Female Gynecology
because of the profound effects it has in treating gynecological issues. Points are named
according to their locations such as CeSanLi (77.22) which means beside-sanli in reference to

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it being lateral to Zusanli (ST-36). Some points are named according to their actions or after the
five elements such as ShuiJin (1010.20). ShuiJins (1010.20) name implies the connection
between the Water (Kidney) and Metal (Lung). It strengthens both the Lung and Kidney,
promoting the descending function of the Lungs and the receiving function of the Kidney. This
has excellent outcomes for treating and regulating respiration. So it has very good effect in
regulating respiration (Young, 2008a, p. 240).
Others are named after the Zang-Fu such as Dan (11.13) which means Gallbladder.
The indications for this two-point unit is for palpitations and morbid night crying of babies.
With the extraordinary connection of the Heart and Gallbladder, it is also effective for infantile
night crying and fright due to deficiency of the Gallbladder. This point is located on the
Pericardium channel. Since the Pericardium has the connection with the Stomach, and
disharmony of the Stomach may disturb the sleep, and therefore the point can treat the above
disease. This is the same reason for the indications related to the Gallbladder (Young, 2008a, p.
54).
Some are named after indications that they treat such as GanMen (33.11) which translates
to Liver Gate. This point is most effective for acute hepatitis. Some are named after the
location and action like ZhiShen (11.15) which translates to Finger Kidney as it is located on
the fourth metacarpal which is the San Jiao channel. The San Jiao connects to the Kidney so
therefore this point is indicated for treating dry mouth, Kidney deficiency and back pain. Some
are named according to number such as SanZhong (77.07) which is named Third Weight after
YiZhong (First Weight, 77.05) and ErZhong (Second Weight, 77.06). These points are frequently

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needled simultaneously to treat hyperthyroidism due to heart diseases or for lumps and cranial
tumors (Young, 2008a).

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Body Correspondence, Angle and Depth of Needle Insertion, and Needle Retention
Body correspondence that Master Tung employed corresponds to the following:

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Skin to treat skin
Muscle to treat muscle
Tendon to treat tendon
Vessel to treat vessel
Bone to treat bone (Young, 2008a, pp. 15-16).

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This can be applied in theory to any acupuncture points, including those on the 14
channels to enhance therapeutic effects. Examples are: When a disease such as urticaria, which
has a component of Wind lodged in the skin, superficial shallow needling at XueHai (SP-10) can
be performed. If it is deeper lodged in the muscle, the same point can be needled to a depth that
reaches the muscle layer. Needling YangLingQuan (GB-34) close to the tendon or into the
tendon has a more profound effect on the sinews and tendons than needling in its common
location just slightly anterior and inferior to the head of the fibula. Another example is in the
case of whiplash where a patient cannot extend or flex the neck, needling both ZhengJin (77.01)
and ZhengZong (77.02) through the tendon has profound and immediate relief. TaiYuan (LU-9)
is proximal to the radial artery and is the Influential Point of Vessels which treats vascular

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diseases very effectively. RenZong (44.08) is supplied by the cephalic vein and radial collateral
artery and DiZong (44.09) is supplied by the post-humoral circumflex artery and the Axillary
nerve. Both points are close to large vessels and can effectively regulate blood circulation and
help with those patients suffering from arteriosclerosis and heart disease with excellent results.
Puncturing ZuSanLi (ST-36) alongside the bone with deep insertion and ShenGuan (77.18)
touching the periosteum can tonify the Kidney and treat bone pain (Young, 2008b, pp. 18-20).
Attention to needle angle, depth, and location of the points is also necessary to have
desired therapeutic efficacy when applying Master Tungs principles. Again, lets use the
acupuncture point ZuSanLi (ST-36) as an example. Needling it to a fairly shallow depth of 0.5 to
1 cun treats pain and diseases of the leg. When you needle to a depth of approximately 1.25 to
1.5 cun (depending on the size of the patients leg), it will treat diseases in the Middle Jiao. With
needling to a deeper depth of approximately 2 cun, with long needle retention of 45 minutes or
greater, it is effecting for asthmatic breathing and heart diseases. When you needle to a depth of
2.5 to 3 cun, you can treat headache. Alternately, when you needle to a depth of 2 cun needled
obliquely against the Foot Yangming Stomach channel upward, the point is more effective for
facial paralysis. Additionally, when you needle this point closer to the bone and to a deeper
level, you effect the Kidney more as bone to treat bone. When you needle ZuSanLi (ST-36)
three cun below DuBi (ST-35) and one finger breadth lateral to the tibial bone, it primarily
affects the Spleen and Stomach channels. Lateral to the standard location, you affect not only
the Spleen and Stomach, but additionally, the Gallbladder as well. Master Tung employed
different applications of needle insertion theory, but one of the most important and useful

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clinically is needle shallowly for acute or localized diseases and deeply for chronic, stubborn or
distal diseases (Young, 2008b, pp. 18-20).
In Lectures on Tungs Acupuncture Points Study, Dr. Young describes that acupuncture
needle retention should be at least 30 minutes based on the Ling Shu, Ying Wei Sheng Hui (The
Origin of the Nutrient and Defensive Systems and Qi Circulation in Them, Miraculous Pivot)
which describes one whole circulation of Qi and Blood in the body takes 28 min, 48 sec to make
its way throughout all the channels. Rounding up, typically retention is at least 30 minutes.
Master Tung usually retained the needles for 45 minutes for greater therapeutic effects (2008a, p.
26). In general, it is suggested the needle retention should be for 45 minutes or longer for
stubborn and chronic conditions, cold syndromes, acute abdominal pain and severe diseases (pp.
18-20). In modern times, people and many acupuncture practices are busy. Therefore, in these
circumstances or a lack of additional space and treatment rooms, needle retention should at least
be for at least 30 minutes.

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Master Tungs and Dr. Wei-Chieh Youngs Essential Needling Methods
Dr. Chuan-Min Wang so easily explains Master Tungs usage of Dao Ma needle
technique in his book, Introduction to Tungs Acupuncture. Dao Ma is the usage of typically two
and sometimes three needles spaced 1 to 2 cun depending on the anatomical region and zone the
practitioner is working (note: this can also be a smaller space depending on smaller areas such as
the thumb and fingers and the desirable therapeutic effects and acupuncture treatment strategy).
When utilizing the Dao Ma technique, there is increased therapeutic results as the De Qi
sensation is frequently enhanced and the free flow of Qi is more readily mobilized through the

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San Jiao channel to allow for the regulation of all the bowels and viscera, thereby strengthening
the overall efficacy of the acupuncture treatment strategy by treating the whole body (Wang et
al., 2013, p. 226). For example, if you needle HuoZhu (66.04) and then HuoYing (66.03) which
is one cun distal from HuoZhu (66.04) this will have greater therapeutic effects and is just one
illustration of Master Tungs Dao Ma technique.
In Dr. Youngs (Young, 2008a) book, Lectures on Tungs Acupuncture Points Study, he
explains the use of Master Tungs mobilizing Qi technique which is referred to as Dong Qi
technique. An example of this technique when treating with Foot Taiyang Urinary Bladder and/
or Foot Shaoyang Gallbladder sciatic leg pain is after inserting LingGu (22.05) and DaBai
(22.04) once the desired De Qi sensation has been obtained, ask the patient to move the affected
leg which is generally in most instances on the contralateral side to the acupuncture needles.
When possible, it is best to rotate the needle with the movement of the affected area being
treated. When the pain decreases or entirely ameliorates, this is indicative that the union of the
acupuncture point(s) and technique and the affected area have been balanced. For chronic cases,
the needle should be retained for longer periods of time typically 30-45 minutes (and in some
cases even longer such as stubborn migraines) and rotated at 10-15 minute intervals repeating the
Dong Qi application described above. If the patient is having chest pain for example needle
NeiGuan (PE-6), using the Dao Ma technique, Neiguan (PE-6) and DaLing (PE-7) and ask them
to take several deep breaths. The pain or discomfort will diminish within seconds as it helps
circulate and bring the Qi to the area of concern thus, another Dong Qi treatment strategy. A
third example: for abdominal and stomach pain needle NeiGuan (PE-6) and JianShi (PE-5) or
MenJin (66.05) with NeiTing (ST-44) another two point Dao Ma technique then ask the patient

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to take deep abdominal breaths and massage the area to reduce or entirely relieve the discomfort
(pp. 20-21).
Dr. Wei-Chieh Young developed a technique which he refers to as Qian Yin (Guiding)
needle method after many years of observing Master Tungs Dong Qi techniques and based on
his own clinical experience. In his book, Lectures On Tungs Acupuncture Therapeutic System,
he explains this in detail. For example, we can use the above example of LingGu (22.05) and
DaBai (22.04) needled contralateral to the site of pain. The Shu-Stream points are needled on
the diseased side as a way to help guide or attract the Qi to the diseased channel. For example, if
the pain is along the Foot Taiyang Urinary Bladder channel, you would use ShuGu (BL-65).
Alternately, if the pain is along the Foot Shaoyang Gallbladder channel, you would needle
ZuLinQi (GB-41). If the pain were to occur in both channels simultaneously, you would use
both Shu-Stream points to attract or guide the Qi (2008b, pp. 16-17).
Dr. Young (Young, 2008b) explains in his book, Lectures on Tungs Acupuncture
Therapeutic System:
It is a needing method that is used to attract the Qi flowing to the desired
area. It is based on the theory of attracting effect. If we needle two
points at the same time and then withdraw one needle, the Qi of the other
point will be attracted and flows towards and finally arrives at the area of
the withdrawn needle. If you give a short stimulation to one of the two
points, the Qi will flow towards the retained needle. This is the basic
mechanism of the attracting needling technique. (p. 16)

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Bloodletting was commonly used as a part of Master Tungs techniques and treatments
strategies. The Nei Jing refers to this method of treatment throughout its chapters in treating
chronic, recalcitrant diseases. In Tungs acupuncture point strategies, most of the points on the
Back (DT.00) and Chest (VT.00) are bled using a three-edged needle. Other very important
areas to bleed are ChiZe (LU-5) for all diseases in the upper body and WeiZhong (BL-40) for all
diseases of the lower body and lower extremities, head and back (McCann & Ross, 2012, p.
209).

Traditional Chinese Medicine and the Etiology and Pathology of Tumors


It is imperative to understand the fundamental etiologies and pathologies from a
traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) perspective before delving into FZGBs role integrating
Master Tungs acupuncture treatment strategies with oncology patients undergoing metronomicdosed chemotherapies.
The six exogenous excesses in TCM are considered to play a major role in tumor
formation. In TCM theory, invasion by any exogenous pathogens, including man-made in
modern day such as chemicals and environmental pollutants, can impede the Zang-Fu organs,
and obstruct the circulation of Qi and Blood, leading to Qi stagnation and Blood stasis. In doing
so, if the Wei Qi is weak or deficient, this can create accumulation and congeal non-pathologic
fluids into Phlegm-Damp which in turn can lead to the formation of tumors (Li, 2003, pp. 19-27).

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Exogenous Wind Invading the Lungs


Exogenous Wind is a external pathogenic factor. The reason for this is it can invade the
body on its own or combine with other pathogenic factors such as Cold, Heat, Dampness,
Summerheat and Dryness (Li, 2003, pp. 19-27).
Exogenous Wind is a Yang pathogenic factor. It penetrates the skin and impairs the
movement of Wei Qi. It has a tendency to move upward and outward. Often it invades the upper
portions of the body obstructing the Lung channel and then with no predictable course, it can
spread to many other regions of the body (Li, 2003, pp. 19-27).
Exogenous Wind can combine with Heat and assault the body. If the Heat becomes
extreme, it will inevitably generate internal Wind so the two pathogenic factors have a
concomitant relationship with one another. If the body is unable to extinguish these pathogenic
factors due to Wei Qi deficiency or the endogenous factors are too robust, Heat Toxins will ensue
and attack the Zang-Fu as well as the channels and network vessels. This may propagate various
pathological mutations within the organism (Li, 2003, pp. 19-27).

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Exogenous Invasion of Pathogenic Cold
Exogenous pathogenic Cold primarily injures the skin and flesh but can also affect the
Zang-Fu, bypassing the skin and flesh. Cold is a Yin pathogenic factor and impairs Yang Qi.
Accumulation of Cold leads to Yin abundance with Yang debilitation. The bodys Wei Qi is
responsible for warming and protecting and the Spleen Qis role is that of transforming and
transporting. When they become impaired, a Yin-Cold pattern will manifest. Cold symptoms
associated with cancers of the digestive system are commonly pain in the Middle Jiao and emesis

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or diarrhea caused from exogenous Cold injuring the Yang Qi of the Spleen and Stomach.
Additionally, if Cold injures the functions of the Kidney, Kidney Yang will become impaired and
its ability to contribute in assisting the Wei Qi is further debilitated as the Ministerial Fire is
unable to warm the body at its optimal level (Li, 2003, pp. 19-27).
Furthermore, patients will present with cold and pain in the lower back and spine. With
complications of cancerous tumors or otherwise, patients may also have ascites, and edema
typically in the lower extremities but can be elsewhere such as the face or upper extremities as
well (Li, 2003, pp. 19-27).
Cold is congealing and stagnant in nature; it causes constriction and tension, leading to
discomfort and pain. Cold is sluggish in movement by its very nature. It obstructs and blocks
the movement of Qi and Blood. Tumor-induced pain is similar to the mechanism of pain caused
by Cold in clinical practice. Therefore, warming Cold and ensuing the free flow of Qi while
invigorating Blood concomitantly helps to reduce or ameliorate tumor-related pain (Li, 2003, pp.
19-27).
Exogenous Cold invading the skin and muscles directly causes the hair follicles to
contract trapping Cold which in turn obstructs the Wei Qi resulting in aversion to Cold and fever.
Recalcitrant fever in patients with advanced-stage cancers can often be effectively managed by
treating Cold. If Cold affects the joints, stiffness in the channels and network vessels will occur.
Numbness, coldness, and a hypertonicity can be observed and palpated with a decrease in
flexibility and range of motion to the affected areas of the body. Often the extremities and low
back will be cold to the touch and the patient will report that they are experiencing stiffness in
the joints and numbness in the extremities, trunk, and/or face and head (Li, 2003, pp. 19-27).

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Exogenous Summerheat Damaging Qi


Summerheat is a Yang pathogenic factor. Its very nature is hot and it scorches the Yinfluids within the body causing them to congeal due to the drying nature of Summerheat. With
the congelation of the fluids, Qi and Blood are again obstructed. Stagnation of Qi and Stasis of
Blood may occur with severe damage to the Yin-fluids of the body and can propagate the
formation of tumors (Li, 2003, pp. 19-27).
Additionally, Summerheat and Damp often amalgamate particularly in humid climates all
over the world. When this happens, Summerheat and Damp intertwine. When extreme, it
transforms into Fire and Fire Toxins will attack the body causing a vast variety of clinical
pathologies and presentations. Blood cancers such as leukemia patients often present with
profuse sweating and high intermittent fevers (Li, 2003, pp. 19-27).

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Exogenous Damp Generating Phlegm-Heat Toxins
When Damp penetrates the body, the functional activities of Qi are obstructed as well as
the Yang Qi is impaired. A Yin pathogenic factor, Damp is heavy, sticky, and viscous. It has a
tendency to linger and is difficult to transform and expel from the body. Damp, when it invades
the body, frequently obstructs the Zang-Fu, channels and network vessels. Damp is oppressive
and can cause shortness of breath and labored breathing in the chest, distention in the abdomen,
and problems with a feeling of complete evacuation with the bowel or difficult urination. When
Damp settles and lingers, Heat and Phlegm are generated and this can give rise to Phlegm-Heat
Toxins in the body (Li, 2003, pp. 19-27).

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The Spleen loathes Damp. When Damp invades, the Spleen Yang Qi is handicapped;
impairing its transportive and transformative abilities. Accumulation will result and ascites in
the peritoneum, edema in the extremities and face, and/or diarrhea may occur. Unfortunately,
when the skin and tissues are edematous or especially when there is ascites, the prognosis is very
poor for advanced-stage cancer patients. Typically, this is observed clinically at the most latentstage of neoplasms and Phlegm-Damp-Heat Toxins are prevailing while the patients Zheng Qi is
very debilitated. Palliative care is typically the best Eastern medicine can do in this scenario (Li,
2003, pp. 19-27).

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Dryness-Heat Damaging Lung Yin and Body Fluids
Dryness is a Yang pathogenic factor. It depletes the body fluids and inevitably leads to
Deficiency of the Yin. Dryness has a tendency to attack the Lung Yin which impairs the
dispersing and diffusing functions of the Lungs. Lung cancer is often presents with bloody,
scanty sputum which is Dryness and Heat smolder the lungs. Additionally, radiation therapy to
the head and neck, breast or lungs is an external form of concentrated Dryness-Heat, albeit manmade, it causes the Yin body fluids to become depleted often with permanent dryness issues such
as dry mouth and Xerostomia with reduced capacity for mastication (Li, 2003, pp. 19-27).

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Fire Toxins Scorching Yin
Fire can attack exogenously and is generally thought of as a more severe form of Heat.
Fire blazes upwards. Symptoms of profuse epistaxis, irritability, mental instability, mania,
incoherent speech, and high fever with profuse sweating can often present with Fire.

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Additionally, the pulse will be flooding and rapid frequently felt in all three positions. When
Fire Toxins are present, the Blood moves in a reckless fashion and damage to the vessels and Yin
can no longer contain the Blood causing hemorrhaging or profuse festering tumorous sores such
as in the case of certain types of breast cancer presentations. When this happens the Fire
scorches the Yin fluids causing congelation and Phlegm-Fire and Toxins are pathologically
abundant (Li, 2003, pp. 19-27).

!
Additional Exogenous Factors
Our world with all its technological advances is not without imperfections. Biological
agents, exposure to toxic industrial chemicals or too many chemical agents that have a collective
effect, and wreak havoc in our bodies. The air that we breathe unfortunately has pollutants that
can cause unequivocal damage often irreversible to our internal environment ("Support PSR!,"
n.d.). Many laborers and tradespeople that worked around asbestos primarily in the late 19th
century inhaled small asbestos fibers. Over the course of a decade or two, a very high
percentage developed malignant Mesothelioma, a type of lung cancer (Peto, Seidman, &
Selikoff, 2005). Consumption of alcohol especially when in excess can increase our risks of
oral, pharynx, esophagus, breast, colorectal, and liver cancers ("Alcohol Use and Cancer," n.d.).

Phlegm-Damp Stagnation not Transformed


Phlegm and Fluids can collect and manifest in many ways. If not transformed by the
body, it pools and collects and may lead to serious pathogenic health complications. Phlegm, a
pathogenic substance, can obstruct the Lungs (known as Substantial Phlegm) causing cough and

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wheezing. Often, the phlegm may be able to be expectorated from the lungs; however, if the
phlegm is deep and stuck, it can be difficult to expectorate. Phlegm can block the orifices of the
Heart and leads to chest oppression and fullness, heart palpitations, metal confusion or muddled
thinking, or withdrawal from the external environment and regular social behavioral patterns.
When Phlegm collects in the middle Jiao and Stomach Fu, it can manifest as nausea and/or
vomiting accompanied by focal distention, fullness, and abdominal discomfort. When Phlegm
and Fluids combine with pathogenic Wind, they have a tendency to ascend leading to dizziness
or impairment of vision. Dampness and Fluids can spread beneath the skin and flesh resulting in
edematous tissue. Fluids that collect in the chest and hypochondrium will cause local pain that is
worse with coughing. Fluids above the diaphragm will present symptomatically with coughing
and the patient will not be able to lie in a supine position comfortably. Fluids in the Intestines
will manifest as abdominal dissension, decreased appetite, and borborygmus (Li, 2003, pp.
19-27).
Phlegm-Fluids stagnating internally manifests as various diseases. Yang Ke Xin De Ji (A
Collection of Experiences in the Treatment of Sores) says, Cancers and tumors are not formed
by binding of Yin, Yang or Vital Qi (Zheng Qi), but by Blood stasis in the five Zang organs and
stagnation of turbid Qi or Phlegm (Li, 2003, p. 24). Phlegm, coughing and wheezing, lumps
and accumulation of liquids in the body and many solid masses and tumors are frequently treated
according to the principles of transforming, dispersing, flushing out, or dislodging Phlegm (Li,
2003, pp. 19-27).

!
!
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Phlegm Invading the Channels, Interstices and Network Vessels


Over a long period of time if Phlegm accumulates, it will flow into the channels,
interstices and network vessels. When this happens and if it is not dispersed properly, it will
inevitably transform into Toxic accumulations, resulting in a condition of congealing of Phlegm
and accumulation of Toxins that blocks the channels, interstices and network vessels and inhibits
the Qi transformation in the San Jiao. Furthermore, congealing of Phlegm due to stagnation can
give rise to Heat and combine transforming into Phlegm-Heat Toxic accumulations. This can
affect any part of the body and manifest as malignant tumors. The primary methods in dealing
with this presentation is addressing Phlegm, dissipating Heat, and resolving Toxins. This has
been discussed in the prior section of transforming, dispersing, flushing out, or dislodging
according to TCM principles (Li, 2003, pp. 19-27).

!
Qi and Blood Stagnation & Stasis
Many types of solid cancerous tumors are due to Qi stagnation and Blood stasis. The
Liver Channel spans over the entire breast(s) and the Stomach channel goes to the nipple and has
an external/internal relationship with the Spleen. When the Liver is affected by irritability and
depression, Liver Qi becomes stagnated and constrained damaging the Liver and its functions.
Likewise, the Spleens ability to transform and transport is impaired by excessive worrying and
preoccupation or poor dietary practices giving rise to Phlegm and Damp. These two pathological
states of the Liver and Spleen allow for Qi stagnation and Blood stasis to combine with Phlegm
and Damp to form masses and tumors. Beginning stage of breast cancer is treated by dredging

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the Liver and regulating Qi. As the tumor becomes firmer, Chinese herbal medicine is often
utilized to invigorate the Blood and transform Blood stasis (Li, 2003, pp. 19-27).

!
The Seven Emotions Damaging the Bodys Internal Environment
The seven emotions can lead to internal damage and contribute to the formation of
malignant tumors. Grief, anxiety and irritability, excessive thought and neurotic behaviors
damage the Spleen and Stomach, consume the Blood and Body Fluids and cause Qi to stagnate
transforming to a more viscous substance in the body known as Phlegm. Once Phlegm is formed
anywhere in the body it is stubborn and resistant to transform back to a more fluid state. In the
case of breast tumors, Phlegm may lie dormant for several years until tumors gradually develop.
These tumors combine with heat toxins and eventually will invade others tissues and organs
within the body. Fu Ren Da Quan Liang Fang (Complete Effective Prescriptions for Womens
Diseases) says: Ru yan (mammary rock) is due to depression and anger in the Liver and Spleen,
and depletion of and damage to Qi and Blood. Dan Xi Xin Fa [Danxis Experiential Therapy]
says: A woman who has been in a state of anxiety and depression for a long period will have
obstruction of Spleen Qi and transverse counterflow of Liver Qi. This will gradually give rise to
dormant nodes (Li, 2003, pp. 19-27).

Zang-Fu Organ Deficiency


The five Zang Yin organs and the six Fu Yang organs denote a functional relationship in
that the Zang are paired with the Fu in both a Yin/Yang polarity and an internal/external
relationship. The Zang-Fu along with the Extraordinary Vessels, Essence, Qi, Blood and Body

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Fluids forming the material basis via the channels and network vessels functioning as pathways
of communication (Li, 2003, pp. 19-27).
Zang-Fu deficiency not only means insufficiency of the congenital Pre-Heaven
constitution or deficiency of the acquired Post-Heaven constitution due to lack of nourishment, it
also includes depletion and damage to the organs functions due to the Six Excesses, internal
damage caused by the seven emotions and dietary irregularities (Li, 2003, pp. 19-27).
During optimal conditions, the functions of the five Zang organs promote and control
each otherkeeping one another in a state of balance with each Yin Zang paired with its Yang
Fu organs with an internal-external organizational relationship. The Zang organs govern the
limbs, the five sense organs and the nine orifices. Under normal conditions, this keeps bodily
functions harmonious and healthymaking a persons body resistant to external pathogenic
factors. When the body system is compromised becoming depleted, pathological factors can lay
the foundation for tumor formation (Li, 2003, pp. 19-27).
As we age, the Kidney Qi gradually becomes more debilitated and the Zang-Fu organs
inevitably become more vulnerable and weakened giving rise to the increased ability of tumor
formation. The Wai Ke Qi Xuan (Revelations of the Mystery of External Diseases) clearly states
that: cancers occur in persons aged 40 and older with depletion of Blood and debilitation of Qi,
and a predilection for rich foods (Li, 2003, p. 11).
Likewise, gender also plays a role of the location of tumors. Women are more prone
towards tumor formation in the breasts and uterus. Men are more prone to cancers affecting the
Spleen such as gastrointestinal tumors and prostate cancer. In the Ling Shu: Shui Zhong (The
Miraculous Pivot: On Edema) it was recorded that Qi Bo said, Shi jia (a stone-like mass) occurs

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in the uterus and therefor only affects women. Ren Zhai Zhi Zhi Fang (Direct Indications of
Ren Zhais Formula) says, In men, cancer is more likely to affect the spleen; in women the
breast. When observing the causes of cancer, consideration should be given to the persons
constitution, age and gender tot eh extent that these may be a factor to deficiency and depletion
of the Zang and Fu (Li, 2003, p. 26).

!
Summary
The expansive scope of Chinese medicine considers that the complex development of
cancer is closely related to external pathogenic factors, dietary and emotional irregularities and
factors, Phlegm-Damp accumulations, and consumption and deficiency of the Zang-Fu organs.
In isolated circumstances, these etiological factors are not typically the cause of extensive
diseasebeing the sole cause of cancerous malignant tumors. However, when combined with
the appropriate external and internal factors affecting the body, they can propagate significant
Yin and Yang imbalance, disharmony of the Qi and Blood, dis-regulation to the Zang and Fu
organs, and local toxic pathogenic components that can lead to malignancies. Therefore, it is
essential to apply the methods of FZGB theory in patients diagnosed with cancer to help restore
the functions of the Zang-Fu and restore balance of the Yin-Yang relationship in the body.

!
Dietary Irregularities, Toxic Foods, and Inappropriate Diet Regimen
Food and drink are an essential aspect in helping to maintain optimum health. The old
adage, you are what you eat is partially true however, the frequency, duration between meals,
portion size, variances of the types of foods and beverages, and food and beverage quality all

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play an intricate role as well. The Spleen and Stomach are responsible for rotting and ripening.
They have a upward and downward-bearing as well as a transportive and transformative function
correlating in part to assimilating the vital nutrients extracted from food and beverages
throughout the body. Overconsumption of food, or poor qualities of foods such as deep-fried,
greasy, Cold and Damp foods such as french fries and ice-cream can bog the Spleen Qis
transformative and transportive functions thus generating Heat, Phlegm and Damp in the body.
This type of stagnation can lead to impairment of the bodys natural ability to absorb nutrients
properly via the Spleens impairment of greasy, Cold and Damp foods and beverages. When this
arises, Qi and Blood are not properly supplemented. They will over time become weakened
resulting in a Deficiency of Zheng Qi. The lowered resistance allows for the external exogenous
factors to penetrate the bodys defensive Wei Qi and illness arises. Rotten expired foods that
become rancid, moldy, or contaminated can also wreak havoc and damage the middle Jiao
leading to Heat Toxins and cancers of the Gastrointestinal tract. Equally important is to have
balance of ingesting hot and cold foods and beverages. Overconsumption of thermally warm
foodsspicy and Yang in nature, will damage the Spleen Qi. This can further damage other
Zang-Fu with the appropriate circumstances (Li, 2003, pp. 19-27).
The Jin Kui Yao Lue (Synopsis of the Golden Chamber) says, Eating spoiled rice, rotten
meat and putrid fish will damage the body, as they are toxic. Contaminated foods enter the
Stomach and move downward to the Intestines, they stagnate and bind and are unable to be
digested. Under these circumstances they will transform into Heat and lead to Toxic
accumulations (Li, 2003, pp. 19-27).

!
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Metronomic-Dosed Chemotherapy
Dr. Ben Chue, whom I had the privilege of working alongside for many years, explains
the concept and application of Metronomic-dosed chemotherapy:
This treatment concept has been referred to by many names including lowdose continuous chemotherapy. However, the most popular title is likely
metronomic chemotherapy. Just as a metronome, used to keep proper time
in music, is unvaryingly regular in its rhythm, so too is a metronomic
chemotherapy schedule. This nickname has been applied to chemotherapy
regimens with low doses scheduled at regular (ideally, very short)
intervals over long periods of time. This way, patients receive equal or
greater amounts of chemotherapy without the harsh side effects of
standard high doses and the long recovery period. Unlike in music, where
the tempo may be altered in either direction, the goal with metronomic
chemotherapy is to maintain the low dosing frequency at a much higher
rate than exists in conventional protocols. Lower-dose, longer-term
maintenance chemotherapy protocols have been important components of
treatment for certain cancers (such as acute lymphoblastic leukemia) in
human oncology. The low dose, metronomic dosing of certain
chemotherapy agents such as Paclitaxel is now an acceptable and standard
practice of many oncologists. Still, many oncologists fail to grasp that the
generally low-cost, high-convenience, and acceptable side effect profiles
of these protocols make them innovative and attractive for cancer

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treatment. One reason for the effectiveness of metronomic chemotherapy


is because low, continuous doses appear to exhibit anti-angiogenic
properties which stop the growth of tumors and progression of cancers by
limiting the pathologic formation of new blood vessels. (Lifespring
Cancer Treatment Center," n.d.)

Alternately, standard dose chemotherapy and adjunct agents are typically spaced several
weeks apart and are given at much higher dosages ("Planning Drug Doses and Schedules," n.d.).
The disadvantage of this type of traditional oncologic therapy is frequently the advanced-stage
cancer patient is too weak to tolerate the standard dosing regimen. Because the dosing regimen

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is frequently spaced three weeks apart from one another, it gives too much time for the cancer
cells to proliferate and continue to weaken the host (the patient) by angiogenesiscreating erratic
blood supplies to the tumor (Fidler, 2000). Thus, inevitably it will steal much needed vital
nutrients, blood, and fluids that the the person needs to the once healthy organs and tissues. The
metronomic-dosed chemotherapy (where applicable to the particular type of cancer the patient
has been diagnosed with) is more readily tolerated with advanced-stage oncology patients where
the cancer has metastasized to other organs (though not without any adverse reactions) and will
not suppress and destroy the individuals immune system as much or as severely according to
what I have been taught through my decade of employment at the center where I worked
(Kerbal, 2007).

!
Master Tungs Acupuncture in Advanced-Stage Oncology Patients Undergoing
Metronomic-Dosed Chemotherapy
With the integration of acupuncture in the West, more and more patients diagnosed with
cancers are seeking what is known as alternative therapies. Adverse reactions commonly seen
with the administration of metronomic-dosed chemotherapy are as follows:

!
Nausea and vomiting
Fatigue
Low appetite
Anxiety
Poor memory aka chemo-brain
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Chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN)


Tumor-related pain
Blood-related disorders

!
Acupuncture is most instrumental in helping common adverse reactions associated with
metronomic-dosed chemotherapy:

!
1) It integrates with allopathic oncology treatment modalities and does not interfere with the
prescribed protocols.
2) It reduces or ameliorates the adverse reactions commonly associated with metronomic-dosed
chemotherapy.
3) It supports the bodys natural defenses and helps keep the patients on their weekly
fractionated chemotherapeutic dosages to reduce tumor burden and have increased efficacy
towards managing cancer.

!
Master Tung Points for Nausea and Vomiting
ZongShu (1010.07), and/or FengFu (DU-16) can be pricked with either a three edged needle or
an acupuncture needle. If a small amount of blood is extracted, even as little as a drop of blood,
there will be greater therapeutic effects to decrease or ameliorate nausea and vomiting.

!
!
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Managing Nausea and Vomiting in Advanced-Stage Oncology Patients Caused From


Metronomic-Dosed Chemotherapy Experiential Master Tungs Point Strategy
Right side upper extremity: NeiGuan (PE-6), JianShi (PE-5)
Right side lower extremity: SiHuaShang (77.08), ZuSanLi (ST-36), MenJin (66.05)
Left side upper extremity: WaiGuan (SJ-5), ZhiGou (SJ-6)
Left side lower extremity: TianHuang (77.17), ShenGuan (77.18), GongSun (SP-4)

!
I have needled the above points over 10,000 times with excellent therapeutic effects
while patients underwent metronomic-dosed chemotherapy. Many women I treated were
receiving Taxol and Carboplatin in metronomic doses for advanced-stage breast cancer. Nausea
was a frequent adverse reaction to these agents. Needling the above points were very successful
in helping to consistently manage the nausea without having to take large doses of prescription
anti-emetics. In fact, many of the women who had oral anti-emetics were able to forego them
especially if they were able to have two acupuncture treatments per week in my experience.

!
Clinical Case
A 47-year-old female diagnosed with advanced-stage breast cancer received 24 weeks of
metronomic-dosed chemotherapy using the combined agents, Taxol and Carboplatin. At Week 3
she reported that she was experiencing considerable nausea despite her antiemetic medication her
oncologist prescribed for her. At the time of her visit she reported no other adverse reactions
with the exception of slight fatigue and looser stools. She reported experiencing nausea 24 to 48
hours after receiving her chemotherapy. On a VAS scale of 1-10, she reported overall that her

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nausea was a 6/10. She stated that it made it difficult to eat during this time, though her appetite
was intact. Pulse was moderate with the right guan pulse being slightly Wiry and Slippery.
Tongue was somewhat swollen, pink in color, with a thicker white tongue fur in the center.

!
TCM Diagnoses
Spleen Qi deficiency with rebellious Stomach Qi.

!
Acupuncture Point Strategy
Treatment was given from week three through week twenty-four during chemotherapy infusion
and two days following the infusion with the acupuncture points listed below. Often, I would
alternate and reverse the below points between right and left sides.
Right side upper extremity: NeiGuan (PE-6), JianShi (PE-5)
Right side lower extremity: SiHuaShang (77.08), ZuSanLi (ST-36), MenJin (66.05)
Left side upper extremity: WaiGuan (SJ-5), ZhiGou (SJ-6)
Left side lower extremity: TianHuang (77.17), ShenGuan (77.18), GongSun (SP-4)

!
Patient Report
Patient reported that by Week 5 she noticed a dramatic effect and stated that her nausea was a
2-3/10 during the first 24 hours following chemotherapy with acupuncture. She stated that she
still was taking her prescription antiemetic medication during this time; however, after the 24
hour period following her chemotherapy infusion, she no longer needed to take her antiemetic
medication.

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!
Practitioner Report
The nausea never completely ameliorated however, it greatly decreased and the patient was able
to continue her 24-week chemotherapeutic regimen with no other health concerns regarding
adverse reactions to the chemotherapy. Pulse gradually became less Wiry and Slippery in right
guan position. Tongue remained swollen; however, the thick white tongue fur had greatly
diminished in the center of the tongue.

!
Managing Fatigue in Advanced-Stage Oncology Patients Caused From Metronomic-Dosed
Chemotherapy Experiential Master Tungs Point Strategy
ZhengHui (1010.01)
BiYi (1010.22) on right side for women, left side for men.
Upper extremity: SanChaSan (A.04) one or both sides selected.
Lower Extremity: ShenGuan (77.18), FuLiu (KI-7) one or both sides selected.
Note: Adding ShenGuan (77.18) and FuLiu (KI-7) it further assists in strengthening the Kidney
and supporting the Zheng Qi of the body, which is greatly taxed with oncology patients and any
combination and dosage of chemotherapy.

!
!

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Managing Low Appetite in Advanced-Stage Oncology Patients Caused From MetronomicDosed Chemotherapy Experiential Master Tungs Point Strategy
LingGu (22.05), SiHuaShang (77.08), MenJin (66.05) ShenGuan (77.18).
Note: I typically select LingGu (22.05) and ShenGuan (77.18) ipsilaterally and SiHuaShang
(77.08) and MenJin (66.05) on the opposite side. When ShenGuan (77.18) is paired with
SiHuaShang (77.08), it balances the Spleen and Stomach as ShenGuan (77.18) is on the Spleen
channel and it also strengthens the Kidney in supporting the Zheng Qi. Often there is nausea or
digestive upset so I will add NeiGuan (PE-6) and JianShi (PE-5) opposite to point LingGu
(22.05).

!
Managing Anxiety Using Master Tungs Acupunture Points in Advanced-Stage Oncology
Patients With Diagnosis of Cancer and Metronomic-Dosed Chemotherapy
ZhengJing (1010.08), HuoYing (66.03) with TaiChong (LV-3) Dao Ma to potentiate HuoYing
(66.03). Bleed ear apex.

!
Clinical Case
A 53-year-old female diagnosed with Stage IV pancreatic cancer with a chemotherapy treatment
protocol of 12 consecutive weeks of paclitaxel, oxaliplantin, leucovorin, and 5-fluorouracil
(POLF) seeking help to manage her anxiety with acupuncture. She was seen on the first week of
her chemotherapy infusion. At that time she had no other main health concerns other than her
anxiety on a VAS scale of 1-10 was a 9/10 which affected her ability to fall and stay asleep since
being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer 2 weeks prior. Her guan pulse on the left was Wiry and

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rapid and her cun and chi pulses on the left was Deep and Weak with the right cun pulse also
being Deep and Weak. Her right guan pulse was slightly Hesitant and Choppy. Her tongue
presentation was red tip and sides, pink with slight purple hue tongue body, thin white tongue
fur, with the sublingual veins being distended, bifurcated with purple spots on the underside of
the tongue body.

!
TCM Diagnosis
Liver invading the Heart, Blood stasis in the Middle Jiao, and Kidney deficiency.

!
Acupuncture Point Strategy
Because it was the patients first time receiving acupuncture, she was very hesitant and fearful of
acupuncture needles. Acupuncture was initiated with:
ZhengJing (1010.08), HuoYing (66.03) with TaiChong (LV-3) Dao Ma to potentiate HuoYing
(66.03). I bled ear apex on the right side getting about 4-5 small drops of blood on the initial
visit.

!
Patient Report
Patient returned the following week during the chemotherapy infusion and reported that she had
noticed that the acupuncture treatment had helped reduce her anxiety somewhat to a 6-7/10 and
she slept the evening following acupuncture treatment, for a few hours.

!
!
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!
Practitioner Report
She continued with weekly acupuncture treatments and I gradually added other points such as
ShenGuan (77.18), SiHuaShang (77.08), and FuLiu (KI-7) to address her new health concerns of
appetite becoming progressively less and her deficient chi pulses both on the right and left sides.
Additionally, I eventually omitted bleeding ear apex on a weekly basis and added it back into the
acupuncture point strategy if she began experiencing insomnia again. During the next six weeks,
her pulse gradually became less Wiry in the left guan position and less Choppy and Hesitant in
the right guan position. Additionally, the chi pulses became less deep and were felt easily at the
middle depth with moderate pressure. Her tongue became gradually less red on the tip and sides
and the sublingual veins became less distended and bifurcated. The purple spots on the
underside of the tongue and the slight purple hue on the tongue body never completely
dissipated. Patient was originally told by an unaffiliated hospital that she needed to get her
affairs in order as she would likely only live 8-10 months from her diagnosis of stage IV
pancreatic cancer. She continued several more rounds of POLF therapy (12 sessions per round)
for a period of 4.5 years until she passed away.

Managing Poor Memory aka Chemo-brain in Advanced-Stage Oncology Patients Caused


From Metronomic-Dosed Chemotherapy Experiential Master Tungs Point Strategy
ZhengHui (1010.01) with QianHui (1010.05) Dao Ma, BiYi (1010.22), LingGu (22.05).
Alternate from treatment to treatment with XiaSanHuang (77.18, 77.19, 77.21).

!
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Managing Chemotherapy Induced Peripheral Neuropathy (CIPN) in Advanced-Stage


Oncology Patients Caused From Metronomic-Dosed Chemotherapy Experiential Master
Tungs Point Strategy
Numbness of the face: DaBai (22.04), HeGu (LI-4).
Numbness of the hand and arms: RenHuang (77.21) with ZhongJiuLi (88.25), ShenGuan (77.18)
Numbness of the lower extremities: ZhouShui (1010.25)
Numbness of the feet: SanCha points (A.02, A.03, A.04)
Numbness of the whole body: LingGu (22.05), ZhongJiuLi (88.25) with QiLi (A.01) Dao Ma,
ShenGuan (77.18) or XiaSanHuang (77.18,77.19, 77.21). Alternate from treatment to treatment
with MuLiu (66.06) and MuDou (66.07) Dao Ma.

!
Managing Tumor-Related Pain in Advanced-Stage Oncology Patients Caused From
Metronomic-Dosed Chemotherapy With Master Tungs Acupuncture Points
Bone Tumors: WuHu (11.27)
Brain Tumors: ZhouLun (1010.04), ShangLiu (55.06)
Brain Tumor Pain
1) ShangLiu (55.06) H, Y, ZhengJin (77.01), ZhengZong (77.02) (Hu) (McCann & Ross, 2012,
p. 196)
2) San Zhong San Zhen Dao Ma Group: (77.05, 77.06, 77.07) (Hu) (McCann & Ross, 2012, p.
196)
3) ZhouKun (1010.03), ZhouLun (1010.04) (Young) (McCann & Ross, 2012, p. 196)

!
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Breast Tumors
1) YiZhong (77.05), ErZhong (77.06), SanZhong (77.07)
2) WaiSanGuan (77.27)
3) Prick to bleed upper back
Note: Choose from the above list and alternate from treatment to treatment.

!
Lung Cancer
1) Prick to bleed around lateral lower leg along Foot Gallbladder Shaoyang channel
2) WaiSanGuan (77.27)
3) SiMaZhong (88.17), SiMaShang (88.18), SiMaXia (88.19)
4) LingGu (22.05), DaBai (22.04)
Note: Choose from the above list and alternate from treatment to treatment.

!
Tumors: WaiSanGuan (77.27)

!
Uterine Cancer and Uterine Tumors
1) HuoYing (66.03), HuoZhu (66.04), ShuiJing (66.13), DiHuang (77.19)
2) JieMeiYi (88.04), JieMeiEr (88.05), JieMeiSan (88.06)
3) MuFu (66.02)
4) Prick to bleed over the lower abdomen and sacrum.
Note: Choose from the above list and alternate from treatment to treatment.

!
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!
Managing Blood-Related Disorders With Master Tungs Acupuncture Points in AdvancedStage Oncology Patients Caused From Metronomic-Dosed Chemotherapy

!
Anemia: HuoFuHai (33.07, moxa or needle with moxa most effective), ShenGuan (77.18)
Bleeding Disorders: HuaGuSi (55.05)
Blood Stasis: YuHuo (1010.21)
Generalized Blood Deficiency: TongGuan (88.01), TongShan (88.02), TongTian (88.03)
Leukemia: MingHuang (88.12), TianHuang (88.13), QiHuang (88.14)
Polycythemia: TuEr (99.04)

!
Chinese Herbal Medicine in Fu Zheng Gu Ben Theory
The primary support that FZGB therapy that is most beneficial to patients diagnosed with
cancer is to support the Zheng Qi in strengthening the bodys resistance to pathogens and further
disease progression. This is accomplished with regulating the Qi and supporting the Blood,
regulating the Zang and Fu organs, and optimizing immunity.
Below are some herbs commonly used with the administration of Chinese herbal
formulas given to oncology patients. Herbal dosages and usage of the lists below should adhere
to pattern differentiation within a TCM framework utilizing a reputable Chinese herbal Materia
Medica (Chen, Chen, & Crampton, 2004).

!
!
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Herbs Used for Breast Cancer


Chuan Bei Mu / Bulbus Fritllariae Cirrhosae
Dang Shen/ Radix Codonopsis Pilosulae
Fu Ling/ Poria Cocos Sclerotium
Gua Lou/ Fructus Trichosanthis
Jin Yin Hua/ Flos Lonicerae
Ling Zhi/ Rhizoma Gynostmmatis Pentaphylli
Pu Gong Ying/ Herba cum Radice Taraxaci
Tian Men Dong/ Radix Asperagi
Wang Bu Liu Xing/ Semen Vaccariae Segetalis
Xia Ku Cao/ Spica Prunellae Vulgaris

!
Herbs Used for Carcinoma of the Brain
Che Qian Cao/Herba Plantaginis
Dan Shen/ Radix Salviae Militiorrhizae
Fu Ling Pi/Cortex Poriae
Ling Zhi/ Rhizoma Gynostmmatis Pentaphylli
Quan Xie/Buthus Martensi/Scorpion
Wu Gong/Scolopendra/Centapede
Ze Xie/Rhizoma Alismatis

!
!
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Herbs Used for Cervical Carcinoma


Zi Cao/ Radix Lithospermi
Bai Hua She She Cao/ Herba Oldenlandia Diffusae
Bai Jiang Cao/ Herba Patrinia
Ban Zhi Lian/ Herba Scutellaria Barbatae
Bei Sha Shen/ Radix Glehniae Littoralis
Fu Ling/ Poria Cocos Sclerotium
Huang Qi/ Radix Astragali
Jin Yin Hua/ Flos Lonicerae
Ling Zhi/ Rhizoma Gynostmmatis Pentaphylli
Mai Men Dong/ Radix Ophiopogonis
Ren Shen/ Radix Ginseng
Tian Nan Xing/ Rhizoma Arisaematis
Tu Fu Ling/ Rhizoma Smilacis
Wu Mei/Fructus Pruni Mume
Yi Yi Ren/ Semen Coicis
Yu Jin/ Tuber Curcumae

!
Herbs Used for Dermatological Carcinomas
Ban Xia/ Radix Pinelliae
Bi Ma Zi/Semen Ricini
Chan Tui/ Cicada Periostractum

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Ku Shen/Radix Sophoriae Flavescentis


Nu Zhen Zi/ Fructus Ligustri Lucidi
Shi Shang Bai/ Herba Selaginellae Doederleinii
Shui Zhi/Leech/Hirudu
Tai Zhi Shen/Hai Er Shen/ Radix Pseudostellariae
Ya Dan Zi/Fructus Brucae Javanicae (Topical Only)
Yu Zhu/ Rhizoma Polygonati Odorati

!
Herbs Used for Esophageal Carcinoma
Bai Hua She She Cao/ Herba Oldenlandia Diffusae
Bai Zhu/ Rhizoma Atractylodis Macrocephalae
Ban Xia/ Radix Pinelliae
Dan Shen/ Radix Salviae Militiorrhizae
Dang Shen/ Radix Codonopsis Pilosulae
Dong Ling Cao/Radix Rabdsiae Rubescenti
Fu Ling/ Poria Cocos Sclerotium
Huang Qi/ Radix Astragali
Huang Yao Zi/ Radix Dioscoreae
Ji Xing Zi/ Semen Impatientis
Jiao Gu Lan/ Ganoderma Lucidum
Qu Mai/Herba Dianthi
Ren Shen/ Radix Ginseng

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San Qi/ Tian Qi/Radix Notoginseng/Pseudoginseng


Tu Fu Ling/ Rhizoma Smilacis
Wei Ling Xian/ Radix Clemetidis

!
Herbs Used for Gastric Carcinoma
Bai Hua She She Cao/ Herba Oldenlandia Diffusae
Bai Zhu/ Rhizoma Atractylodis Macrocephalae
Bei Sha Shen/ Radix Glehniae Littoralis
Dang Shen/ Radix Codonopsis Pilosulae
Dong Ling Cao/Radix Rabdsiae Rubescenti
Fu Ling/ Poria Cocos Sclerotium
Gou Qi Zi/ Fructus Lycii Chinensis
Gua Lou/ Fructus Trichosanthis
Huang Qi/ Radix Astragali
Ji Nei Jin/ Endothelium Corneum Gigeriae Galli
Ren Shen/ Radix Ginseng
San Qi/ Tian Qi/Radix Notoginseng/Pseudoginseng
Tu Fu Ling/ Rhizoma Smilacis
Wei Ling Xian/ Radix Clemetidis
Wu Jia Pi/ Cortex Radicis Acanthopanacis
Yi Yi Ren/ Semen Coicis

!
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Herbs Used for Hepatic Carcinoma


Bai Hua She She Cao/ Herba Oldenlandia Diffusae
Bai Jiang Cao/ Herba Patrinia
Bai Zhu/ Rhizoma Atractylodis Macrocephalae
Ban Bian Lan/ Herba cum Radix Lobeliae Chinensis
Che Chian Cao/ Herba Plantaginis
Fu Ling/ Poria Cocos Sclerotium
Jiang Huang/ Rhizoma Curcumae
Ling Zhi/ Rhizoma Gynostmmatis Pentaphylli
Mai Men Dong/ Radix Ophiopogonis
Ren Shen/ Radix Ginseng
San Leng/ Rhizoma Sparganii
Shi Hu/ Herba Dendrobii
Tai Zhi Shen/Hai Er Shen/ Radix Pseudostellariae
Xi Yang Shen/ Radix Panacis Quinquefolii
Yu Jin/ Tuber Curcumae
Zhi Mu/ Rhizoma Anemarrhenae
Zhu Li/ Succus Bambusae

!
Herbs Used for Leukemia
Bai Hua She She Cao/ Herba Oldenlandia Diffusae
Bai Zhu/ Rhizoma Atractylodis Macrocephalae

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Da Qing Ye/Folium Isatidis


Dang Shen/ Radix Codonopsis Pilosulae
Gou Qi Zi/ Fructus Lycii Chinensis
Gui Ban/Plastrum Testudinis
Huang Qi/ Radix Astragali
Huang Qin/Radix Scutellariae
Jiao Gu Lan/ Ganoderma Lucidum
Mai Men Dong/ Radix Ophiopogonis
Mu Dan Pi/ Cortex Moutan Radicis
Sheng Di Huang/ Radix Rehmannia
Shi Hu/ Herba Dendrobii
Shu Di Huang/ Radix Rehmannia (Prepared)
Tai Zhi Shen/Hai Er Shen/ Radix Pseudostellariae
Tian Men Dong/ Radix Asperagi
Zhi Mu/ Rhizoma Anemarrhenae

!
Herbs Used for Lung Cancer
Bai He/ Bulbus Lilii/ Lily Bulb
Bai Lian/ Radix Ampelopsis
Bai Wei/ Radix Cynanchi Atrati
Bai Xian Pi/ Cortex Dictamni Dasycarpi
Bai Zhu/ Rhizoma Atractylodis Macrocephalae

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Dan Shen/ Radix Salviae Militiorrhizae


Han Lian Cao/ Herba Ecliptae
Hai Zao/ Herba Sargassi
Qing Hao/ Herba Artemisiae Annuae
Ren Shen/ Radix Ginseng
Tian Nan Xing/ Rhizoma Arisaematis
Xian He Cao/ Herba Agimoniae Pilosae
Xie Bai/ Bulbus Allii/ Bakeri
Yu Xing Cao/ Herba Houttuyniae Cordatae
Zi Wan/ Radix Asteris Tatarici

!
Herbs Used for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma
Bai Hua She She Cao/ Herba Oldenlandia Diffusae
Bai Mao Gen/ Rhizoma Imparatae
Ban Zhi Lian/ Herba Scutellaria Barbatae
Jin Yin Hua/ Flos Lonicerae
Ling Zhi/ Rhizoma Gynostmmatis Pentaphylli
Mai Men Dong/ Radix Ophiopogonis
Ren Shen/ Radix Ginseng
Sheng Di Huang/ Radix Rehmannia
Shi Hu/ Herba Dendrobii
Shi Shang Bai/ Herba Selaginellae Doederleinii

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Shu Di Huang/ Radix Rehmannia (Prepared)


Tai Zhi Shen/Hai Er Shen/ Radix Pseudostellariae
Tian Hua Fen/ Radix Trichosanthes
Xuan Shen/ Radix Scrophularia
Yu Zhu/ Rhizoma Polygonati Odorati
Zhi Mu/ Rhizoma Anemarrhenae

!
Herbs Used for Ovarian Carcinoma
Bai Zhu/ Rhizoma Atractylodis Macrocephalae
Ban Zhi Lian/ Herba Scutellaria Barbatae
Cao He Che/ Rhizoma Polygoni Bistortae
Che Chian Cao/ Herba Plantaginis
Dang Shen/ Radix Codonopsis Pilosulae
Fu Ling/ Poria Cocos Sclerotium
San Leng/ Rhizoma Sparganii
Tai Zhi Shen/Hai Er Shen/ Radix Pseudostellariae
Yi Yi Ren/ Semen Coicis
Yu Jin/ Tuber Curcumae

!
Herbs Used for Pancreatic Carcinoma
Da Huang/ Radix et Rhizoma Rhei
Fu Ling/ Poria Cocos Sclerotium

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Gua Lou/ Fructus Trichosanthis


San Qi/ Tian Qi/Radix Notoginseng/Pseudoginseng
Ye Ju Hua/ Flos Chrysanthemi Indici
Yu Jin/ Tuber Curcumae
Zhi Zi/ Fructus Gardeniae Jasminoidis

!
Herbs Used for Prostatic Carcinoma
Bai Zhu/ Rhizoma Atractylodis Macrocephalae
Bei Sha Shen/ Radix Glehniae Littoralis
Dan Shen/ Radix Salviae Militiorrhizae
Fu Ling/ Poria Cocos Sclerotium
Gou Qi Zi/ Fructus Lycii Chinensis
Huang Qi/ Radix Astragali
Ling Zhi/ Rhizoma Gynostmmatis Pentaphylli
Mu Dan Pi/ Cortex Moutan Radicis
Shu Di Huang/ Radix Rehmannia (Prepared)
Tai Zhi Shen/Hai Er Shen/ Radix Pseudostellariae
Tao Ren/ Radix Persicae
Yi Yi Ren/ Semen Coicis
Yu Zhu/ Rhizoma Polygonati Odorati
Zhu Ling/ Sclerotum Polypori Umbellati

!
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Herbs Used for Rectal and Colonic Carcinoma


Bai Hua She She Cao/ Herba Oldenlandia Diffusae
Bai Jiang Cao/ Herba Patrinia
Bai Zhu/ Rhizoma Atractylodis Macrocephalae
Ban Zhi Lian/ Herba Scutellaria Barbatae
Da Huang/ Radix et Rhizoma Rhei
Dang Shen/ Radix Codonopsis Pilosulae
Di Yu/ Radix Sanguisorbae Officinalis
Fu Ling/ Poria Cocos Sclerotium
Gua Lou/ Fructus Trichosanthis
Huang Lian/ Radix Coptidis
Ren Shen/ Radix Ginseng
Tai Zhi Shen/Hai Er Shen/ Radix Pseudostellariae

!
Herbs Used for Renal Carcinoma
Ban Bian Lan/ Herba Cum Radix Lobeliae Chinensis
Ban Zhi Lian/ Herba Scutellaria Barbatae
Che Chian Cao/ Herba Plantaginis
Fu Ling/ Poria Cocos Sclerotium
Gou Qi Zi/ Fructus Lycii Chinensis
Jin Yin Hua/ Flos Lonicerae
Ling Zhi/ Rhizoma Gynostmmatis Pentaphylli

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Nu Zhen Zi/ Fructus Ligustri Lucidi


Ren Shen/ Radix Ginseng
Tai Zhi Shen/Hai Er Shen/ Radix Pseudostellariae
Xi Yang Shen/ Radix Panacis Quinquefolii

!
Herbs Used for Testicular Carcinoma
Fu Ling/ Poria Cocos Sclerotium
Jin Yin Hua/ Flos Lonicerae
Ju He/ Semen Citri Reticulatae
Nu Zhen Zi/ Fructus Ligustri Lucidi
Xiao Hui Xiang/ Fructus Foeniculi Vulgaris
Yu Jin/ Tuber Curcumae
Yu Zhu/ Rhizoma Polygonati Odorati

!
Herbs Used for Thyroid Carcinoma
Chan Tui/ Cicada Periostractum
Dan Shen/ Radix Salviae Militiorrhizae
Fu Ling/ Poria Cocos Sclerotium
Hai Zao/ Herba Sargassii
Huang Yao Zi/ Radix Dioscoreae
Ling Zhi/ Rhizoma Gynostmmatis Pentaphylli
Mu Li/ Concha Ostreae

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San Leng/ Rhizoma Sparganii


Xia Ku Cao/ Spica Prunellae Vulgaris
Zhe Bei Mu/ Bulbus Fritillariae Thunbergii

!
Herbs Used for Tongue and Oral Cavity Malignant Tumors
Bai Mao Gen/ Rhizoma Imparatae
Bei Sha Shen/ Radix Glehniae Littoralis
Feng Fang/Lu Feng Fang/ Nidus Vespae
Fu Ling/ Poria Cocos Sclerotium
Huang Lian/ Radix Coptidis
Jin Yin Hua/ Flos Lonicerae
Ling Zhi/ Rhizoma Gynostmmatis Pentaphylli
Mai Men Dong/ Radix Ophiopogonis
Qing Dai/ Indigo Pulverata
Shi Hu/ Herba Dendrobii
Tai Zhi Shen/Hai Er Shen/ Radix Pseudostellariae
Tian Men Dong/ Radix Asperagi

!
Herbs Used for Urinary Bladder Carcinoma
Bai Jiang Cao/ Herba Patrinia
Ban Bian Lan/ Herba cum Radix Lobeliae Chinensis
Che Chian Zi/ Semen Plantaginis

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Da Huang/ Radix et Rhizoma Rhei


Fu Ling/ Poria Cocos Sclerotium
Ling Zhi/ Rhizoma Gynostmmatis Pentaphylli
Qian Cao Gen/ Radix Rubiae Cordifoliae
Tai Zhi Shen/Hai Er Shen/ Radix Pseudostellariae
Xi Yang Shen/ Radix Panacis Quinquefolii
Xiao Ji/ Herba Circii Segeti
Zhu Ling/ Sclerotum Polypori Umbellati

!
!
Chinese Herbal Formulas Used in Fu Zheng Gu Ben Theory
Formulas can be utilized to support patients diagnosed with advanced-stage cancers while
they undergo metronomic-dosed chemotherapy. The formulas listed below can be modified with
individual herbs from the previous section for a more targeted approach following stringent
pattern differentiation guidelines (Scheid & Bensky, 2009).

Common Formulas to Support the Interior for Management of Metronomic-Dosed


Chemotherapy Patients

Category

Formula

Formulas to Boost Qi

Bu Zhong Yi Qi Tang
Liu Jun Zi Tang
Si Jun Zi Tang

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Category

Formula

Formulas to Supplement
Blood

Dang Gui Bu Xue Tang


Qi Bao Mei Ran Dan
Si Wu Tang

Formulas to Supplement
Qi and Blood

Ba Zheng Tang
Gui Pi Tang
Ren Shen Yang Ying Tang
Sheng Yu Tang
Shi Quan Da Bu Tang

Formulas to Boost Qi and Sheng Mai San


Nourish Yin
Formulas to Enrich Yin

Da Bu Yin Wan
Liu Wei Di Huang Wan
Sha Shen Mai Men Dong Tang
Zhi Bai Di Huang Wan
Zuo Gui Wan

Formulas to Warm Yang

Ba Wei Di Huang Wan


You Gui Wan

!
Cancer is a complex disease with various forms of etiologies and pathologies as
mentioned previously. With the presentation of accumulation of toxins and/or heat gives rise to
stagnation and obstruction, the stagnation and obstruction leads to further heat or toxin
accumulations. To ensue a change in this vicious cycle one uses herbs to clear heat, resolve
toxin, move blood, and dispel stasis. In China, this approach is seldom used alone but usually in
combination with chemotherapy or surgery. Anti-neoplastic herbal therapy is only used alone if
the patient is too weak to accept western medical treatments or for some other reason is unable or
unwilling to undergo such treatment.

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Because Bai Hua She She Cao and Ban Zhi Lian are used to manage most cancers, some
practitioners prepare a separate formula of these two herbs as a syrup and have the patient take it
with a specific herb formula (Heuertz, 2006).

!
Bai Hua She She Cao Ban Zhi Lian Gao
Bai Hua She She Cao (60 grams)
Ban Zhi Lian (60 grams)

!
1) Place the above herbs in a large pot and add enough water to cover the herbs and soak for
one-half hour (It is good to grind the herbs coarsely so that they are less bulky).
2) Bring the herbs to a boil then lower the heat to a simmer and cook for 25 minutes.
3) Strain out the herbs and return the liquid to the pot. Continue to cook on a low flame until the
liquid reduces to about one quarter of the volume it was when it was returned to the pot.
4) Add honey to the remaining liquid and cook on a low flame until mixture thickens into a
syrup. The amount of honey required varies according to the viscosity of the herb liquid and the
type of honey. Typically, at least a 1:1 ratio of honey to herb liquid is used, but this ratio can be
increased up to 3:1. This syrup can be stored in the refrigerator for several weeks. The usual
dose is two tablespoons dissolved in a cup of hot water 3 times per day (Heuertz, 2006).

!
!
!
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Formulas Used in Modern-Day to Manage Oncology Patients Given Metronomic-Dosed


Chemotherapy

Formula
Ba Zheng San

Application
Bladder and urinary tract cancers

Explanation with Examples of


Herbal Additions
Treats Damp-Heat in the Lower
Jiao. Add herbs in the UB
carcinoma list above when
appropriate to strengthen the
effects.

Long Dan Xie Gan Thyroid cancer with Heat signs


Tang

Add Shan Dou Gen and herbs for


Thyroid cancer list above such as
Xia Ku Cao, Zhe Bei Mu and
Dan Shen.

Mai Men Dong


Tang

Lung cancer

Qi and Yin Xu. Add Chi Shao,


Yu Xing Cao or other herbs in
the list above for lung cancer
such as Bai Wei, Xian He Cao,
Zi Wan, Tian Nan Xing when
appropriate.

San Zhong Kui


Jian Tang

Lymphatic and thyroid cancers

Add herbs to dispel stasis in the


appropriate areas. Use guiding
herbs if there are tumors in
various regions of the body such
as in the upper extremities add
Jiang Huang and Gui Zhi or
lower extremities add Chuan Niu
Xi. If Dampness in lower
extremities, add Si Miao Wan.

Xue Fu Zhu Yu
Tang

Lung cancer with Qi and Blood


Stagnation & Stasis

Add Xia Ku Cao and or other


appropriate herbs like Gua Lou
Shi or herbs in lung cancer list
when appropriate.

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Formula

Application

Explanation with Examples of


Herbal Additions

Zi Cao Gen Mu Li
Tang

Breast cancer involving the lymphatic For Excess Heat-Toxin patterns


ducts
with malignant tumors at or near
the nipple. Add Lu Lu Tong, Mo
Yao, Qing Pi, Wang Bu Liu Xing
and Pu Gong Ying.

Dang Gui Si Ni
San

Abdominal masses including tumors


in the spleen, pancreas, liver,
intestines and gynecological tumors

Ge Xia Zhu Yu
Tang

Bai Hua She She Cao, E Zhu,


San Leng, Ban Zhi Lian should
be added to dispel Toxic-Heat
accumulations and move Blood.
Many other herbs can be
considered when appropriate.

Gui Zhi Fu Ling


Wan

Shao Fu Zhu Yu
Tang

Zhe Chong Yin


Shi Liu Wei Liu Qi Breast cancer with Toxic swelling of
Yin
the breast and pus. Use when there is
an underlying deficiency of Qi and
Blood.

Add Pu Gong Ying, Wang Bu


Liu Xing, and Yu Jin.

!
The individual herbs and Chinese herbal formulas listed above are in no way intended to
be a primary form of treatment for patients diagnosed with cancer. Rather, they can be
implemented in an integrative modality to help offset the adverse reactions of patients
undergoing metronomic-dosed chemotherapy or other standard primary treatments given to
oncology patients such as standard-dose chemotherapy, radiation, surgery, hormonal therapy,
targeted therapies etc. Furthermore, many of the individual herbs and Chinese herbal formulas
are designed to support the Zheng Qi and strengthen the bodys natural defenses in optimizing

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immunity, harmonize digestion, reduce toxicity and clear toxins, regulate the Qi and invigorate
the Blood etc. The herbs and formulas should be used in accordance with TCM theory,
principles and texts under a trained Chinese medicine practitioner.
Granules or bulk (i.e., raw or crude) herbs are generally thought the most therapeutically
effective by various senior practitioners I have had the privilege with being mentored by them
however, bulk herbs can be problematic in several ways such as having the space for them in a
small clinic, maintaining potency if they remain on the shelf for a prolonged period of time, and
with patient compliance in properly preparing them and tolerating the smell when they are
decocted by the patient. In todays modern western society, often granules are used for
compliance, stringent quality assurance and preparation methods. Patents in pill form can be
used when patient compliance is not well tolerated for drinking herbsespecially when certain
formulas may be given for a long duration of time such as Liu Wei Di Huang Wan as one
example.

!
Congees That Help Strengthen and Support Advanced-Stage Oncology Patients
Undergoing Metronomic-Dosed Chemotherapy
Congees are a porridge-like nutritious food. Typically, made from a base of rice,
sorghum, corn, or other grains or seeds. They are easy to digest and applicable to cancer patients
when their appetite and digestion have been impaired from the chemotherapeutic agents such
that they cannot properly absorb and assimilate nutrients from standard foods they typically are
accustomed to ingesting (Li, 2003, pp. 385-391). It is a preferred method, and a beneficial
substitute to the allopathic B.R.A.T. (bananas, rice, applesauce, and toast) diet and can be varied

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adding different foods and medicinal herbs to promote health and aid in digestion. Below are a
few of literally hundreds of recipes that are easy for the patients in America to tolerate and
enhances compliance with supplementation of medicinal congees. Chinese Materia Medica such
as Astragalus root (Huang Qi), Chinese Wolfberry (Gou Qi Zi), ginseng (Ren Shen) and Reishi
mushroom (Ling Zhi) can be given to the patient so that it will make it easier for them not trying
to locate those items. Additionally, granules may be substituted using appropriate conversions at
the practitioners prescribing discretion.

!
Shan Yao Er Mi Zhou (Chinese Yam, Rice, and Millet Congee)
Ingredients:
Chinese Yam (Shan Yao) 50-100 grams
Rice (Geng Mi) 25 grams
Millet (Su Ya) 25 grams
Rock candy 20 grams

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!
Preparation: Peel the Chinese yam (Shan Yao) and cut into pieces. Add the yam (Shan Yao),
rice (Geng Mi) and millet (Su Ya) to 4 cups of water. Bring to a boil and reduce heat to simmer
for 40 minutes until the congee is ready.
Properties: Sweet and neutral.
Channels entered: Spleen, Stomach, Lung, Kidney, Large Intestine.
Functions: Fortifies the Spleen, supplements the Lungs, enriches the Kidneys, and nourishes the
Stomach.
Indications: Debility and poor appetite in cancer patients resulting from surgery, radiation or
chemotherapy (Li, 2003, pp. 385-391).

!
Hei Zhi Ma Er Mi Zhou (Black Sesame Seed, Rice and Millet Congee)
Ingredients:
Rice (Geng Mi) 50 grams
Millet (Su Ya) 50 grams
Black sesame seed (Hei Zhi Ma) 50 grams

!
Preparation: Stir-fry to the point of when the black sesame seeds (Hei Zhi Ma) are fragrant.
Then, crush the seeds. Add the rice (Geng Mi) and millet (Su Ya) to 6 cups of water, bring to a
boil and reduce to simmer for about 40 minutes. Mix in the sesame seeds (Hei Zhi Ma) and
serve.
Properties: Sweet, aromatic, and neutral.

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Channels entered: Spleen, Stomach, Kidney, and Large Intestine.


Functions: Fortifies the Spleen, increases the appetite, aids digestion, moistens the intestines,
and has anti-cancer properties.
Indications: Deficiency patterns in the middle-aged and elderly, and in cancer patients (Li, 2003,
pp. 385-391).

!
Ling Zhi Hong Zao Zhou (Ganoderma Mushroom and Chinese Date Congee)
Ingredients:
Reishi mushroom (Ling Zhi) 15-20 grams
Chinese dates (Da Zao/Hong Zao) 15-30 grams
Rice (Geng Mi) 50 grams

!
Preparation: Put the Reishi mushrooms, dates (Da Zao/Hong Zao) and rice (Geng Mi) in 6 cups
of water, bring to a boil and simmer for approximately 40 minutes until the congee is thick, then
serve.
Properties: Sweet, bland, warm.
Channels entered: Spleen, Lung, and Kidney.
Functions: Greatly supplements Deficiency.
Indications: Leukopenia (low white blood cell count) in the early, middle or late stages of
radiation or chemotherapy (Li, 2003, pp. 385-391).

!
!
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Ren Shen Zou (Ginseng Congee)


Ingredients:
Ginseng (Ren Shen) 5 grams
Fresh ginger (Sheng Jiang) 15 grams
Rice (Geng Mi) 50 grams

!
Preparation: Use powdered ginseng (Ren Shen) and press the fresh ginger (Sheng Jiang) to
squeeze out the juice. Add 4 cups of water and boil down until it is approximately 2 cups of
liquid. Add the rice (Geng Mi) and simmer over a low heat for 30 minutes until the congee is in
a porridge state. Take a little at frequent intervals on an empty stomach.
Properties: Sweet, salty, bland, warm.
Channels entered: Spleen, Stomach, Heart, and Kidney.
Functions: Greatly supplements the Zang organs, augments Original Qi (Yuan Qi), nourishes the
Spirit, and has anti-cancer properties.
Indications: Cachexia, anemia, debility, emaciation, palpitations, shortness of breath, insomnia,
poor appetite, and chronic diarrhea in cancer patients. Also, can relieve side-effects of surgery,
radiation, and chemotherapy (Li, 2003, pp. 385-391).

!
Niu Rou Zhou (Beef Congee)
Ingredients:
Beef 100 grams
Cornstarch 10 grams

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Rice (Geng Mi) 25 grams


Millet (Su Ya) 20 grams
Coix seeds (Yi Yi Ren) 20 grams
Beef stock/bouillon cube

!
Preparation: Cut the beef into thin slices and coat with the cornstarch mixed with water. Put the
rice (Geng Mi), millet (Su Ya) and Coix seeds (Yi Yi Ren) in 2 cups of water and bring to a boil
and simmer for 20 minutes. Add the beef and simmer for another 30 minutes. Add the beef
stock cube and salt if desired. Serve hot.
Properties: Salty, sweet, warm.
Channels entered: Spleen and Stomach.
Functions: Supplements Spleen-Earth, fortifies the Spleen and Stomach, and has a similar
function to Astragalus root (Huang Qi) in supplementing Deficiency of Post-Heaven Qi and
Blood.
Indications: Cachexia due to malignant tumors, especially tumors in the digestive tract with
loose stool or diarrhea (Li, 2003, pp. 385-391).

!
Qi Qi Ling Fen Zhou (Astragalus, Wolfberry and Water Caltrop Starch Congee)
Ingredients:
Astragalus root (Huang Qi) 30 grams
Chinese Wolfberry (Gou Qi Zi) 20 grams
Rice (Geng Mi) 20 grams

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Millet (Su Ya) 20 grams


Chinese dates (Da Zao/Hong Zao) 10 grams
Water caltrop starch (or water chestnut starch) 15 grams

!
Preparation: Decoct the Huang Qi in 1.5 to 2 cups and boil down to approximately 3/4 to 1 cup.
Strain off the liquid and discard the residue. Add the Chinese Wolfberry (Gou Qi Zi), rice (Geng
Mi), millet (Su Ya) and Chinese dates (Da Zao/Hong Zao) to the strained decoction, top off with
another 3/4 to 1 cup of water, bring to a boil and simmer for 30 minutes until congee resembles a
porridge. Mix the water caltrop starch (or cornstarch) and bring back to a boil. Serve warm. Eat
once every three days.
Properties: Sweet and warm.
Channels entered: Spleen, Lung, Liver, and Kidney.
Functions: Supplements the Middle Jiao and augments Qi, supports the Vital Qi (Zheng Qi) and
has anti-caner properties. Astragalus root (Huang Qi), Chinese dates (Da Zao/Hong Zao) are
supplementing ingredients that inhibit cancer; Chinese dates relieve Toxicity and supplement the
Blood to inhibit cancer.
Indications: Weakness and emaciation in patients with malignant tumors. Helps alleviate sideeffects of radiation and chemotherapy (Li, 2003, pp. 385-391).

!
!
!
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Lifestyle, Qigong, Meditation, and Nutrition for Advanced-Stage Oncology Patients


Undergoing Metronomic-Dosed Chemotherapy
Lifestyle encompasses a vast range of topics in Western society. We all tend to lead a
busy lifestyle in various ways. For each person this can be different, so integrating a balanced
approach may be of benefit. Generally speaking, for those unfortunately diagnosed with cancer
and undergoing metronomic-dosed chemotherapy, it is important to rest after allopathic
treatments. Trying to get 8 hours of sleep each evening or more in some cases it beneficial in
allowing the body to recuperate from chemotherapeutic agents. Additionally, it is important to
try and get some exercise even if this means walking to the mailbox or around the block and
gradually increasing the distance each day (Mayo Clinic Staff, n.d.). Often advanced-stage
oncology patients report that they initially awake with fatigue following their western treatments
however, once they get up and out of bed or off the couch and get outdoors for a walk or other
forms of exercise, they almost always feel betterless fatigued. It is important to stress that
they should not push themselves to the point of exhaustion because this can be taxing and further
delay their recovery. Finding their individual balance is subjective as each person is unique and
not entirely like another. Furthermore, with todays busy work environment it is important to
stress that if a person must maintain their job which is frequent in the United States, they try and
find the balance in not working themselves to complete physical and mental exhaustion. This
will inevitably be detrimental towards their recovery.
Traditional Chinese medicine theorizes that tumors are formed due to insufficient of the
Zheng Qi, which leads to impairment and injures the functions of the Zang-Fu organs. This
inevitably will lead to Qi stagnation initially, followed by Blood stasis. Fluids will congeal to

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form Phlegm, and accumulation and binding of toxic pathogenic factors will ensue giving rise to
cancer and malignancy with metastasis in the late stages. Mechanisms that contribute to an
individuals decline are improper diet, inability to adapt to changes in climate or temperatures,
overexertion, and emotional instabilities (Li, 2003, pp. 19-27).
Learning and practicing qigong, meditation, or taijiquan can help one to regain structure
and balance and assist in trying to regain balance in that it helps to regulate respiration, regulate
Qi and Blood, provides balance in harmonizing emotions and reduces inflammation thus,
increasing an individuals quality of life (Oh et al., 2009). There are many national support
groups such as Gildas Club that provide these services at no charge and reportedly by patients,
most beneficial.
Nutrition is important as cancer consumes the bodys resources. It is important to get a
balance of nutrients with easily digestible foods which are readily absorbed and assimilated
(Pitchford, 1996). I have already listed congees as an invaluable way to get nutrients. It is
important that oncology patients abstain from an excessive amount of sugary foods as possible
(Shigihara & Erickson, 2010, p. 102).
We all utilize sugar metabolically speaking, however, an excess of sugary foods found in
desserts, pastries, cakes and candy however may not be what the doctor had intended so to speak.
Cancer cells love sugar just as our noncancerous cells do. Cancerous tumors create a dominant
and erratic blood supply. They are able to quickly utilize sugars converted to glucose in the
body, essentially starving other vital organs and tissues of much needed nutrients. Some
physicians uphold in their theoretical foundations that when we feed our body excessive amounts
of sugar, this is like adding gasoline to a fire. Cancer cells quickly gain the upper hand and

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utilize it for energy and proliferate. By decreasing the amount of refined and processed sugars
and all processed foods that have high fructose and other non-essential additives, we can help to
assist our internal environment in not feeding cells glucose. For oncology patients in the West
who typically eat a diet high in processed foods that are prepackaged or convenient, a diet rich in
whole foods, grains, and plant-based diets are suggested. Furthermore, many naturopathic
physicians I have worked alongside recommend that fatty and processed meats should be
avoided while a moderate amount of good protein found in cold water fish such as salmon and
free-range hormone free chicken should be substituted in small amounts. In general, lean meats
are recommended (Murray, 2002, pp. 150-164).
Almond butter and tree nuts contains no aflatoxin and is safer for an oncology patient to
consume due to them being immune compromisedit is recommended that they avoid peanut
butter because of the aflatoxin that so easily grows on the legume (Campbell, 2006).
There is much research on green tea (Camellia sinensis) and has been consumed in Asia
for thousands of years. It is less oxidized than oolong or black tea which also come from the
leaves of the same plant. Green tea is known for its anti-oxidative properties an contains
polyphenols and flavonoids which are a group of phytochemicals present in many plant products
responsible for health benefits such as anti-oxidative and anti-carcinogenic functions. Green tea
is commonly recommended for advanced-stage oncology patients undergoing metronomic-dosed
chemotherapy as it can help reduce inflammation and potentially assist in reducing neoplastic
cell proliferation ("Tea and Cancer Prevention," 2010).
Our environment has changed and we too must adapt. No longer are our foods
commonly as rich in nutrients as they were in the last century. With the introduction of

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agricultural foods and chemicals such as pesticides, it is best (if possible) to consume trusted
sources of organic foods found at various supermarkets or farmers markets locally in our
demographic.

!
Support Networks, Patients Mental Attitude and Conclusion
Through the years, I have always observed one element that seems to be an important
factor and not entirely understood is a patients mental statein having a positive attitude
towards being an active participant towards a journey of healing. This does not mean with the
diagnoses of advanced-stage cancer that healing necessarily constitutes survival. It can mean
many different things depending on the individual and their own personal journey. For some, it
can be coming to terms with the fact that we are impermanent beings and we all inevitably will
face mortality. For others, faith in whatever they believe and acceptance that they soon will pass
relinquishing control may be their own personal journey. Others, it simply may be embracing
themselves and their familyhaving patience and understanding. Nonetheless, it is interesting
to note that when patients diagnosed with advanced-stage cancer have a positive outlook, their
outcome will be better no matter whether they survive for a greater period of time or whether
they pass in serenity in my own clinical observation. There are some publications on this subject
but often they are difficult to conduct stringent research methods ("Emotional Well-Being,"
2013).
In conclusion, having compassion for the people we are so fortunate to treat should
remain in our conscious. For myself, having over a decade of experience in helping to manage
individuals diagnosed with advanced-stage cancer receiving metronomic-dosed chemotherapy

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with Master Tung style acupuncture and applying Fu Zheng Gu Ben treatment strategies in an
integrated clinical setting has been an honored privilege. With continued understanding and as
my knowledge and application of Master Tung style acupuncture grows, so does the therapeutic
efficacies of the treatments I am able to provide. There is an endless combination of Tung-style
points that always enable the practitioner to refine their treatment strategies in order to have
profound treatments results. With advanced practitioners and scholarly mentors such as Dr. WeiChieh Young, the late Dr. Miriam Lee, Dr. Chuan-Min Wang, Susan Johnson, and Dr. Henry
McCann we are able to deepen our understanding of Master Tung style acupuncture and theory.
I am grateful for their contributions in rich texts and lectures. As a practitioner, I am always
aware that there is a dialogue amongst myself and the patients I am able to have a professional
relationship with. At times, I am the teacher, communicating to them Chinese medicine and its
intricacies. Most of the time, I am the studentlearning from them.

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