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The abuse of the laws that govern

Hunting & Fishing

In Ontario

Being a responsible hunter and fisherman The importance of hunting & fishing The different punishments;

  • - Fines

  • - Contraventions

  • - Etc…

The effects of the abuse of the hunting & fishing The science of hunting & fishing How to avoid abusing the laws that are often abused Wildlife identification Fishing and Hunting seasons (provincial)

The abuse of the laws that govern

Hunting & Fishing

In Ontario

TABLE DES MATIÈRES

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 
 

Introduction à la chasse et la

2-6

Définitions

2

L’importance de la chasse et la pêche

2

Un chasseur et pêcheur responsable

3

La sécurité

5

 

6

 

Cartes de l’Ontario

8-13

Description

8-9

Territoires de chasse

10-12

Zones de pêche ..............................................................13

 

L’abus des lois

14-18

Pourquoi respecter ces lois ...........................................14 La science.......................................................................15 Les écosystèmes sans les humains ................................16 Le braconnage et gaspillage de la vie sauvage ..............17 Conclusion .....................................................................18

 

Entrevue avec Justin Hoffman

21-23

L’entrevue ......................................................................22 Résumé ..........................................................................23

 

Les lois spécialisées à l’autochtones

26-27

Les lois et les amendes

28-37

Les amendes

27-35

Scénarios

36-37

Identification de la vie sauvage

40-43

Comparaison de la famille des chevreuils .....................41

 

Comparaison des familles de poisson

42-43

Hunting species and seasons

44-77

Fishing species and seasons

75-87

Hunter Orange

90-91

Bibliography

94-97

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INTRODUCTION TO HUNTING AND FISHING

INTRODUCTION TO HUNTING AND FISHING

Important definitions:

INTRODUCTION TO HUNTING AND FISHING INTRODUCTION TO HUNTING AND FISHING Important definitions: Hunting Hunting for wildlife

Hunting

Hunting for wildlife or game, especially for food or sport.

Game

Game is any animal hunted for sport or for food.

Wildlife

Undomesticated animals living in the wild.

Fire arm

A weapon, like a rifle or a pistol, from which a projectile is fired by gunpowder.

Fishing

The activity of catching fish, either for food or as a sport

The importance of hunting and fishing :

Hunting and fishing are two very controversial activities. The reason why these activities still exist today is through government that wants to control and help ecosystems by allowing us to hunt and fish. It is true that for some people and from a certain point of view, these activities can be seen as cruel or unfair to the animal but it's important to recognize the importance of these activities and to realize that this has more advantages than disadvantages. The reasons why hunting and fishing are important activities for biological, social and other reasons is for the following reasons:

Surveillance of the fish and wildlife population.

Monitoring activity of hunters, fishermen and harvesters.

Research on the environment, ecosystems, biodiversity, nature, etc ...

Harvest planning and allocation.

Conservation of habitats.

Public contribution.

Good for the economy.

Provides more reasons for conserving our forests, water bodies and nature.

Greater appreciation of nature from the public.

It encourages teamwork

INTRODUCTION TO HUNTING AND FISHING

A responsible outdoorsman:

Surveys show that the vast majority of non-hunters and non-fishermen in Ontario accept such activities provided that there is no abuse. Which in this case, people will start to have concerns. It is important to recognize that the majority of citizens who live in Ontario are non-fishermen nor hunters, and when they start to have concerns with the rights or laws of hunting and fishing, the government would have to listen to them more because they have more participants against it. It is therefore important that each individual who is interested in such activities know why and how to be a responsible hunter and/or fisherman.

Why?

These concerns may lead the public to consider these activities as "unfair" and "cruel" to the animals. With public concerns about fishing and hunting, the public can develop an image arrogance and injustice in wildlife for hunters and fishermen. Once concerns are developed, the vast majority of Ontario and Canadian citizens would be mostly focused on the fact that these activities involve and require the killing of animals, which could result in consequences such as stricter laws or even elimination of all rights of hunting and fishing from the people. For these reasons, it is therefore important for all those who fish and/or hunt to respect the following regulations and the laws that govern these activities.

How?

Respect: Hunters and fishermen must respect wildlife. It is important that every individual who is interested in such sport understands that animals are not just targets to shoot and kill for fun. This includes respect with wildlife, habitats, territories, other people, hunters and fishermen, private property, laws and those who are in the area. You may ask yourself these four following questions to see how environmentally friendly you are:

Do I hunt or fish for a valid reason?

Do I fully use the animals I take?

Do I hunt or fish in a way that respects the values of others, hunters, fishermen, non-fishers and

non-hunters? Did I properly educate myself about the animals I hunt or fish?

Responsibility: It is important that every hunter and fishermen is responsible; this means knowing the laws. for hunters, you have to know and practice with your weapon in order to know when to shoot and to ensure that it is a clean shot to minimize the wounds and suffering of the animal. You must also be prepared to follow and track down an injured animal. You can ask yourself these four following questions to see how responsible you are:

Do I understand the population concerns and wildlife management objectives associated with the

animal I am hunting? Do I have the skills, knowledge and equipment to make clean kills or catch the fish I am targeting?

Do I have the skills, knowledge and equipment to retrieve and prevent waste of animals taken?

Have I accounted for the concerns and sensitivities of those whose lands I use to hunt or fish?

INTRODUCTION TO HUNTING AND FISHING

INTRODUCTION À LA CHASSE E

Safety: It is important that each hunter and fisherman uses the equipment safely. For fishermen: if you use

a boat, make sure that it is in good condition, does not leak and that the waves are not too big for your boat. If you are fishing on ice, you must ensure that the ice is in good condition. For hunters, you must use

weapons and equipment in safe ways, use safe procedures and use equipment the way it’s made to be used.

You may ask yourself these three following questions to see how safe you hunt and/or fish:

 

Do I know and follow the hunting/fishing laws?

Do I follow safe procedures at all times?

In addition to safe use of equipment, have I considered the risks of other tools, such as chainsaws, hooks and knives? As well as the techniques used during hunting and fishing?

Preservation: Preservation plays an important role in hunting and fishing. We must continue to ensure that these activities help to support the wildlife population. Moreover, as a fisherman or hunter, it is important to see hunting and fishing from an environmental and social point of view in order to reduce negative effects on wildlife and the environment. You may ask yourself these two following questions to see if you preserve while you hunt and/or fish in good ways:

 

Does my hunting activity demonstrate my knowledge and concern for the long-term sustainability

of wildlife and wildlife habitat? Are there lifestyle choices, outside of my hunting and fishing that I can make that will benefit wildlife and the environment?

Image: Each hunter and fisherman must respect the laws and these six regulations (respect, responsibility, safety, preservation, image and honor the heritage) in order that non-hunters and non-fishermen have a good perception on these activities. This is very important because the majority of people in Ontario and

Canada are not hunters or fishermen and they’ll have a greater say in things if they believe that we need to

make the law stricter or even remove the hunting and/or fishing rights from the people. You may ask yourself these three questions to see if you are planning a good image for hunting and/or fishing:

 

Will hunters, fishermen and non-hunters view the way I hunt and/or fish and where I hunt/fish as

appropriate? Am I willing and able to modify, restrain or defend my activity in response to thoughtful

criticism? Am I aware that things that I say and do, even when I am not hunting can affect the image of hunters and fishermen?

Honor the heritage: Hunting and fishing is kept popular and active through sharing wildlife with family and friends, songs, stories and art. Relationships and bonds are formed when people hunt and/or fish. These are two special activities to the people who participate. You may ask yourself these two following questions to ensure that you honor your heritage:

 

Is my hunting true to those traditions that respect the natural world and the animal being hunted?

Since the “kill” is just a part of the overall hunting experience, am I keeping it in perspective when I talk to others? Am I describing the complete experience, including planning, scouting, friendships, non-game experiences, weather and meals?

4

INTRODUCTION TO HUNTING AND FISHING

The safety of hunting and fishing

One of the most common questions and arguments against hunting and fishing is that they are not safe activities even though there are several studies that prove that hunting and fishing are safe activities and one of the safest recreational activities in the world - here are some reasons why:

In Ontario, each hunter must pass the Ontario Hunter Training Course, and each hunter using a firearm must

pass the Canadian Firearms Safety Course. Each course requires the student to pass the final exam with a score of 80% or more. Thanks to excellent education programs and those who hunt, hunting is a recreational activity with one of the lowest rates of incidents. In Ontario, every fishermen or citizen using a boat must pass the Canadian Boating Safety Course of

Transport Canada with a final score of 80% for each quiz. The NSSF (National Shooting Sports Foundation), an American association, have studies that prove that hunting and fishing are safer activities than most recreational activities such as Golf, American Football, Basketball, Football and many others ...

Activity

Number of

Total injuries

Injuries per 100,000

One injury for every

participants

2010 (USA)

participants

x participants

Hunting

  • 16 8 122

300 000

 

50

2 000

Fishing

  • 33 69 963

800 000

 

207

483

Activity’s

Injuries per

 

100,000

participants

Fishing

207

Hunting

50

Hockey

594

(ice)

Basketball

1

965

Golf

 

161

Soccer

1

675

Swimming

 

196

Skateboard

1

696

Volleyball

548

Injuries per 100,000 participants for certain activities

Fishing Hunting Volleyball Hockey Skateboard Swimming Golf Soccer
Fishing
Hunting
Volleyball
Hockey
Skateboard
Swimming
Golf
Soccer

Basketball

INTRODUCTION TO HUNTING AND FISHING

Provincial laws and federal laws:

There are two different levels of legislation governing hunting and fishing in Ontario. There are provincial laws that are governed by the provincial government of Ontario and the federal laws that are governed by the national government of Canada. Provincial laws are responsible for animals, hunting, fishing, the environment, seasons and almost everything in terms of hunting and fishing. While federal laws do not concern fishing, and deals with firearms laws and licensing and registration of firearms. The following are examples of these two types of legislation;

Provincial :

Provincial deals with firearms such as air or pellet rifles, a long bow and crossbows. Animals - such as fish, fur-bearing animals that can be trapped, animals that can be hunted, and animals that cannot be hunted, trapped or fished. Licenses for fishing and hunting. Private property. Vehicles and boats. They all have search warrants automatically given by law. They all have the right to confiscate licenses, vehicles, boats, guns, etc. Use of poison and other illegal substances. Wardens take care of provincial laws.

Fédéral :

Handles firearms, such as rifles and shotguns. The laws of transportation of firearms. The laws of possession of firearms. The laws of transfer and lend of firearms. The laws of importing and exporting firearms (companies). Licenses and registration of firearms. Regular police take care of federal laws. The laws and seasons for waterfowl

6

INTRODUCTION TO HUNTING AND FISHING Provincial laws and federal laws: There are two different levels of
INTRODUCTION TO HUNTING AND FISHING Provincial laws and federal laws: There are two different levels of
INTRODUCTION TO HUNTING AND FISHING Provincial laws and federal laws: There are two different levels of

ONTARIO

MAPS OF ONTARIO

The fishing zones and hunting territories of Ontario:

Hunting

About WMUs: Ontario is divided into 95 Wildlife Management Units (WMU). Some WMUs are divided into sub- units. It is important that everyone takes the time to know the seasons and laws of the WMU from where they plan to go hunt in to avoid unintended abuse of laws. Each WMU has customized hunting regulations for:

Game you can hunt

Open season dates

Permitted methods of hunting

It’s your responsibility to:

Know which WMU you are hunting in

Know and follow the hunting regulations for that WMU

Fishing

About FMZs: Ontario is broken down into 20 fisheries management zones (FMZs). It is important that everyone takes the time to know the seasons and laws of the FMZ from where they plan to go fish in to avoid unintended abuse of laws. FMZs help the province manage the individual needs and nature of each zone by customizing catch limits and seasons:

Allows more fishing in thriving fisheries

Protect vulnerable fisheries

Re-establish fish populations

Adjust fishing seasons for different climates

Each zone has its own rules that you must follow. The map of the fisheries management zones of Ontario can be

found at page X.

Specially designated waters: Some zones contain important lakes and rivers that need more careful management, planning and monitoring. For example:

Lake Nipissing

Lake Simcoe

These important fisheries, called “Specially designated waters” are managed differently than the rest of their FMZ.

ONTARIO

ONTARIO

FMZ planning: Fisheries management follows a cycle of:

Planning (setting objectives and strategies)

Implementing strategies

Monitoring and reporting

Evaluating succes

Learn about your FMZ: Each fisheries management zone reports on its activities:

Calls for consultation

Monitoring and management reports

Advisory council news

Changes to fishing regulations

Fish stocking

Find your zone based on where you plan to fish.

ONTARIO

Wildlife Management Units (WMU):

ONTARIO Wildlife Management Units (WMU): Map 1- Southwestern Ontario 1. Stag Island (WMU 93) 2. Rondeau

Map 1- Southwestern Ontario

  • 1. Stag Island (WMU 93)

  • 2. Rondeau (Provincial Park) (WMU 93)

  • 3. Fingal (WMU 92)

  • 4. Aylmer (WMU 92)

  • 5. Calton Swamp (WMU 92)

  • 6. Long Point (WMU 90)

  • 7. Hullett (WMU 85)

  • 8. Luther Marsh (WMU 80)

  • 9. Orangeville (WMU 81)

    • 10. Rankin (WMU 83)

    • 11. Beverly Swamp (WMU 87)

    • 12. Binbrook (WMU 87)

    • 13. Mud Lake (WMU 89)

    • 14. Mara 89)

    • 15. Pine River Provincial Fishing Area (WMU 81)

ONTARIO

Map 2 Southeastern Ontario

  • 16. Tiny Marsh (WMU 76)

  • 17. Matchedash Bay (WMU 76)

  • 18. Copeland Forest Resources Management Area (WMU 76E)

  • 19. Holland Marsh (WMU 77)

  • 20. Nonquon (WMU 73)

  • 21. Scugog Island (WMU 73)

  • 22. Darlington (Provincial Park) (WMU 72)

  • 23. Presqu’ile (Provincial Park) (WMU 71)

  • 24. Brighton (WMU 71)

  • 25. Mountain (WMU 65)

  • 26. Lake St.Lawrence (WMU 65)

  • 27. Gananoque (WMU 67)

  • 28. Camden Lake (WMU 68)

  • 29. Pt. Petre (WMU 70)

  • 30. Wye Marsh National Wildlife Area (WMU 76)

  • 31. Howard Ferguson Nursery (WMU 66B)

ONTARIO

ONTARIO Map 3 – Northern Ontario  Hilliardton Marsh (WMU 28) 12

Map 3 Northern Ontario

Hilliardton Marsh (WMU 28)

ONTARIO

The fishing zones Fisheries management Zones (FMZ) Map 4

ONTARIO The fishing zones – Fisheries management Zones (FMZ) – Map 4 13

THE ABUSE OF LAWS

L’ABUS DES LOIS

THE ABUSE OF LAWS

Why respect the laws governing hunting & fishing:

The Education

Ontario is noted for the excellence of its hunting and firearms education program, which consists of learning about laws, the importance of laws, safety and much more. In summary, these courses teach people how to be a responsible hunter and sportsman. The Ontario Hunter Education Manual and the instructors who provide the educational materials are the elements responsible for such success.

The risk of losing hunting & fishing

rights

Hunting and fishing activities are mainly kept legal for biological reasons, beneficial to ecosystems. If abuse of laws begins to become a greater problem and the activity is no longer beneficial to the ecosystems, there

is a risk of losing hunting and / or fishing rights - the laws governing these activities are

to be taken seriously and aren’t there for

nothing.

Biological reasons

THE ABUSE OF LAWS L ’ABUS DES LOIS THE ABUSE OF LAWS Why respect the laws

Hunting tags, daily limits and total possession limits of wildlife and fish are not placed and given for no reason ... The number of hunting tags per territory (WMU) that will be given to people, the daily limits as well as total possession of wildlife or fish is not a random number - they are numbers decided on after many studies have been done. Before the final decision of each of these numbers by WMU and ZGP, the government considers the number of such species documented in the area or territory as well as the number of predators and food in the area for the species. All of this research makes it possible to find the number of its species that can be taken per year to balance the ecosystem of the zone / territory and this allows to be able to go hunting and/or fishing without abusing and destroying the ecosystem; It helps.

THE ABUSE OF LAWS

The science behind the laws governing hunting & fishing:

Keystone

Keystone Species

Key species are either a plant or an animal. They play an important and unique roll in the food chain and functions of the ecosystem given their size or population. If a keystone species were removed or were to disappear from their ecosystems, the ecosystem will have difficulties or even risk disappearing. (See image 1)

Animals are all interdependent; they all depend on other species for

their survival, whether it’s for food, shelter or to help them reproduce.

Examples:

Bees help flowers to spread their pollen,

Wolves rely on a good population of deer, moose or other

things to eat, Plants depend on animals and animals depend on plants - animals inhale carbon dioxide (CO2) and exhale oxygen (O) which is inhaled by plants which then exhales it as carbon

dioxide (CO2), it’s a continuous cycle that does not stop, and

THE ABUSE OF LAWS The science behind the laws governing hunting & fishing: Keystone Keystone Species

to conclude, without trees, the animals would die and without the animals, the plants would die.

Image 1 The keystone species in this illustration would be the keystone (green stone): without it, the whole structure risks falling.

Key species are often, but not always, predators. A few predator key species can control the population of their prey in the region and this has a domino effect on other plants and animals on the area that depend on this prey directly or indirectly. Take the gray wolves of Yellowstone, National Park of Wyoming as an example. Their population fell to zero in the 1930s, mostly due to hunting (before tougher laws like todays were implemented), but in 1995 the gray wolves were reintroduced to the park and their impact has been monitored ever since. It turns out that this impact was actually a good thing - without the wolves, the elk got used to not needing to be afraid of predators, they ate so many plants that they even went to the river bed for food, which is an area they would never go to if they knew there were wolves in the area. The amount of plants they ate had an effect on aspen, cottonwood and also, riverside willows, which is a tree that beavers depend on for food or construction. Beavers are also a key species because of their special engineering talents that prevents flooding in the area and controls water flow. Since the wolves have been reintroduced, riverside willows and other trees have been able to grow much better and this has resulted in positive changes, such that beaver colonies have grown in population in a ratio of 1: 9, elk population declined at first, but now seems to have stabilized and because of this, the bison population increased because there was less competition against elk for food. It is therefore clear that the disappearance of the gray wolves in Yellowstone has had negative changes on its ecosystem and since they were reintroduced to the area, their impact has been positive.

THE ABUSE OF LAWS The science behind the laws governing hunting & fishing: Keystone Keystone Species

15

THE ABUSE OF LAWS

Ecosystems without humans

Although humans are not necessarily considered to be keystone species, without our biological role in ecosystems and nature, meaning hunting and fishing, many negative consequences would be created and ecosystems as a whole would risk to no longer exist.

Humans have been hunting and fishing for as long as they’ve been on earth. It was only during the last century that humans no longer had to hunt and fish for food, causing the sport’s participation to drop, and since then people’s perspectives on the sports have changed. Today, humans buy their meats and fish already prepared in grocery stores. We are constantly looking for meat from animals that have not been bred using hormones or steroids this is not a concern for meat and fish obtained by hunting and fishing.

Without humans hunting or fishing, there would no longer be control over the ecosystems. Our impact on ecosystems has always been present and if it were to suddenly stop, it would cause several problems on the ecosystems. Such as, predators like for example, wolves and bears would eventually lose the fear of humans, creating more animal attacks and urban encounters. Moreover, this will also affect the food chain of the region (ex at image 2). The population of deer would increase, so the population of vegetation would decrease, causing other herbivore species such as moose’s population to decrease, causing a decrease in the population of its predators, such as gray wolves, which would increase the populations of its prey such as hares, which would further decrease vegetation, which would decrease the deer population – it’s a cycle that continues and as a result causes environmental problems all started by

Figure 2 – exemple très simple d’une chaine alimentaire

humans stopping to hunt and fish…

THE ABUSE OF LAWS Ecosystems without humans Although humans are not necessarily considered to be keystone

16

THE ABUSE OF LAWS

Poaching and the waste of resources

Illegal hunting to meet the demands of international trade in wildlife and wildlife parts is a major problem facing those concerned with the protection and sustainability of wildlife populations around the world. In same areas poaching is causing a devastating effect on wildlife. Most of the people involved in the trade of illegally hunted animals are the same people involved with organized crimes like drugs and aren’t true outdoorsmen – they do

what they can to get as much money as possible without thinking, they want to be where there is money, and

there’s money in wildlife and there’ s wildlife in our ecosystems…

As wildlife populations decline in other countries (often causing

hunting and fishing to become illegal), these criminals are moving to Canada as a next plan as Canadian animals are worth a lot… Most are killed only for certain parts of their bodies such as antlers, taxidermized trophy and more…

The trophy heads of bighorn sheep, elk, deer, moose, goats and bears are selling for high prices. The same applies to fetuses, antlers, antler velvets, hoofs and tails of deer, elk and caribou, feathers of eagles and other birds of prey, gallbladders, paws, claws and bear teeth.

After they take the part of the body they want, the rest of the body is left on the spot to waste… This is cruel and gives a negative image to hunters which can cause hunting and fishing laws to become more severe and perhaps even to become illegal. This does not benefit the environment; it abuses it.

Your lifetime hunting and fishing can be ruined by the illegal act of a single poacher!
Your lifetime hunting and fishing can be ruined
by the illegal act of a single poacher! Each year,
hunters and fishermen locate decomposing
carcasses of abandoned and illegally harvested
wildlife. Protect our wildlife and call 1-800-222-
8477 to report illegal activities. All calls to
Crime Stoppers are anonymous and you may
be eligible for a cash reward.
17
17

Wildlife is not there to take advantage of it… In addition, this

affects the amount of tags given to people in draws. As the

government, must put into consideration the criminals who poach, and so they must give out less tags to reduce the negative effects it has on the environment.

When the Air India flight from Toronto to New Delhi crashed on June 22, 1985, two suitcases containing dried gallbladders from 1,000 black bears, which were killed simply for their gallbladders, were declared lost. The 70-pound shipping was valued at $1,000.000 CAD. Like the drug trade, criminals make a lot of money off of this and often, they succeed… This is a sad reality.

THE ABUSE OF LAWS Poaching and the waste of resources Illegal hunting to meet the demands

THE ABUSE OF LAWS

Conclusion

In conclusion, we, hunters and fishermen must respect the laws of hunting and fishing to be a good,

respectful outdoorsman and not to damage the environment. We must understand out role in the ecosystems, even if we are not considered to be a keystone species, our impact on ecosystems act as if we are one. If we abuse or lose hunting and/or fishing rights, the ecosystem will suffer from several

negative consequences or risk to even fail and no longer exist… It is our responsibility to report any

evidences and/or cases of poaching to the Ontario Crime Stoppers so these criminals do not get away with such an act. Everything in ecosystems depends on everything else in that ecosystem in a direct or indirect way and that is what structures an ecosystem. It is also important to know that if you abuse the laws governing hunting and fishing, it is very likely that you will affect the ecosystem of the area and that

once you get caught, you’ll be fined, possibly lose your hunting and/or fishing rights, your equipment and

a criminal record will be places under your name.

INTERVIEW

INTERVIEW WITH JUSTIN HOFFMAN

About Justin Hoffman:

Justin Hoffman is a freelance outdoor writer, a professional wildlife photographer and a wildlife enthusiast residing in Ottawa, ON. He is currently an editor for the Ontario OUT OF DOORS magazine.

Publication Credits:

Ontario OUT OF DOORS Sentier Chasse-Pêche Western Sportsman Outdoor Canada Real Fishing Canadian Sportfishing Fishing Facts
Ontario OUT OF DOORS
Sentier Chasse-Pêche
Western Sportsman
Outdoor Canada
Real Fishing
Canadian Sportfishing
Fishing Facts
BassPro.com
INTERVIEW INTERVIEW WITH JUSTIN HOFFMAN About Justin Hoffman: Justin Hoffman is a freelance outdoor writer, a

INTERVIEW

L’entrevue :

How long have you been working in this field of work?

  • I have been an outdoor writer for the last 16 years, and more recently, a wildlife photographer -

Field Editor for Ontario Out of Doors magazine, and publishing credits which include Outdoor

Canada, ON Nature, Fishing Facts, Bass Pro, Cabela's, Sportsmansguide, etc.

Do you hunt or fish? If so since when?

  • I fish but do not hunt. Saying that, I tag along on many hunting trips with friends to shoot stock

photography. I have been fishing since the age of 5 (I am now 43).

How’d you get into hunting and/or fishing?

My father introduced me to fishing as a youngster, at the age of five. I haven't looked back since.

Why do you hunt and/or fish?

  • I fish for the pure pleasure it brings - to be out in nature, for the solitude, and the strategy

involved in trying to hook something that swims in a large body of water. It is also a great pastime to connect with friends.

Do you believe that respecting the Ontario hunting & fishing regulations is important? Why?

Without respecting the Hunting and Fishing Regulations, in the long run, it ultimately harms everyone. Our fish and wildlife is a valued resource, with set limits and rules in place to both protect vulnerable species while also ensuring fish and wildlife will be around for future generations.

Are there any laws that you disagree with?

Although I am not well-versed in all of the current laws and regulations, those that I am aware of

  • I have no issue with.

Are there any laws that you think should be implemented?

  • I would like to see a greater access to land, as currently a great deal throughout Ontario is private.

Also, stiffer penalties for repeat offenders.

Do you think the laws adequately protect the resources?

  • I believe the current laws do adequately protect our resources, but unfortunately, the government

chooses to under-fund the MNRF - resulting in less manpower to patrol and ensure laws are being followed.

Has the abuse of the hunting? Fishing regulation laws ever affected you? If so, how?

No.

Would you say that people breaking the hunting/fishing regulation laws is common? If so, why?

  • I believe for the most part, fishing and hunting laws are followed. Generally, it is not the true "outdoors

person" that breaks rules, as most realize the harm it can bring. Poaching/fishing out of season, etc., certainly does occur, but I don't believe to the extent that it might have happened a decade ago. This is due

in part to better education.

Summary INTERVIEW In summary, Justin Hoffman, a wildlife photographer and a field editor of the Ontario
Summary
INTERVIEW
In summary, Justin Hoffman, a wildlife
photographer and a field editor of the Ontario
OUT OF DOORS magazine, has been
fishing since the age of five for the pleasure it
brings and to connect with friends and
sometimes tags along to hunting trips to
shoot stock photography. He believes that
the laws that govern hunting and fishing are
fair and protect wildlife. The only change in
the laws he would like to see would be stiffer
penalties for repeat offenders and decrease
in the amounts of private land. Other than
that, he thinks the current laws are perfect
and he does not want to get rid of them.

Justin Hoffman believes that those who

abuse these laws are not real “Outdoorsmen”

and there needs to be an increase in game wardens to reduce the amount of abuse that occurs in nature.

Summary INTERVIEW In summary, Justin Hoffman, a wildlife photographer and a field editor of the Ontario

23

SPECIALIZED LAWS FO R NATIVES

SPECIALIZED LAWS FOR NATIVES

For a long time now, Native people have had special rights with the Canadian resources that nature provides such as wildlife. This agreement exists because of arrangements made in the 18 th century between explorers and natives.

The Natural Resources Transfer Agreement (NRTA), which is part of the 1930 Constitutional Acts, states that Native people

“have the right, which the province hereby assures to them, of

hunting, trapping and fishing game and fish for food at all seasons of the year on all unoccupied Crown lands and on any

other lands to which (they) may have a right of access.” The

treaty of aboriginal rights relating to hunting, fishing and harvesting are also recognized and affirmed as part of the Constitution of Canada by section 35 of the Constitution Act,

1982.

Non-native people can accompany native people who hunt, fish or trap, but may not help them to exercise their hunting, trapping or fishing rights. For example, non-natives cannot lay or raise nets or set traps, shoot at or towards an animal, carry a gun, search for or flush game, or take any meat, fish or animal parts. They can however help recover wildlife and fish or help carry them, but they must be with a native person, otherwise it is considered to be illegal hunting, fishing or trapping and possession.

SPECIALIZED LAWS FO R NATIVES SPECIALIZED LAWS FOR NATIVES For a long time now, Native people

SPECIALIZED LAWS FOR NATIVES

Hunting:

When hunting, or trapping for food on lands where you have the right to access, the status natives:

Do not require licences.

Are not restricted to specific seasons.

Are not restricted to bag limits.

Status natives generally have the right to access the following lands to hunt or trap:

Indian reserves, wildlife management areas, provincial forests, areas of provincial parks where licensed hunting is permitted, unoccupied crown lands, and other crown lands where licensed hunting or trapping is permitted.

Private land with the permission of the landowner or occupant.

No person may hunt within:

Areas of provincial parks closed to all hunting.

Most Ecological Reserves.

Fishing:

When you fish for food, the status natives:

Generally, do not require licences, however, free General Fishing Permits may be required on waters where there are multiple-use management or conservation concerns.

Are not subject to gear restrictions such as gill net mesh size or the number of lines that can be used while

angling, however, any nets or other unattended gear must be clearly marked with the owner’s name and

treaty number so that officers know the gear is legally entitled to be there and is not part of an illegal set or commercial set.

May transport fish from the catch point to their nearest residence without a load slip.

Status Indian people may engage in recreational fishing and angle in fish derbies without a licence, but are subject to all other fishing regulations when not fishing for food purposes.

27
27

THE LAWS AND FINES

THE LAWS AND FINES

Wildlife and nature laws are important management tools that support a variety of wildlife management and social objectives.

To be effective, these laws must be enforceable and flexible enough to cope with changes in wildlife populations, habitats and the needs of ecosystem populations.

It is important that every person who is interested in hunting and fishing understand the reasons of the laws and obey them. The laws that apply to hunters and fishermen have different objectives and can be simply grouped into several general categories:

28

Biological laws are based on the biological

characteristics of wildlife, such as behavior, birth rates, mortality rates and population size. These laws control the activity of hunters and fishermen, boundaries and other things to protect wildlife. These laws are based on several scientific studies, population inventories, habitat inventory, and hunter and fishermen surveys.

Allocation laws tend to equitably share available resources between hunters, fishers and others. These laws decide the number of animals, fish or birds that can be taken per WMU or FMZ.

Income laws ensure that fees are collected. These fines as well as other government revenues help pay for wildlife management activities.

Behavior laws address the behavior of hunters and fishermen and include provision to prevent the wastage of game meat, fish, trespassing, and the shooting of swimming big game.

Support laws help police officers to be more effective. An example of this would be the requirement to keep a wind on birds or to keep some flesh on fish for identification purposes.

Laws designed to ensure a quick kill control the methods used to kill wildlife. An example of this would be the minimum calibre size for certain animals.

Safety laws take care of the personal safety of hunters, fishermen and the non-hunter or fishermen public.

Vehicle laws control the hours and types of engines, boats, four wheelers and modifications that can be used.

THE LAWS AND FINES THE LAWS AND FINES Wildlife and nature laws are important management tools

THE FINES

THE LAWS AND FINES

Offence:

Set Fine

(CAD)

Hunt specially protected wildlife

200.00$

Hunt wild bird

200.00$

Trap specially protected wildlife

200.00$

Trap wild bird

200.00$

Resident hunt big game without licence

300.00$

Resident hunt game mammal without licence

100.00$

Resident hunt game bird without licence

150.00$

Resident hunt game furbearing mammal without licence

150.00$

Resident hunt game reptile without licence

100.00$

Resident hunt game amphibian without licence

100.00

Resident hunt bird without licence

100.00$

Resident hunt wildlife without licence

100.00$

Resident trap big game without licence

300.00$

Resident trap game mammal without licence

150.00$

Resident trap furbearing mammal without licence

150.00$

Resident - trap game reptile without licence

150.00$

Resident - trap game amphibian without licence

150.00$

Resident trap bird without licence

150.00$

Resident trap wildlife without licence

150.00$

Non-Resident hunt big game without licence

450.00$

Non-Resident hunt game mammal without licence

300.00$

Non-Resident hunt game bird without licence

300.00$

Non-Resident hunt furbearing mammal without licence

300.00$

Non-Resident hunt game reptile without licence

150.00$

Non-Resident hunt game amphibian without licence

150.00$

Non-Resident hunt bird without licence

300.00$

Non-Resident hunt wildlife without licence

300.00$

Non-Resident trap big game without licence

450.00$

Non-Resident trap game mammal without licence

450.00$

Non-Resident trap furbearing mammal without licence

300.00$

Non-Resident trap game reptile without licence

300.00$

Non-Resident trap game amphibian without licence

300.00$

Non-Resident trap bird without licence

300.00$

Non-Resident trap wildlife without licence

300.00$

Unlawfully destroy egg of wild bird

200.00$

Unlawfully destroy nest of wild bird

200.00$

Unlawfully take egg of wild bird

200.00$

Unlawfully take nest of wild bird

200.00$

Unlawfully possess egg of wild bird

200.00$

Unlawfully possess nest of wild bird

300.00$

Unlawfully interfere with black bear den

300.00$

Unlawfully damage dwelling of furbearing mammal

200.00$

Unlawfully damage beaver dam

200.00$

THE LAWS AND FINES

Unlawfully hunt wildlife in provincial park

200.00$

Unlawfully hunt wildlife in Crown game preserve

200.00$

Unlawfully trap wildlife in provincial park

200.00$

Unlawfully trap wildlife in Crown game preserve

200.00$

Unlawfully possess wildlife in provincial park

200.00$

Unlawfully possess wildlife in Crown game preserve

200.00$

Unlawfully possess firearm in provincial park

200.00$

Unlawfully possess firearm in Crown game preserve

200.00$

Unlawfully possess trap in provincial park

200.00$

Unlawfully possess trap in Crown game preserve

200.00$

Unlawfully possess prohibited device in provincial park

200.00$

Unlawfully - possess prohibited device in Crown game preserve

200.00$

Trespass for the purpose of hunting

100.00$

Trespass for the purpose of fishing

100.00$

Trespass in possession of firearm

100.00$

Trespass in possession of fishing rod

100.00$

Trespass in possession of other hunting or fishing device

100.00$

Hunt while trespassing

100.00$

Fish while trespassing

100.00$

Fail to leave premises when trespassing

100.00$

Interfere with notice

100.00$

Trespass in party exceeding 12

100.00$

Unlawfully enter crops

100.00$

Unlawfully permit dog to enter crops

100.00$

Unlawfully trespass on Crown land

100.00$

Unlawfully hunt for gain

300.00$

Unlawfully hire a person to hunt for gain

300.00$

Unlawfully trap for gain

300.00$

Unlawfully hire a person to trap for gain

300.00$

Unlawfully pay bounty

300.00$

Unlawfully accept bounty

300.00$

Possess illegally killed wildlife

200.00$

Possess illegally injured wildlife

200.00$

Possess illegally captured wildlife

200.00$

Interfere with lawful hunting

150.00$

Interfere with lawful trapping

150.00$

Interfere with lawful fishing

150.00$

Unlawfully purport to give notice

150.00$

Hunt with firearm in unsafe area

150.00$

Fail to wear proper coloured clothing while hunting

100.00$

Fail to wear proper coloured clothing while trapping

100.00$

Use firearm carelessly to hunt

300.00$

Use firearm carelessly to trap

300.00$

Fail to report accident involving firearm

150.00$

THE LAWS AND FINES

Unlawfully have loaded firearm in conveyance

200.00$

Unlawfully discharge firearm from conveyance

250.00$

Unlawfully discharge have loaded firearm in right of way in prescribed area

250.00$

Unlawfully discharge firearm in travelled roadway

200.00$

Unlawfully discharge firearm across travelled roadway

250.00$

Hunt with shotgun not permanently plugged

100.00$

Unlawfully hunt at night

250.00$

Unlawfully possess firearm at night

150.00$

Unlawfully use light to hunt at night

250.00$

Unlawfully kill big game by trap

250.00$

Unlawfully capture big game by trap

250.00$

Unlawfully injure big game by trap

250.00$

Kill game bird by trap

200.00$

Capture game bird by trap

200.00$

Injure game bird by trap

200.00$

Hunt big game that is swimming

250.00$

Use vehicle to kill, injure, harass wildlife

250.00$

Use boat to kill, injure, harass wildlife

250.00$

Hunt big game with unlicensed dog

100.00$

Hunt big game with dog in prescribed area

100.00$

Permit dog to be at large during closed season

100.00$

Permit dog to be at large during closed season

150.00$

Unlawfully use dogs to chase wildlife during closed season

150.00$

Unlawfully hunt with specially protected raptor

200.00$

Unlawfully hunt with bird of prey

200.00$

Hunt with ferret

100.00$

Unlawfully use poison

150.00$

Unlawfully use adhesives

150.00$

Kill more wildlife than necessary

150.00$

Cause wildlife unnecessary suffering

150.00$

Fail to dispose of wildlife as directed

150.00$

Act as guide without licence

100.00$

Provide black bear hunting services without licence

200.00$

Use unlicensed guide

100.00$

Use unlicensed person to provide black bear hunting services

200.00$

Guide unlicensed person

100.00$

Provide black bear hunting services to unlicensed person

200.00$

Own game bird hunting preserve without licence

150.00$

Operate game bird hunting preserve without licence

150.00$

Own fishing preserve without licence

150.00$

Operate fishing preserve without licence

150.00$

Unlawfully own wildlife enclosure

200.00$

THE LAWS AND FINES

Unlawfully operate wildlife enclosure

200.00$

Abandon flesh suitable for food

150.00$

Waste flesh suitable for food

150.00$

Unlawfully abandon pelt of furbearing mammal

150.00$

Unlawfully permit pelt of furbearing mammal to be destroyed

150.00$

Unlawfully abandon flesh of fish suitable for food

150.00$

Unlawfully possess commercial fish net

150.00$

Unlawfully sell commercial fish net

150.00$

Unlawfully keep live game wildlife

200.00$

Unlawfully keep live specially protected wildlife

200.00$

Unlawfully hunt game wildlife to keep it in captivity

300.00$

Unlawfully trap game wildlife to keep it in captivity

300.00$

Unlawfully hunt specially protected wildlife to keep it in captivity

300.00$

Unlawfully trap specially protected wildlife to keep it in captivity

300.00$

Unlawfully hunt farmed animal

300.00$

Unlawfully permit hunting of farmed animal

300.00$

Unlawfully hunt wildlife in captivity

300.00$

Unlawfully permit hunting of wildlife in captivity

300.00$

Fail to mark specially protected report

200.00$

Fail to mark prescribed bird of prey

200.00$

Fail to keep records

150.00$

Fail to surrender wildlife in custodian’s possession

200.00$

Unlawfully offer to propagate wildlife

250.00$

Unlawfully propagate wildlife

250.00$

Unlawfully possess wildlife for propagation

250.00$

Unlawfully release farmed animal

300.00$

Unlawfully release captive wildlife

300.00$

Fail to ensure farmed animal does not escape

300.00$

Fail to ensure wildlife does not escape

300.00$

Fail to notify Minister of escape or release

300.00$

Unlawfully fail to carry out obligations on escape or release

300.00$

Unlawfully engage in aquaculture

400.00$

Unlawfully buy game wildlife

250.00$

Unlawfully sell game wildlife

250.00$

Unlawfully buy specially protected wildlife

250.00$

Unlawfully sell specially protected wildlife

250.00$

Unlawfully buy pelts

250.00$

Unlawfully sell pelts

250.00$

Unlawfully sell animal represented as game wildlife or specially protected wildlife

250.00$

Unlawfully sell invertebrate represented as specially protected wildlife

250.00$

Unlawfully possess black bear gall bladder

250.00$

Unlawfully buy fish

250.00$

Unlawfully sell fish

250.00$

Unlawfully list wildlife on menu

250.00$

THE LAWS AND FINES

Unlawfully list fish on menu

250.00$

Unlawfully charge for serving wildlife

250.00$

Unlawfully charge for serving fish

250.00$

Unlawfully import wildlife

250.00$

Unlawfully release imported wildlife

300.00$

Unlawfully release imported invertebrate

300.00$

Unlawfully release wildlife propagated from imported stock

300.00$

Unlawfully release invertebrate propagated from imported stock

300.00$

Fail to ensure imported wildlife does not escape

300.00$

Fail to ensure imported invertebrate does not escape

300.00$

Fail to ensure invertebrate propagated from imported stock does not escape

300.00$

Fail to ensure wildlife propagated from imported stock does not escape

300.00$

Unlawfully fail to notify Minister of escape or release

300.00$

Unlawfully fail to carry out obligations on escape or release

300.00$

Unlawfully export wildlife

300.00$

Unlawfully export wildlife for sale

300.00$

Unlawfully export wildlife for propagation

300.00$

Transport wildlife unlawfully killed, captured or possessed

200.00$

Transport fish unlawfully taken or possessed

200.00$

Transport unmarked container

200.00$

Unlawfully possess wildlife from another jurisdiction

200.00$

Unlawfully possess invertebrates from another jurisdiction

200.00$

Unlawfully possess fish from another jurisdiction

200.00$

Sell wildlife from another jurisdiction where sale is prohibited

250.00$

Offer to sell wildlife from another jurisdiction where sale is prohibited

250.00$

Sell invertebrate from another jurisdiction where sale is prohibited

250.00$

Offer to sell invertebrate from another jurisdiction where sale in prohibited

200.00$

Unlawfully possess imported pelts

200.00$

Unlawfully remove seal or mark from imported pelts

200.00$

Unlawfully fail to comply with licence issuing manual

200.00$

Fail to comply with conditions of licence

200.00$

Fail to comply with conditions of authorization

200.00$

Unlawfully old more than one licence to hunt a species of big game

200.00$

Unlawfully issue licence to a minor

150.00$

Hunt without having licence on your person

100.00$

Trap without having licence on your person

100.00$

Trap without having authorization on your person

100.00$

Fish without having licence on your person

100.00$

Fish without having authorization on your person

100.00$

Fail to produce licence for conservation officer

100.00$

Fail to produce authorization for conservation officer

100.00$

Unlawfully transfer licence

300.00$

Unlawfully buy licence

300.00$

Unlawfully sell licence

300.00$

THE LAWS AND FINES

Unlawfully use another person’s licence

300.00$

Enable someone to unlawfully use licence

300.00$

Possess incomplete licence

100.00$

Possess void licence

150.00$

Possess void authorization

150.00$

Use void licence

150.00$

Use void authorization

150.00$

Display void licence

150.00$

Display void authorization

150.00$

Permit void licence to be displayed

150.00$

Permit void authorization to be displayed

150.00$

Fail to surrender void licence

150.00$

Fail to surrender void authorization

150.00$

Unlawfully hunt without municipal licence

100.00$

Fail to submit document in required form

100.00$

Make false statement in a document

200.00$

Fail to pay fees

200.00$

Fail to pay royalties

200.00$

Fail to stop for conservation officer

200.00$

Fail to produce things for inspection

200.00$

Fail to provide information during inspection

200.00$

Make a false statement to a conservation officer

250.00$

Fail to surrender cancelled licence

100.00$

LES LOIS ET LES AMENDES

Scenarios:

An individual spends a weekend at a provincial park. He hopes to go hunting and

trapping, so he brought all his equipment. Late Sunday afternoon, this individual had a

total of three partridges and one hare. As he’s packing up to leave, a wildlife

protection officer comes to visit the park. He informs him that the park does not allow

hunting, fishing or trapping, and he is forced as it’s his job to make him pay the

necessary fines.

Unlawfully hunt wildlife in provincial park ($200) + Unlawfully trap wildlife in

provincial park ($200) + Unlawfully possess wildlife in provincial park ($200) +

Unlawfully possess firearm in provincial park ($200) + Unlawfully possess trap in

provincial park ($200) → 200 + 200 + 200 + 200 = 800$ CAD

A group of 13 guys decides to go deer hunting in a nearby forest. At the end of the

day, they had a total of three deer’s, on their way back to the house, a wildlife

protection officer stops them to see if everything’s alright. He notices that they hunted

on private land and all the other offenses that they committed and is forced to give

them a ticket.

13(Trespass for the purpose of hunting ($100) + Trespass in possession of firearm

($100) + Hunt while trespassing ($100) + Fail to leave premises when trespassing

($100) + Trespass in party exceeding 12 ($100)) → 13(100 + 100 + 100 + 100 + 100)

= 6 500$ CAD total, 500$ per person.

36

LES LOIS ET LES AMENDES Scenarios:  An individual spends a weekend at a provincial park.

LES LOIS ET LES AMENDES

A guy is driving at night, on his way back from work. He always keeps his rifle in his

car and when he passes a farm field, he notices some deer. He gets out of the car and

leaves the car facing the field, with the headlights on. he then gets his rifle and shoots

a deer even though he doesn’t yet have a licence, he decides he’ll buy one the next

day. While he’s collecting the deer, a wildlife protection officer asks him to see his

license and deer tag but he has none. After calculating all the offenses, the agent gives

him a ticket to pay.

Hunt big game without licence ($300) + Hunt game mammal without licence ($100) +

Hunt wildlife without licence ($100) + Trespass for the purpose of hunting ($100) +

Trespass in possession of firearm ($100) + Hunt while trespassing ($100) +

Unlawfully enter crops ($100) + Possess illegally killed wildlife ($200) + Unlawfully

discharge firearm in travelled roadway ($250) + Unlawfully possess firearm at night

($150) + Unlawfully hunt at night ($250) + Unlawfully use light to hunt at night

($250) → 300 + 100 + 100 + 100 + 100 + 100 + 100 + 200 + 250 + 150 + 250 + 250 =

2 000$ CAD

An individual brings his dog to hunt wild turkey on a farm field. He did not think he

had to ask the landowner for permission to trespass. After shooting a turkey, the

owner calls the wildlife protection officers because there is someone hunting on his

property. When the agent arrives, he is forced to calculate all fines for the offenses

committed and make him pay a ticket.

Trespass for the purpose of hunting ($100) + Trespass in possession of firearm ($100)

+ Hunt while trespassing ($100) + Fail to leave premises when trespassing ($100) +

Unlawfully permit dog to enter crops ($100) + Unlawfully enter crops ($100) → 100

+ 100 + 100 + 100 + 100 = $500 CAD

WILDLIFE IDENTIFICATION

WILDLIFE IDENTIFICATION

Hunters and fishermen must be able to properly identify species of wildlife. This is important so people are able to know whether a species is a protected species and cannot be hunted or fished. Other than that, it is important that people can know the rules, seasons and bag limits of species to lessen the abuse of wildlife and nature.

Wildlife and fish are classified into five general categories:

  • 1. Big Game (white-tailed deer, moose, elk, bear)

  • 2. Small Game (hare, rabbit, squirrel, wolf)

  • 3. Upland Game Birds (grouse, wild turkey)

  • 4. Migratory Birds waterfowl (ducks, geese)

  • 5. Fish (pike, walleye, small mouth bass, largemouth bass)

Wildlife identification techniques

It takes a lot of practice, studying and experience to be able to properly identify wildlife quickly and accurately.

Bull elk in the fall

The more you practice, the better you will become. You

should learn as much as possible about the species of wildlife that interest you. Including their appearances, ecosystems and habitats. It's interesting, fun and will provide you with a better understanding of the natural world and give you a sense of satisfaction and appreciation of nature. Good hunters and fishermen are good naturalists.

Some species are easier to identify than others, such as deer and moose. However, for some species, such as moose, the hunter must be able to identify its sexes and be able to distinguish calves from adult moose.

Hunting wild turkeys requires the hunter to be able to identify a non-bearded bird, usually a turkey hen or a female bird, a tom or a male bird. Waterfowl is a particular identification challenge because they’re often flying. Therefore, you must be able to identify the species by their wings, because, in some cases different species have different bag limits.

WILDLIFE IDENTIFICATION WILDLIFE IDENTIFICATION Hunters and fishermen must be able to properly identify species of wildlife.

Rainbow trout

WILDLIFE IDENTIFICATION

Comparison of the deer family:

In Ontario, there are four different members of the deer family. To hunt these species, you must have a valid license. There is no season for caribou and a limited season for elk, so you have to be absolutely certain that the animal you are seeing is of the right species, sexes and age. All four members of this family have different sizes, shapes and colors. Here they are:

Limited Open Season
Limited Open Season

* Note that does (female) have no antlers except for woodland caribou *

Elk

White-Tailed Deer

No Open Season

WILDLIFE IDENTIFICATION Comparison of the deer family: In Ontario, there are four different members of the

Moose

Woodland Caribou

WILDLIFE IDENTIFICAT ION

Comparison of the fish families:

In Ontario, there are a total eight different general fish families. Before being able to accurately identify all Ontario fish species to be able to properly know their seasons, appearances and bag limits, you must be able to properly identify their families to categorize them. Here they are:

WILDLIFE IDENTIFICAT ION Comparison of the fish families: In Ontario, there are a total eight different

Bass

Catfish

Pike

WILDLIFE IDENTIFICAT ION Comparison of the fish families: In Ontario, there are a total eight different

Panfish

WILDLIFE IDENTIFICATION Sucker Fish Salmon
WILDLIFE IDENTIFICATION
Sucker Fish
Salmon
Trout Walleye
Trout
Walleye
EASTERN WILD TURKEY EASTERN WILD TURKEY
EASTERN WILD TURKEY
EASTERN WILD TURKEY

Eastern Wild Turkey is the largest wildlife bird in Ontario. On average, adults can weigh between 10 to 22 lbs. Male adults, or toms, are usually about twice as large as adult females, or hens. Young males, also known as jakes can weight from 12 to 17 lbs. The young females are called jennys.

Their appearance varies from their sexes. The males have varied feather colors such as brown, bronze and black and their heads are bright red, white and blue. The females have much less variety of colors, their colors consisting of their breasts being brown and their heads being blue.

44

Males have spurs on their lower legs. These spurs are pointed tips much like their claws and can grow up to 4cm in length. Other than that, one of the most evident differences between males and females would be that the males have beards and females do not. These beards are long black hair-like feathers hanging from their breasts. These beards are moderately from 7 to 25 cm long and may be more in some cases. Although males have this, there is also a small population of about 10% female wild turkeys that have a beard, therefore, this isn’t the most effective method of identification.

EASTERN WILD TURKEY EASTERN WILD TURKEY Eastern Wild Turkey is the largest wildlife bird in Ontario.

EASTERN WILD TURKEY

Eastern Wild Turkey seasons:

SPRING WILDL TURKEY

 

WMU(s)

Open Season

Bag Limit

Hours

42, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66A, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80,

Residents and non-residents April 25 to May

One bearded wild turkey per licence

½ hour before sunrise to

81, 82, 83A, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95

31, 2016

Two licences per hunter maximum

7 :00 p.m.

The two birds may not be taken on the same day

 

FALL WILD TURKEY

 

WMU(s)

Open Season

Bag Limit

Hours

59, 64, 65, 66A, 67, 68,

Residents and non-

One fall licence per

½ hour before

73, 76, 77, 78, 80, 81, 82,

residents October 11

hunter maximum

sunrise to ½

84, 85, 87, 89, 90, 91, 92,

to October 23, 2016

hour after sunset

93

One wild turkey may be harvester EITHER one male OR one female

MOOSE

MOOSE

MOOSE MOOSE Eastern Wild Turkey is the largest wildlife bird in Ontario. On average, adults can

Eastern Wild Turkey is the largest wildlife bird in Ontario. On average, adults can weigh between 10 to 22 lbs. Male adults, or toms, are usually about twice as large as adult females, or hens. Young males, also known as jakes can weight from 12 to 17 lbs. The young females are called jennys.

Their appearance varies from their sexes. The males have varied feather colors such as brown, bronze and black and their heads are bright red, white and blue. The females have much less variety of colors, their colors consisting of their breasts being brown and their heads being blue.

Eastern Wild Turkey is the largest wildlife bird in Ontario. On average, adults can weigh between 10 to 22 lbs. Male adults, or toms, are usually about twice as large as adult females, or hens. Young males, also known as jakes can weight from 12 to 17 lbs. The young females are called jennys.

Their appearance varies from their sexes. The males have varied feather colors such as brown, bronze and black and their heads are bright red, white and blue. The females have much less variety of colors, their colors consisting of their breasts being brown and their heads being blue.

MOOSE

 

Bows and Muzzle-loading guns Only

 

WMU(s)

Resident Open Season

Non-Resident Open Season

Conditions (restrictions only)

7A

Adult Moose - Oct. 15 to Dec.

Adult Moose - Oct. 17 to Dec.

 

15

15

Calf Moose - Oct. 22 to

Nov. 4

Calf Moose - Oct. 22 to

Nov. 4

18B

Adult Moose - Sept. 17 to Oct.

Adult Moose - Sept. 17 to Oct.

 

7

7

 

Bows Only

WMU(s)

 

Resident

Non-Resident Open

Conditions (restrictions only)

Open Season

Season

2, 3, 4, 18A, 24, 27

Adult Moose

Adult Moose - Sept.

 

-

Sept. 17 to

  • 17 to Oct. 7

Oct. 7

5, 6, 7B*+, 8, 9A, 9B*+,

Adult Moose

Adult Moose - Sept.

*Non-resident landowners must hunt

11A*+, 11B*, 12A, 12B*+, 13*, 14*, 15A, 15B, 19,

Sept. 24 to Oct. 14

-

  • 24 to Oct. 14

through a Tourist Outfitter.

21A, 21B, 22, 23, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42

+ Non-residents must employ a guide in the Territorial District of Rainy River. Due to a concurrent gun hunt, hunter orange must be worn when hunting in WMU 11B. No hunting of predominantly white- coloured moose (over 50% white) in WMUs 30 and 31.

48, 55A, 55B, 57

Adult Moose & Calf Moose from Oct. 3 to Oct. 8

No Season

 

MOOSE

 

Rifles, Shotguns, Bows and Muzzle-loading guns

WMU(s)

Resident Open Season

Non-Resident Open Season

Conditions (restrictions only)

1A**,1C,1D**,16A,

Adult Moose - from Sept. 17

Adult Moose - from Sept.

 

16B,16C,17**, 25

to Dec. 15

  • 19 to Nov. 15

Calf Moose - from Oct. 22 to Nov. 4

Calf Moose - from Oct. 22 to Nov. 4

2, 3, 4, 18A, 18B

Adult Moose - from Oct. 8 to

Adult Moose - from Oct.

 

Dec. 15

  • 10 to Nov. 15

Calf Moose - from Oct. 22 to Nov. 4

Calf Moose - from Oct. 22 to Nov. 4

5, 6, 7B*+, 8, 9A, 9B*+, 11A*+, 11B*,

21B

Adult Moose - from Oct. 15 to Nov. 15

Adult Moose from Oct. 17 to Nov. 15

* Non-resident landowners must hunt through a Tourist Outfitter

12A, 12B*+, 13*, 14*, 15A, 15B, 19, 21A,

Calf Moose from Oct. 22 to Nov. 4

Calf Moose - from Oct. 22 to Nov. 4

+ Non-residents must employ a guide in the Territorial District of Rainy River.

22, 23, 28, 29, 30*, 31*, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42

Adult Moose - from Oct. 8 to 15 Nov.

Adult Moose - from Oct. 10 to Nov. 15

*No hunting of predominantly white-coloured moose (over 50% white) in WMUs 30 and 31)

Calf Moose - from Oct. 22 to Nov. 4

Calf Moose - from 22 Oct. to 4 Nov.

24, 27

Adult Moose - from Oct. 8 to

Adult Moose - from Oct.

 

Nov. 15

  • 10 to Nov. 15

Calf Moose - from Oct. 22 to Nov. 4

Calf Moose - from Oct. 22 to Nov. 4

26

Adult Moose - from Sept. 17 to Oct. 31

Adult Moose - from Sept. 19 to Oct. 19

 

Calf Moose - from Oct. 22 to Oct. 31

Calf Moose - from Oct. 22 to Oct. 31

46, 47, 49, 50, 53, 54,

Adult Moose & Calf Moose

No Season

 

56, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62,

from Oct. 17 to Oct. 22

63

48, 55A, 55B, 57

Adult Moose & Calf Moose from Oct. 17 to Oct. 22

No Season

 

** UGF 1A, 1D, 17 no road access; water or air only.

 
 

MOOSE

 

2016 Moose Hunts with Controlled Hunter Numbers

WMU(s)

Resident Open

Non-Resident

Conditions (restrictions only)

Season

Open

Season

11B

Adult Moose - Sept. 24 to Oct. 14

No Season

Must have lower limb disability. Eligible hunters must obtain a tag through the draw if they wish to hunt adult moose. Rifles, shotguns, muzzle-loading guns only.

65*

Adult Moose & Calf Moose from Oct. 5 to Oct. 7

No Season

Must have lower limb disability. Eligible hunters must obtain a tag through the draw if they wish to hunt moose. Only bows may be used. Written landowner permission required. No dogs.

65*

Adult Moose & Calf Moose from Oct. 8 to Oct. 14

No Season

Seuls les arcs peuvent être utilisés. Une autorisation écrite des propriétaires est requise. Pas de chiens.

* All hunters must obtain a WMU 65 validation tag, or be the partner of a hunter who has obtained a WMU 65 validation tag, before they can hunt any moose (adult or calf) in WMU 65. Written landowner permission required.

ELK

ELK

ELK ELK Elk are the lightest colored species of deer family. They are often referred to

Elk are the lightest colored species of deer family. They are often referred to the name "wapiti" which is a word that originates from the natives, meaning "pale deer". Their fur is a light brown, their torso is the lightest part of their body with a beige color and their head being the darkest part of their body. Adult males can weigh an average of 1000 pounds. While the cows are much smaller and can weigh an average of 500 to 600 lbs. An adult elk can measure a total of twice the size of white-tailed deer, but less than a moose.

Their antlers are similar to those of white-tailed deer, but are much longer broad and have more branches their structure is very similar to a caribou’s antler.

For most part of the year, bulls have large branchy antlers that can measure up to four feet tall, causing the elk to measure up to a total of nine feet tall.

ELK

Harvest Areas and Hunt Codes for the 2016 Elk Draw (Open Season Dates and

 

Seal Quotas)

WMU

Harvest

Hunt

Description of Harvest Area Boundary

2016

Seal Quota

area

Code

Resident

Open Season

 

Bulls

Cows

57

1

100

The part of WU 57 west of a line formed by Hwy

 

1

1

  • 62 south of Maynooth and Hwy 127 north of

Maynooth

57

2

101

The part of WU 57 east of a line formed by Hwy

2

15

  • 62 south of Maynooth and Hwy 127 north of

Maynooth

58

3

110

The part of WU 58 south and west of Madawaska River

1

1

60

4

120

The part of WMU 60 east of Hwy 28

Sept. 19 to Oct. 2.

1

3

61

5

130

The part of WMU 61 north of the northern edge of the Hydro One transmission line (X1P) running through Tudor, Grimsthorpe and Effingham Townships.

2016

2

8

61

6

131

The part of WMU 61 north of the northern edge of the Hydro One transmission line (X1P) running through Tudor, Grimsthorpe and Effingham Townships.

2

14

62

7

140

The part of WMU 62 north of Hwy 7

1

1

63A

8

150

The part of WMU 63A west of former K&P Railway line.

1

1

WHITETAIL DEER WHITETAIL DEER
WHITETAIL DEER
WHITETAIL DEER

Whitetail deer is the smallest species in the deer family in North America. Their size is moderately between 6 to 7.75 feet in height and they weigh on average 110 to 300 lbs.

As in their names, the whitetail deer are easily identified by their white tails and white beneath. When the deer is disturbed, scared or running, the animal lifts its tail and flashes it in the air, making it easy to see their white tails.

52

Their color varies throughout the year. During the summer, their fur is reddish-brown, whereas during winter, their fur becomes gray-brown color.

WHITETAIL DEER WHITETAIL DEER Whitetail deer is the smallest species in the deer family in North

WHITETAIL DEER

 

Rifles, Shotguns, Bows and Muzzle-loading guns

WMU(s)

Resident Open

Non-Resident

Conditions (Restrictions Only)

Season

Open Season

1C, 16A, 16B, 16C, 17

Sept. 17 to Dec.

No Season

 

15.

2, 3, 4, 11B, 13, 14, 15A, 15B,18A, 18B, 19, 21A,

Oct. 8 to Dec. 15

No Season

 

5

Oct. 1 to Oct. 7

No Season

Bows, muzzle-loading guns only; no dogs

5

Oct. 8 to Dec. 15

No Season

No dogs

6, 7B+, 9A, 9B+, 11A+

Oct. 1 to Oct. 7

Oct. 1 to Oct. 7

 

6, 7B+, 9A, 9B+, 11A+, 12A,

Oct. 8 to Dec. 15

Oct. 8 to Dec. 15

Bows, muzzle-loading guns only; no dogs

12B+

+Non-resident guide requirement in the territorial district of Rainy River

7A

Oct. 8 to Dec. 15

Oct. 8 to Dec. 15

+Non-resident guide requirement in the territorial district of Rainy River

8

Oct. 15 to Oct.

Oct. 15 to Oct. 28

Bows, muzzle-loading guns only; no dogs

28

8

Oct. 29 to Dec.

Oct. 29 to Dec. 15

No dogs

15

10

Oct. 29 to Dec.

Oct. 29 to Nov. 15

No resident guide requirement; no dogs

15

18B

Sept. 17 to Oct.

No Season

Bows and muzzle-loading guns only

7

21B

Oct. 8 to Dec. 15

Oct. 10 to Nov. 15

 

22, 23, 24, 27, 30, 34*

Oct. 8 to Nov. 15

Oct. 10 to Nov. 15

 

25

Sept. 17 to Dec.

Sept. 19 to Nov. 15

 

15

26

Sept. 17 to Oct.

Sept. 19 to Oct. 31

 

31

WHITETAIL DEER

28, 29, 31, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42

Nov. 7 to Nov. 19

Nov. 7 to Nov. 19

 

43A, 43B

Nov. 21 to Nov. 19

Nov. 7 to Nov. 19

Landowner’s written permission required; no dogs. Burpee Twp. Is in WMU 43B

44

Nov. 21 to Nov. 27

Nov. 21 to Nov. 27

Landowner’s written permission required; no dogs.

45

Nov. 12 to Nov. 18

Nov. 12 to Nov. 18

No dogs

46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 53A, 54, 55A, 55B, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63A, 63B, 64A, 66A, 67, 68A, 74B

Nov. 7 to Nov. 20

Nov. 7 to Nov. 20

 

59

Nov. 7 to Nov. 20

Nov. 7 to Nov. 20

Bows and muzzle-loading guns only

65, 71, 72A, 73, 75

Dec. 5 to Dec. 11

Dec. 5 to Dec. 11

Bows, shotguns and muzzle-loading guns only; no dogs

37, 60, 61, 62, 63A, 63B, 64A, 64B, 65, 66A, 67, 68A, 68B, 69B, 71, 72A, 73, 74A, 74B, 75

   

Bows and muzzle-loading guns only; no dogs

43A, 43B

Dec. 5 to Dec. 11

Dec. 5 to Dec. 11

Landowner’s written permission required; bows and muzzle-loading guns only; no dogs.

64B, 68B, 69B, 74A

Nov. 7 to Nov. 20

Nov. 7 to Nov. 20

Bows, shotguns and muzzle-loading guns only

82A, 82B, 83A, 84

Nov. 7 to Nov. 12

Nov. 7 to Nov. 12

No dogs

82A, 82B, 83A, 84

Dec. 5 to Dec. 10

Dec. 5 to Dec. 10

Bows and muzzle-loading guns only

82B

Nov. 21 to Nov. 26

Nov. 21 to Nov. 26

Bows and muzzle-loading guns only

WHITETAIL DEER

 

2016 Bows-Only Seasons Deer (No Dogs)

 

WMU(s)

Resident

Non-Resident

WMU(s)

Resident Open

Non-Resident

Open Season

Open

Season

Open Season

Season

2, 3, 4, 11B, 13, 14, 15A, 15B, 19, 21A

Sept. 1 to Oct. 7

No Season

65

-Oct. 1 to Oct. 4 -Oct. 15 to Nov. 6 -Nov. 21 to Dec. 4 -Dec. 12 to Dec.

-Oct. 1 to Oct. 4 -Oct. 15 to Nov. 6 -Nov. 21 to Dec. 4 -Dec. 12 to Dec.

31

31

5

Sept. 1 to

No Season

66B

Nov. 14 to Nov.

Nov. 14 to Nov. 19

Sept. 30

19

6, 7B*, 9A, 9B*, 11A*

Sept. 1 to Sept. 30

Sept. 17 to sept. 30

69A1, 69A3, 72B

Oct. 1 to Dec. 31

Oct. 1 to Dec. 31

8

Sept. 1 to

Oct. 1 to Oct.

69A2, 70

-Oct. 1 to Dec. 4

-Oct. 1 to Dec. 4

Oct. 14

14

-Dec. 12 to Dec.

-Dec. 12 to Dec.

31

31

10*

Sept. 1 to

Oct. 1 to Oct.

76A, 76B, 76C,

-Oct. 1 to Nov. 6

No Season

Oct. 7

14

76D, 76E, 77A, 77B, 77C, 78A, 78B, 81A, 81B

-Nov. 12 to Dec. 4 -Dec. 10 to Dec.

31

12A, 12B*

Sept. 1 to Oct. 7

Sept. 17 to Oct. 7

78C, 78D, 78E, 87A, 88, 94A

Oct. 1 to Dec. 31

No Season

18A

Sept. 17 to Oct. 7

No Season

79C, 79D

-Oct. 1 to Nov. 6 -Nov. 12 to Dec.

No Season

31

21B

Sept. 1 to

Sept. 1 to Oct.

80, 85A, 85B, 85C,

-Oct. 1 to Nov. 6

No Season

Oct. 7

7

87B, 87C, 87D, 87E, 89A, 89B, 90A, 90B, 93A, 93B

-Nov. 14 to Dec. 4 -Dec. 12 to Dec.

31

22, 23, 24, 27,

-Sept. 1 to

-Sept. 1 to

82A, 83A, 84

-Oct. 1 to Nov. 6

31

-Oct. 1 to Nov. 6

31

30

Oct. 7

Oct. 7

-Nov. 16 to Nov. 30

-Nov. 16 to Nov. 30

-Nov. 13 to Dec. 4 -Dec. 11 to Dec.

-Nov. 13 to Dec. 4 -Dec. 11 to Dec.

WHITETAIL DEER

28, 29, 31, 35, 38,

-Oct. 1 to

-Oct. 1 to

82B

-Oct. 1 to Nov.

-Oct. 1 to

39, 40, 41

Nov. 6

Nov. 6

6

Nov. 6

-Nov. 20 to Nov. 30

-Nov. 20 to Nov. 30

-Nov. 13 to Dec. 4

-Nov. 13 to Dec. 4

-Dec. 11 to Dec. 31

-Dec. 11 to Dec. 31

34**

Nov. 16 to

Nov. 16 to

86A, 86B

-Oct. 1 to Dec.

No Season

Nov. 30