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Name of business:

Food Control Plan


Food Service and Food Retail

Official Template December 2015


Basics Pack

For all food service and food retail businesses.

Food Control Plan Dec 2015 INTRO 1.1 page 1


INTRO 1.1 page 2 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Contents
Basics Pack For all food businesses Element Needed?
1.0 Introduction Yes No MPI Issue
1.1 Contents Dec 2015
1.2 Amendment record Dec 2015
1.3 Getting started Dec 2015
1.4 How to use the plan Dec 2015
1.5 How to use the diary Dec 2015
1.6 Getting started checklist Dec 2015
Summary of requirements for a food control plan
1.7 applied to this template Dec 2015
2.0 Management
2.1 Business management details Dec 2015
2.2 Physical boundaries and layout Dec 2015
2.3 Documents, records and reporting Dec 2015
2.4 Design, location and use of food places Dec 2015
2.5 Facilities, equipment and essential services Dec 2015
2.6 Training, supervision, competence Dec 2015
2.7 Managing Listeria Dec 2015
2.8 Managing Listeria in the care sector Dec 2015
3.0 Places Basic
3.1 Preventing cross contamination Dec 2015
3.2 Using shared places for commercial food Dec 2015
3.3 Water supply Dec 2015
3.4 Roof water supply Dec 2015
3.5 Surface water or ground water supply Dec 2015
3.6 Cleaning Dec 2015
3.7 Designing a cleaning schedule Dec 2015
3.8 Cleaning schedule Dec 2015
3.9 Waste management Dec 2015
3.10 Pest and animal control Dec 2015
3.11 Maintenance Dec 2015
3.12 Designing a maintenance schedule Dec 2015
3.13 Maintenance schedule Dec 2015
4.0 People Basics
4.1 Sickness Dec 2015
4.2 Exclusion of infected persons Dec 2015
4.3 Hand hygiene Dec 2015
4.4 Personal hygiene Dec 2015
5.0 Food Basics
5.1 Potentially hazardous food Dec 2015
5.2 Checking temperatures Dec 2015
5.3 Purchasing and receiving goods Dec 2015
5.4 Perishable and shelf-stable food storage Dec 2015
5.5 Chilled and frozen food storage Dec 2015
5.6 Fruit and vegetables Dec 2015
5.7 Food stalls, food promotions & tastings Dec 2015
5.8 Food vending machines Dec 2015
5.9 Making and selling ice Dec 2015
5.10 Customers reheating food Dec 2015
5.11 Food allergens Dec 2015
5.12 Food composition Dec 2015
Equipment, packaging and other items in contact with
5.13 food Dec 2015
5.14 Food labelling Dec 2015
5.15 Transporting food Dec 2015

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 INTRO 1.1 page 3
5.16 Customer complaints Dec 2015
5.17 Supplying (wholesaling) and tracing food Dec 2015
5.18 Recall of food and recall of items in contact with food Dec 2015
Reopening a food business after a power cut or civil
5.19 emergency Dec 2015
Reopening a food business after a power cut or civil
5.20 emergency checklist Dec 2015
5.21 Donating food Dec 2015
5.22 Directly importing food Dec 2015
6.0 Records - Basics
6.1 Staff training Dec 2015
6.2 Sickness Dec 2015
6.3 Transporting potentially hazardous food Dec 2015
6.4 Hot-held food temperature Dec 2015
6.5 Suppliers Dec 2015
6.6 Imported food consignments Dec 2015
7.0 Diary
7.1 Using the diary Dec 2015
7.2 Diary checks Dec 2015
7.3 Diary checks using shared places Dec 2015
7.4 Thermometer calibration Dec 2015
7.5 Week commencing Dec 2015
7.6 Notes Dec 2015
7.7 Four week review Dec 2015
8.0 Retail Basics
8.0 Contents
8.1 Establishing shelf life Dec 2015
8.2 Cooling hot food and freezing food Dec 2015
8.3 Defrosting frozen food Dec 2015
8.4 Hot-holding food Dec 2015
8.5 Reheating food Dec 2015
8.6 Handling, displaying, serving potentially hazardous food Dec 2015
8.7 Slicing and packaging Dec 2015
8.8 Re-using food that has been for sale Dec 2015
8.9 Bulk foods Dec 2015
8.10 Non-food retail items Dec 2015
9.0 Records - Retail Basics
9.1 Staff training Retail Basics Dec 2015
9.2 Foods that can be reused Dec 2015
9.3 Hot-held food temperature Dec 2015
9.4 Ready-to-eat foods list Dec 2015
9.5 Ready-to-eat foods batch record Dec 2015

INTRO 1.1 page 4 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Introduction
SPECIALIST SECTIONS Use those that apply
Element Needed?
TOPIC Yes No MPI Issue
10.0 Serve Safe Processes
10.1 Defrosting frozen food Dec 2015
10.2 Preparation Dec 2015
10.3 Cooking poultry Dec 2015
10.4 Proving that a time/temperature cooks poultry Dec 2015
10.5 Checking poultry is cooked Dec 2015
10.6 Cooking Dec 2015
10.7 Hot holding prepared food Dec 2015
10.8 Cooling hot prepared food Dec 2015
10.9 Reheating prepared food Dec 2015
10.10 Display and self service Dec 2015
10.11 Displaying food for retail sale Dec 2015
10.12 Off-site catering Dec 2015
10.13 Sushi made using acidified rice Dec 2015
10.14 Chinese Style roast duck Dec 2015
10.15 Proving a drying method for Chinese style roast duck Dec 2015
10.16 Doner kebab Dec 2015
10.17 Cooking using the sous vide technique (cook-serve) Dec 2015
10.18 Cooking using the sous vide technique (cook-chill) Dec 2015
10.19 Proving a cooking method for sous vide Dec 2015
Additional food safety information for sous vide
10.20 procedure Dec 2015
Catering for vulnerable people: Texture modified foods,
10.21 nutritional supplements and shakes Dec 2015
Catering for vulnerable people: Fresh produce
10.22 (fruit and vegetables) Dec 2015
10.23 Ice Dec 2015
11.0 Records Serve Safe
11.0 Staff training Serve Safe Dec 2015
11.1 Hot-held food temperatures Dec 2015
11.2 Offsite catering pre-event checklist Dec 2015
11.3 Cooking poultry temperature Dec 2015
11.4 Sushi rice pH record Dec 2015
11.5 Chinese style roast duck drying record Dec 2015
11.6 Proving a cooking method for sous vide Dec 2015
11.7 Sous vide control sheet Dec 2015
11.8 Transporting potentially hazardous food Dec 2015
12.0 Bakery Safe
12.1 Food Additives in bread and bakery products Dec 2015
12.2 Limits for harmful microbes in bakery products Dec 2015
12.3 Composition of bread and bakery products Dec 2015
12.4 Preparing raw meat, poultry and fish Dec 2015
12.5 Making bread, cakes and slices Dec 2015
12.6 Making other bakery products Dec 2015
12.7 Baking and finishing Dec 2015
12.8 Cooking meat and poultry Dec 2015
12.9 Validating a cooking process Dec 2015
12.10 Checking meat and poultry items are cooked Dec 2015
12.11 Cooking other foods Dec 2015
12.12 Filled sandwiches, rolls, wraps Dec 2015
Dec 2015

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 INTRO 1.1 page 5
13.0 Records Bakery Safe
13.1 Staff training specialist Bakery Dec 2015
13.2 Cooking temperature checks Dec 2015
13.3 Once a week meat and poultry temperature checks Dec 2015
13.4 Transported food temperature checks Dec 2015
14.0 Fishmonger Safe
14.1 Food Additives in fish and fish products Dec 2015
14.2 Limits for harmful microbes in fish products Dec 2015
14.3 Composition of fish and fish products Dec 2015
14.4 Making and using ice Dec 2015
14.5 Live shellfish Dec 2015
14.6 Preparing raw seafood Dec 2015
14.7 Batters, marinades, and coatings Dec 2015
14.8 Cooking seafood and other foods Dec 2015
14.9 Validating a seafood cooking or hot smoking process Dec 2015
14.10 Checking seafood is cooked Dec 2015
14.11 Hot smoking products Dec 2015
15.0 Records Fishmonger Safe
15.1 Staff training specialist Fish Dec 2015
15.2 Cooking temperature checks Dec 2015
15.3 Hot smoking record Dec 2015
15.4 Transported food temperature checks Dec 2015
16.0 Butchery Safe
16.1 Food additives in meat products Dec 2015
16.2 Limits for harmful microbes in meat products Dec 2015
16.3 Composition of meat products Dec 2015
16.4 Defrosting meat Dec 2015
16.5 Preparing raw meat and poultry Dec 2015
16.6 Marinades and coatings Dec 2015
16.7 Brining and pickling meat Dec 2015
16.8 Cooking meat and poultry Dec 2015
16.9 Validating a meat and poultry cooking process Dec 2015
16.10 Checking meat and poultry items are cooked Dec 2015
16.11 Cooking other foods Dec 2015
16.12 Making dried meat products Dec 2015
16.13 Hot smoking products Dec 2015
16.14 Making fermented meat products Dec 2015
16.15 Validating water activity Dec 2015
16.16 Testing finished product Dec 2015
17.0 Records Butchery Safe
17.1 Staff training specialist Butchery Dec 2015
17.2 Cooking temperature checks Dec 2015
17.3 Once-a-week meat and poultry temperature checks Dec 2015
17.4 Drying products batch record Dec 2015
17.5 Hot smoking products batch record Dec 2015
17.6 Transported food temperature checks Dec 2015

INTRO 1.1 page 6 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Introduction
18.0 Delicatessen Safe
18.1 Food additives in deli products Dec 2015
18.2 Limits for harmful microbes in deli products Dec 2015
18.3 Composition of deli foods Dec 2015
18.4 Batters, marinades and coatings Dec 2015
18.5 Preparing raw meat, poultry and fish Dec 2015
18.6 Preparing and handling ready-to-eat deli foods Dec 2015
18.7 Deli dairy products Dec 2015
18.8 Sushi made using acidified rice Dec 2015
18.9 Cooking meat and poultry Dec 2015
18.10 Validating a meat and poultry cooking process Dec 2015
18.11 Checking meat and poultry items are cooked Dec 2015
18.12 Cooking seafood Dec 2015
18.13 Cooking other foods Dec 2015
18.14 Serving ice cream and making milkshakes Dec 2015
19.0 Records Delicatessen Safe
19.1 Staff training specialist Deli Dec 2015
19.2 Cooking temperature checks Dec 2015
19.3 Once-a-week meat and poultry temperature checks Dec 2015
19.4 Once-a-week seafood temperature checks Dec 2015
19.5 Transported food temperature checks Dec 2015
19.6 Sushi rice pH record Dec 2015

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 INTRO 1.1 page 7
Introduction Amendment record
(To be used with hard copy only.)

It is the owners responsibility to make sure they are meeting current law at all times.This is particularly important for requirements that
are subject to regular change such as those in the Food Standards Code. Business owners are advised that MPI will update the template
as soon as practicable after relevant changes in food law have been made. From time to time MPI will also make other changes to the
template to make it clearer or easier to use after considering feedback from businesses.
Updating your Food Control Plan
When you receive an amendment:
remove the appropriate outdated pages and replace them with the new issue pages supplied;
mark as outdated the removed pages (keep them at the back of your plan or file them safely they need to be kept for at least four
years and made available on request);
file the information that accompanies the new issue at the back of your Food Control Plan;
sign off and date the Amendment record (this page).
Complete instructions will be given with the information that accompanies the amendment.
If you have any queries, please ask your verifier or registration authority.

Amendment No. Date Initials Amendment No. Date Initials

1 11

2 12

3 13

4 14

5 15

6 16

7 17

8 18

9 19

10 20

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 INTRO 1.2 page 1
INTRO 1.2 page 2 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Introduction Getting started with the template
Is this template for me?
This template has been developed by the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) to help food retail, food service and catering
businesses meet requirements under the Food Act 2014 (the Act) and the Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code (the
Code). It provides a set of procedures that can be tailored by an operator to become the business food control plan (FCP). It
identifies hazards to food and how they are managed at the business. It also contains pre-printed forms for records and a diary
that a business can use when it checks that FCP is being followed.
It is important that your FCP fits your business. You will need to think about the types of food, and the processing and handling
that your business does. You will need to make sure that your plan covers the types of things you do, wherever you do them.
What types of businesses does this template apply to?
This template is written for businesses that operate in the following food sectors identified in Schedule 1 of the Food Act 2014:
Food retail sector where food businesses prepare or manufacture and sell food - such as a butcher, a fishmonger, a retail baker,
or a business that combines one or more of these activities such as a delicatessen or supermarket; and
Food Service Sector such as a restaurant, cafe, takeaway or caterer, including those providing catering to schools. The template
may also be used by operators of residential care facilities.
The template does not cover:
businesses in food sectors subject to a food control plan for which there is no MPI template;
any business required to operate with a Risk Management Programme registered under the Animal Products Act 1999, or a Wine
Standards Management Plan registered under the Wine Act 2003;
Businesses subject to a national programme.
You may change the order of pages in the template FCP, use your own record sheets if they capture the same required
information as the record sheets in the template, or place pages that are not relevant at the back of the template. Theres more
information on this in the Documents and reporting page. Speak to your local council before you make any changes to your FCP
and find out what you will need to do.
Significant amendments: If your business makes a food or carries out production, processing and handling activities that are not
covered by, or are different to what MPI has written in this template FCP, you need to stop the activities that are not covered
by the template. If you wish to re-introduce the activities you will need to develop a custom procedure to cover those particular
activities. If you choose to develop a custom procedure to add to your template FCP it will need to be evaluated by a recognised
evaluator then be registered with MPI as this will become a custom FCP. Alternatively, you may develop a fully custom FCP that
covers the full scope of your business operations and requires evaluation by a recognised evaluator instead of using the template
FCP.
It is illegal to sell home kill and recreationally caught fish. It is also illegal to sell recreationally caught meat or meat products, such as
venison shot in the wild that has not then gone through the regulated system.

Whats in the plan?


The template FCP consists of a number of parts. All food service and retail businesses need to use the Basics Pack. All retail
businesses also need to use the Retail Pack. Businesses then select which additional specialist packs also apply to their
business.
Basics Pack for all food service and retail businesses
1.0 Introduction provides information about how to turn the template into your FCP and integrate it into your business. All
businesses should have this section.
2.0 Management contains your business details, document control requirements and training and supervision requirements.
All businesses need this section to provide information required by the Act.
3.0 Places Basic includes the procedures that are needed to ensure that the place where the food business operates from is
suitable before food is prepared, handled and sold. All businesses need this section to meet requirements of the Act.
4.0 People Basic includes the procedures that need to be in place for the people at the business, before food is prepared,
handled and sold. All businesses need this section to meet requirements of the Act.
5.0 Food Basic includes the procedures that need to be in place for food preparation, handling and sale. All businesses need
this section to meet requirements of the Act.
6.0 Records Basic provides records for use by all businesses to meet requirements of the Act. Alternative records may be used
so long as they capture the same information.
7.0 Diary contains pre-printed pages that the business completes to confirm that important tasks have been carried out and to
record what action was taken if something went wrong.
Retail Pack for retail businesses
8.0 Retail Basics includes the additional procedures that need to be in place for food retailing. All retail businesses need this
section to meet requirements of the Act.
9.0 Records Retail Basics provides additional records for use by retail businesses to meet requirements of the Act.
Alternative records may be used so long as they capture the same information.

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 INTRO 1.3 page 1
Whats in the plan?
Specialist Packs - use those that apply
10 to 19 Specialist sections a range of specialist food business sections with procedures for the safe handling and processing
of food for sale. An operator selects the section(s) that cover the scope of their business food activities, adds them to the first
two sections and moves each Contents page to the front of the plan. All businesses will need some procedures from these
specialist sections to meet requirements of the Act.

How does it work?


Simply put: the plan doesnt work, unless you do! The plan provides you with a system to help you meet Food Act requirements
and produce safe food for your customers.
The key to success is leadership. If management is committed to following the plan and producing safe food then staff will be
more likely to take their responsibility seriously.

Making it yours
The first step in making the template into your plan is to take the Introduction and Management and Basics sections and add
the specialist section(s) for the types of food(s) you sell. Your plan will need to include all your food activities.
Take time to read through the template. Some procedures require you to identify the way you do things in your business (this is
referred to as tailoring the plan). It is important that you take time to do this because you have a duty under the Food Act to
ensure that you operate your business in the ways youve identified in your Plan. You may do something very similar to, but not
exactly as described by, a procedure in the template. This may be okay, provided it achieves the same outcome that is intended
by the procedure see the goal of the procedure. Talk it through with your verifier.
You may find procedures in specialist sections that dont apply to your business; for example the Transporting food procedure
if you dont transport food. You can remove this procedure and any pre-printed records associated with it and put it at the back
of the Plan (in case you later decided to transport food), or you can leave the page in your Plan but mark it as not applicable,
Update the Plan Contents page so that it is clear that this activity is not a part of your business. If in doubt, check with your
local council.
You may find that it helps to do just a few procedures at a time, and to involve staff in the process. This can help them become
familiar with the Plan and develop a sense of ownership.
Once the Plan has been tailored make sure the people who work in the business are familiar with the procedures that relate to
their job (see the Training, Supervision and Competence procedure).
Use the Getting started checklist to assist in implementing the Food Control Plan.

INTRO 1.3 page 2 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Introduction How to use the plan
All of the procedures contained in the Basics and Specialist Safe sections are formatted in the same way.

Key for Food Control Plan

Important information. It helps to identify Helpful explanation. You dont have to


why things need to be done. It is not a do this, it is just a suggestion. It is not a
requirement of your plan requirement of your plan.

Goal
This box contains
The Basics Hand hygiene
a statement about Goal Why? Why?
the aim of the To prevent food and food contact surfaces from becoming Hand washing and drying is one of the best ways to prevent
This box explains
contaminated by unclean hands through effective hand harmful microbes from getting onto food.
procedure and washing and drying. Harmful microbes carried on hands (or gloves) can be why the goal is
the relevant passed onto food by either touching food directly or by
important.
touching other things that the food comes into contact with
requirements of the (e.g. benches, knives, chopping boards etc).

Act.
How this is done How this is done
Everyone (including contractors) follows good hand hygiene Gloves are only worn for the following tasks:
How this is done practices by washing and drying their hands, especially:
This section when entering any area where unwrapped ready-to-eat food
is handled;
provides before touching unwrapped ready-to-eat foods;
requirements and after touching raw food (meat, vegetables etc);
before putting on gloves and after removing them;
procedures you after coughing and sneezing;
after using the toilet.
must follow to Hand jewellery and finger nails
Hand washing
comply with the To enable good hand hygiene, fingernails should be kept
Step 1: Clean under each fingernail using warm running short. Hand jewellery should not be worn, if the food handler
Act, Regulations water, soap and a nail brush. is working with unwrapped food.
and Notices. Step 2: Wash hands with warm running water and soap,
rubbing vigorously (front, back and between fingers). What if there is a problem? What if there is
When a staff member doesnt follow correct hand hygiene a problem?
discuss the issue straight away with the person to find out why.
It can be hard to judge time, so it is
recommended you develop a habit that will
This box contains
You may need to:
help you measure the required washing demonstrate the correct procedure to them; examples of the
time (e.g. try singing twice through the provide a hand washbasin at a more convenient location;
happy birthday song).
change the type of hand cleaning materials;
types of things you
provide information, e.g. on a poster above the basin. might need to do
Step 3: Dry hands thoroughly (front, back and between
fingers) by using: [tick option]
If there is not a supply of soap and hand towels, renew in the event that
supply. Review restocking practice.
something goes
Tailor the procedure single-use cloth (roller) towel
Rub hands on two sections of towel. wrong.
Some procedures will
single-use paper towel
require you to write
down what you do,
Rub hands on two paper towels.
air blower
Write it down Write it down
or to tick a box to
Rub hands whilst air blower operating. Write down in the Diary when employees are If there is anything
Using gloves noticed not following good hand hygiene and that you need to
indicate what option Using gloves is not a substitute for hand washing. what was done to correct them.
applies to you. write down, you will
Gloves are changed between tasks (e.g. after handling
uncooked food and before handling ready-to-eat foods etc). find instructions
here.
Gloves do not protect food from cross-
contamination (e.g. passing microbes from
raw food to cooked food). Gloves, just like
hands, can transfer microbes from raw
food, equipment, utensils and surfaces
to ready-to-eat food. Hands need to be
washed when dirty gloves are removed and
before clean gloves are put on.

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Version 5.0 2013 B4

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 INTRO 1.4 page 1
Introduction How to use the plan
Pages that look like this provide guidance and information for operators of Food Control Plans.

Guidance Customer complaints


Complaints about food known that may not be available to the business, such as:
what type of harmful organism caused the illness;
If a customer is the first to identify a problem with food, the
the symptoms and when they started;
information that they provide can be vital in identifying what
a history of food consumed and other matters that could have
went wrong. An unusual taste or foreign object might be a one-
caused illness.
off, but it could be the first warning of a batch-wide problem.
If a customer suspects that they have a foodborne illness advise
Investigating a complaint will help determine the scope of the
them to contact the local public health service: phone number:
issue, what needs to be done and ensure that other customers
arent compromised. Foreign objects in food can sometimes
be dangerous if they are small enough to be swallowed or are
Contact the local public health service as soon as possible to
sharp.
advise them of the suspected foodborne illness and seek further
Receiving customer complaints advice.
If a customer makes a complaint about a food sold by the If a customer has concerns about their health advise them to
business the following action is taken: see their doctor.
Obtain as much information about the food from the customer Following up complaints
as possible including:
If someone with a complaint is not satisfied with your
what the customer believes is wrong (if possible see the food
investigation and answer, advise them to contact their local
and what the problem is) e.g.:
council.
a foreign object and what its made of (metal, plastic, glass,
wood, insect/pest etc.); If a problem is traced to food processed and handled by your
an unusual taste (describe); business you must take the necessary steps to ensure that it
when it was sold (if possible see the till receipt); does not happen again.
how the food was packaged;
Let a customer know about what you have done to investigate
information provided with the food (e.g. batch details, date
their complaint and what you found.
code) to help identify other food that may be affected);
record in the Diary the date and time that the complaint is
how the customer has kept and handled the food since
made;
purchase.
customer details (name, address, telephone number so that
Guidance on investigating customer complaints: the business can contact them after investigating the problem);
Complaints about foreign objects in food are investigated to find what the complaint is about (the product, what the customer is
the cause and to identify action needed to prevent it happening concerned about);
again. date/time the item was purchased (so that the business can
Identify the likely source of the object could it have come from identify what batch/ delivery/supplier might be involved).
your business or from somewhere else? Consider:
You should write down in the Diary what you did to investigate
ingredients talk to suppliers;
the issue, what you found and what you did to prevent the
staff jewelry, clothing, hair, Band-Aids;
problem from happening again.
environment walls, windows, overhead lights, wooden
pallets;
packaging when product was opened or when product was
packaged.
Identify what went wrong and what might need to change.
The complaint is investigated to determine the likely cause.
If it related to food that wasnt made or packaged by your
business, notify the manufacturer/supplier with the details.
If food was processed or packaged by your business, find out
whether the complaint has arisen from these activities:
If it has, identify what went wrong, how it happened and what
can be done to stop it happening again;
If it hasnt, notify the supplier/manufacturer with the details.
Complaint about a foodborne illness

If illness has been caused by a food certain facts need to be

INTRO 1.45.36
FOOD page 2 FoodFood Control
Control Plan Plan Dec 2015
Dec 2015 Ministry
Ministry for Primary for Primary Industries
Industries
Monday (Any problem Week commencing
or changes what were they and what did you do?)
Week one
/ /
Introduction How to use the diary
Monday (Any problem or changes what were they and what did you do?)

The DiaryTuesday (Any


contains problem
records or changes
of checks made what were
during thethey andEach
week. what week
did you
is do?)
presented on two pages. The Diary is also used to record
any food safety problems that arise and show how they are dealt with. Every four weeks there is a page to review the activities of the
previous month and confirm that any changes at the business are in accordance with the plan.
Tuesday
The Diary can also be used (Anyother
to keep problem or changes
day-to-day what
records thatwere
youthey
use and what did
to follow youryou do?)You can download the Diary and
plan.
replacements from www.mpi.govt.nz
Week one
Week commencing
Wednesday (Any problem or changes what were they and what did you do?)
/ /
Monday (Any problem or changes what were they and what did you do?)
Wednesday (Any problem or changes what were they and what did you do?) Are there plenty
Week one
Week commencing / / of hand washing
Thursday (Any problem
Monday (Anyor changes what
what were they anddidwhat did you do?) materials
1 Date
problem or changes were they and what you do?)
Are there ple
at the hand
Write Mondays date
Tuesday (Any problem or changes what were they and what did you do?) of hand wash
washbasins?
here
Thursday (Any problem or changes what were they and what did you do?) materials
Tuesday (Any problem or changes what were they and what did you do?)
at the hand
Friday (Any problem or changes what were they and what did you do?) washbasins?
2 Problems or Wednesday (Any problem or changes what were they and what did you do?)
Wednesday (Any problem or changes what were they and what did you do?)
changes
Write down in the Friday (Any problem or changes what were they and what did you do?)
Are there plenty
Diary anything that of hand washing
went wrong that day
Saturday (Any problem orproblem
Thursday (Any changes what
or changes were
what they
were they andand what
what did did you do?)
you do?) materials
Are there ple
and what you did to at the hand of hand wash
washbasins?
put things right.
Thursday (Any problem or changes what were they and what did you do?) materials
Saturday (Any problem or changes what were they and what did you do?)
Friday (Any problem or changes what were they and what did you do?)
at the hand
washbasins?
Sunday (Any problem or changes what were they and what did you do?)

Saturday (Any problem or changes what were they and what did you do?)
Friday (Any problem or changes what were they and what did you do?)
Sunday (Any problem or changes what were they and what did you do?)

Sunday (Any problem or changes what were they and what did you do?)
Once a week checks

Weekly and fortnightly cleaning tasksorcompleted Signs


theyofand
pestwhat
activity: No Yes
3 Once a week checks Saturday (Any problem changes what were did you do?)
(If yes, write down what you did above)
Tick the boxes afterand fortnightly maintenance tasks completed
Weekly
Once a week checks
completing the tasks. Once a week checks
The procedures in Weekly
our Food Control
and fortnightly
Weekly Plan tasks
cleaning
and fortnightly werecleaning
followedtasks
completed andSigns
effectively
completedsupervisedSigns
of pest activity: No this
Yes week.
of pest activity: No Yes
(If yes, write down what you did above)
Weekly and fortnightly maintenance tasks completed (If yes, write down what you did above)
Weekly and fortnightly maintenance tasks completed
The procedures in our Food Control Plan were followed and effectively supervised this week.

Sunday (Any problem or changes what were they and what did you do?)
4 Sign off The procedures in our Food Control Plan were followed and effectively supervised this week.
At the end of each
week, the day-to-day
manager Name:
should sign Name: Signed:
Signed:

the Diary to confirm 8 Food Control Plan Diary Version 5.0 2013 Ministry for Primary Industries

that the8planFood
hasControl Plan Diary Version 5.0 2013 Ministry for Primary Industries
been followed. Once a week checks
Name: Signed:
Weekly and fortnightly cleaning tasks completed Signs of pest activity: No Yes
(If yes, write down what you did above)
8 Weekly andPlan
Food Control fortnightly maintenance
Diary Version 5.0 2013 tasks completed Ministry for Primary Indu

The procedures in our Food Control Plan were followed and effectively supervised this week.

Ministry for Primary Industries December 2015 Food Control Plan INTRO 1.5 page 1

Name: Signed:
Introduction How to use the diary
The Diary contains records of checks made during the week. Each week is presented on two pages. The Diary is also used to record
any food safety problems that arise and show how they are dealt with. Every four weeks there is a page to review the activities of the
previous month and confirm that any changes at the business are in accordance with the plan.
The Diary can also be used to keep other day-to-day records that you use to follow your plan. You can download the Diary and
Diary
replacements from www.mpi.govt.nz Week 2 commencing / /

Week 22commencing
Week commencing
2 commencing
Daily chilled and hot-held food checks
Diary
Diary
Diary
Week / //
Each day, write down the food temperature (see Checking temperatures procedure) within each unit used to hold either hot or // /
chilled food.
Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun
These numbers refer
DailyUnit
chilled andchilled
hot-held
Daily Daily
chilled and andfood
hot-held food checks
hot-held
checks food checks
to the numbers you Each 1day, writewrite
down
downthe
thefood temperature (see Checking
Each day,
Each day, write food temperature
down the food(see Checking
temperature (see temperatures
temperatures procedure) procedure)
Checking within
within each unit
temperatures used toeach
procedure) hold unit
eitherused
within hot or to hold either hot or
each unit used to hold either hot or
assigned to your chilledchilled
food. food.
2 chilled Mon
food. Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun
chiller units on page Mon Mon Tue Tue Wed Wed Thu Thu Fri Fri Sat Sat Sun Sun
3
Unit
one. Unit 1 4 Unit
1 2
5 1
3
2 64 2
Every business day, 3
75 3
record the food 4 4
86
temperature in each 5 9
7
5
8
unit along with the 6 109 6
time that you did the7 1110 7
check. 8 8 1211
9 1312 9
13
10 14 10
This section is only 11 14 11
1515
used if you serve 12 Temperature
12 Time temperature taken
Temperature Time temperature taken
dishes that contain 13 13 poultry temperature checks (+meat and poultry if a butcher, deli or baker)
Once a week
poultry. Once
14 a week
Cooking14 poultry
poultry temperature
checking checks
a proven cooking (+meat and poultry if a butcher, deli or baker)
procedure
15Cooking
Select one poultry
15 checking
poultry item or dish that a youproven cooking
cook using procedure
a proven time and temperature setting see Proving that a time/temperature
settingone
Select cooks poultryitem
poultry or +validating
or dish athat meatyou
andcook
poultry cooking
using process.time
a proven Checkandits cooked temperature
temperature to confirm
setting see thatProving
it is cookedthatby a time/temperature
Temperature
either:Temperature Time temperature Time taken
temperature taken
setting cooks poultry or +validating a meat and poultry cooking process. Check its cooked temperature to confirm that it is cooked by
reaching at least 75oC; or
Once aeither:
week
Oncepoultry
meeting atheweek temperature
poultry temperature
time/temperature checks (+meat
combinations Cookingand
inchecks poultry
(+meat
poultry. andif poultry
a butcher, if adeli or baker)
butcher, deli or baker)
Ifreaching
you cook more at least
than one75oitem
C;aoror dish that contains poultry, select a different item or dish each week.
Cooking poultry checking proven cooking
Cooking poultry checking a proven cooking procedure procedure
Day:meeting theitem
time/temperature
or+ dish
Poultry item: combinations Cooking
ainproven poultry.
Select one poultry
Select one poultry that
item oryoudishcook
thatusing
you cook usingtime and temperature
a proven setting see
time and temperature Proving
setting see that a time/temperature
Proving that a time/temperature
IfMethod
setting you cook
cooks more
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or one
+validatingitem or
a dish
meat that
and contains
Time
poultry poultry,
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1st probe* a different2nd item or dish
probe eachtakenweek.
(how wassetting
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and poultry or +validating
Select cooking time/temperaturea meatstarted poultryprocess.
and time cooking
temp
Check
process.
time
its cooked
Check
temp
temperature
its cooked
Action to confirm to
temperature
if temperature that it is cooked
confirm that it by
is cooked by
poultry cooked?) setting used: cooking not reached
either:
Day: either: + Poultry item:
reaching
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orCooked
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75oC; or Time 1st probe* 2nd probe
(how was the
meeting the meat and
time/temperature Selectatcombinations
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C for in Cooking poultry. started Action taken if temperature

poultry cooked?) meeting the time/temperature
settingseconds/minutes
used: combinations in Cooking cooking
poultry.
time temp time temp not reached
If you cook Ifmore
you than more
cook one item than orone
dishitem
thatorcontains
dish thatpoultry,
contains select a different
poultry, select aitem or dishitem
different each or week.
dish each week.
*If the core temperature of the food when it is first probed is above 75 C, it isnt necessary to probe it a second time.
o
Cooked to 75C
Day: Day: poultry + + Poultry item:
Reheating + Poultry item:
Select
Method one poultry + item or dishCooked at
that is reheated C for
and check its reheated temperature
thatTime is at least 75oC. Complete
Time 1st probe* the table below.
Method
seconds/minutes 1st probe* 2nd probe 2nd probe
(how was
If the
you meat
reheat
(how and
wasmore
the than
meatSelect
one cooking
anditem dishtime/temperature
orSelect that contains
cooking poultry+, select
started a different
time/temperature item or dish each week.
started Action takenAction
if temperature
taken if temperature
poultry cooked?) time temp time temp not reached not reached
poultry cooked?) setting used:setting used: cooking cooking time temp time temp
*If the core temperature of the food when it is first probed is above 75oC, it isnt necessary to probe it a second time.
Reheating
Cooked to 75C
Cooked
Method tothe75CTime started
(How was Time finished Finished
Reheating
Day poultry + item
Poultry poultry reheated?) reheating reheating core temp** Action taken if temperature not reached
Select one poultry + item Cooked at Cooked
or dish at C for andCcheck
that is reheated for that its reheated temperature is at least 75oC. Complete the table below.
seconds/minutes
If you reheat more than one item or dishseconds/minutes
that contains poultry+, select a different item or dish each week.
*If the **The core
core*If temperatureofofthe
temperature the food
foodshould
when be 75isCfirst
or above.
o
If theisfood has not oreached this temperature, keep reheating
it atoitsecond
until it does.
the core temperature of the itfood when probed
it is first above
probed75is C,above
it isnt
75necessary
o
C, it isnttonecessary
probe probe ittime.
a second time.
Reheating
Cooling potentially hazardous food (only required if food has been cooked or heated and then cooled)
ReheatingReheating
poultry +poultry +
Method (How was Coolingthe Time started Time finished Finished
Select
Day one poultryone
Select + Poultry
item or dish
poultry item that
+ item orisdish
Method
reheated
that
poultry
(How was
and
the is Time
checkreheating
reheated
reheated?) started and
its reheated
that after
Tempcheck that itstemperature
afterreheatedcore
reheating
Temp
istemp**
at least Action
temperature 75
is atC.least
o
Complete
taken 75 o
C. the table
not below.
Complete
if temperature the table below.
reached
Day
If you reheat more Food item
thanmore
one item
If you reheat thanorone
fooddish thatorcontains
cooled?)
item dish thatpoultry+,
cooling
containsselect
2 hours*** a different
4
poultry+, select aitem
hours*** Action or dish
taken
different if each
temperature
item week.each week.
not
or dish reached

Reheating Reheating
**The core
***Food temperature
must of60
be cooled from the
o food
C to 21Cshould
within 2be
Method
75owas
hours
(How
C orthe
and above.
from 21CIftothe food
below
Time started 5C has nothours
within reached
see this
Time 4finished
temperature,
Cooling
Finished hot food. keep reheating it until it does.
Method (How was the Time started Time finished Finished
DayCooling
Day Poultry hazardous
potentially item
Poultry item
poultry
foodreheated?)
(onlypoultry if reheating
reheated?)
required reheating
reheating
food has been cooked core
andtemp**
reheating
or heated coreAction
temp**
then cooled) takenAction
if temperature not reached not reached
taken if temperature
Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 DIARY 8.6 page 1

Cooling
Method (How was the Time started Temp after Temp after
**TheDay
core **The
temperature Food
of the item
food of
core temperature should
the food 75
be foodo
Ccooled?)
should or above.
be 75oCIf or
theabove.
food has
cooling notfood
If the reached
2has thisreached
hours***
not temperature,
4 hours***keepAction
reheating
this temperature, keepitifreheating
taken until it does.
temperature not reached
it until it does.
Cooling potentially hazardous
Cooling potentially food (only required
hazardous if food
food (only has been
required cooked
if food or heated
has been cookedand
or then cooled)
heated and then cooled)
Cooling Cooling
***Food must be cooled from 60oC toMethod
21C within 2 hoursTime
(How was the
and started
from 21CTemp
to below
after
5CTemp
withinafter
4 hours see Cooling hot food.
Method (How was the Time started Temp after Temp after
Day Day Food item Food itemfood cooled?) food cooled?) cooling 2 hours*** 2 hours***
cooling Action takenAction
4 hours*** 4 hours*** if temperature not reached not reached
taken if temperature
Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 DIARY 8.6 page 1

***Food must be cooled


***Food mustfrom 60oC to
be cooled 21C
from 60within
o 2 hours
C to 21C and2from
within hours21C
and to below
from 5C
21C to within 4 hours
below 5C see
within Cooling
4 hours hotCooling
see food. hot food.
INTRO 1.5 page 2 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Ministry for Primary Industries
Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan
Food Control
Dec 2015Plan Dec 2015 DIARY 8.6 page 1 8.6 page 1
DIARY
Introduction Getting started checklist
Use the following checklist to assist you to tailor and introduce the Food Control Plan to your business.

Start with the Basics section and add the specialist section(s) that cover the scope of your retail and/or Done
1 food service activities.

Read through all the pages in each section of the template and where there are blanks or tick boxes fill Done
2 them in to show what happens in your business. Complete the site plan of your business.

If there are things you do that you think are not covered by the template, stop and contact your local Done
3 council for advice to see if the plan is appropriate for your business.

Remove any pages or mark as not appropriate any that do not apply to your business (keep them Done
4 at the back of your plan in case you change what you do and need them later) or mark them as not
appropriate. Update the Contents pages and keep these at the front of the plan.

Complete the cleaning and maintenance schedules. You may want to keep these with your Diary. Done
5

Write in the diary the equipment used for cold storage and holding food and write the opening and Done
6 closing checks carried out each day.

If you use a particular time and temperature setting for cooking poultry, complete the Proving that a Done
7 time/temperature setting cooks poultry procedure.

Make sure that everyone who works in the business is trained and is familiar with your Plan and start a Done
8 training record for each member of staff.

Register your completed Food Control Plan and arrange for a verification visit. Done
9

Follow the procedures contained in your Food Control Plan.


10

Review your plan when things change (to ensure that your FCP still fits your business) or go wrong Done
11 (to prevent them happening in the future), and make amendments as required. Refer to significant
amendments on page 1.3.
After your FCP is registered your business will be regularly checked (verified/audited) against the Plan. The verifier will want to confirm
that your Plan reflects your business activities, that you are meeting Food Act requirements, see your Diary and other completed records
and discuss with you and your staff what you do to ensure that the food you sell is safe.

Helpful stuff - Contact your registration authority if you need further guidance on how to complete and
register your plan.

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 INTRO 1.6 page 1
INTRO 1.6 page 2 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Introduction Summary of requirements for a food
control plan applied to this template
S. 36 in Food Act 2014 Where this is found in template
A food control plan is a plan designed for a particular food The template recognises the range of foods and operations
business to identify, control, manage, and eliminate or that are within the general scope of businesses operating in
minimise hazards or other relevant factors for the purpose of the sector.
achieving safe and suitable food, taking into account The Basics sections 3 to 6 cover matters relation to places,
(a) each type of food that the food business trades in; and people and food that are relevant to the business. The Retail
(b) each type of process or operation that is applied to the Basics section covers matters common to retailers.
food; and Specialist sections 1019 cover matters specific to particular
(c) each place in which the food business trades in food. businesses, activities, foods or processes.
This allows a business operator to tailor the template to
recognise the range of operations at their business.
S. 39 Food control plan: chief executives power to
issue official template or model
(1) The chief executive may, by notice under section 405, This template is issued by the Food Notice Official
issue a template or model for different types of food sectors Template Food Control Plan for Schedule 1 Food Businesses:
or food businesses. Food Service and Food Retail, December 2015.
See www.mpi.govt.nz

S. 41 Food control plan: form

A food control plan must be in writing in a form acceptable This template is issued by Notice. When it has been correctly
to the appropriate registration authority. completed by a food business it will become acceptable for
registration.

S. 42 Food control plan content

A food control plan must set out:


(a) the name, trading name, and business address (including This is in the Business and Management details: Section 2
the electronic address, if available) of of this template.
(i) the food business or businesses covered by the plan; and
(ii) if the plan applies to only one food business, the
operator of the food business; and
(iii) if the plan applies to more than one food business, the
operator of the plan and the operator of each food business
covered by the plan;
(b) the operators physical and electronic addresses for the This is in the Business and Management details.
purposes of section 378(3)(a);

(c) the physical address or, if appropriate, the location of the This is in the Business and Management details.
food business or its nominated home base;

(d) the name, or the position or designation, and the This is in the Business and Management details.
area of responsibility (if appropriate) of the person who is
responsible for the day-to-day management of the plan, as
nominated by the person in control of the food business or
businesses
(e) the scope of the plan, including (without limitation) (i) Template title provides the scope, e.g. Food Service and
(i) the type of food to which it applies; and Retail Food Control Plan;
(ii) the nature of the food business or businesses covered by (ii) The scope of the plan is also identified in the Plan
the plan; and Introduction Section 1.0 1.7;
(iii) the trading operations under the plan. (iii) The scope of trading is also identified by the elements of
the FCP that are ticked as relevant on the contents page by
the business operator.

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 INTRO 1.7 page 1
S. 42 Food control plan content cont... Where this is found in template

(f) how the applicable requirements of this Act (as defined The template enables a business operator to meet the
in section 8(1)) will be met under the plan applicable requirements of the Act when they tailor the
template to become their food control plan by ticking
relevant boxes on the contents page and filling out other
pages as indicated in the template.
(g) a description of the hazards and other factors that are Procedures in the template identify and describe particular
reasonably likely to occur or arise hazards that can arise, for example in the why? section
(h) procedures to achieve the safety and suitability of food, Procedures in the template are set out in each respective
including (without limitation) section (3 - 19) of the template covering a particular topic:
(i) good operating practice; and (i) describe good operating practices to control, eliminate or
(ii) control of all relevant hazards and other factors that are reduce the risk that particular hazards will occur or arise, for
reasonably likely to occur or arise; and example in the how this is done section;
(iii) monitoring of appropriate parameters and limits; and (ii) identify where checks are needed;
(iv) preventative actions; and (iii) identify preventative actions. Good operating practices
can be, in themselves, preventative actions. Highlighted
(v) corrective actions; and
information contained in the important information boxes
(vi) operator verification activities; and may also identify preventative actions;
(vii) document control and record keeping (iv) describe corrective actions should a hazard occur, for
example in the what if there is a problem? section;
(v) incorporates verification checks for the operator such as
equipment calibration, confirming cleaning has been carried
out; making sure that the plan is up to date/new staff have
been trained;
(vi) identifies what needs to be written, such as in the write
it down section. The template also includes pre-printed
forms for keeping records and provides for document control
such as with version numbers; contents pages and an
amendment record.
(i) any validation information as appropriate Where the template includes practices that may require
validation, procedures provide a validation process, such as
to confirm that a temperature setting for a particular length
of time will consistently meet a cooking parameter identified
in the template.
Where MPI has specified particular times, temperatures and
other measurable requirements, these have been based on
relevant science.
http://www.foodsafety.govt.nz/elibrary/industry/Technical_
Guidance-Explains_Been.htm
(j) any other matters that may be specified in regulations or Elements in the template take into account requirements set
in Notices under section 405 in regulations (and Notices) see below.
S.45 amendment to a Food Control Plan based on a template
(2) if the amendment to the Food Control Plan is not a Information about amending the plan is included in the
significant amendment, the operator must give written introduction section 1.0 - 1.7.
notice of the amendment to the registration authority
(3) If the amendment is a significant amendment, the Information about amending the plan is included in the
operator must apply to the registration authority for the plan introduction.
to be registered Also note Significant amendments are define in Part
3 of the Food Notice Food Control Plans and National
Programmes.
S.50 Duties of operators of registered food control plans Information about the duties of operators is incorporated in
the introduction included in section 2.3 Documents, records
and reporting.

INTRO 1.7 page 2 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Introduction
S.51 Operator of a registered FCP must notify registration Information about significant change in circumstances is
authority of significant change in circumstances included in Section 2.3 Documents, records and reporting.

R. 6 Additional contents of a food control plan

6(2) A FCP must: This is in the Business and Management details section
describe the physical boundaries and layout of the place in reference 2.1 - 2.8.
which the food business is operating by providing a diagram
or site plan; and
describe the activities of the food business that are carried
out within those physical boundaries; and
describe any activities carried out within those physical
boundaries that are not activities of the food business; and
(ii) how those activities pose a risk to food safety and
suitability; and
(iii) how any such risk to food safety and suitability will be
managed to ensure that food safety and suitability is
not compromised;
describe the activities that are carried out in neighbouring
premises that pose a risk to the safety and suitability of food.

R1-6,12-38,83-85,88,90

The Food Regulations 2015 provide the details of things Some parts in various sections of the template, for example,
that businesses subject to food control plans need to take Design, location and use of food places, Training, supervision
into account and do. These matters include: and competence and Water supply are included as these are
interpretation; required by the regulations.
the design, construction and location of food business

places, and facilities, equipment and essential services;
supporting activities such as pest control, waste Verification is in Business and Management details.
management, cleaning and maintenance;
sourcing and receiving food;
protecting food from contamination by people and during
production, processing and handling;
competency and training;
corrective action;
record keeping and reporting;
verification and frequency.

Food Standards Code (The Code)

The Food Standard Code provides requirements for things References to the Code are scattered throughout the
such as composition, labelling, substances added to food template to assist businesses about where they are relevant.
and microbiological limits. It is not intended or advised that a food business place
Note that the Code is regularly amended and it is the food reliance on this guidance material to ensure legal obligations
businesss responsibility to refer to the current code for the with Code requirements are fully met. A food business
latest requirements. must know and ensure all relevant standards in the Code as
enacted are complied with. Code changes or amendments
See www.foodstandard.gov.au may not be reflected in the template. If a food business
is unsure about what Code standards apply or their
interpretation, it is recommended that the food business
seek independent legal advice.

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 INTRO 1.7 page 3
INTRO 1.7 page 4 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Management

Food Service and Retail Food


Control Plan
Management

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 MGMT 2.0 page 1
MGMT 2.0 page 2 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Management Business management details
Business details

Legal name

Trading name

Legal status sole trader partnership limited liability company


[tick as appropriate]
other [specify]:
Type of business single outlet managed branch of company franchise
[tick as appropriate]
other [specify]:
Food Service: dine in takeaway on-site catering off-site catering
other [specify]:

Activity Food Retail: butcher delicatessen bakery fishmonger fresh produce grocery
[tick as appropriate]
transport/delivery
supply other businesses transport/logistics other (specify):
mobile food service or retail

Postal address

Telephone

Fax

Email

Location(s)

Street address (1)


(premises where food business
operates)

Water supply
Additional sites [continue on a separate sheet if needed and attach]
List below any other premises that are used in connection with the food business (e.g. premises used for storage or pre-
preparation of food). These activities and sites will also be covered by this FCP. If water is used for food purposes, identify the
source of the water supply.

Street address (2)

Activities/water supply source

Street address (3)

Activities/water supply source

Street address (4)

Activities/water supply

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 MGMT 2.1 page 1
Introduction Business management details
Management
Operator
The operator is the owner or other person in control of the food business. If the food control plan applies to more than one food business, the
operator is the person responsible for the food control plan*

Name
Physical address
(Business or Residential)
Electronic address
Telephone
*Operator of each food business (if plan applies to more than one food business)
Add additional rows as necessary.

Name
Physical address
(Business or Residential)
Electronic address
Telephone
Day-to-day manager [write as above if the day-to-day manager is the operator]
The day-to-day manager is the person who has the overall responsibility to make sure that the FCP is being followed and the appropriate checks
and records are completed.

Name and/or position


Telephone
Delegated responsibilities
In some cases, specific tasks maybe undertaken by someone other than the day-to-day manager. Delegated tasks and the people responsible are
identified below (unless otherwise stated, the back-up person for these tasks is the day-to-day manager).

Name and/or position


Delegated duty
[write name of procedure or task that
is delegated]

Name and/or position


Delegated duty
[write name of procedure or task that
is delegated]

Name and/or position


Delegated duty
[write name of procedure or task that
is delegated]

Name and/or position


Delegated duty
[write name of procedure or task that
is delegated]

Registration authority (this will be your local council unless your FCP covers premises situated in more than one council
jurisdiction or you have a third-party verifier in which case it will be MPI)

Registration authority
Contact person
Address
Telephone
Fax
Email
Verifier (if not local council)
Verifier (agency)
Contact person
Address
Telephone
Fax
Email
MGMT 2.1 page 2 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Management Physical boundaries and layout
Using the grid below draw a diagram showing the physical boundaries, the layout of the place where you operate your business, and
the types of activity carried out there. You must also show the location of any other activities within the physical boundaries that
are not activities of your food business. You do not need to show activities that happen outside the physical boundaries unless the
activities on neighbouring properties pose a rick to the safely and suitability of food. Use the box below the grid to describe what
these activities are.
If you operate from more than one place you can copy this page to provide the information about each location.
Your FCP must include details of how you keep food safe and suitable if the other activities could affect the safety and suitability of
your food. This is included in Using shared places for commercial food.

Business name

Site address

CLICK HERE TO INSERT A PHOTO

A description of the activities that are not activities of this business:

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 MGMT 2.2 page 1
MGMT 2.2 page 2 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Management Documents, records and reporting
Record keeping
Keeping accurate records is a requirement of the Act (section 50) and regulations (regulations 35 - 38).
This template includes important record-keeping documents your business may require depending on your food business
including:
a list of suppliers;
staff training;
sickness record;
pest control;
cleaning.
Completing the Diary is an important part of record keeping. It helps to show how you correct things that go wrong and could
affect the safety or suitability of food. You can use the diary to:
write down anything that goes wrong;
write down what was done to correct the problem and prevent customers from being affected;
write down what was done to prevent a problem from happening again;
confirm that the procedures in the FCP have been followed.
The Diary also contains space for keeping records of temperatures of cooked, stored and displayed food and thermometer
calibrations.
Theres more information on how to use the Diary in the introduction and in the Diary itself.
Pre-printed documents for recording other checks are also provided for specific activities, for example:
recording the shelf life of foods;
checking meat is cooked;
re-using food.

You might find it useful to keep your Cleaning and Maintenance schedules in the
Diary so that you can easily confirm that they are being followed

Making changes
If you carry out any food activities that arent identified in this plan, they may require evaluating and approval before you can
incorporate them into the plan. Changes that will require evaluation and approval are set out in Part 3 of the Food Control Plans
and National Programmes Notice 2015: What constitutes a significant amendment to a food control plan. They include major
alterations of processing facilities; processing food not covered by the plan; setting up a new process not covered by the plan;
making changes that introduce new hazards; and other activities that are not covered by the procedures in this template. If you
make a significant amendment your plan becomes a custom FCP and must be registered with MPI.
Changes that are not likely to require evaluation and approval include:
using your own record sheets as long as they contain at least the same information as those provided in the template;
changing the order of procedures;
removing or marking as not applicable parts of the template that do not apply to your business (e.g. removing Transporting food
if you dont transport food).
If you make a significant change to your plan (see above), make sure that the contents pages and procedures in your FCP are
updated with the date the change was made and a new version number. If you update your plan with an Amendment issued by
MPI, also update the Amendment record.
If you change any Business management details in section 2.1 or the information that accompanied your application for
registration, you must notify your registration authority. This includes details on the death of the owner or operator, bankruptcy,
liquidation, receivership etc.
All documents, including versions that are no longer used, and all records must be kept for at least four years and made
available on request (e.g. by a Verifier or Food Safety Officer).
If youre unsure whether a proposed change may require approval, contact your registration authority for advice.

Reporting
If something goes wrong at your business that either results in food that is not safe and suitable, or food that may not be safe or
suitable and the situation could make people sick you must report this to your verifier.

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 MGMT 2.3 page 1
Management Design, location and use of food places
Goal Why?
Places used for food are located, designed and constructed Food may be contaminated and customers made ill from:
appropriately, so they can be used to prepare and/or serve toxic materials left over from previous uses of places;
food that is safe and suitable. contaminants such as dust, fumes, spray-drift;
materials unsuitable for contact with food that are used in
Act requirements:
construction of places.
The design must exclude, where possible, dirt, dust, fumes,
Good design and layout of places provides sufficient space
smoke, pests and other contaminants.
for:
The design, construction and location of the place of food
people to work in ways that wont contaminate food;
business must enable food to be safe and suitable.
effective cleaning and maintenance.
Any risk posed to food safety and suitability relating to the
location of the place (e.g. from previous use; or proximity to
activities that could result in food becoming contaminated)
must be identified and managed.
A place must have adequate space for processing and
handling activities, fixtures and fittings.
The design must provide for easy access for effective
cleaning and maintenance.

How this is done


The places used by the business must be appropriate for
producing safe and suitable food.
The following matters must be considered and managed in
the design, location and use of places to prevent or minimise
contamination or cross-contamination of food:
external environmental factors (including dust, pests, dirt,
fumes, smoke);
internal environmental factors (including transfer of
contaminants from surfaces and between foods, dust from
overhead fittings);
the build-up of dirt, mould, condensation and the
shedding of particles;
size of food places is sufficient in regard to the number
of people working there, the nature of the business, the
potential patronage and the volume and range of food
prepared and served;
working conditions facilitate good operating practices and
ensure cross-contamination and deterioration of food is
minimised;
allows for the easy movement of people involved with
preparing/serving food and provides good access to areas
for cleaning, checking and maintenance;
materials used in the construction of structures and
surfaces must not be a source of contamination for the
food (e.g. they should not impart chemicals or toxic matter
to the food) and can be easily cleaned.
In addition, places used for food are exclusively used for
the purpose of food business activities while the business is
operating.

MGMT 2.4 page 1 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Management Facilities, equipment and essential
services
Goal Why?
To ensure that facilities, equipment and essential services Food may be contaminated and customers made ill from:
are designed, constructed and located so that they may be poorly designed equipment that cant be adequately
operated in ways that that keeps food safe and suitable. cleaned;
equipment constructed of unsuitable materials for contact
Act requirements:
with food;
The design, construction and location of facilities,
facilities, equipment and essential services operated
equipment and essential services at a business must enable
beyond their designed capacity and capability.
food to be safe and suitable.
Facilities, equipment and essential services must not be
operated beyond their capacity or capability.

How this is done


The location, design, construction and operation of facilities,
equipment and essential services must prevent or minimise
contamination or cross-contamination of food:
appliances and food containers are not a source of
contamination of the food (e.g. they should not impart
chemicals to the food or easily break i.e. glass), and are
made of materials that can be easily cleaned, sanitised and
sterilised (as appropriate to their use);
adequate lighting that gives sufficient natural or artificial light
for all activities including cleaning;
sufficient natural or mechanical ventilation to effectively
remove fumes, smoke, steam and vapours, and in the
case of a mechanically assisted air flow the intake must be
positioned to draw clean air;
adequate self-drainage of floors to minimise water ponding;
provision of adequate supply of suitable water;
an adequate hot water capacity for the nature of the
business;
suitable facilities that can meet temperature control
requirements for the hygienic preparation and storage of
food (e.g. chillers, freezers, ovens);
an adequate number of hand washbasins with warm
running water and supplies for hygienic cleaning, sanitising
and drying of hands or another suitable means of cleaning,
sanitising and drying hands;
adequate facilities and appliances for cleaning and sanitising
the premises, facilities and appliances;
adequate storage for cleaning materials and staff personal
items that cannot be taken into work areas.

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 MGMT 2.5 page 1
Management Training, supervision, competence
Goal Why?
To ensure that all staff have a good understanding of the Food may be contaminated and customers made ill if people
Plans requirements and food safety matters related to their do not understand and put in place practices that keep food
area of work. safe.
Some staff may need supervision due to inexperience,
Visitors to processing and handling areas, such as
ability, size of operation etc.
maintenance or delivery personnel, understand what they
Staff need to be competent in what they do if the plan is to
must do to keep food safe and suitable.
be successfully implemented.
Appropriate training and supervision is provided.
Act requirements:
The instruction, training and supervision of staff to achieve
the safety and suitability of food must be adequately
implemented and resourced.
Any person who can affect the safety or suitability of food
or carries out any activities in relation to food must have the
competency required to carry out their tasks.
Staff and visitors (such as delivery or maintenance
personnel), must understand what they must do while at the
place of business to keep food safe and suitable.

How this is done What if there is a problem?


The day-to-day manager must be familiar with and Retrain staff if necessary.
understand all of the procedures in the FCP.
You should also consider:
The day-to-day manager must ensure that each member of reviewing staff training to see if it can be improved;
staff is skilled and has the competency required to carry out improving staff knowledge of why its important to follow safe
each safe practice and procedure relevant to their work. food practices;
making sure staff have access to the relevant procedures
All staff and visitors where appropriate must be trained in
from the Plan;
the following practice and procedures before they can work:
the need to increase supervision.
hand hygiene;
personal hygiene;

Write it down
health and sickness;
potentially hazardous food;
cleaning and sanitising;
food allergens; You must:
Complete a Staff training record for each
person who works in the business.
Sign off each task on an employees Staff
training record when he or she has received
Staff must also be trained in other procedures appropriate to training in a task, has demonstrated a
the tasks before they are expected to carry them out. good understanding and has been observed
When to train staff: consistently following the correct procedures.
before new staff start working;
when introducing new procedures;
Record any retraining or refresher training in
when existing procedures are changed; an employees Staff training record.
whenever something goes wrong due to staff failing to
follow procedures.
Write down in the Diary if something went
wrong that was caused by inadequate training,
Unless a staff member has received
supervision or lack of skill. Identify what went
training in a specific task, then they are wrong, why it happened and what you have
not allowed to perform that activity. done to help prevent it from happening again.

MGMT 2.6 page 1 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Management Managing Listeria
Goal Why?
To prevent ready-to-eat (RTE) food becoming contaminated To prevent ready-to-eat (RTE) food becoming contaminated
with the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes. with the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes.
Listeria bacteria can be found everywhere and will grow in
Act requirements:
food processing and storage areas
All food that is produced or processed and handled must
Listeria monocytogenes causes the foodborne illness
be handled in a way that minimises contamination or
listeriosis. A significant proportion of people who get
deterioration.
listeriosis die, including babies who can become infected by
There must be procedures in place that prevent, eliminate
their mothers.
or reduce hazards during the production, processing and
Consumers with lower immunity, have a greater risk of
handling of food.
getting sick from food than other people. These people
include the very young and the elderly; people who are ill,
those either recovering from illness or on medication and
women during pregnancy.
Listeria is particularly associated with long shelf life,
refrigerated RTE processed foods.
Listeria monocytogenes is considered the most dangerous
pathogen of chilled processed foods as it can grow under
refrigerated temperatures, in air, in no air (e.g. a vacuum
pack), and under relatively acidic conditions.

How this is done How this is done


Special care must be taken when handling foods that are People and places
potentially hazardous see Potentially hazardous foods.
All handlers of potentially hazardous foods must follow good
Follow the instructions below carefully. This is because they
hygiene practices when they are in the food preparation
are foods that:
area. This includes washing and drying hands thoroughly
will support growth of Listeria monocytogenes;
before handling food and after touching nose, hair and other
may not be processed further to make them safe to eat;
surfaces where harmful organisms are likely to be present.
are stored refrigerated; and
Food surfaces and equipment must be cleaned and sanitised
can be stored for long periods.
before starting preparation. All handlers must wear clothing
You must thoroughly clean, and if necessary, sanitise that is dedicated to food handling activities.
processing areas and equipment. Self-service areas must be kept clean.
Used utensils must be regularly replaced with clean ones;
It is important that if potentially hazardous foods are taken out
of their packaging, they are handled hygienically to prevent Food spillages must be dealt with promptly.
them becoming contaminated.
To prevent a build-up of food waste discard food scraps
In the rest of this template, the important information box often.
below is used for procedures where it is particularly important Cleaning and sanitising
to control the spread of Listeria.
To control the presence, spread, and growth of Listeria
monocytogenes you must:
Controlling Listeria monocytogenes is an
keep processing areas clean; and
important part of this process.
clean and sanitise equipment that comes into contact with
potentially hazardous processed food.
Equipment where food can accumulate, such as slicers and
can openers, must be cleaned and sanitised before and
after use and between different food types. This may require
taking the equipment apart to get at hidden areas where
small particles of food have lodged.

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 MGMT 2.7 page 1
How this is done
Storing food Further information on the control of
Listeria monocytogenes in ready-to-eat
You must keep cooked and ready-to-eat foods separate
foods can be found at www.mpi.govt.nz
from other foods so that they dont accidentally become including:
contaminated. Potentially hazardous foods must be stored
Listeria management;
chilled below 5C, or kept hot above 60C. Good operating practices;
All foods must be stored and used according to instructions Microbiological testing for
provided on the original labelling, or within two days of verification of the control of Listeria
monocytogenes;
opening. Once their original packaging is opened, they must
Guidance for the Control of Listeria
be stored covered until used.
monocytogenes in ready-to-eat
Frozen food must be thoroughly defrosted before cooking, foods;
or cooking times extended to ensure they are cooked right Fact sheet on Managing Listeria in
the Care Sector.
through.
Check that stored food is still within its Use-by or
Best- Before date. If the date has passed, or the storage
conditions have not been met, throw the food away.
Bulk food containers e.g. containers of jams, pickles, sauces
must be emptied and cleaned and sanitised before re-use.
You must regularly check that fridges and chillers are
keeping the food stored in them at or below 5C.
Cooking food

When cooking potentially hazardous food, it must be cooked


thoroughly. Use a probe thermometer to measure the
temperature in the thickest part of the food has reached
70C for three minutes or 75C for 30 seconds. After
cooking, serve high-risk food promptly.
Serving food

Take extra care when preparing and serving salads (e.g.


pasta, rice, tabbouleh, and cold meat salads), cold cuts,
pies, quiches etc and sandwiches especially those
containing salad ingredients.
Check the labelling on salad packaging and unless it clearly
states that the salad ingredients are ready to eat, wash them
in clean water.
Prepare these foods as close to meal time as practical and
store them chilled until needed. If any of these foods are left
at room temperature they must be eaten within four hours
otherwise the food must be thrown away.
If cold cuts are on the menu, slice and serve them as close
to meal time as possible.

MGMT 2.7 page 2 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Guidance Managing Listeria in the care sector
For those catering for the elderly, very young and other Management Plan1 in place.
vulnerable people Listeria monocytogenes (Listeria) causes Cleaning and sanitising
the foodborne illness listeriosis. Those who are at greater risk
from severe/invasive listeriosis are people with lower immunity Regular and thorough cleaning and drying of food preparation
(either because of an illness or medication), the very young, areas and equipment will help prevent Listeria becoming
frail older people and pregnant women. Listeria can also cause established.
miscarriage, stillbirth or premature birth, and serious illness Even if you cant see dirt Listeria may be present. You wont
or even death to newborn babies. Although invasive listeriosis know if it is there unless you test for it. Listeria is particularly
affects very few people each year in New Zealand, it is a very at home in slicers and other areas that are hard to clean, also
serious illness and a significant proportion of these people will wet places, such as drains, drainage channels and wet areas
die. around waste containers from where it can easily be spread to
Listeria bacteria are naturally found in the environment and on other places. Dirty cloths and damaged hoses are great hiding
raw food products and the bacteria are easily introduced into places for Listeria.
food preparation, processing and storage areas. Listeriosis is You can develop a cleaning schedule that identifies specific
most likely to be associated with foods that are ready-to-eat areas and equipment for cleaning, when it needs to be done,
(processed) and are stored chilled. This is because these foods how it is to be cleaned (and if necessary sanitised) and who
are often contaminated after processing, e.g. after cooking, is to make sure it is done. This will help to make sure that
and unlike most other organisms that cause foodborne nothing is missed out.
illness Listeria monocytogenes can grow under refrigeration
temperatures, in air, in no air (e.g. a vacuum-pack), and under You can also develop a sampling programme to check
relatively acidic conditions. key places and identify whether Listeria is in the food
environment.
See Food Standards Australia New Zealand Standard 1.6.1.
Microbiological Limits for Food. Take particular care with these common high risk foods:
fresh produce which is difficult to wash e.g. seed sprouts,
Food and Listeria
pre-cut bagged salads, raspberries;
It is vital that you and your staff understand the risk from pre-prepared ready to serve packaged fruit and vegetables;
Listeria and know how to prevent its spread when serving food ready-to-eat foods that may contain cooked and uncooked
to vulnerable consumers. Make sure that this is included as ingredients such as sushi, dips, hummus and mixed vegetable
part of your staff training programme. and protein salads;
cooked meats, uncooked ready-to-eat meats such as salami
Cooked and ready-to-eat foods, that are stored chilled and
or jerky, cold cooked chicken;
have a long shelf-life are of particular concern. They are
vegetable pates, pastes and terrines unless sealed in jars or
among a group of foods termed high risk foods. This
cans;
is because they are foods that may contain the harmful
soft cheeses, blue cheeses and grated cheese (unless it is
organisms that can cause illness and may support the growth
going to be cooked before serving);
of Listeria monocytogenes if not kept under temperature
raw or unpasteurised milk, or dairy products made from raw
control. See the list of common high risk foods on this page.
or unpasteurised milk;
To reduce the risk of listeriosis you may wish to use foods fish and other seafood that is going to be served raw or lightly
that have been heat processed in their final container, such cooked;
as retort-processed foods, canned foods and some pouched processed chilled seafood (e.g. hot and cold smoked fish and
foods. These foods will have been cooked or processed to shellfish, pre-cooked prawns and crab, surimi); and
remove harmful organisms. processed foods, especially meat and fish where the salt or
Purchasing food acid have been reduced or the moisture increased compared
to traditional shelf-stable product.
Make sure you source food from a supplier who has processes
to ensure their food is safe and suitable, and who will
consistently supply food in clean and undamaged packaging.
The food should have a Use-by or Best-Before date. It is
a good idea to order quantities that you will use straight away
to avoid the risk of your stored food becoming out-of-date.
You should also check that the manufacturer has a Listeria

1 Information on Listeria Management Plans can be found at


http://www.foodsafety.govt.nz/science- risk/programmes/hazard-risk-management/listeria.htm

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 MGMT 2.8 page 1
Guidance

MGMT 2.8 page 2 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Places basics

Food Service and Retail Food


Control Plan
Places Basics

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 PLACES 3.0 page 1
PLACES 3.0 page 2 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Places basics
Preventing cross-contamination
Goal Why?
To prevent foods becoming contaminated from contact with Food that becomes contaminated by harmful microbes,
people, dirty surfaces and other foods. chemicals and dirt can make people ill.
An allergen-free product could become contaminated with
The Act requires:
an allergen.
Food must be processed and handled in ways that minimise
the contamination or deterioration of food and prevents food
from containing any biological or chemical agents or other
substance that would be unexpected and unreasonable in
food.

How this is done How this is done


Everyone involved with processing and handling food must Method 3. Separation by time and cleaning
carry out good hygiene practices before handling foods see
Cross-contamination is prevented by keeping RTE foods
Hand hygiene and Personal hygiene.
and raw foods, or allergen free/allergen containing foods,
Cleaning practices must manage the presence of harmful separate from one another, even though they may be handled
microbes (like Listeria monocytogenes) in processing areas, in the same place and using the same equipment. They are
to prevent the contamination of ready-to-eat (RTE) food kept apart by:
see Cleaning. Cleaning practices must also be followed to carrying out different tasks at different times e.g. handling
make sure allergen free foods do not become contaminated and preparing RTE foods before raw foods, or allergen free
with small amounts of allergens. foods first;
thoroughly cleaning and sanitising surfaces, equipment and
One of the following methods must be used to minimise the
utensils before they are used for RTE foods or allergen free
contamination of food during processing and handling:
foods (using dedicated cleaning equipment).
Method 1. Physical separation using different places
and equipment Anyone processing and handling both raw and RTE foods
or allergen free and allergen containing foods must carry
Cross-contamination is prevented by keeping RTE foods and
out good hygiene practices before handling foods e.g. hand
raw foods, or allergen free/allergen containing foods, totally
washing (and hand sanitising where appropriate); changing
separate from one another by using different:
overclothing between tasks involving raw and RTE foods. See
rooms;
the People Basics and Food Allergens sections of the Plan.
people;
refrigerators and freezers;
preparation/handling areas; What if there is a problem?
display cabinets; If foods that need to be kept apart are not properly
equipment and utensils (including cleaning equipment) separated, stop activities until they are.
dedicated to each type of food.
If you cannot use one of the three available methods to keep
If it isnt possible for different people to handle and process RTE food apart from raw food, do not handle unwrapped RTE
raw and RTE food or allergen free/allergen containing foods, foods.
anyone processing and handling these foods must carry out
good hygiene practices before handling them. For example, RTE or allergen free food that has been cross-contaminated
hand washing (and hand sanitising where appropriate); or must not be sold unless it can be made safe and suitable.
changing overclothing between tasks involving raw and RTE If in doubt, throw it away.
foods, or allergen free/allergen containing foods are options. Find out what happened and take action to prevent it
See the People Basics and Food Allergens sections of the happening again.
Plan.
Review staff training.
Method 2. Separation using different areas and equipment

Cross-contamination is prevented by keeping RTE foods


and raw foods, or allergen free/allergen containing foods,
separate from one another, even though they may be handled
in the same place and at the same time. They are kept apart
by using:
dedicated, clearly defined handling areas for each product;
storage on different sides of the same refrigerator or freezer;
partitioned-off parts of the same display cabinet;
staff dedicated to either raw or RTE food; and
equipment and utensils(including cleaning equipment)
dedicated to each type of food.

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 PLACES 3.1 page 1
Write it down Food can become contaminated from touching
other foods and unhygienic surfaces and hands
You must: during storage, preparation, handling, packaging,
transport and display for sale.
tailor the parts of the plan that require you It is particularly important to keep cooked and ready-
to-eat foods(RTE) apart or from contact with surfaces
to identify how you separate raw from cooked/ used for raw products as RTE foods will not be
ready-to-eat foods, and allergen free from cooked/processed further to make them safe to eat.
allergen containing foods
Write down in the Diary: Using different surfaces such as dedicated
cutting boards that can be readily identified
what you did if foods needing separation were with a particular food e.g. by colour -
not kept apart; will also help reduce the risk of cross-
contamination. Let everyone in the business know
what you did if cleaning and sanitising has not which colour is used with which food, and why.
Cross-contamination by types of food
been carried out correctly. Its good practice when handling/packaging a range
of raw foods to not mix types. Always clean surfaces
and equipment between meat species and between
different foods.

PLACES 3.1 page 2 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Places basics
Using shared places for commercial food
Goal Why?
To ensure that food is safe and suitable when processed Food for sale that is stored, processed and handled at a
and handled at places shared with other activities (such as place shared with other activities can become contaminated:
another businesses, or in a home kitchen). by those activities (e.g. the activities arent compatible with
food);
The Act requires:
from the effects of those activities (e.g. dust, fumes);
The design, construction, and location of a place of food
by people involved with those other activities (e.g. they dont
business enables food to be safe and suitable.
need to meet standards for food handlers); and
A food control plan must describe activities that are not
by foods at those activities (e.g. home kill or recreational
activities of the food business, how those activities affect
catch)
food safety and suitability, and how any risk to food safety or
suitability will be managed. Contaminated food could make people ill.
A business operator must ensure that food is produced
or processed and handled in a way that minimises the
contamination or deterioration of food.

How this is done How this is done


This template does not allow you to make food for sale at the surfaces, equipment and utensils must be thoroughly
same time that a place is being used for other activities. If cleaned and sanitised using cleaning equipment
you want to do that you will need to make changes to your dedicated to the food business.
Plan and register it as a custom FCP. When food for sale is being processed or handled:
the plan must be followed;
A diagram showing the physical boundaries and layout of
no other activities take place that could affect the safety
places used by the food business must be made. There is a
or suitability of the food; and
pre-printed page to do this in the Management section.
Food for sale is be stored separately from any other food
Where processing and handling food for sale is shared with that may be present and in ways that prevents other food
other activities at the place, the diagram must show or from being used in, or contaminating, food for sale.
describe what the activities are and where they take place.
Food for sale must not be processed or handled when ill
Using a place for food for sale and other activities people are present at the place (e.g. sick family members)
In order to use this template at a place shared with other Homekill or recreationally caught seafood [tick the box
activities one of the following options must be followed to show which of these apply]
[tick the box to show which of these you do]:
No home-killed or recreationally caught animal products
1. Physically separate food for sale handling from are ever handled at the place.
other activities
Home killed or recreationally caught animal products
All matters affecting safety and suitability that may arise might be handled at the place.
from other activities shall be managed by keeping food
for sale operations and other activities separate from one Home killed or recreationally caught products are prevented
another by using different rooms and equipment. from becoming food for sale by [describe the practices to
keep non-regulated food from being sold]:
When food for sale is being processed or handled the plan
must be followed.
2. Using the same place (e.g. a home kitchen) for food
for sale and other activities but at different times

All matters affecting safety and suitability that may arise


from other activities must be managed by keeping food
for sale operations and other activities separate from one
another by taking place at different times, even though
they happen in the same area.
Whenever the place is being used for food for sale:
Food for sale must be prepared and handled at a different
time to any other activities.
Before food for sale is processed or handled:
the place must be cleared of any items that could present
a hazard to the processing and handling of the food; and

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 PLACES 3.2 page 1
What if there is a problem?
If you cannot meet one of the separation options you must
Write it down
not process or handle commercial food at the place. Speak
with your registration authority to find out what you will need You must write down:
to do.
In the Diary checks: using shared places page
If foods that need to be kept apart are not properly the daily and other checks that you make when you
separated, stop activities until they are.
use a shared place for commercial food. [NOTE: the
If other activities at the place start while commercial food
is being processed or handled: stop work, protect food from Diary checks: using shared places page is provided in
contamination and dont restart until separation of activities the Basics records section. Take it and replace the
is restored. Thoroughly clean and sanitise affected surfaces Diary checks page in the Diary.]
before restarting business activities.
Throw away food that has been contaminated. Your method for keeping commercial food
Find out what happened and take action to prevent it
separate from other activities.
happening again.
In the Diary what you did to deal with a
problem, what you did with any affected food and
what action you took to prevent this happening
again.
.

PLACES 3.2 page 2 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Places basics Water supply
Goal Why?
To ensure water is kept clean and safe for making food, for Water may carry harmful microbes and chemicals that can
personal hygiene such as hand washing, for cleaning and for cause illness.
serving to customers. Water can be contaminated during on-site storage and
distribution around food premises.
Act requirements:
Insufficient amount of water can mean cleaning and hygiene
To ensure that water is suitable for the purpose for which
tasks arent carried out and food gets contaminated.
it is used and does not adversely affect the safety and
Water systems need to be able to cope with times of high
suitability of food.
demand.
To ensure that the capacity of the water supply is adequate
for the operations of the food business

How this is done What if there is a problem?


Water is sourced from: [tick as appropriate] If you suspect your water supply is not safe, dont use it
unless it has been:
Registered supplier (e.g. council supply) boiled for one minute; or
Name of supplier disinfected by adding chlorine.

Surface or ground water Alternatively, use a temporary supply of safe water (e.g.
bottled water or water from a registered water supplier).
Roof water Throw away any food that could have become contaminated.
If you ticked registered supplier, this page and the extra Clean any contaminated surfaces used for food preparation.
information overleaf will give you the information you need. Water contaminated on site
If you ticked Surface or ground water or Roof water,
there are other pages in this FCP covering them and you will If water could have become contaminated from something
need to meet the requirements set in a Food Act Notice for that happened on site, identify the problem, arrange for its
self-supplied water in order to operate with this FCP. More repair and dont use the water until youre notified that its
information is available from the food safety website safe to do so.
(www.mpi.govt.nz) or your local council. Notification of contamination by supplier

As an operator, you are responsible for the safety of supplied If the water supplier gives notice that the water supply might
water from the point at which it enters your business. not be safe, follow their instructions until the supply is safe
Water pipes must:
again.
be kept in a sound condition to prevent contaminants Contact your verifier and advise them of the action youve
entering the system; taken.
flushed after repairs or maintenance to clean the system;
flushed to remove stagnant water, if theyre not used for
more than seven days.
Water tanks must be: Write it down
kept clean and in good repair to prevent any build up of
sediment (see Cleaning schedule); You must write down:
have covered and screened openings to protect against
access by animals, birds and debris.
the annual checks for backflow devices and
Lower quality water
tanks in your Maintenance schedule.
Water tanks, pipes and outlet taps of any water supplies on any problem with the water supply and
site that are not suitable for food processing, or personal
hygiene, or cleaning must be clearly identified (e.g. grey
what you did about it, (e.g. in the appropriate
water for irrigation). day in the Diary.)
These water supplies must not be used for food processing,
or personal hygiene, or cleaning. Helpful information. Backflow is the unplanned
Backflow devices reversal of flow of water or mixtures of water
Backflow devices must be maintained in accordance with and contaminants into the water supply.
Backflow devices like valves or an air gap are
the manufacturers instructions to prevent contamination of
used to prevent this reverse flow occurring. In a food
clean water. business, you will usually find a backflow device either
on individual equipment (e.g. dishwashers, glass
washers, drink dispensers with carbonators, some
ovens) or in the reticulation line covering several
equipment items or processing areas.

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 PLACES 3.3 page 1
Guidance Water supply
What is it?

Extra information about keeping Design and construction

water safe Your water system


Ensure your water system is or has been designed and
Definitions installed to prevent cross-connections, dead ends, unused
pipes and backflow.
Cross-connection Connections between pipe work that Tanks
can result in different water flows Ensure all overflow, blow-off, clean-out or vent pipes are
mixing turned downwards to prevent rain entering the water system.
Dead end Unused pipe ends within a reticulation Screen the tanks with removable, fine-mesh screens to keep
system out vermin and other contamination.

Systems that are not routinely flushed with normal use Ensure all inlet and outlet pipes of storage tanks are properly
supported and located to minimise the effects of settling, i.e.
When you provide drinking water or sell food as part of your they dont allow sediment that has settled at the bottom of the
business you have a responsibility to make sure that the water tank to enter the pipes.
you use will not harm your customers. The relevant legislation
that applies is the Food Act 2014 and associated regulations. Use a cover on treated water storage tanks. Covers should be
Legislation requires any water used for processing, producing watertight, constructed of permanent materials (i.e. not wood),
and handling food, personal hygiene, cleaning or any other provided with handles and locks, and designed to drain freely,
purpose to be suitable for use and to not adversely alter the i.e. they dont encourage pooling and they prevent the
safety and suitability of food. contamination of the stored water.
Maintenance of the water system
The Ministry of Health Drinking-water Standards for
NewZealand 2005 (Revised 2008) contain a series of Disinfect all tanks before theyre put into service and after
maximum acceptable values for: extensive repairs or cleaning. Develop a schedule of regular
Escherichia coli (less than one in 100mL of sample); maintenance and inspection. Parts of your water system that
total pathogenic protozoa (less than one infectious oocyst per need to have checks (at least annually) include backflow
100L of sample); devices to make sure they are working correctly and water
chemicals. storage tanks to ensure they are clean and in good repair.

Useful pamphlets provided by the Ministry of Health Complete the Maintenance schedule to identify the checks
include: and when they need to be carried out.

Water Collection Tanks and Safe Household Water Focus cleaning on removing accumulated sediments, leaf
www.healthed.govt.nz/resource/water-collection-tanks-and- litter and other objects, such as insects and animals, that may
safe-household-water have got into the tank.

Household Water Supplies Sediment can build up in the bottom of tanks and this might
www.healthed.govt.nz/resource/household-water-supplies need to be removed. You can do this by either using tank
cleaning contractors or installing a tank vacuum. For more
Secure Groundwater Bores and Wells for Safe Household details on how to clean out your tank, refer to the Ministry of
Water www.healthed.govt.nz/resource/secure-groundwater- Health information pamphlet Water Collection Tanks and Safe
bores-and-wells-safe-household-water Household Water.
Water pipes, equipment and tanks If you repair or change your water system, make sure you flush
it with clean water before using the water for food processing.
The pipes, pumps and storage tanks that deliver the
water from its source to the tap are collectively called the
reticulation system. Its important your businesss water
system doesnt contaminate any water and is kept clean and
in good repair. Pipes and outlet taps from an unsuitable water
source should be clearly identified to prevent this water being Warning!
used (cross-connected) for any food-related activity. If you need to enter the tank to clean it,
How to flush your businesss water system make sure the tank has adequate ventilation
and that someone else is present.
Open taps to allow a substantial water flow. The length of
time the water will need to flow will depend on the size of
your building and water system. Enough water should be run
through the taps to ensure pipes end up with fresh water in
them.

PLACES 3.3 page 2 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Places basics Roof water supply
Goal Why?
To ensure water is kept clean and safe for making food, for Roof water can carry harmful microbes and chemicals that
personal hygiene such as hand washing, for cleaning and for can cause illness.
serving to customers. Clean water used with food doesnt contain E. coli or
harmful organisms that could make people ill.
Act requirements:
Insufficient supply of clean water can mean cleaning and
To ensure that water is suitable for the purpose for which
hygiene tasks arent carried out and food gets contaminated.
it is used and does not adversely affect the safety and
suitability of food.
To ensure that the capacity of the water supply is adequate
for the operations of the food business.

How this is done How this is done


Self-supplied water (water that isnt provided by a drinking The water treatment system must be installed and
water supplier) must be safe to use with food and meet maintained in accordance with the manufacturers
requirements for clean water. instructions. See also Design and use of food premises and
Maintenance sections.
Clean water must be provided in sufficient quantities to
enable food activities identified in the Plan to be carried out Checking the treatment system is working
hygienically. The water treatment system must be regularly checked
against the manufacturers instructions to ensure its working
Initial assessment and treatment of a water supply effectively.
An operator supplying clean water for use at the place of
food business must ensure that chemical and physical
hazards from the water source are identified and managed What if there is a problem?
and water at point of use meets the criteria in Table 1: If you suspect your water supply is not safe, dont use it
Table 1: Testing requirements for a self-supply source unless it has been:
boiled for one minute; or
Criteria for Clean Water from a Self-supply Water Source disinfected by adding chlorine.
Measurement Criteria Alternatively, use a temporary supply of safe water (e.g.,
Escherichia coli Less than 1 in any 100 ml sample bottled water or water from a registered water tanker).
Must not exceed 5 Nephelometric Throw away any food that could have become contaminated.
Turbidity
Turbidity Units (NTU) Clean any food preparation surfaces that could have become
Not less than 0.2 mg/l (ppm) free contaminated.
Chlorine (when
available chlorine with a minimum of Water contaminated on-site
chlorinated)
20 minutes contact time If water could have become contaminated from something
pH (when chlorinated) 6.58.0 that happened on-site, identify the problem, arrange for its
repair and dont use the water until youre notified that its
Reassessment of water supply
safe to do so (see Maintenance section)
The operator must ensure that tests are carried out to
determine that water meets the criteria in Table 1 Dispose of contaminated water or arrange treatment to
a) whenever an operator obtains water from a new source; remove the contaminant dont use this water until it has
and been treated and the contaminant removed.
b) as soon as practicable and not later than within one Treatment system is not working
week of the operator becoming aware of a change to the If the treatment system isnt working, arrange for repairs
environment or activities in or around a water source that to be carried out and checks to be made to ensure the
may affect the safety and suitability of water from that treatment system is operating properly. Use an alternative
source. clean water supply until this work has been completed.
Water collection Water shortage
Water must be collected only from roofs and gutters that Before youre affected by a water shortage, identify a
have been made from safe substances (e.g. no lead-based safe alternative water source. Transport the water using a
paint, bitumen, exposed timber, or copper guttering). registered water tanker.
Contamination from birds, animals, and leaves must be Record any action taken in the Maintenance schedule.
reduced by screening guttering, removing overhanging Consult your water specialist for advice about undertaking
branches and vegetation. any repairs. Contact your verifier and advise them of the
Aerials and satellite dishes must be mounted away from the action you have taken.
roof to reduce contamination from birds. Refer Places Basic Roof water supply above.
A first flush device must be installed and used to divert the
first flush of water when it rains.
Water treatment
Write it down
You must write down in the Maintenance schedule regular inspection and
A water treatment system must be able to provide clean maintenance identified for the water treatment system (e.g. changing filters)
water at point of use. Include in your Cleaning schedule any regular cleaning of water treatment
equipment (e.g. UV light equipment). You must write down (e.g. in the Diary)
The water treatment system used is: (tick appropriate box/es) the results of regular checks of your water supply and equipment and any water
filtration testing (e.g. for Free Available Chlorine (FAC), other chemicals or microbes)
chlorination that you or your local council carries out. You must write down (e.g. in the
UV disinfection Diary) any problems you had with the water supply and what you did about
other it. You must keep a record of checks made that the water treatment system is
working effectively and produce clean water at point of use.
Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 PLACES 3..4 page 1
Guidance
Guidance Roof water supply
What is it?

Extra information about managing Filters are usually installed in the reticulation system between
the water source (e.g. tank, bore, dam, and creek) and
your roof water supply other treatment steps (e.g. chlorine disinfection, UV light
disinfection)
Identifying possible microbial or chemical contamination
Cloudy or dirty-looking water will require filtration before
Identify anything that could contaminate your water source. it can be disinfected. Particles and dirt in the water make
Your local council is a good source of information for likely disinfection less effective. Filtering water with a high sediment
naturally occurring chemicals in the area. Discuss any load can be made more effective by adding a coagulation
potential issues with your verifier. chemical before the water is filtered. Coagulation chemicals
cause small particles in the water to clump together.
To confirm whether contamination has affected your water
Types of filters include cartridge filters, filters containing sand
source it might be necessary to test for the microbial or
or silica, ceramic filters, activated carbon filters and reverse
chemical contamination of concern. Testing should be carried
osmosis filtration. The choice of filter and filtration method will
out by accredited laboratory. MPI doesnt expect food business
be determined by the contaminants that need to be removed.
operators to test their water for all possible microbes or
chemicals found in water, but to concentrate on the microbes Maintenance
or chemicals that are most likely to be an issue for your water All equipment used with food (including water equipment)
source and could be a possible risk to food. must be maintained so that it doesnt make food unsafe. You
If the water source has become contaminated with microbes need to ensure filters are regularly replaced or cleaned (in
or chemicals, stop using the water and take immediate accordance with the manufacturers instructions) in order to
action. Consider measures to protect the water source from remain effective. Filters should allow a steady flow of clean
contaminants or schedule routine water treatment. (See above water to pass through them. Dirty filters enable bacteria to
-What if there is a problem) grow which can then be released and re-contaminate the
filtered water. Clogged filters can also lead to more wear
Treating your roof water supply
on the pump and the need for more maintenance. The
A roof water supply is unlikely to be safe for consumers unless manufacturers operating and maintenance instructions must
its filtered and disinfected before use. be carefully followed.

A range of treatment processes is available, but the Monitoring


effectiveness of each type depends on the contaminants that Water quality needs to be regularly checked after filtration. If
require control. A water treatment professional will be able the flow-rate decreases or the water becomes turbid (dirty or
to assist you select and design a water treatment system that cloudy), the filter may need replacing more frequently than
best suits your particular water supply and business needs. scheduled. Some filter systems include a pressure gauge that
(e.g. look in the Yellow Pages under Water treatment.) indicates when filters need replacing.
Treatment processes include: Proving your water supply is safe
Filtration
You might need to consider testing the effectiveness of
Chlorine disinfection
your treatment (e.g. by turbidity testing). Ask your water
UV disinfection
professional for advice.
1. Filtration
What if there is a problem?
Filtration can remove particles, chemicals, algal toxins and
Refer Places Basics Roof water supply above.
parasites.
2. Chlorine disinfection
Youll need a filtration system if your water supply:
Is turbid or contains a lot of suspended particles (above 1NTU Chlorine controls many harmful microbes, but is not very
defined below). Filtering the water first will help ensure effective in controlling parasites such as Giardia and
further treatment (chlorination and UV) is successful; Cryptosporidium, or treating water with a high sediment load.
Is at risk of contamination with sewage, farm run-off, animals Parasites and sediment are better dealt with by filtering the
that may contain parasites such as Cryptosporidium and water before adding chlorine (see above).
Giardia; or Topics to discuss with your water professional
Contains chemical contaminants or is at risk of chemical Chlorine can be manually dosed directly into the tank (a good
contamination method for emergency disinfection) but treatment is better
Topics to discuss with your water professional carried out using an automated system to regularly inject and
maintain a suitable level of chlorine.
Factors determining a filters ability to remove specific types Chlorine is an accessible, economical and effective means of
of contaminants include the material the filter is made from, treating a large volume of water.
the filter grade (how fine the filter is) and the flow rate of water
through the filter.

PLACES 3.4 page 2 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Guidance Roof water supply
What is it?
Maintenance Any repairs or replacement identified should be carried out
promptly.
You must maintain the chlorine dosing equipment so the
correct amount of chlorine is used. Its important to make sure Proving your water supply is safe
there is enough chlorine in the water. It is recommended that the water is tested regularly for E.coli
Monitoring (at least every three months). Ask your water professional for
advice.
If checking for free chlorine and an online chlorine meter is not
incorporated into the treatment system, a suitable test kit What if there is a problem?
(such as a swimming pool chlorine kit) must be used. This will Refer Places Basic Roof water supply above.
measure and monitor levels of chlorine and pH in the system
and identify whether your chlorine dosing needs adjusting.
You should regularly (e.g. weekly) monitor the amount of
chlorine in the water as it leaves the taps, to check the level
of disinfectant especially if the treatment system has not
been used for a while. It is desirable to have at least 0.2 mg/L
free chlorine in water used for drinking, hand washing and It is recommended that you get a water
assessor at a public health unit to review
food preparation.
your water treatment to ensure that it is
For chlorine to work effectively, the pH of the water must be suitable.
6.5 - 8.0. A pH of greater than 8 can decrease the efficiency
of chlorine disinfection.
Proving your water supply is safe

It is recommended that the water is tested weekly for checks


on the level of free available chlorine (FAC) or regularly
for E.coli (at least every three months). Ask your water
professional for advice.
What if there is a problem?

Refer Places Basic Roof water supply above.


3. Ultraviolet (UV) light disinfection

Ultraviolet (UV) light kills many kinds of harmful microbes.


Some UV light systems are effective against Giardia and
Cryptosporidium. Youll need to check this with your water
professional.
Topics to discuss with your water professional
UV light cant penetrate dirty or cloudy water so filtration is
often necessary (see Filtration above).
In a power outage alternative disinfection (e.g. chlorination)
will be needed.
Maintenance

A UV light system needs a reliable power source, regular


inspection, and careful maintenance to ensure it remains
effective. Always follow the manufacturers instructions.
UV lamps have a limited effective life span and need to be
replaced regularly in accordance with the manufacturers
instructions, or every six months whichever is the most often.
A UV light system needs regular checking to ensure:
It has a stable power supply and the system is switched on.
The lamps are intact, operating and free from a build-up of
scum.

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 PLACES 3.4 page 3
PLACES 3.4 page 4 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Places basics
Surface water or groundwater supply
Goal Why?
To ensure water from surface (streams, creeks, lakes) or Water taken from surface or groundwater sources can carry
underground (bore) sources is clean and safe for making harmful microbes and chemicals that can cause illness.
food, for cleaning food areas and for serving to customers. Clean water used with food doesnt contain E.coli or harmful
organisms that could make people ill.
Act requirements:
Insufficient supply of clean water can mean cleaning and
To ensure that water is suitable for the purpose for which it
hygiene tasks arent carried out and food gets contaminated.
is used.
To ensure that self-supplied water is clean water.
To ensure that the capacity of the water supply is adequate
for the operations of the food business.

How this is done How this is done


Self-supplied water (water that isnt provided by a drinking Silage is not stored near the water source.
water supplier) must be safe to use with food and meet Human waste there is clear space (buffer zone) between
requirements for clean water.
the water source and land used for human effluent disposal
Clean water must be provided in sufficient quantities to (e.g. septic tank drainage fields, long drop toilets).
enable food activities identified in the Plan to be carried out
hygienically. The local council must be contacted to determine naturally
occurring chemicals that are likely to be present in source
Initial assessment and treatment of a water supply
An operator supplying clean water for use at the place of water.
food business must ensure that chemical and biological These are:
hazards from the water source are identified and managed
and water at point of use meets the criteria in Table 1: Checks have been carried out for activities that may cause
Table 1: Testing requirements for a self-supply source chemical contamination of the water supply (e.g. industry,
Criteria for Clean Water from a Self-supply Water Source landfills, and chemical storage areas) upstream of, and
surrounding, the water source.
Measurement Criteria
Escherichia coli Less than 1 in any 100 ml sample The following activities/contaminants might be of concern to
Must not exceed 5 Nephelometric the water supply:
Turbidity
Turbidity Units (NTU)
The potential hazards identified above must be taken into
Not less than 0.2 mg/l (ppm) free
Chlorine (when account in water treatment.
available chlorine with a minimum of
chlorinated)
20 minutes contact time
Regular checks are made to identify any new sources of
pH (when chlorinated) 6.58.0 hazards or changes to hazards (see Maintenance section).
Reassessment of water supply
Groundwater sources
The operator must ensure that tests are carried out to
determine that water meets the criteria in Table 1 The bore head must be designed correctly and maintained so
a) whenever an operator obtains water from a new source; that it is protected against surface contamination (see extra
and
b) as soon as practicable and not later than within one information on next page).
week of the operator becoming aware of a change to the Water treatment
environment or activities in or around a water source that
may affect the safety and suitability of water from that A water treatment system must be able to provide water that
source. meets the Notice at point of use.
Water is sourced from: [tick as appropriate] The water treatment system used is: (tick appropriate box/es)
surface or insecure groundwater (follow instructions on filtration
this page) chlorination
secure groundwater (a supply that meets the definition of UV disinfection
secure in the Drinking Water Standards for NewZealand, other
(while you continue to meet this definition you need to do
nothing further.) The water treatment system must be installed and
a supply that is currently subject to a Public Health Risk maintained in accordance with the manufacturers
Management Programme. (While you continue to follow this instructions.
programme you need do nothing further). Checking the treatment system is working:
Surface or insecure groundwater The treatment system must be regularly checked against the
Wherever possible on-site water intakes must be protected manufacturers instructions to ensure its working effectively.
from:
Livestock fenced-off from access to the water source (e.g.
stream, lake, bore).
Animal effluent manure spreading does not take place on
pastures near the water source.
Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 PLACES 3.5 page 1
Places basics
Surface water or groundwater supply
What if there is a problem?
Write it down
If you suspect your water supply is not safe, dont use it
unless it has been:
boiled for one minute; or
You must write down in the Maintenance
disinfected by adding chlorine. schedule regular inspection and maintenance
Alternatively, use a temporary supply of safe water (e.g.,
identified for the water treatment system (e.g.
bottled water or water from a registered water tanker). changing filters)
Throw away any food that could have become contaminated. Include in your Cleaning schedule any regular
Clean any food preparation surfaces that could have become cleaning of water treatment equipment (e.g.
contaminated.
UV light equipment). You must write down
Water contaminated on-site
(e.g. in the Diary) the results of regular checks
If water could have become contaminated from something of your water supply and equipment and any
that happened on-site, identify the problem, arrange for its
repair and dont use the water until youre notified that its
water testing (e.g. for Free Available Chlorine
safe to do so (see Maintenance section). (FAC), other chemicals or microbes) that you
Dispose of contaminated water or arrange treatment to
or your local council carries out. You must
remove the contaminant dont use this water until it has write down (e.g. in the Diary) any problems you
been treated and the contaminant removed. had with the water supply and what you did
Treatment system is not working about it. You must keep a record of checks
If the treatment system isnt working, arrange for repairs made that the water treatment system is
to be carried out and checks to be made to ensure the working effectively to produce clean water at
treatment system is operating properly. Use an alternative point of use.
clean water supply until this work has been completed.
Water shortage

Before youre affected by a water shortage, identify a


safe alternative water source. Transport the water using a
registered water tanker.
Record any action taken in the Maintenance schedule
Consult your water specialist for advice about undertaking
any repairs.
Contact your verifier and advise them of the action you have
taken.

It is recommended that you get a water


assessor at a public health unit to review
your water treatment to ensure that it is
suitable.

PLACES 3.5 page 2 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Guidance
Surface water or groundwater supply
What is it?

Extra information about managing Identifying possible chemical contamination

your surface or groundwater Identify anything that could contaminate your water source.
You can do this by inspecting the intake point or bore head
supply and the area within 50 metres of your source. Things to be
concerned about include local agricultural activity, mining
Bore head security for groundwater supplies
operations or geothermal activity (see above for more
Poorly constructed and maintained well bore heads can examples). Your local council is a good source of information
introduce contamination into the groundwater. for likely naturally occurring chemicals in the area. Discuss
Seal the area between the casing and the surrounding any potential issues with your verifier.
ground with concrete to stop rain or surface water carrying
To confirm whether contamination has affected your water
contaminants into the well.
source it might be necessary to test for the chemical of
Seal between the casing and any hoses or cables going down
concern. Testing should be carried out by an accredited
the well shaft.
laboratory. MPI doesnt expect food business operators to test
Lock a protector cap on an unused well.
their water for all possible chemicals found in water, but to
Keep rubbish, pesticides, fertiliser, animals and compost away
concentrate on the chemicals that are most likely to be an
from the well bore head.
issue for your water source and could be a possible risk to
Seal any free-flowing wells.
food.
Regularly check that the well bore head is protected from
surface contamination If the water source has become contaminated with chemicals,
Sanitary protection of a typical bore
stop using the water and take immediate action. Consider
measures to protect the water source from contaminants,
alternative supplies of clean water, and water treatment.
(See previous page What if there is a problem).
Treating your surface or groundwater

A water supply is unlikely to be safe for consumers unless


its filtered and disinfected before use. However, if you have
a secure well bore head, as defined in the Ministry of Health
Drinking Water Standards (www.moh.govt.nz), disinfection
wont be necessary.
A range of treatment processes is available, to treat non-
secure water sources, but the effectiveness of each treatment
depends on the contaminants that require control. A water
treatment professional will be able to assist you select and
design a water treatment system that best suits your particular
Source: Ministry of Health (2005), Source Waters, The Guidelines for water supply and business needs. (e.g. look in the Yellow
Drinking-water Quality Management for NewZealand, pg 22 Pages under Water treatment.)

Identifying possible microbial contamination Treatment processes include:


1. Filtration
Identify anything that could contaminate your water source.
2. Chlorine disinfection
You can do this by inspecting the intake point or bore head 3. UV disinfection
and the area within 50 metres of your water source. Things to Filtration
be concerned about include a faulty bore head, offal pits/soak
holes or effluent discharge (see above for more examples). Filtration can remove particles, chemicals, algal toxins and
parasites.
To confirm whether contamination has affected your water
source it might be necessary to test for Escherichia coli Youll need a filtration system if your water supply:
(E. coli). Testing should be carried out by an accredited Is turbid or contains a lot of suspended particles (above 1NTU
laboratory. E.coli is found in human and animal faeces, so its defined below). Filtering the water first will help ensure
presence in the water sample indicates contamination and further treatment (chlorination and UV) is successful.
possibly disease causing microbes like Campylobacter and Is at risk of contamination with sewage, farm run-off, or from
Salmonella. animals that may contain parasites such as Cryptosporidium
and Giardia.
If the water source has become contaminated with E. coli, Contains chemical contaminants or is at risk of chemical
and you dont have a treatment system to manage E.coli, contamination.
stop using the water and take immediate action. Consider
measures to protect the water source from contaminants,
alternative supplies of clean water, and water treatment.
(See previous page What if there is a problem).

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 PLACES 3.5 page 3
Guidance
Surface water or groundwater supply
What is it?
Topics to discuss with your water professional Maintenance
Factors determining a filters ability to remove specific types
You must maintain the chlorine dosing equipment so the
of contaminants include the material the filter is made from,
correct amount of chlorine is used. Its important to make sure
the filter grade (how fine the filter is) and the flow rate of water
there is enough chlorine in the water.
through the filter.
Filters are usually installed in the reticulation system between Monitoring
the water source (e.g. tank, bore, dam, and creek) and
If checking for free chlorine and an online chlorine meter is not
other treatment steps (e.g. chlorine disinfection, UV light
incorporated into the treatment system, a suitable test kit
disinfection).
(such as a swimming pool chlorine kit) must be used. This will
Cloudy or dirty-looking water will require filtration before
measure and monitor levels of chlorine and pH in the system
it can be disinfected. Particles and dirt in the water make
and identify whether your chlorine dosing needs adjusting.
disinfection less effective. Filtering water with a high sediment
You should regularly (e.g. weekly) monitor the amount of
load can be made more effective by adding a coagulation
chlorine in the water as it leaves the taps, to check the level
chemical before the water is filtered. Coagulation chemicals
of disinfectant especially if the treatment system has not
cause small particles in the water to clump together.
been used for a while. It is desirable to have at least 0.2 mg/L
Types of filters include cartridge filters, filters containing sand
free chlorine in water used for drinking, hand washing and
or silica, ceramic filters, activated carbon filters and reverse
food preparation.
osmosis filtration. The choice of filter and filtration method will
be determined by the contaminants that need to be removed. For chlorine to work effectively, the pH of the water must be
Turbidity suspended particles in water can be measured and 6.5 - 8.0. A pH of greater than 8 can decrease the efficiency
expressed as nephlometric turbidity units (or NTU). Water of chlorine disinfection.
filtered for disinfection should measure 1 NTU or less.
Proving your water supply is safe
Maintenance
It is recommended that the water is tested weekly for checks
All equipment used with food (including water equipment) on the level of free available chlorine (FAC) or regularly
must be maintained so that it doesnt make food unsafe. You for E.coli (at least every three months). Ask your water
need to ensure filters are regularly replaced or cleaned (in professional for advice.
accordance with the manufacturers instructions) in order to
What if there is a problem?
remain effective. Filters should allow a steady flow of clean
water to pass through them. Dirty filters enable bacteria to Refer Places Basic Roof water supply.
grow which can then be released and re-contaminate the
3. Ultraviolet (UV) light disinfection
filtered water. Clogged filters can also lead to more wear
on the pump and the need for more maintenance. The Ultraviolet (UV) light kills many kinds of harmful microbes.
manufacturers operating and maintenance instructions must Some UV light systems are effective against Giardia and
be carefully followed. Cryptosporidium. Youll need to check this with your water
Monitoring
professional.
Topics to discuss with your water professional
Water quality must be regularly checked after filtration. If
the flow-rate decreases or the water becomes turbid (dirty or UV light cant penetrate dirty or cloudy water so filtration is
cloudy), the filter might need replacing. Some filter systems often necessary (see Filtration on previous page).
include a pressure gauge that indicates when filters need In a power outage alternative disinfection (e.g. chlorination)
replacing. will be needed.
Maintenance
Proving your water supply is safe
You might need to consider testing the effectiveness of A UV light system needs a reliable power source, regular
your treatment (e.g. by turbidity testing). Ask your water inspection, and careful maintenance to ensure it remains
professional for advice. effective. Always follow the manufacturers instructions.
UV lamps have a limited effective life span and need to be
2. Chlorine disinfection replaced regularly in accordance with the manufacturers
instructions, or every six months whichever is the most often.
Chlorine controls many harmful microbes, but is not very
effective in controlling parasites such as Giardia and A UV light system needs regular checking to ensure:
Cryptosporidium, or treating water with a high sediment load. It has a stable power supply and the system is switched on.
Parasites and sediment are better dealt with by filtering the The lamps are intact, operating and free from a build-up of
water before adding chlorine (see above). scum.
Topics to discuss with your water professional Any repairs or replacement identified should be carried out
Chlorine can be manually dosed directly into the tank (a good promptly.
method for emergency disinfection) but treatment is better
Proving your water supply is safe
carried out using an automated system to regularly inject and
maintain a suitable level of chlorine. It is recommended that the water is tested regularly for E.coli
Chlorine is an accessible, economical and effective means of (at least every three months). Ask your water professional for
treating a large volume of water. advice.
What if there is a problem?
Refer Places Basic Roof water supply.

PLACES 3.5 page 4 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Places basics Cleaning
Goal Why?
To ensure places, facilities and equipment are kept clean. Cleaning removes dirt and grease. Sanitising kills harmful
microbes on surfaces.
Act requirements:
Unclean premises and equipment will enable microbes to
To establish and carry out procedures for cleaning and
grow, which, if they contaminate food, can make people
sanitising places, facilities and equipment.
sick.
To ensure that cleaning equipment and cleaning compounds
Dirty premises can attract pests, like mice, rats and
are appropriate for the task and used in accordance with the
cockroaches, that can spread disease.
manufacturers instructions.
To ensure that food is produced or processed and handled
in a way that minimises the contamination or deterioration
of the food.

How this is done How this is done


Places, (e.g. the kitchen or food processing space) facilities, A new or freshly cleaned cloth must always be used to wipe
(e.g. storage areas, amenities) and equipment (e.g. surfaces that come into contact with ready-to-eat food.
chopping boards, work surfaces, containers, machinery) Outside tables etc must be cleaned using cloths designated
must be cleaned in accordance with a documented cleaning for these tasks only (and are not to be used for other
schedule. cleaning).
A re-usable cloth must be be identified, (e.g. by its
Other items that may contaminate food indirectly (e.g. by
colour) with a type of cleaning activity to prevent cross-
contaminating a food workers hands) must also be regularly
contamination (e.g. a cloth used in the toilet cant be used in
cleaned and sanitised. For example, handles of doors and
a food preparation area).
refrigerators; taps, hand washbasins.
Equipment used for cleaning
This is done by identifying what needs to be cleaned, and
Cleaning materials must be clearly identified and away from
where necessary sanitised, and the frequency with which this
food.
is to be carried out. Information about how to do this is in
Cleaning equipment must be kept in good repair and not
Designing a cleaning schedule.
used for any other purpose.
The manufacturers instructions must be followed when Cleaning equipment must be regularly cleaned and
using chemicals and cleaning equipment. sanitised.
Chemicals must be clearly labelled.
Food must be appropriately protected or removed before
Chemicals must never be stored in a food container.
cleaning or sanitising.
Staff using cleaning chemicals must be trained how to use
General cleaning requirements chemicals safely.
Cleaning must occur between tasks (clean as you go).
Items must be left to air dry. What if there is a problem?
Cloths must be changed daily or more frequently if needed. If an area, equipment or utensils etc are dirty, clean them.
Used towels (e.g. ones used for floor cleaning) must be Discuss the problem with staff members involved and find
stowed for laundering and not mixed with in-use cloths. out why the cleaning wasnt effective. Take the action
Dishwasher needed to reduce the likelihood of it happening again.

Where dishwashers are used they must be operated and The solution might include:
serviced according to the manufacturers instructions. providing more training or assistance;
For items that cant be put through the dishwasher
changing the type of cleaning chemicals and materials used;
replacing the item to be cleaned with something that is
1. Pre-clean remove visible dirt and food residue.
easier to clean.
2. Main clean wash with hot water and the correct amount
of detergent. Throw out any ready-to-eat food that may have become
3. Rinse with clean, hot water. contaminated.
4. Air dry or use a single-use drying cloth.
For clean surfaces that will come into contact with
ready-to-eat food: Write it down
1. Sanitise -with a food-safe sanitiser.
You must write down:
2. Rinse (if sanitiser instructions require).
3. Air dry or use a single-use drying cloth. in the Cleaning schedule what items need to
Using cloths be cleaned, how they are to be cleaned and, if
Single-use cloths are used whenever possible and thrown necessary, sanitised, how often and who will do it.
away after each task.
When using reusable cloths they must be thoroughly
in the Diary when weekly cleaning tasks have
washed, sanitised and dried between tasks. been satisfactorily completed.
Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 PLACES 3.6 page 1
When operating correctly, items in the Cleaning and Listeria
dishwasher will be too hot to handle When you process and handle foods
immediately after the rinse cycle. that support the growth of Listeria you
will need to take particular care with
your cleaning. Further information
about dealing with Listeria will be found
throughout the plan.

PLACES 3.6 page 2 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Places basics
Designing a cleaning schedule
Goal Why?
To ensure that places, facilities, equipment and utensils are Cleaning removes dirt and grease. Sanitising kills harmful
cleaned on a regular basis. microbes on surfaces.
Unclean premises and equipment will enable microbes to
The Act requires that:
grow, which, if they contaminate food, can make people
To establish and carry out procedures for cleaning and
sick.
sanitising places, facilities and equipment.
Dirty premises can attract pests, like mice, rats and
Cleaning facilities and equipment must be maintained
cockroaches, that can spread disease.
and otherwise kept in a state of repair and condition
that facilitates cleaning and sanitising; and prevents the
contamination of food.

How this is done


Identify all:
surfaces that must be cleaned; and
surfaces that must be cleaned and sanitised.
Identify how they must be cleaned (the cleaning method), and how often this must be done out in order to keep food safe and
suitable, and who is responsible for doing this.

Guidance on designing your cleaning schedule High-priority cleaning:


Items that come into contact with food, including slicers;
Walk through your business and make a list of everything
work surfaces and chopping boards;
that needs cleaning. You may find it helpful to go through the
utensils, e.g. knives, scoops, tongs;
examples opposite.
interior of fridges, display cabinets;
equipment with moving parts, e.g. food mixers, slicers and
processors;
sinks and soap dispensers;
reusable cloths and work clothes;
ice machines
vacuum-packing equipment
Frequently touched items:
rubbish bins, broom and mop handles;
door handles, taps, switches and controls;
can openers, telephones.
Other cleaning:
floors, walls, ceilings;
storage areas and freezers;
waste areas, drains, grease traps;
microwaves, ovens, dishwashers,
places where customers handle food.
Toilets and staff facilities.
For each item, or group of items, write down what should be Include details on:
done to clean them (and sanitise where appropriate). how to clean the item(s) including dismantling where
necessary to get to all surfaces that touch food or could get a
Make sure that food is protected from contamination
build up of food;
(e.g. from water sprays/aerosols) during cleaning.
how to sanitise items;
what chemicals to use (and in what dilutions);
what equipment to use; how often to clean the item(s).
how to clean without affecting any food being prepared

Review your schedule regularly and check that all cleaning is Let staff know what is on the cleaning schedule, so they know
being done properly. what they have to do and when. Supervise cleaning.

A template cleaning schedule is included in this FCP, or you can create your own. Complete it when you tailor your plan see the
Getting started checklist and keep it handy for referring to, e.g. in the Diary.

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 PLACES 3.7 page 1
PLACES 3.7 page 2 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Ministry for Primary Industries

Frequency of cleaning [tick]

Places basics
After Every Method of cleaning Who is responsible
Items and areas to be cleaned use shift Daily Weekly Other (including manufactuers instructions for dilution of chemicals) e.g. kitchenhand

Cleaning schedule
Food Control Plan Dec 2015
PLACES 3.8 page 1
PLACES 3.8 page 2 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Places basics
Waste management
Goal Why?
To effectively manage the hygienic collection, storage and Rubbish and recyclable material that is not stored
disposal of waste and recyclable material. appropriately and collected regularly can:
prevent effective cleaning;
Act requirements:
encourage pests;
Waste must be managed in a way that ensures the safety
contaminate food and food-handling areas.
and suitability of food.
Waste must be collected, stored and disposed of in ways Waste food that is used in food for sale may make people ill.
that prevents it from becoming a source of contamination, or
being mistaken for food for sale and attracting or harbouring
pests.

How this is done How this is done


Waste and recycling material must be stored so that it is Supplying food waste for feeding pigs -Guidance
clearly identifiable and cannot be mistaken as usable.
If you supply food waste to someone else for feeding to pigs,
Bins and other equipment used for waste and recyclable the Biosecurity (Meat and Food Waste for Pigs) Regulations
material must not be used for any other purpose. 2005 apply to you. One way to ensure you meet your
Food preparation areas obligations under the regulations is to seek written assurance
An adequate number of watertight waste bins must be from the person who you supply the food waste to that it
provided. will be treated according to the regulations. (NOTE: seeking
Where appropriate, bins with foot-operated lid openers are written assurance is not a regulatory requirement).
used. MPI has a template you can use for the written assurance.
Bins must be emptied when full, and at least daily. The template and additional information on the regulations
External storage areas are available at: www.biosecurity.govt.nz/foodwaste, or you
External waste bins must be pest proof and easy to clean. can email any queries to foodwaste@mpi.govt.nz.
Cleaning Contact details of pig waste collector(s) used (if any):
Rubbish bins and other receptacles must be cleaned
regularly as part of the cleaning schedule.
Grease traps and converters
Grease traps and converters must be used in accordance
What if there is a problem?
with the manufacturers instructions and cleaned
regularly. Waste from grease traps is collected every If rubbish and recyclable material is not being stored
(specify when) appropriately, check to make sure there are enough bins and
and as needed by: that they are located appropriately.
Contractor Review staff work habits and refresh staff training as
Phone necessary.
Rubbish and recycling collection Resolve any problems with the waste collector as they arise.
Waste is collected and removed from the site every If problems persist and cant be fixed use another, more
(specify when) reliable waste collector.
and as needed by:
Contractor
Phone Write it down
Waste liquids
The sewage and waste-water system must be adequate for
You must:
the volume of liquid at the place, and operates so that it write down the cleaning instructions for
doesnt contaminate food.
bins and areas used to store waste and
recyclable material in the Cleaning schedule.
include the grease traps and converters in
the Maintenance schedule.
Keep any written assurances from your food
waste collectors with your other records.

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 PLACES 3.9 page 1
Places basics
Pest and animal control
Goal Why?
To remove conditions that attract pests (e.g. birds, insects, Pests, such as mice, rats, birds, cockroaches and flies, carry
other animals) and prevent pests from entering premises. microbes that can cause illness if these microbes come into
contact with food.
To ensure that animals do not contaminate food on site.
Faeces and urine from pests, such as rats and mice, can
Act requirements: contaminate food and cause illness.
To establish and carry out procedures to control pests Pests can damage stock.
including carrying out regular checks for pests, removing
sites where pests could breed, and taking action to eradicate
pests where found.
To dispose of food or any food-related accessory, that has
been contaminated by pests .
Food must be processed and handled in a way that
minimises the contamination of the food.

How this is done How this is done


Remove things that attract pests Animals such as pets and disability assist animals
Rubbish bins must be kept covered and rubbish removed Animals must not be allowed in any area used for the
regularly (see Waste management). processing and handling of food.
Cleaning clearing and cleaning must be carried out Sight- and hearing-assistance animals must be allowed in
regularly (clean as you go). Spills etc are cleaned up customer areas, provided food on display is protected from
straight away. Cleaning schedule tasks are completed. contamination (in accordance with the Dog Control Act
Outdoor dining areas are cleaned and cleared frequently, and 1996).
used tableware, waste etc is not left to build up. Other pet animals may at the discretion of the business
Food storage open and/or unpackaged food must be stored be allowed in customer areas provided food on display is
in pest-proof containers. protected from contamination.
Keep pests out
What if there is a problem?
Maintenance gaps and holes that could allow pest entry
must be repaired in a timely manner (e.g. holes in fly If you see pests or evidence of pest activity (e.g. droppings,
screens etc). damaged goods etc) take action to:
Incoming goods must be checked to make sure pests are throw out any food that looks like it has been damaged by
not inside the packaging. pests;
Keep a look out for pest activity clean down the affected areas and clean and sanitise areas
where unwrapped food is prepared or handled;
Places must be checked at least weekly for signs of pests.
eliminate the pests and ensure that access routes are
Traps and bait stations etc must be looked at as part of removed.
regular checks.
In the case of a severe pest infestation, or an infestation of
Our pest control contractor is (if any):
cockroaches, call in a pest control company.
Company

Write it down
Phone

Email
You must:
The pest control contractors records are kept:
write in the Diary any sightings of pests
or pest activity (including type of pest and
Pesticides and pest control equipment
extent of infestation) and what action you
have taken to fix the problem.
Pest control equipment, such as bait stations, electric insect
killers, traps etc, must be installed and located so that it note in the Diary if, when you do your
doesnt cause contamination. regular checks, there is no evidence of any
Using pesticides
pests.
All food must be removed before treating the premises with If you are not using a pest control contractor,
insecticides or chemical sprays. Food-contact surfaces (e.g. you must write down where and what pesticides
benches) must be cleaned to remove the chemical before and/or traps are in use (keep this information
using them again. in the FCP with this procedure).

PLACES 3.10 page 1 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Places basics
Maintenance
Goal Why?
To ensure that places, facilities and equipment enable Places, facilities and equipment need to be in good
good hygiene practices, including protecting food from condition to enable the safe preparation and storage of food.
contamination. Facilities and equipment that doesnt operate efficiently
may affect food safety (e.g. fridge not keeping food cold
To maintain places, facilities and equipment in good working
enough thereby allowing harmful microbes to grow; toilets
condition.
not working).
Act requirements: Surfaces that get worn or damaged can become hard to
To make sure that places, facilities and equipment are clean or sanitise resulting in a build up
maintained in a way that:
provides easy access for the effective maintenance and
cleaning of the fixtures, fittings and equipment used; and
excludes dirt, dust, fumes, smoke, other contaminants
and pests entering and remaining.
Ensures that construction materials and materials used
for the surfaces of the fixtures, fittings and equipment that
are likely to come into contact with food are not capable
of contaminating food. To make sure that maintenance
compounds are appropriate for the task and used in a way
that maintains the safety and suitability of food.
To minimise the contamination or deterioration of food.

How this is done How this is done


Planned maintenance Compounds and chemicals:
Planned maintenance is based on the operators knowledge must be fully labelled, stored, sealed and used in
of the places and facilities used for the business, and the accordance with the manufacturers instructions;
recommendation of equipment manufacturers or service must not be stored in food containers or containers that
persons, and the level of use. could be mistaken for food containers;
All equipment must be serviced and, if appropriate, must not be stored or transported using packing material
calibrated periodically. See Designing a maintenance that has, or is likely to be, used for storing or transporting
schedule. food.
The Maintenance schedule is used to check, on a regular General housekeeping
basis, that the premises and equipment are in good working All unused and/or broken equipment must be removed from
condition. food-handling areas.
Unplanned maintenance or repairs
When damage occurs or equipment breaks down, repairs What if there is a problem?
must be done in a timely manner.
If cracked, broken or damaged surfaces or equipment are
Whenever maintenance or repairs are carried out noticed, repair or replace as appropriate.
Maintenance and service personnel must follow all relevant
Identify whether the Maintenance schedule needs updating.
procedures (including personal hygiene). They should not
use tools that have been used in contaminated areas. Throw away any food that may have become contaminated.
Whenever possible, work is done outside food preparation
Ensure that staff know what to do if something breaks down
times.
when you are not present.
Food that could become contaminated must be covered or
removed before maintenance tasks are carried out.

Write it down
Following maintenance, any surfaces that could have
become contaminated must be cleaned (and sanitised if
necessary).
Maintenance equipment and Maintenance compounds You must write down:
Food-grade lubricant etc must be used where necessary.
Maintenance compounds, chemicals, tools and associated
regular maintenance tasks in the
things must be stored in a designated area away from food- Maintenance schedule.
handling areas.
unplanned maintenance carried out in the
appropriate day in the Diary.

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 PLACES 3.11 page 1
The frequency with which places and equipment
need regular maintenance will depend on a
range of factors such as the type of the place or
equipment, its age and frequency of use.
It is the operators responsibility to identify the
maintenance frequency. This can be based on
the information provided by the manufacturer
on servicing their equipment or may need to be
varied depending on the above factors.
Sometimes things get damaged, go wrong or
break (unplanned maintenance) so it is also
important to be able to have repairs carried out
quickly.

PLACES 3.11 page 2 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Places basics
Designing a maintenance schedule
Goal Why?
To develop and implement a regular maintenance programme Regular maintenance of places and equipment:
so that the places, facilities and equipment stay in good can identify that things are starting to go wrong before they
working condition. become an issue that affects the safety of food;
enables alternative action to be taken in advance of an issue
Act requirements:
arising that could affect the safety of food;
To make sure that places, facilities and equipment are
will help to prevent a situation arising such as fire that
maintained in a way that:
could affect staff and customers and close the business.
provides easy access for the effective maintenance and
cleaning of the fixtures, fittings and equipment used; and
excludes dirt, dust, fumes, smoke, other contaminants
and pests entering and remaining.

How this is done


Identify all things that need regular maintenance:
Identify what maintenance is to be done, how often maintenance must be carried out in order to keep food safe and suitable,
and who is responsible for doing this.

Guidance on designing your maintenance schedule Mechanical/electrical equipment


Ovens
Walk through your business and make a list of everything
Fridges
that needs regular (scheduled) maintenance. You may find it
Freezers
helpful to go through the examples in the opposite column.
Dishwashers
You are likely to have other things that are not on this list. Ice machines
Air extraction equipment
Hot/cold holding equipment
Vacuum-packers
Slicers
Mixers
Lighting
Non-mechanical
Cutting/chopping blocks
Fly screens
Surface claddings
Hand tools knives etc
Waste bins
For each item write down the frequency that it should be How often you plan maintenance may vary and depend on the
checked. (Your manufacturer may give you some guidance manufacturers information, frequency of use, age of item and
relating to this in the manual or when they install it). its importance to your business.

For each item of equipment or area of your premises write Keep this record up to date in case something breaks down
down who will carry out the maintenance and their contact when you are not on site. You may want staff to contact you
details. first to confirm what action to take.
Write down a description of what work is to be undertaken. This might be a general service by a service engineer or work
a staff member can carry out, such as checking for damage or
removing a build up of material around fridge motors and fans.
Keep a record to confirm that your planned maintenance has In the Diary, make a note of the maintenance work carried
been carried out, noting the date that it occurred. out. You can use the Diary to work out when the next
maintenance is due. Increasingly frequent (and costly)
maintenance can indicate that it is time to consider replacing
a piece of equipment.
Review your maintenance schedule at least annually or when Regularly reviewing your maintenance schedule identifies
you purchase new equipment or no longer use a piece of whether you have included new equipment and whether some
equipment. checks are either too frequent or not frequent enough.

A template maintenance schedule is included in this FCP, or you can create your own. Complete it when you tailor your plan see
the Getting started checklist and keep it handy for referring to e.g. in the Diary.

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 PLACES 3.12 page 1
PLACES 3.12 page 2 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Places basics Maintenance schedule
You must tick the boxes in the Diary to confirm when scheduled maintenance tasks have been carried out.
Use the Diary to plan when the next maintenance task needs doing.
responsible Description of maintenance activity
Contractor/
person
daily, weekly, fortnightly,
monthly, six monthly,
Frequency (e.g.

annually)
Equipment/item
Food Control Plan Dec 2015 PLACES 3.13 page 1
PLACES 3.12 page 2 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
People basics

Food Service and Retail Food


Control Plan
People Basics

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 PEOPLE 4.0 page 1
PEOPLE 4.0 page 2 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
People basics Sickness
Goal Why?
To prevent anyone who is carrying a communicable disease Food can become contaminated by people who are unwell
from contaminating food. with certain infections or are carrying the organisms in or on
their body.
Act requirements:
Harmful microbes can be transmitted through a sick
The operator must have procedures to ensure that any
persons faeces (poo), vomit and in some cases other body
staff member or visitor at the place of food business who
fluids.
is known to be, or suspected of being, sick does not
contaminate food or food-related accessories.
The operator must ensure that the procedures are complied
with.
Sick means being infected by or being a carrierof a disease
or illness (including a notifiable infectious disease listed in
section A of Part 1 of Schedule 1 of the Health Act 1956)
that is likely to be transmitted through food.

How this is done How this is done


1. No one (including a contractor, visitor, etc) is permitted Notes for How this is done
in a food-handling area if suffering from vomiting or
Vomiting in the absence of other obvious causes,
diarrhoea.
e.g. morning sickness or alcohol poisoning.
Anyone who has vomited or had diarrhoea in the 48
Diarrhoea other than that associated with conditions such
hours before entering the food premises must report it to
as irritable bowel syndrome, Crohns disease or ulcerative
.
colitis.
2. Any food handler who has had diarrhoea two or more
Food handler any person who comes into direct contact
times, or any vomiting within 48 hours must seek medical
with food or the equipment or utensils used to prepare food
advice and have a faecal specimen tested to identify the
(e.g. cooks, waitresses etc).
cause of illness.
must ensure the food What if there is a problem?
handler is excluded from the premises until they meet the If staff are not following this procedure you must find out
appropriate clearance criteria (see Exclusion of infected why and retrain them if necessary.
persons guidance).
If someone vomits on the premises, you must clean and
is to determine whether a sanitise the area (including the cleaning equipment). Throw
sick food handler is to be given safe alternative work that out any food that might have been infected and send the
does not involve direct contact with open food or surfaces person home.
and equipment in any food area.
3. Any vomiting at work must be reported immediately to
.
The food handler must be excluded immediately from all
Write it down
food-handling areas. You must write down in the Staff sickness
The affected area and all contaminated surfaces, record (see Records section) when employees or
including equipment and utensils, must be cleaned and others who visit the premises are unwell and
sanitised.
what action has been taken.
Any food that may have become contaminated must be
disposed of.
will ensure that this is done.
4. Anyone with jaundice (yellowing of the skin) who is Excluding food handlers
suspected of, or has, hepatitis A, must not be allowed in
See the Exclusion of infected persons
a food-handling area.
guidance for further information and
5. Anyone with scaly, weeping or infected skin that cannot clearance requirements.
Keep
be totally a vomit
covered duringkitfood
(disposable apron,
handling must notgloves,
be If you are uncertain whether a food handler
permittedbleach etc) food.
to handle handy to safely clean up any
may pose a risk, seek advice from MPI or
vomiting that may occur.
an Environmental Health Officer at your
local council.

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 PEOPLE 4.1 page 1
Guidance
Exclusion of infected persons
1. Exclusion controls for unspecified vomiting and diarrhoea

Vomiting is an important symptom of a viral or bacterial infection. A food handler who has vomited (in the absence of other obvious
causes, e.g. alcohol poisoning, morning sickness etc) in the 48 hours before starting work must be excluded, and the ill person
must seek medical advice. The person must tell the doctor that they work as a food handler (the doctor should then arrange for
faecal testing).
Diarrhoea other than that associated with conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome, Crohns disease or ulcerative colitis may also
indicate the presence of an infection see also section 6 below: Factors not associated with microbiological contamination of food.
Anyone suffering from diarrhoea must cease work immediately. If there is only one episode of diarrhoea and no other symptoms,
such as ongoing nausea, abdominal cramps or fever, the person may resume food-handling duties again after 48 hours of being
symptom free. They should be reminded of the importance of good hand hygiene practice, particularly hand washing and thorough
drying. If symptoms persist, the person should seek medical advice. The person must tell the doctor that they work as a food
handler (the doctor should then arrange for faecal testing).

Faecal (poo) testing


It is important that faecal specimens of food handlers who have been ill are tested if they have
vomited or have had two or more episodes of diarrhoea.
There are also some specific illnesses where clearance with faecal specimens is required, so it is
important to know the identity of the cause of the illness (see next section). Clearance with faecal
specimens can be arranged by a doctor or through the local public health unit.

2. Exclusion controls for specific illnesses


Organism (Hazard) Action to be taken (Control)
Campylobacter Exclude from work until well and without diarrhoea for a period of 48 hours.
Cryptosporidium Exclude from work until well and without diarrhoea for a period of 48 hours.
Giardia Exclude from work until well and without diarrhoea for a period of 48 hours.
Hepatitis A Exclude from work until cleared by the Medical Officer of Health.

See section 3 below: Illnesses requiring special consideration for further


control measures.

Shigella Exclude from work until two consecutive negative faecal specimens (taken 48 hours apart) have been
confirmed.*
Salmonella Exclude from work until two consecutive negative faecal specimens (taken 48 hours apart) have been
confirmed.*
Organisms causing Exclude from work until clearance is given by a Medical Officer of Health.
Typhoid, Paratyphoid
See section 3 below: Illnesses requiring special consideration for further
and Cholera
control measures.

VTEC (such as E.coli Exclude from work until two consecutive negative faecal specimens (taken 48 hours apart) have been
0157:H7) confirmed.*

The number of organisms needed to cause infection is low and the health
implications for high-risk groups, such as the elderly, young, pregnant and
immuno-compromised, can be serious, with some cases resulting in death.

Yersinia Exclude from work until well and without diarrhoea for a period of 48 hours.
Viruses (such as Exclude from work until well and without diarrhoea for a period of 48 hours.
Norovirus)
(presenting as gastrointestinal Highly infective. Virus particles survive in the environment for long periods.
illness consisting of diarrhoea, Seek immediate advice from the public health unit regarding disinfecting
nausea or vomiting)
work areas and disposal of potentially contaminated food.

* Illness that requires medical clearance before returning to work. Specimens should be collected at least 48 hours after the last
dose of any antibiotic treatment. Negative faecal specimens are required, as the organism may still be excreted even after the
symptoms have stopped.

PEOPLE 4.2 page 1 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Guidance
People basics
Exclusion of infected persons
3. Illnesses requiring special consideration In contrast, infected lesions on non-exposed skin, e.g. the back
of the legs, are not an impediment to food-handling duties;
Hepatitis A
however, the importance of meticulous hand hygiene should be
Anyone either infected, or suspected of being infected, with emphasised.
hepatitis A must be excluded from food handling for at least
Clean wounds must be totally covered with a distinctively
seven days after the onset of symptoms. Most adults will
coloured waterproof dressing but there is no need to discontinue
experience the sudden onset of an influenza-like illness followed
food handling.
by muscle aches, headache, loss of appetite, abdominal
discomfort, fever and jaundice (yellowing of the skin). Advice in 5. Infections of the eyes, ears, mouth and throat
all cases should be sought from the public health unit.
Any food handler whose eyes, ears, mouth or gums are weeping
or discharging must be excluded from food handling until they
A food handler who is a close personal are better. Those with a persistent sore throat and no other
contact (household, sexual etc) of a person
respiratory symptoms, such as a runny nose or cough, may have
who has hepatitis A must notify their
manager. In such cases, the food handler a streptococcal throat infection and should be referred to a
should not handle unwrapped food until doctor for assessment.
advice is sought from the Medical Officer of 6. Factors not associated with microbiological
Health at the public health unit. contamination of food
Non-infective gastrointestinal disorders
The period of highest infectivity is just before and after the Disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome, Crohns disease
onset of symptoms. This presents a risk, as a person will not or ulcerative colitis are not a barrier to employment as a food
normally be diagnosed until after the onset of symptoms. In handler, even though they may result in diarrhoea. Workers
such cases, the public health unit will need to assess whether with these disorders must be aware of the need to seek medical
other corrective action may need to be taken in addition to advice and notify the manager if any change from their normal
excluding the food handler (e.g. sanitising work areas and bowel habit occurs, as this must be assumed to be infectious
communal facilities, disposing of food where there has been a until proven otherwise.
risk of contamination and immunising other food handlers or
Chest and long-term respiratory diseases
food consumers to reduce their risk of illness). There is often
a short time frame to offer protection, so early notification is Tuberculosis is not spread through food handling. However, the
essential. disease may affect a persons general health so as to make them
unfit for work or they pose a risk of infection to others in the
Typhoid and paratyphoid
workplace. Contact the public health unit for more information
on this.
Anyone suffering from typhoid, paratyphoid Bloodborne infections
or cholera must be excluded from working
Infections such as HIV, hepatitis B or C do not themselves
with food.
present a risk of food contamination. As long as workers are
well, there is no reason why people with these infections should
Investigation and management of people with typhoid,
not be employed as food handlers.
paratyphoid or cholera will normally be carried out by the local
public health unit, which will usually require people to be All blood spills should be treated as if infected, and the affected
excluded from food-handling work until faecal tests indicate area should be suitably cleaned and sanitised (e.g. with a
that the infecting organism is no longer being excreted. diluted bleach solution) and any affected food discarded.

If food handlers are found to have typhoid, paratyphoid or


cholera they should be excluded from all food-handling
activities and the local public health unit should be contacted
immediately.
4. Skin conditions

Food handlers with lesions on exposed skin


(hands, face, neck or scalp) that are actively
weeping or discharging must be excluded
from work until the lesions have healed.

An infection of the fingernail-bed or boil on the face or other


exposed skin, even if covered with a suitable waterproof
dressing, will be considered grounds for exclusion as a food
handler.

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 PEOPLE 4.2 page 2
Places basics Hand hygiene
Goal Why?
To prevent food and food contact surfaces from becoming Hand washing and drying is one of the best ways to prevent
contaminated by unclean hands through effective hand harmful microbes from getting onto food.
washing and drying. Harmful microbes carried on hands (or gloves) can be
passed onto food by either touching food directly or by
Act requirements:
touching other things that the food comes into contact with
All staff and visitors must follow appropriate personal
(e.g. benches, knives, chopping boards etc).
hygiene routines to make sure that the safety and suitability
Gloves are not a substitute for hand hygiene.
of food is not compromised.

How this is done How this is done


Everyone (including contractors) must follow good hand Hand jewellery and finger nails
hygiene practices by washing and drying their hands, as
To enable good hand hygiene, fingernails should be kept
described in the steps below especially:
short. Hand jewellery should not be worn, if the food handler
when entering any area where unwrapped ready-to-eat food
is working with unwrapped food.
is handled;
before touching unwrapped ready-to-eat foods; What if there is a problem?
after touching raw food (meat, vegetables etc);
before putting on gloves and after removing them; When a staff member doesnt follow correct hand hygiene
after coughing and sneezing; discuss the issue straight away with the person to find out
after using the toilet. why.

Hand washing You may need to:


demonstrate the correct procedure to them;
Step 1: Clean under each fingernail using warm running
provide a hand washbasin at a more convenient location;
water, soap and a nail brush.
change the type of hand cleaning materials;
Step 2: Wash hands with warm running water and soap, provide information, e.g. on a poster above the basin.
rubbing vigorously (front, back and between fingers).
If there is not a supply of soap and hand towels, you must
renew supply. Review restocking practice.
It can be hard to judge time, so it is
recommended you develop a habit that will
help you measure the required washing
time (e.g. try singing twice through the
happy birthday song). Write it down
You must write down in the Diary when
Step 3: Dry hands thoroughly (front, back and between employees are noticed not following good hand
fingers) by using: [tick option]
hygiene and what was done to correct them.
single-use cloth (roller) towel
Rub hands on two sections of towel.
single-use paper towel
Rub hands on two paper towels.
air blower Gloves do not protect food from cross-
contamination (e.g. passing microbes from
Rub hands whilst air blower operating. raw food to cooked food). Gloves, just like
Using gloves hands, can transfer microbes from raw
food, equipment, utensils and surfaces
Gloves must be changed between tasks (e.g. after handling to ready-to-eat food. Change gloves
uncooked food and before handling ready-to-eat foods etc). frequently. Hands need to be washed when
dirty gloves are removed and before clean
When gloves are first used and whenever they are changed gloves are put on.
hands must be washed see hand washing (above)
Gloves are only worn for the following tasks: Staff that do tasks that dont involve
unwrapped food may be able to keep
hands clean by using other cleaning
methods, such as hand wipes or gels.
Hand sanitisers are not effective unless
hands are cleaned first.

PEOPLE 4.3 page 1 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
People basics
Places Personal hygiene
Goal Why?
To prevent contamination of food and food contact surfaces Customers can become sick if they eat food that has been
for clothing and inappropriate behaviour. contaminated with harmful microbes carried by dirty food
handlers.
Act requirements:
Dirty or inappropriate clothing can contaminate food.
All staff and visitors must follow appropriate personal
hygiene routines to make sure that the safety and suitability
of food is not compromised.
Where a persons presence or action may contaminate
food they must wear clothing that prevents or, if this is not
possible, minimises contamination.

How this is done What if there is a problem?


Clothing If staff are not following this procedure you must find out
why and retrain them if necessary.
Appropriate clean clothing is worn when handling
unpackaged food to protect it from contamination. If someone is handling food and has an uncovered weeping
sore on their hand, you must stop the person and dispose of
The following standards of dress apply:
any food that might have been infected.
Job/position
You must not allow the person to handle food until
appropriate steps have been taken to ensure they will not
Clothing (dress standard) infect the food (e.g. retraining, sore is covered etc).

Job/position Anyone (including a contractor, visitor etc)


entering a food preparation area must
wear appropriate clean clothing.
Clothing (dress standard)

Job/position
Write it down
Clothing (dress standard)
You must write down in the Diary what action
you took if something goes wrong (e.g. a food
Outer protective clothes (e.g. aprons etc) must be removed handler is observed working with an uncovered
when a food handler leaves food preparation areas (e.g. to go open sore on their hand or not wearing clothing
to the toilet, lunch room, going home etc).
that protects food from contamination).
Personal conduct
Food handlers touching nose, mouth, hair and skin during
food preparation must wash their hands before handling
food or touching food contact surfaces.
Food handlers must not spit, sneeze or cough over food.
Disposable tissues should be used to blow nose; hands must


be washed afterwards.
Smoking is not permitted in the food preparation area.
Food handlers must not eat when handling food in food
preparation areas.
Cuts and sores
All cuts and sores on hands and arms must be covered
with a sticking plaster to stop microbes from the wound
contaminating food.
Brightly coloured waterproof sticking plasters are used that
can be easily seen if they fall off. A disposable glove is used
to cover sticking plasters if they are on the hand.
If a cut or sore is weeping or infected and cannot be totally
covered, the person must not handle food.

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 PEOPLE 4.4 page 1
PEOPLE 4.4 page 2 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Food basics

Food Service and Retail Food


Control Plan
Food Basics

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 FOOD 5.0 page 1
FOOD 5.0 page 2 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Guidance
Potentially hazardous food
What is it?

Important information. Potentially hazardous food is food that must be kept at certain temperatures
(at or below 5C or above 60C) to minimise the growth of harmful microbes that can be present in
the food or to prevent toxins (poisons) forming in the food.

Potentially hazardous food must meet the temperature requirements contained in this FCP.
What food is potentially hazardous?

For the purposes of this FCP, food that meets both of the following criteria is considered potentially hazardous:
the food may contain microbes that need to multiply in order to cause illness; and
the food will support the growth of harmful microbes; and
the food will be made unsafe or unsuitable if it is kept at temperatures that allow harmful microbes to grow.
Food that must be kept under temperature control to prevent toxins forming is also considered potentially hazardous. For
example, scombroid fish (such as kahawai, tuna, mackerel etc.) need to be kept chilled from shortly after capture to when they
are cooked to minimise the formation of histamine.
Examples of foods considered potentially hazardous
raw and cooked meat or foods containing raw or cooked meat, e.g. a tray of boneless chicken, casseroles, curries, lasagne and
meat pies;
dairy products or foods containing dairy products, e.g. yoghurt, custard and dairy-based desserts;
raw and cooked seafood (excluding live seafood) or foods containing seafood, e.g. filleted fish, seafood chowder;
processed fruits and vegetables, e.g. salads and unpasteurised juices;
cooked rice and pasta, e.g. pasta salads;
processed foods containing eggs, beans, nuts or other protein-rich food, e.g. quiche and soya bean products;
foods that contain any of the above foods, e.g. sandwiches and wraps.
What food is not defined as potentially hazardous?

Many foods do not rely on temperature control for safety because they have been processed to ensure that harmful microbes
are not present in the food or the food cant support their growth. These foods are not considered potentially hazardous. Food
manufacturers usually achieve food safety by one of the following methods:
destroying any harmful microbes and packaging the food so it cannot be contaminated, e.g. canned and bottled food;
creating an environment in the food that does not support the growth of harmful microbes (this is usually done by making the food
too acidic for microbes to grow, reducing the available water in the food by drying the food and/or adding salt and sugar, using
food additives that inhibit bacterial growth or a combination of these things, e.g. dried fruit, salted dried meats and fermented
dried meats);
destroying or reducing the number of harmful microbes in the food and creating an environment that will minimise or prevent the
growth of any harmful microbes that are still present and could multiply in the food, e.g. cheeses, spreads, sauces, dried pasta,
pasteurised juices, breads, dried milk and dried custard powder etc.

Although the above foods are not considered potentially hazardous they may become so when the
food package is opened or the food is altered in some way. For example, a canned beef stew should
be considered potentially hazardous once it is opened, and custard powder should be considered
potentially hazardous once milk or water is added.

Many raw unprocessed or semi-processed foods are also not potentially hazardous because they either do not support the
growth of foodborne pathogens (e.g. raw whole fruits and vegetables, uncooked rice, flour and sugar) or do not contain harmful
microbes (e.g. nuts in the shell).

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 FOOD 5.1 page 1
Food basics Checking temperatures
Goal Why?
To accurately measure food temperatures. Potentially hazardous food must be kept at temperatures
that prevent the growth of harmful microbes, or people will
Act requirements:
be made ill.
All food that is produced or processed and handled must be
Regular temperature checks of potentially hazardous
handled in a way that minimises deterioration.
food will check whether or not it is being kept at a safe
There must be procedures in place that prevent, eliminate
temperature.
or reduce hazards during the production, processing and
A thermometer that is not correctly calibrated may provide
handling of food along with the criteria and reason for each
inaccurate temperature readings.
criterion.
A dirty thermometer can transfer microbes onto food that
could make people ill.

How this is done How this is done


Using the thermometer Automated temperature monitoring system

The probe thermometer must be sanitised before probing Any automated system must be commissioned, operated and
foods and between probing different items. This is done by: maintained according to the manufacturers instructions.
[tick method used]
using sterile wipes What if there is a problem?

washing the thermometer in hot soapy water, then If the thermometer doesnt reach 0C (plus or minus 1C)
sanitising in the ice point check or 100C (plus or minus 1C) in the
boiling point check, then the thermometer must be either
other method replaced or sent for servicing to:
Probe is dried with: [tick method used]
paper towel
air dry.
Checking chilled food temperatures
Use another thermometer until the original has been
The temperature of potentially hazardous refrigerated food recalibrated.
must be checked. This is best done by checking the internal
If the alarm on an automated system does not activate at the
temperature of the fridge using: [tick process used]
correct temperature, the system must be checked by service
a probe thermometer to measure the inside temperature personnel and reset.
of:
container of water Write it down
cube of jelly
You must write down in the Management section who is
food responsible for responding to a temperature alarm
other You must write down in the Diary.
an infrared (IR) thermometer to check surface the date of calibration, method used and
temperature of food calibration results on the Thermometer calibration
an automated system that monitors the internal or record.
surface temperature. the date of configuration and calibration checks
Checking cooked food and hot-held food temperatures of automatic systems and retain a copy of the
certificates used.
The temperature at the centre of potentially hazardous
cooked and hot-held food must be checked. This is done what happened if an automated system was not set
using a probe thermometer. at the correct alarm temperature and what was done
to put it right.
When cooking batches of food, a sample of items may be
probed rather than each one. Items must be probed from what was done to check any affected food was still
different parts of the oven to check that heat is being safe.
distributed evenly and that all foods have been cooked
properly see Checking poultry is cooked. Its good practice to regularly check
Calibrating the thermometer that an automated monitoring system
is set correctly by checking food
This must be done every 12 weeks to check that the thermometer temperatures using an accurate probe or
is working correctly (see the procedure in the Diary). IR thermometer.
FOOD 5.2 page 1 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Food basics
Purchasing and receiving goods
Goal Why?
To take all reasonable steps to assess and confirm that the Food may be contaminated with harmful microbes,
food received from a supplier, or otherwise sourced by the chemicals or physical objects during growing, handling,
food business, is safe and suitable. processing or delivery.
Harmful microbes can grow if potentially hazardous food is
Act requirements:
not kept cold (or hot) during delivery.
Food is produced or processed and handled in a way that
Pests may have contaminated food that has been poorly
minimises the contamination or deterioration of the food and
stored or handled.
prevents the food from containing anything which would be
It is illegal to sell certain foods, e.g. home killed meat or
unexpected and unreasonable in that food.
recreationally caught seafood.
There must be procedures for controlling hazards at each
Sufficient information about received goods must be
processing and handling step where it is essential to
provided to enable you to accurately label food and identify
eliminate or reduce a hazard to an acceptable level.
food in the event of a recall.

How this is done How this is done


Food suppliers Goods that are delivered outside operating hours must be
protected from contamination and temperature abuse. This
The operator must take steps to ensure that food is sourced
from suppliers who produce, process and handle it in a way is achieved by the person delivering the goods storing them:
that minimises contamination and deterioration of the food. [specify how, where].

Other factors to consider when choosing a food


What if there is a problem?
supplier
Reject or return goods to the supplier if any of the following
How quickly do they respond to your concerns? happens:
Do they seem responsible in the way they store, transport frozen products are completely thawed;
and pack their goods? frozen products are partially thawed unless they will be used
straight away;
Can you rely on them to supply the goods youve specified, chilled potentially hazardous and ready-to-eat food is too
such as when you sell products that need to meet a warm (above 5C), unless confident that it has been held at
composition standard? more than 7C for less than 2 hours;
Receiving incoming goods hot, potentially hazardous food is delivered below 60C,
unless confident that it has been held between 20C and
The following checks must be made when food is delivered: 60C for less than two hours;
packages are free of damage; fresh produce is damaged or mouldy;
fresh produce shows no sign of damage, mould, blight etc.; date marks have expired;
packages are properly labelled with the name and address goods have been transported or handled in a manner that
of the manufacturer or supplier/importer and have a batch exposes them to risk of contamination;
code or date mark; packaging/seals are damaged;
food is not past its expiry date; there is insufficient information to enable food to be
food has been transported hygienically and food has not accurately labeled, unless confident that the supplier will
been exposed to any hazards (chemicals, machinery etc.) provide it.
during transportation;
frozen food is frozen solid when delivered with no sign of Food that is not safe and suitable, and food that is not
thawing or refreezing; intended to be sold or used, must be stored separately from
chilled seafood (not live seafood) is no more than 1C, and other food and clearly marked Not for sale or use.
other potentially hazardous food is delivered chilled (cold to Contact the supplier to resolve any problems as soon as they
touch) or at a temperature recommended by a manufacturer arise. If problems persist and cant be fixed, use a different
if in any doubt, the temperature is checked using a supplier.
thermometer to confirm its at 5C or below;
live shellfish are clean, alive and not damaged with
information allowing traceability;
hot deliveries of potentially hazardous food are at 60C or
above.
Food that does not meet the above requirements must be
rejected and sent back to the supplier unless it can be used
according to the FCP.
Chilled, frozen or hot food thats accepted by the business
must be put under the appropriate temperature control
straight away, unless it is to be used directly see Chilled
and frozen food storage.

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 FOOD 5.3 page 1
Food basics

Write it down
You must write down the information of all suppliers in
the Food suppliers record.
Keep a record of deliveries (e.g. dispatch notes, invoices)
and note the delivery temperature of chilled and hot
foods (e.g. in the Diary or on dispatch notes, invoices).
You must write down in the Diary when goods are
received that do not meet the requirements and what
you did to address the problem (include time, condition
of goods, supplier, batch numbers and a description of
products).

FOOD 5.3 page 2 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Food basics Perishable and shelf-stable food storage
Goal Why?
To store and display perishable and shelf-stable food safely Food can become contaminated if not correctly stored.
and appropriately. Poor handling practices can damage packaging and
contaminate food.
Act requirements:
Stock that is not sold before its use-by date can result in
Food must be produced or processed and handled in a way
customers becoming ill.
that minimises the contamination or deterioration of the food
and prevents the food from containing anything which would
be unexpected and unreasonable in that food.
There must be procedures for controlling hazards at each
processing and handling step where it is essential to
eliminate or reduce a hazard to a level at which a hazard will
not prevent food from being safe or suitable.
All staff and visitors must follow appropriate personal
hygiene routines to make sure that the safety and suitability
of food is not compromised

How this is done What if there is a problem?


All food must be stored to protect it from contamination. If food is found that has passed its use-by date throw it
away.
Food that is not safe and suitable, and food that is not
intended to be sold or used must be stored separately from Identify why this happened, and review staff training as
other food and clearly marked not for sale or use. needed.
See also Chilled/frozen food storage. Food that has been contaminated by pests (e.g. droppings,
eggs, webs etc.) or is in damaged packaging that exposes the
Storage and display
food is thrown away.
Areas used for perishable and shelf-stable foods must be
Review your pest control procedure and take appropriate
kept clean and operated hygienically. See Cleaning and
action to control pests.
sanitising, Pest control.
Cans that are bulging, corroded or damaged close to the
Products must be stored off the floor (this helps with
edges or joints are thrown away.
cleaning and prevents them from picking up dirt that could
be transferred to work surfaces). Food that shows signs of mould is thrown away
Toilet areas, wash rooms and changing areas must not be Find out how any damage to packaging occurred and review
used to store food or packaging. handling practices as appropriate.
Storage practices prevent or minimise damage to packaging. If chilled perishable food is too warm (i.e. above 5C) follow
Food is stored so that its shelf life can be easily identified. the practices in Chilled/frozen food storage.
Produce Food that is not safe and suitable, and food that is not
intended to be sold or used, must be stored separately from
Fresh produce is stored cool, or chilled or according to type.
other food and clearly marked not for sale or use.
Stock checks/stock rotation
Packaged foods must be checked for:
clear labelling;
Write it down
damage to packaging that exposes food; You must write down in the Diary what action
corroded, damaged, leaking or bulging containers. you have taken if food has not been stored
the oldest within-date stock is used first;
Food is thrown away at its use-by date;
correctly.
Food is regularly checked to make sure it is within its best- Keep a record in the Diary of any maintenance
before date.
that was undertaken as a result of something
Food in opened packaging
going wrong with food storage.
Food that has been opened/taken out of the manufacturers
original packaging must be stored covered and labelled
with a date by which it must be used. See Labelling and
Calculating shelf life.
Eggs recommended storage times from date of lay
Eggs held at or below 15C throughout the supply chain
maximum 35 days.
Eggs held at temperatures higher than 15C anywhere in
supply chain maximum 21 days.

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 FOOD 5.4 page 1
Food basics

Helpful stuff 1
Perishable food
Perishable food is unprocessed or processed
food that can be kept at room temperature but
may have a relatively short shelf life before
showing signs of deterioration or spoilage
(such as mould or fur on fruit or bread).
Spoiled food should be removed from
storage or display as soon as possible. See
also Potentially hazardous food. Keeping
perishable foods cool or cold can extend the
time before they deteriorate or spoil.
Shelf-stable food
Food that is shelf stable has usually been
processed so that it can be safely stored in a
sealed container at room temperature for a
usefully long shelf life; for example, canned
meat, bottled jams and sauces and dried
foods such as spices, pasta, flour.

Helpful stuff 2
What to look for when checking cans
Blown one or both ends of the can bulge
outwards from gases caused by reactions
(bacterial or chemical) in the can.
Springer one end bulges outwards when the
other end is pushed.
Leaking can or seal damage causing
contents to leak.
Rusting indicates can is old or has been
exposed to damp conditions. Rust weakens
can, may cause pin holes and contaminate
contents.
Dented damage/bad dents around rim or
seals could have broken the integrity of the
can leading to contamination of contents.

FOOD 5.4 page 2 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Food basics
Chilled and frozen food storage
Goal Why?
To protect chilled and frozen food from contamination and Storing potentially hazardous foods in the temperature
prevent microbes growing to harmful levels danger zone (5C to 60C) will allow harmful microbes to
grow;
Act requirements:
Stock that is not sold before its use-by date could result in
Food must be processed and handled in ways that minimise
customers becoming ill.
its contamination or deterioration.
It is illegal to sell food beyond its use-by date;
Measuring equipment needed to ensure that food is safe
and suitable must be provided and used.
Food that is not safe or suitable must be identified and
stored in a way that prevents it being used or contaminating
food.

How this is done How this is done


All food must be stored to protect it from contamination. Stock checks/stock rotation
When not being prepared or used chilled and frozen food is Packaged foods are checked for:
kept covered. clear labelling;
Equipment used to hold chilled and frozen food must always damage to packaging that exposes food;
be operated within its design capacity and capability see corroded, damaged, leaking or bulging containers.
Equipment. The oldest within-date stock is used first.
Chilled food Food is thrown away at the end of its use-by date.
Food is regularly checked to make sure it is within its best-
Chilled fish and seafood (excluding live fish and seafood) before date.
must be stored at no more than 1C.
Potentially hazardous food must be stored at or below 5C What if there is a problem?
unless otherwise directed by the manufacturers instructions. If ready-to-eat food has become contaminated by raw food
Chilled food should only be out of chilled storage if it is throw it away.
being prepared or used or when re-stocking equipment.
Throw away food that has passed its use-by date. Find out
Potentially hazardous food that is prepared on site for later why this happened.
use (e.g. a fish pie) and food that has been taken from the
manufacturers packaging (e.g. a block of ham, food out of a Chilled food above 5C
can) must be marked with the date that it needs to be used Ready-to-eat potentially hazardous foods that have been
by see Calculating shelf life. stored at temperatures between 5C and 60C for a total of:
Chilled and frozen food is stored so that its shelf life can be less than two hours must be refrigerated or used
easily identified. immediately;
between two and four hours must be used immediately;
Uncooked, raw food must be separated from cooked or
longer than four hours must be thrown out.
ready-to-eat food. This is done by: [tick method used]
storing cooked and ready-to-eat food above raw, uncooked Freezer is not working properly
food in the chiller or fridge; If food is still frozen solid, move it to another freezer. If this
storing cooked and ready-to-eat food in different areas cant be done, keep the freezer door closed. Arrange for the
(e.g on different sides) of the chiller or fridge from raw, appliance to be repaired.
uncooked food;
If potentially hazardous food has thawed to the point of
using separate chillers for storing cooked, ready-to-eat
being soft to the touch, it must be defrosted and used within
food and raw uncooked food.
its normal refrigeration storage time.
Raw poultry must be stored so that it cant touch or drip If frozen ready-to-eat potentially hazardous food has
juices onto other foods. Where possible, it is stored in a defrosted and has been above 5C for more than four hours,
separate refrigerator. it must be thrown out.
Frozen food Part-defrosted or fully defrosted food that has not been
Frozen food must be stored frozen solid or at a temperature processed further to make it safe and suitable must not be
refrozen.
recommended by the manufacturer.
Food that is not safe and suitable, and food that is not
Frozen food should only be out of a freezer if it is being
intended to be sold or used, must be stored separately from
thawed, prepared or used or when re-stocking equipment other food and clearly marked not for sale or use.
see Thawing food.

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 FOOD 5.5 page 1
Write it down
Each day, note in the Diary the food Helpful stuff
temperature in each chiller or display used for Foods that must be kept cold
potentially hazardous food. Certain foods need to be chilled or frozen to
help slow the growth of harmful microbes.
You must write down These include raw and cooked meat, poultry,
seafood and dairy products. See Potentially
in the Diary what action you took if food hazardous food.
has not been stored correctly.
in the Maintenance schedule when chillers
and freezers need to be serviced/checked
Keep a record in the Diary of any maintenance
that has been undertaken of chillers and
freezers.

FOOD 5.5 page 2 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Food basics Fruit and vegetables
Goal Why?
To ensure the hygienic processing and handling of produce. Fruit and vegetable produce may be contaminated by dirty
hands equipment and surfaces.
Act requirements:
Pre-packaged produce that has become contaminated
Food must be produced or processed and handled in ways
during growing or processing needs to be stored under
that minimise the contamination or deterioration of food and
refrigeration or harmful microbes will grow.
prevent food containing substances that are unexpected or
Poorly stored produce can form toxins that can make people
unreasonable.
ill.
There must be procedures for controlling hazards at each
production and processing and handling step where it is
essential to eliminate or reduce a hazard to an acceptable
level.
Food must be safe and suitable.

How this is done How this is done


To make ready-to-eat (RTE) salads, such as leafy greens, Manufacturer pre-packaged RTE salads and sprouts
pasta, rice etc. see the Delicatessen specialist section of the
Pre-packaged RTE foods must be stored and handled
plan.
according to manufacturers instructions.
Surfaces and equipment used for preparing food must be in
Fruit and vegetables prepared as ingredients
sound condition and clean before use. Surfaces in contact
with ready-to-eat foods must be sanitised before use - see Raw fruit and vegetables used as ingredients in other foods
Cleaning and Equipment, packaging and other items, Food must be rinsed in clean running water before use (unless
Allergens. received pre-washed or pre-peeled and ready-to-use).

Good hand hygiene and personal hygiene practices must be


followed see Hand hygiene and Personal hygiene. What if there is a problem?

Storage and display If equipment or preparation surfaces are not clean,


thoroughly clean before using. Review cleaning practices for
Fresh produce must be: fruit and vegetable processing and handling.
stored, processed and handled so that they are protected
from contamination; If produce that is not suitable for sale (e.g. excessively
kept under conditions that maintain its suitability for use, damaged, mouldy, slimy), or food is beyond its Use-by date
according to type, (e.g. the type of produce is best-kept and has not been removed from sale, find out why and take
chilled, cool, at ambient temperatures, in humid conditions, action to prevent it from happening again.
in dry conditions, away from sunlight etc); Retrain staff as appropriate.
removed from sale if they may no longer be safe or suitable
(e.g. slimy, mouldy, badly damaged produce; green
potatoes).
Preparation for sale Write it down
Produce must be checked for bruising, damage, mould etc.
Anything that cant be used must be thrown away.
You must write down (in the Cleaning
Cutting surfaces and utensils must be [identify which schedule) the surfaces and equipment that
applies]: need to be cleaned and sanitised, when and how
dedicated for either raw produce or ready-to-eat (RTE) this is done, and by whom.
produce, or
used for raw and RTE produce but cleaned and sanitised You must write down (e.g. in the Diary) any
before being used for RTE produce problems that occurred and what you did to
Produce must be processed and handled (e.g. cut/trimmed)
hygienically.
prevent them from happening again. Also write
Clean water must be used to rinse or moisten produce see down any matters that might need following up
Water. (e.g. training, review cleaning schedule etc).
Packaging must completely enclose cut surfaces of RTE
produce see Equipment, packaging and items in contact Write (e.g. in the Diary) any items that you
with food. have had to throw away, and why.
Produce is date coded and subject to good stock rotation
practices see Perishable and shelf-stable foods.

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 FOOD 5.6 page 1
Write it down
When you take other manufacturers RTE
products from the packaging and you dont
use them straight away, list them with their
opened shelf-life in the Ready-to-eat foods
list.
Use the Ready-to-eat foods - batch list to
show how RTE products used/made/sold by the
business meet their shelf-life

It is important to understand the range of matters that can affect the shelf life of the foods you make,
such as:
changes that may occur during processing and storage
changing the storage conditions or repackaging
factors in or around food that affect shelf-life
the likely causes of deterioration and spoilage of the types of foods you make
Information about these issues can be found at: http://www.foodsafety.govt.nz/elibrary/
industry/determine-shelf-life-of-food/how-to-determine-the-shelf-life-of-food-revision.pdf

FOOD 5.6 page 2 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Food basics Food stalls, food promotions & tastings
Goal Why?
Handle, store and display food safely at a food stall, food Dust, dirt, chemicals, pests and other foreign objects may
promotion event or in-food tasting. contaminate unprotected food.
Harmful microbes can multiply if potentially hazardous food
Act requirements:
is stored or displayed at temperatures between 5C and
Food must be processed and handled in ways that minimise
60C.
the contamination or deterioration of food and prevent food
Ready-to-eat (RTE) food that is not adequately separated
containing substances that are unexpected or unreasonable.
from raw food, or is poorly handled at a stall can be
There must be procedures for controlling hazards at each
contaminated by harmful microbes.
production and processing and handling step where it is
Food that is givenaway, to promote a food or business
essential to eliminate or reduce a hazard to an acceptable
is still classed as food for sale. This means that anyone
level.
organising or running a food promotion or tasting event
needs to understand and follow the relevant procedures in
the Plan.

How this is done How this is done


Safe procedures in the plan must be followed at the stall, Keeping potentially hazardous [identify which applies]:
food promotion or tasting including:
cold at or below 5C
the hygienic storing, preparing, cooking, display and
transport of food; frozen solid
hand washing, personal hygiene and cleaning of stall and
hot above 60C
equipment;
labelling of food put out for tasting that may contain Temperatures of cold and hot foods must be regularly
allergens or gluten. checked using a thermometer see Potentially hazardous
food, Checking temperatures.
Stall construction

Construction of a food stall and the provision of any facilities


at a stall must to be appropriate for the food and activities What if there is a problem?
carried out there. If the stall, equipment or preparation surfaces are not clean,
Construction must take into account: thoroughly clean before using. Review cleaning practices.
the type of food sold; Throw away any food that becomes contaminated.
the need to protect food from contamination from:
the elements; Throw away potentially hazardous food that has been kept
people and activities at the stall and area adjoining the between 5C or above 60C for more than 2 hours.
stall; and Find out why this happened and take steps to ensure that it
customers. does not happen again.
Surfaces in contact with food must be made of materials If there has been an equipment breakdown or failure arrange
that: to repair or renew equipment.
wont contaminate food (e.g. they wont impart toxins or
Retrain staff if necessary.
splinters to food);
are in good condition;
wont absorb fluids and can be cleaned (and sanitised if
needed). Write it down
See also Food allergens You must write down (in the Cleaning schedule) the
Stall facilities and equipment surfaces and equipment that need to be cleaned and
sanitised, when and how this is done, and by whom.
Where potentially hazardous food is processed or handled
at the stall, facilities must be provided at or close to the You must write down (e.g. in the Diary):
stall that enable activities to be carried out hygienically and any problems that occurred and what you did to
procedures in the plan to be followed, including: prevent them from happening again. Also write down
people can keep hands clean; any matters that might need following up (e.g. training,
equipment and food surfaces can be regularly cleaned (and review cleaning schedule etc).
sanitized where needed).
the temperatures of chilled/hot stored and
Equipment must be provided to enable activities to be displayed food.
carried out hygienically and procedures in the plan to be
followed, including: any items that you have had to throw away, and
why.

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 FOOD 5.7 page 1
FOOD 5.7 page 2 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Food basics Food vending machines
Goal Why?
To position, stock and replenish food at vending machines to Food prepared for sale from in vending machines can
ensure that it is safe. become contaminated from dirty hands, contact surfaces,
chemicals, pests and other foreign objects .
Act requirements:
Harmful microbes can multiply if potentially hazardous food
Places used for food must be designed, constructed and
is stored or displayed at temperatures between 5C and
located to keep food safe and suitable.
60C.
Food must be processed and handled in ways that minimize
A water supply to a vending machine that is not clean may
the contamination or deterioration of food and prevent food
contain harmful microbes that could make customers ill.
containing substances that are unexpected or unreasonable.
There must be procedures for controlling hazards at each
production and processing and handling step where it is
essential to eliminate or reduce a hazard to an acceptable
level.

How this is done How this is done


Ingredients must be suitable for any products made see Vending machines must be operated in ways to prevent pests
Purchasing and receiving food, Water Supply. being attracted (e.g. food spillages are dealt with promptly;
Surfaces and equipment used for preparing food must be in rubbish bins are provided for customers to deposit food
sound condition and clean before use. Surfaces in contact wrappers).
with ready-to-eat foods must be sanitised before use - see Liquids dispensed from vending machines
Cleaning and Equipment, packaging and other items. Water supplied to a vending machine must be clean water at
Good hand hygiene and personal hygiene practices must point of use - see Water.
be followed when marinating or coating meat - see Hand Pipes and taps for dispensing liquids must be regularly
hygiene and Personal hygiene. cleaned and sanitised.
See also Potentially hazardous food, Perishable and shelf-
stable foods, Cleaning, Transporting food. What if there is a problem?
Food vending machine Throw away any food that becomes contaminated.
This is a machine that dispenses food in bulk or in a If the machine dispenses food that has not been kept at the
package and does not need re-filling between each sale. correct temperature it must be fixed before further use.
Location
Potentially hazardous food that has been kept between 5C
The food vending machine must be sited to: and 60C for longer than 4 hours must be thrown away. See -
protect food from becoming contaminated; Chilled and frozen food storage.
enable easy cleaning of the machine and surrounding area;
If vending machine equipment breaks down make
not offer/provide harbourage for pests.
arrangements to replace or repair it.
Maintenance and use
all parts of the vending machine that come into contact Review maintenance schedule and make changes as
with food or food packaging, must be regularly cleaned and appropriate.
sanitized;

Write it down
vending machine location must be kept clean and hygienic;
food in the vending machine must come from a reputable
supplier;
food must be transported, and the vending machine
You must write down (in the Cleaning schedule):
stocked, hygienically; the surfaces and equipment that need to be cleaned
food reheated in a vending machine must be reheated and sanitised, when and how this is done, and by whom.
thoroughly see Reheating food; You must write down (in the Transporting Food
potentially hazardous food in a vending machine must be Temperature Record):
kept either at or below 5C or above 60C; the temperature of chilled/hot food transported to
a vending machine must not be able to dispense potentially vending machine sites.
hazardous food that has not been kept either at or below 5C You must write down (e.g. in the Diary):
or above 60C;
a vending machine must not be able to dispense potentially
any problems that occurred and what you did to
prevent them from happening again. Also write down any
hazardous food that is beyond its Use-by date; matters that might need following up (e.g. training, review
the vending machine must be regularly checked (e.g. when cleaning schedule etc).
it is restocked) that it is operating as intended.
checks of temperatures taken of chilled/hot food
in the vending machine (e.g. when restocking)
any items that you have had to throw away, and why.
Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 FOOD 5.8 page 1
FOOD 5.8 page 2 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Food basics Making and selling ice
Goal Why?
To ensure that ice is made, used and sold hygienically. Ice can become contaminated from hands, contact
surfaces, chemicals, pests and other foreign objects.
Act requirements:
A fresh water supply to an ice-making machine that is not of
Food must be processed and handled in ways that minimize
drinkable quality may contain harmful microbes that could
the contamination or deterioration of food and prevent food
make customers ill.
containing substances that are unexpected or unreasonable.
Seawater used to make ice may contain harmful organisms
There must be procedures for controlling hazards at each
that could contaminate seafood.
production and processing and handling step where it is
essential to eliminate or reduce a hazard to an acceptable
level.

How this is done How this is done


Surfaces and equipment used for preparing ice must be in Using ice
sound condition and clean before use. Surfaces in contact
Ice that has been in contact with non-ready-to-eat food must
with ice must sanitised before use - see Cleaning and
not be sold, or used with other foods.
Equipment, packaging and other items.
Good hand hygiene and personal hygiene practices must be What if there is a problem?
followed - see Hand hygiene and Personal hygiene.
Visibly contaminated ice received from suppliers is rejected
Ice making equipment or only used where it will not come into contact with food.
Equipment making ice must use a clean water supply to Ice spilled from broken/split bags/containers is not sold/
make cubes or blocks of ice used.
The ice making equipment must be located or sited to: If cleaning or handling procedures arent followed find out
prevent ice from becoming contaminated; why and take action to stop it happening again.
enable easy cleaning of equipment and surrounding area;
prevent harbourage for pests. Retrain staff if necessary.

Water

Water for making ice must be clean and meet requirements


for water see Water.
Write it down
Seawater used for making ice must not contain any E. coli or You must write down (in the Cleaning
other faecal coliforms. schedule) the surfaces and equipment that
Maintenance and use need to be cleaned and sanitised, when and how
During use: this is done, and by whom.
all parts of the ice making equipment that come into contact
with water or ice must be regularly cleaned and sanitised
You must write down (e.g. in the Diary) any
moulds must not be allowed to grow particularly in areas problems that occurred and what you did to
where condensation occurs (which can often be hard-to- prevent them from happening again.
reach places to clean).
equipment location must be kept clean and hygienic;
shovels, axes, scoops, containers and other equipment that
comes into contact with ice must be regularly cleaned and
sanitised;
equipment/utensils used with ice must be stored hygienically
when not being used in ways that prevent contamination;
ice must be protected from contamination and handled and
stored hygienically;
water used to make ice must be maintained so that it is
clean.
Ice from suppliers
delivered blocks/containers of ice must be checked for signs
of contamination;
bagged ice must be delivered in clean, intact bags;
ice storage containers (including freezers) must be clean.

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 FOOD 5.9 page 1
FOOD 5.9 page 2 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Food basics Customers reheating food
Goal Why?
Provide equipment to enable customers to safely reheat Customers need to be able to reheated food thoroughly to
food. destroy any harmful microbes that may be present.
Equipment provided for customers to reheat food needs to
Act requirements:
be kept in good condition to enable thorough reheating of
Food must be produced or processed and handled in ways
food.
that minimize the contamination or deterioration of food and
Surfaces and equipment need to be kept clean to prevent
prevent food containing substances that are unexpected or
contamination of food.
unreasonable.

How this is done What if there is a problem?


See Potentially hazardous food, Perishable and shelf-stable If cleaning is not carried out or spillages are not cleaned up,
foods. find out why and take steps to prevent issues from arising in
the future.
Equipment for customers to re-heat food
Pre-programmed times, or instructions must be provided Revise cleaning schedule.
that allow customers to thoroughly re-heat foods.
Retrain staff.
Areas used by customers must be kept clean and hygienic.
Equipment (e.g. microwave oven) must be cleaned regularly
see Cleaning.
Regular checks must be carried out to ensure equipment is Write it down
working as intended.
Spillages must be cleaned up as soon as possible after they You must write down (in the Cleaning
occur. schedule) the surfaces and equipment that
Food for customers to reheat need to be cleaned and sanitised, when and
food must be provided in packaging that is appropriate for how this is done, and by whom.
the reheating method; or
clear instructions must be provided that packaging is to be You must write down (e.g. in the Diary) any
removed before reheating. problems that occurred and what you did to
See Reheating food prevent them from happening again.
Write down in the Maintenance schedule when
equipment is to be checked.

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 FOOD 5.10 page 1
FOOD 5.10 page 2 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Food basics Food allergens
Goal Why?
To provide customers with accurate information on whether Customers must be able to make informed choices about
a food contains specific allergens or could have traces of an the food they, and people in their care, eat.
allergen from cross-contact. Food allergies can result in life-threatening reactions that
affect the whole body, often within minutes of eating the
Act requirements:
food.
Food must be produced or processed and handled in ways
that minimise the contamination of food and prevents food
containing unexpected or unreasonable substances.
There must be procedures for controlling hazards at each
processing and handling step where it is essential to
eliminate or reduce a hazard to an acceptable level.
The Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code (the Code)
(Standard 1.2.3) requires a business to provide information
to customers about allergens.

How this is done How this is done


If a customer tells you that they have a food allergy, the Unwrapped food
following staff member must be told:
Details of all the ingredients must be available (e.g.
day-to-day manager information provided on the packaging or by the supplier, in:
foods that are made on-site (e.g. pies) also check what is
head chef
in manufactured ingredients (e.g. sauce mix);
other bulk foods that are sold loose or re-packaged (e.g. coatings).
The person identified above must be responsible for Avoid cross-contact
providing information to the customer on what allergens
Food that is sold as not containing an allergen must not be
could be present in the food.
contaminated with an allergen from surfaces, utensils and
equipment that have been used to prepare other foods see
If you are told by a customer that they
Cross-contamination. Clothing and hands must be clean
suffer from an allergy, talk to them
about what food you have that may be before handling foods that dont contain allergens see
appropriate for them to order. If you are Hand hygiene, Personal hygiene.
not confident that you can produce food You must prepare food containing different allergens in
for them safely dont. It is better for them
separate areas using separate equipment and utensils unless
to buy food elsewhere than risk an allergic
reaction. this is not possible.

If there is any doubt about whether a If not possible, then all equipment and utensils to be used
food contains even a small amount of an must be thoroughly cleaned and dried before preparing the
allergen, tell the customer never guess! food.
You must not fry non-allergen food in oil that has previously
Know whats in the food
been used to fry food containing an allergen.
Someone who has a food allergy needs to know the exact
ingredients of the food that they eat. What if there is a problem?
Be aware of all ingredients used in the food to be served to If you think a customer is having a severe allergic reaction:
customers with a food allergy. immediately ring 111 and ask for an ambulance with a
Check all the ingredients in the food, as well as what is paramedic straight away;
used to cook the food (e.g. oils etc) as well as sauces and immediately explain that your customer could be having an
garnishes served with, or added to, the food. allergic reaction.
Use the Voluntary Incidental Trace Allergen Labelling system
(VITAL ) to assess the potential impact of allergen cross Identify what led to the customers allergic reaction.
contact. VITAL also provides guidance on appropriate Inform your verifier of a customers allergic reaction.
precautionary allergen labelling. http://allergenbureau.net/
Review ingredient labels and recipes to ensure all allergens
Common allergens are known.
Foods that most frequently cause allergic reactions include
cereals, shellfish, eggs, fish, milk, nuts, sesame seeds, Review the way staff prepare food for someone with a food
peanuts, soybeans, sulphites, wheat, and bee products allergy; make changes as appropriate.
such as royal jelly, pollen and propolis. These foods are
Retrain staff to ensure that they understand how important it
responsible for over 90percent of serious reactions.
is to provide accurate information to food allergic customers.

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 FOOD 5.11 page 1
Important information
Before any in-store demonstrations
Write it down
or tastings make sure that promoters Keep details of the ingredients (and what they
understand business requirements for
allergens. contain) for all food intended to be served or
sold to customers with a food-related allergy.
You must write down in the Diary any action
taken in the event that someone has an
allergic reaction.

FOOD 5.11 page 2 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Food basics
Food composition
Goal Why?
To ensure foods you are selling meet any requirements for Food sold in New Zealand (and Australia) must meet the
composition and food additives. requirements of the Australia New Zealand Food Standards
Code (the Code).
Act requirements:
Food must be safe and suitable.

What if there is a problem?


If a food doesnt meet a standard required by the Code it
Write it down
must not be sold.
Keep a record of your composition calculations
Find out why this happened and take action to prevent it with your recipes.
happening again. If necessary retrain staff.
Keep a record of supplier confirmation that the
Code requirements have been met for products

Guidance
Food additive requirements
A food additive is a substance not normally consumed as a food itself but is added to the food to perform a particular function,
such as:
colouring;
emulsifier;
flavour enhancer (e.g. MSG);
flavouring;
intense sweetener;
preservative;
raising agent;
stabiliser;
thickener.
The Code Standard 1.3.1 contains a list of the foods that are permitted to contain food additives, and the permitted food
additives. Food additives must not be added to food unless they are permitted by the Code.
The Australia NewZealand Food Standards Code can be found at: www.foodstandards.govt.nz
Processing aids requirements
A processing aid is a substance that is added to carry out a technological function during processing, but not in the finished
product. For example:
Antifoam agent;
Lubricant;
Catalyst;
Desiccator;
Bleaching agent;
Ion exchange resin;
Release agent;
Washing agent;
Extraction solvent.
The Code Standard 1.3.3 permits certain processing aids. Processing aids that are not permitted by the Code must not be added
to food.
Food composition requirements
The Code provides specific definitions, composition and labelling requirements for certain foods. For example:
a pie must contain at least 250g/kg of meat flesh to be called a meat pie;
food marketed to a specific consumer group must not mislead (e.g. if sold as a vegan product it must not contain any food of
animal origin).
The Code can also specify the amount of an ingredient that must be present, and an ingredient that must be declared, such as:
sausage must contain no less than 500g/kg of fat-free meat; and the proportion of fat in sausage must be no more than 500g/kg of
the fat-free meat content;
iodised salt must be used for making bread.

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 FOOD 5.12 page 1
Guidance
The Code Chapter 2 details the range of foods to which compositional standards apply.
Microbiological limits - requirements

The Code Standard 1.6.1 sets the maximum permissible levels of harmful organisms (if any) that may be present in certain
foods; for example, sprouted seeds must not contain any Salmonella organisms.
Some foods are required to be regularly sampled and tested.
Check what requirements the products that you make or sell are subject to at: http://www.foodstandards.gov.au/code
Sourcing ingredients of the right quality for making products will help in meeting the Code requirements see Purchasing and
receiving food.
There is more information about food composition and microbiological limits in the specialist food sections of the Plan.
Pre-packaged foods

Before purchasing pre-packaged foods a check is made with the supplier that it complies with the Code. See also Food labelling
and Allergens sections.
Check the Code to see if products you are making or selling have composition requirements. See also Food allergens and Food
labelling.

Its important to know there is legislation Helpful stuff:


covering what is allowed to be put in food
When making food:
when you sell it whether you made it or
someone else did. The Code contains all Calculate the composition of food at
this information and provides lists of, for the point of mixing your ingredients
example, permitted food colourings. (you will also need to allow for any
losses on cooking, if appropriate);
Check that your descriptions of food
are correct, for example:
- pies containing offal are correctly
identified e.g. steak and kidney pie;
- use of the words cream or mock
crme where appropriate.

FOOD 5.12 page 2 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Food basics
Equipment, packaging and other
items in contact with food
Goal Why?
To prevent food becoming contaminated from food Equipment, packaging, tableware and items in contact with
equipment (e.g. slicers, vacuum-packers), utensils, food that dont meet industry standards may contaminate
packaging (e.g. shrink wrap, food containers), tableware food (e.g. chemicals and other substances may migrate from
(plates, platters etc.) and other items that come into contact packaging into food).
with food (e.g. display labels or tags) and ensure that they Equipment, packaging, tableware and items in contact with
are appropriate and meet industry standards. food that are not stored and used correctly, could result in
food becoming contaminated (e.g. by transferring dirt to
Act requirements:
food and food contact surfaces).
Equipment must be designed, constructed and located in a
Packaging equipment that is not operated correctly could
way that enables food to be safe and suitable.
cross-contaminate food (e.g. by transferring juices from raw
Equipment must not be operated beyond its capacity.
to cooked food).
Packaging and anything else in contact with food must be
able to maintain food safety and suitability.

How this is done What if there is a problem?


Equipment, packaging materials, tableware and items that You must reject packaging, tableware or food contact items
come into contact with food, such as labels and tags, must that do not meet the required standard.
be:
If packaging is not being used appropriately find out why, fix
suitable for their intended use and not able to contaminate
the problem and retrain staff if necessary.
or taint food;
capable of being thoroughly cleaned;

Write it down
protected from contamination when not in use.
See also Storage of perishable and shelf-stable food.
Before purchasing equipment for processing and handling Write down how you know that packaging, and
food, a check is made with the supplier that it can be
operated in ways that meet the procedures in the Plan.
other items that come into contact with food,
are OK to use. For example, confirmation from
Before purchasing packaging and other items that come
into contact with food (e.g. display trays, containers, plastic the supplier, packaging labels, manufacturers
bags, disposable drink cups, takeaway trays etc.) a check is information etc.
made with the supplier that it complies with either:
current requirements specified in the Australian and
NewZealand Food Standards Code (the Code) for articles
and materials in contact with food; or
requirements specified in the current US Code of Federal
Regulations; or
any other appropriate international standard recognised as When sourcing new equipment, make
acceptable by MPI. sure that you will be able to thoroughly
Packaging equipment clean it, and it wont harbour food scraps
and dirt in hard-to-reach parts that could
Equipment used for wrapping and packaging must be contaminate food.
capable of being kept clean.
If you supply packaging materials and
Tableware utensils for customers to pack their own
selections (e.g.pick and mix) make
All tableware must be suitable for use and not capable of
sure that re-usable utensils are regularly
contaminating food, or imparting lead, antimony, arsenic, cleaned. If customers are permitted to use
cadmium or any other hazardous substance to the food. containers that they provide themselves,
Misuse of food articles and packaging these should be visibly clean.

Any utensil or equipment used to measure, store or pour


chemicals must be clearly identifiable and must not be used
for any other purpose. Food safe is a term that is sometimes
applied to articles likely to come into
Food must not be put or stored in any container or package
contact with food that wont have a
that is commonly used for medicine or chemicals.
detrimental effect on, or taint, the food in
any way.

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 FOOD 5.13 page 1
FOOD 5.13 page 2 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Food basics
Food labelling
Goal Why?
To ensure that food for sale is labelled correctly.
Food for sale in New Zealand must meet the requirements of
the Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code (the Code).

How this is done What if there is a problem?


Pre-packaged food Your local council will be able to advise you where to get
further information.
Pre-packaged food that is purchased for retail sale is
checked to make sure that the labelling clearly describes the For labelling very complex products, a food safety consultant
product in English, is legible and includes: or legal professional will be able to advise you further.
quantity marking (e.g. net weight);
name and address of manufacturer, supplier or importer
within New Zealand or Australia;
appropriate date marking;
Write it down
statement of ingredients;
nutrition information (if needed).
Keep a completed labelling checklist for
each product (from using the Food Labelling
Labels must also meet any food identification requirements
and if appropriate:
Guide) handy - they will be a record of how
any specific standards; you have identified and applied the labelling
warning and/or advisory statements; requirements of the Code to your food
instructions for storage and use.
Bulk foods brought in for repackaging

Food that is repackaged for retail sale is checked for


labelling requirements using MPIs Labelling Guide.
If labelling is required, the product information supplied
with the bulk food is used as a basis to develop labels for
the repackaged food. There is more information about food
labelling requirements in the Code:
http://www.foodstandards.gov.au/code
Foods made and packaged on site

All foods that are being made and packaged for retail sale
are checked for labelling requirements using MPIs Labelling
Guide.

Guidance
What food will not require labelling?

The following foods are generally unlikely to require full labelling:


food made and packaged on the premises from which its sold;
food delivered packaged and ready-to-eat at the express order of the purchaser (e.g. delivered pizza);
food packed in the presence of the purchaser;
food sold at a fundraiser event;
food sold from an assisted display cabinet (e.g. deli counter).
Although some food will not require a label, you may still be required to provide certain information specific to the product if a
customer asks for it, such as:
Does this food contain an allergen?
How much apple is in this apple pie?
How can I safely store and cook this product?
When should I eat it by?
It is important, however, to still use the Labelling Guide to check whether there are any product-specific labelling requirements
for the food. The guide can be found at:
http://www.foodsafety.govt.nz/index.htm

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 FOOD 5.14 page 1
Guidance
Making a label

Begin by writing down your recipe and ingredients. Work through MPIs Labelling Guide, filling in the summary in section 15 as
you go.
Providing information when labelling is not legally required

It is good practice to always provide information on a product label even if it is not legally required.
Consider including the following:
name or description of the food;
lot identification (date and batch number);
your business name and address;
a use-by date if the food must be consumed by this date for food safety reasons;
directions for use and storage;
any of the common food allergens present in the product.

Use-by and Best-before date marks What food will require labelling?
Use-by is usually applied to chilled, ready-to- When considering what labelling may be
eat foods with a short shelf-life. It is the date needed first consider if the food may not
until when, provided the food has been stored require full labelling. The following foods
in intact packaging and in accordance with are generally unlikely to require labelling:
stated storage conditions, it is safe to eat. It is
illegal to sell food after its use-by date. food is made and packaged on the
premises from which its sold (such as
Best-before means the date until when, a pack of fish fillets);
provided the food has been stored in intact food is packed in the presence of the
packaging and in accordance with stated purchaser (such as loose sweets);
storage conditions, it will be fully marketable packaged whole fruit and vegetables
and retain its quality. Food that is still fit to eat (except sprouts), provided the contents
may legally be sold after this date; although are clearly visible;
customers may feel misled if unknowingly food is sold from an assisted display
purchasing out of date stock. cabinet (e.g. delicatessen foods).
It is the suppliers responsibility to determine
the shelf-life of their food and let their Although some food will not need a label,
customers know what this is. You can find you may still be required to provide certain
further information to help determine whether information if a customer asks for it, such
a product needs a Use-by or Best-before as how do I keep this product safe to eat?
date in the MPI Food Labelling Guide. or does this food contain an allergen?
See Food Allergens.
Regularly check your labels and the
labelling requirements in the Code to see
if any updates are needed.

FOOD 5.14 page 2 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Food basics
Transporting food
Goal Why?
To transport food safely including: Dust, dirt, chemicals, pests and other foreign objects can
from a supplier; contaminate unprotected food.
to customers; Harmful microbes can multiply if potentially hazardous food
to an off-site venue for service at an event. is transported at temperatures between 5C and 60C.
Harmful microbes can be transferred from raw to ready-to-
Act requirements
eat food if transported together without adequate separation.
All food that is produced or processed and handled must be
handled in a way that minimises deterioration.
There must be procedures in place that prevent, eliminate
or reduce hazards during the production, processing and
handling of food.

How this is done What if there is a problem?


All food must be transported in a way that protects it from If parts of a vehicle used for transporting food are dirty,
contamination. clean them before use.
The parts of the vehicle where food and food equipment is
Throw away food that becomes contaminated.
carried are clean.
Ready-to-eat food is separated from raw food. Throw away potentially hazardous food that has been kept
Food is kept separate from non-food retail goods (e.g. between 5C and 60C for longer than four hours.
household chemicals, pet food). If there has been an equipment breakdown or failure, make
Food and food equipment is not transported with anything arrangements to replace or repair equipment. Review the
that could contaminate the food or equipment (e.g. tools, adequacy of the maintenance schedule and make changes
chemicals etc). as appropriate.
Animals are not allowed access to the parts of a vehicle used
to transport food or food equipment. Retrain transport staff.
Potentially hazardous food

Potentially hazardous food must be transported and delivered


at the correct temperature and regular checks made. Write it down
Frozen food must be transported so it stays frozen solid;
Potentially hazardous food must only be delivered at
You must:
temperatures between 5C and 60C if it is going to be used record checks made of temperatures of
or eaten within four hours of being at this temperature.
potentially hazardous on the Transporting
Potentially hazardous food that will not be used or eaten potentially hazardous food record.
within four hours must either be transported cold at or below
5C; or hot above 60C by using: [tick box] write in the diary what you did if
insulated boxes to maintain food at safe temperatures; there was a problem with transported food
portable chillers or hot holding equipment; temperatures, and what action you took to
ensure that these did not happen again.
other [state method] shaded area for writing.

See also:
write down in the Cleaning schedule
Hot holding prepared food; transport equipment cleaning requirements
Cooling prepared food;
Reheating prepared food.

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 FOOD 5.15 page 1
FOOD 5.15 page 2 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Food basics
Customer complaints
Goal Why?
To receive and investigate complaints from dissatisfied Investigating complaints made by customers will help
customers. identify whether there are food safety problems that need
putting right.
Act requirements:
A breach of the food control plan must be reported and
records must be kept.
Corrective action requirements must be complied with.

Write it down
How this is done
Investigating customer complaints

The person responsible for dealing with customer complaints Recalls


is:
Keep a copy of the recall notice in the Diary
Name/position:
and details of the quantity of affected
product found, and action taken.
Customer complaints must be investigated to determine the
cause of the complaint. Where a problem is identified, action Customer complaints
is taken to prevent it happening again.
Record in the Diary at the time that the
For information on complaints about allergens and food
intolerances refer to Food Allergens.
complaint is made:
Complaints about foreign objects in food are investigated customer details (name, address, telephone
to find the cause and to identify action needed to prevent it number so that the business can contact
happening again. them after investigating the problem);
Identify the object. What is it made of (e.g. metal, plastic,
glass, insects/pests)? what the complaint is about (the product,
Identify the likely source. Consider: what the customer is concerned about);
ingredients talk to suppliers;
staff jewellery, clothing, hair, band-aids; date/time the item was purchased (so that
environment walls, windows, overhead lights, wooden the business can identify what batch/
pallets;
packaging when product is opened or final product
delivery/supplier might be involved).
packaged. You may also want to write down in the Diary
Identify what went wrong and what might need to change.
what you did to investigate the issue, what you
found and what you did to prevent the problem
What if there is a problem?
from happening again.
If a customer has further concerns:
If someone has a complaint that relates to an object in the
food, such as metal or glass, advise them to contact their
local council Environmental Health Officer.
If someone suspects that they have a foodborne illness,
advise them to contact the local public health service
[phone number]. Advise
them to see their doctor if they have any concerns regarding
their health.
Contact the local public health service as soon as possible
to advise them of the suspected foodborne illness and seek
further advice.
If an investigation finds that a food is not safe or suitable to
eat, action must be taken to prevent people eating it. See
Recall of food and recall of items in contact with food.
If a complaint is traced to something that has happened at Foreign objects in food can be offensive
the business, take steps to ensure it doesnt happen again, and sometimes dangerous if they are
such as staff training, repair or replace equipment, review or small enough to be swallowed or are
add item to maintenance schedule, change suppliers. sharp.

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 FOOD 5.16 page 1
Guidance
Customer complaints
Complaints about food known that may not be available to the business, such as:
what type of harmful organism caused the illness;
If a customer is the first to identify a problem with food, the
the symptoms and when they started;
information that they provide can be vital in identifying what
a history of food consumed and other matters that could have
went wrong. An unusual taste or foreign object might be a one-
caused illness.
off, but it could be the first warning of a batch-wide problem.
If a customer suspects that they have a foodborne illness advise
Investigating a complaint will help determine the scope of the
them to contact the local public health service: phone number:
issue, what needs to be done and ensure that other customers
arent compromised. Foreign objects in food can sometimes
be dangerous if they are small enough to be swallowed or are
Contact the local public health service as soon as possible to
sharp.
advise them of the suspected foodborne illness and seek further
Receiving customer complaints advice.
If a customer makes a complaint about a food sold by the If a customer has concerns about their health advise them to
business the following action is taken: see their doctor.
Obtain as much information about the food from the customer Following up complaints
as possible including:
If someone with a complaint is not satisfied with your
what the customer believes is wrong (if possible see the food
investigation and answer, advise them to contact their local
and what the problem is) e.g.:
council.
a foreign object and what its made of (metal, plastic, glass,
wood, insect/pest etc.); If a problem is traced to food processed and handled by your
an unusual taste (describe); business you must take the necessary steps to ensure that it
when it was sold (if possible see the till receipt); does not happen again.
how the food was packaged; Let a customer know about what you have done to investigate
information provided with the food (e.g. batch details, date their complaint and what you found.
code) to help identify other food that may be affected); record in the Diary the date and time that the complaint is
how the customer has kept and handled the food since made;
purchase. customer details (name, address, telephone number so that
Guidance on investigating customer complaints: the business can contact them after investigating the problem);
Complaints about foreign objects in food are investigated to find what the complaint is about (the product, what the customer is
the cause and to identify action needed to prevent it happening concerned about);
again. date/time the item was purchased (so that the business can
Identify the likely source of the object could it have come from identify what batch/ delivery/supplier might be involved).
your business or from somewhere else? Consider: You should write down in the Diary what you did to investigate
ingredients talk to suppliers; the issue, what you found and what you did to prevent the
staff jewelry, clothing, hair, Band-Aids; problem from happening again.
environment walls, windows, overhead lights, wooden
pallets;
packaging when product was opened or when product was
packaged.
Identify what went wrong and what might need to change.
The complaint is investigated to determine the likely cause.
If it related to food that wasnt made or packaged by your
business, notify the manufacturer/supplier with the details.
If food was processed or packaged by your business, find out
whether the complaint has arisen from these activities:
If it has, identify what went wrong, how it happened and what
can be done to stop it happening again;
If it hasnt, notify the supplier/manufacturer with the details.
Complaint about a foodborne illness

If illness has been caused by a food certain facts need to be

FOOD 5.16 page 2 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Food basics
Supplying (wholesaling) and
tracing food
Goal Why?
To ensure that food supplied to other businesses is safe and A business that supplies food to another business must
suitable. meet the requirements of the Australia and New Zealand
Food Standards Code (the Code):
To be able to successfully trace food:
Food that may not be safe or suitable can be identified and
back to a supplier (e.g. ingredients);
traced so that it is not sold or used in products that may
within the business (e.g. stock in hand, used in products);
make people ill.
Supplied to other businesses.
Act requirements:
There must be procedures for identifying food and
tracing the movement of food from the supplier to the
food business; within the food business, and from the
food business to the next recipient (other than the final
consumer) in the supply chain.

How this is done What if there is a problem?


Supplying food Products that dont meet compositional requirements but
which are safe to eat may be reworked using a process
Food supplied to other businesses:
shown to make the product safe for use.
must be processed and handled according to the
procedures identified in the plan; Review practices to identify how this happened and work out
must meet requirements in the Code including for: how to prevent it happening again.
composition requirements see also Food composition
general and food composition procedures for specific
foods and Food Allergens;
shelf-life see Calculating shelf-life;
Write it down
labelling so that food is supplied either:
accurately labelled for sale by another business (as
You must write down information about
agreed with that business); or suppliers to the business - see Purchasing and
is accompanied by information that enables the seller receiving food and Supplier record.
to accurately label it. (see important information about
labelling food). When you make food that you supply, write
Tracing food
down details of the source of ingredients used
- see Ingredients record.
Incoming food and ingredients in food supplied to
businesses must be able to be: Keep a record of the businesses that you
traced to a supplier see Purchasing and receiving food; supply, the type of food and the date and
identified when stored at the business;
identified in products made by the business.
quantity supplied - see Record of food supplied
to other businesses.
Batches of food and the amounts supplied, must be able to
be traced to business customers. You must write down in the Diary if you
See also Recalling food. needed to trace food (and why), what you did
to trace it, what you did with the food once
you traced it, and what action you took to
prevent this happening again.

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 FOOD 5.17 page 1
Labelling food Retail businesses prepare and/or make
A person selling food is responsible for food and sell it directly to consumers.
ensuring that it is accurately labelled. Supply or wholesale businesses prepare
When food is supplied to other businesses or manufacture food that another business
there will be different labelling requirements. sells, or uses.
The Food Standards Code, (the Code) Standard
1.2.1 states requirements for labelling and
information provided with food. Standard 1.2.1
sets provisions for:
food for retail sale - see Labelling;
food for catering purposes;
food transferred within a company;
food that is not for any of these purposes
e.g. it is supplied to make another food.
Labelling exemptions for retail food that is sold
from the place where it is made will not apply
when the same food is sold elsewhere.
A business that sells food wholesale will need
to provide sufficient information with the food
to enable another business to either use it or
to accurately label it before sale.
Check the Code for the requirements for the
products that you make or sell at: http://www.
foodstandards.govt.nz/code/Pages/Food-
Standards-Code-from-1-March-2016.aspx
Information to help you calculate shelf life
is at: http://www.foodsafety.govt.nz/elibrary/
industry/determine-shelf-life-of-food/how-to-
determine-the-shelf-life-of-food-revision.pdf

Tracing food
Traceability is the ability of a business to
track a food through all stages of production,
processing and distribution; e.g. to trace
a food or ingredient back to a supplier
(one step back), identify where it is in the
production and processing chain within the
business (stock in hand), and to know which
business customers have received it (one
step forward).
If each business in the supply chain can trace
a product received and forwarded, then should
a problem later arise with the product it will
be possible to identify where it is and stop it
being sold.
It is only necessary to be able to trace food
supplied to other businesses and not food
sold to individual consumers.

FOOD 5.17 page 2 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Food basics
Recall of food and recall of items
in contact with food
Goal Why?
To prevent food that is not safe and suitable from being Food that isnt safe and suitable, may make people ill.
consumed and to arrange for stocks of the food to be Contaminated items that come into contact with food can
removed from sale or where there is doubt about whether it contaminate food which may then make people ill.
is safe and suitable.
To prevent items that come into contact with food (such as
packaging or utensils) from being sold or used if they could
contaminate food.
Act requirements:
There must be a procedure to recall:
a food sold by the business that is not safe or suitable or
where theres doubt about its safety and suitability; and
a food related accessory sold by the business that has
contaminated food or which may have contaminated food
or caused food to no longer be safe or suitable.
Any decision to recall must be reported to MPI.
How this is done How this is done
A business that makes food that is sold by others (wholesale) any recalled product and other food that the product has
must be able to recall that food. Information on how to been used in is removed and put in a separate area clearly
carry out a recall and develop a plan is available on the MPI marked as Recalled do not use;
website here: http://www.foodsafety.govt.nz/recalls-warnings/ the supplier and/or manufacturer of the recalled product
is notified of the quantity of product identified and
If there is a possibility that the business has made and
arrangements made for its collection and disposal;
supplied a food that is unsafe or unsuitable the following
an estimate is made of the amount of product already used.
actions need to be taken:
Contact an MPI Food Safety Officer to seek advice by
What if there is a problem?
phoning 0800 00 83 33.
Follow the businesses recall plan or follow the instructions If a problem is traced to food made by the business,
on the MPI website about Conducting a food recall investigate what happened and take action to ensure that
Provide information about the product including quantity it does not happen again, e.g. train staff, re-assess the
affected, how much has been sold, what the food safety supplier, review maintenance or cleaning programmes,
concern is to MPI. repair/replace equipment.
Use the MPI Recall/hazard risk analysis form to collect
If a recall notification doesnt provide details on what to
all information needed to help decide whether a recall
do with recalled product contact the business recalling the
is needed available here: http://www.foodsafety.govt.nz/
product to find out.
elibrary/industry/recall-hazard/index.htm
Food that is not safe and suitable, and food that is not
Recalls made by other businesses
intended to be sold or used, must be stored separately from
A food product, or a piece of food equipment or packaging other food and clearly marked not for sale or use.
can be recalled by manufacturers and suppliers if it has
been found to be unsafe or unsuitable.

Foreign objects in food can be offensive Write it down


and sometimes dangerous if they are
small enough to be swallowed or are If initiating a recall, you must provide the
sharp. information required by the recall procedure or
a Food Safety Officer with the recall notice.
When information is received from a manufacturer, supplier,
the authorities or the media that a food or item is being Keep a copy of a recall notice in the Diary
recalled, the following action must be taken: and details of the quantity of affected
identify if the recalled food is on display, in storage or been
used as an ingredient in another food; or
product found, and action taken.
identify if the recalled food contact item is being used at the
business, or if it has been supplied to another business;
comply with all instructions provided in the recall
notification;

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 FOOD 5.18 page 1
FOOD 5.18 page 2 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Guidance
Food basics
Reopening a food business after a
power cut or civil emergency
(e.g. earthquake, flood)
As you get your business up and running again, its vital extra steps are taken to ensure food is safe for your
customers.
What you do next will depend on the amount of damage to your premises and equipment, the availability and
amount of drinking water supply you need, condition of food in stock and the type of food you want to sell.
The following points and the Reopening a food business checklist provide a summary of the most important things
to consider as a food retailer reopening for business.

1. Are premises structurally sound for preparing or When the boil water notice has been lifted, run taps to check
handling food? the water before you use it. If you notice anything unusual with
Once the building has formally been declared as safe, you will the colour or cloudiness or smell, contact your water supplier
need to make sure any damage to food areas does not stop for advice. Dont use the water until your supplier has confirmed
you from operating hygienically. Is there a chance that food that it is okay. Further information about water in food
will become contaminated, such as from leaking sewerage or businesses can be found at:
damaged ceiling or wall claddings falling onto food? www.foodsafety.govt.nz/elibrary/industry/food-control-food-fcp-
plans/water_supply.pdf
Make sure the services you need for power, water supply and
drainage havent been damaged or weakened in the premises. 5. Is food still safe to use?

2. Are toilets and personnel hygiene facilities working? Check how long fridges, chillers and freezers have been without
power because food safety may have been affected. As a rule:
Make sure toilets for staff and customers are in working order. If If power to fridges and chillers was off for less than 24 hours,
a boil water notice is in effect, staff should wash hands using and chillers were not opened during the power cut (or opened
cooled boiled water or water treated with bleach or chlorine only briefly to add bags of ice), contents must be checked but
(5 drops of bleach to 1 litre of water); then use a hand sanitiser. should be okay.
Have hand wipes and hand sanitisers available for customer If power was off for more than 24 hours, or chillers were opened
hygiene. (e.g. not to add bags of ice), potentially hazardous food should
3. Can the premises be thoroughly cleaned before use? be discarded.
In either instance, food beyond its use-by date must be
Areas used for food preparation and serving will need to be
thrown out.
thoroughly cleaned, and food preparation surfaces and utensils
sanitised before use, to ensure there is no risk to food safety. Potentially hazardous foods are those that need to be kept at 5C
4. Is the water safe to use? or below. These are foods containing meat, fish, dairy products;
plus prepared salads, sandwiches, cooked rice and pasta and
If a boil water notice is in effect, it is recommended that you processed foods containing eggs, beans, nuts or other protein-rich
use a supply of bottled drinking water if you need to use water foods. Any harmful microbes on these foods can grow when the
as an ingredient in food while the notice is in place. temperature of the food increases.
Turn off ice machines until the boil water notice has been Perishable foods in the chiller, for example, fruit and hard
lifted. cheeses, may still be safe to use if they are not showing obvious
signs of spoilage.
Turn off post-mix and slushy machines until the boil water If a freezer was full, power was off for less than four days and
notice has been lifted. the freezer was not opened during the power cut and there is no
Most coffee machines only heat water to 8085C, so these evidence of thawing, contents should be okay to use.
machines need to be supplied with pre-boiled water. Plumbed- If power was off for more than four days, or the freezer was
in machines should not be used. opened during the power cut, or the freezer was not full, or
there is any evidence that contents have completely thawed,
Remember to use only cooled boiled water or water treated with or have thawed then refrozen, then DO NOT USE THE FOOD
bleach or chlorine (5 drops of bleach to 1 litre of water) to wash throw it out. And dont feed it to your pets.
hands when preparing food. Use a sanitiser after washing hands, Partially thawed food in the freezer should be completely
especially if water is scarce. defrosted and used immediately.
Identify the best way to boil or chlorinate the water needed and Food still frozen with ice crystals throughout can continue to be
make someone responsible for maintaining the supply. kept frozen if you are sure it did not thaw out and then refreeze
Using disposable gloves might help, but remember to change when the power came back on. Frozen food that has defrosted
them regularly and wash your hands in clean water when you do and was refrozen when the power was restored should not be
so. used. This will not always be obvious, but important signs of
defrosting and refreezing will be misshapen products, or drip

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 FOOD 5.19 page 1
Guidance

from packaging that has become frozen, or packages stuck


together, or the pooling of frozen fluids in the bottom of sealed
packages.
Other foods, such as shelf-stable foods, should be checked for
damage. These foods can be used as long as packaging is intact
and food is not exposed. Cans should not have damage around
edges and seals. Thoroughly clean packaging before opening to
prevent contamination of food.
If in doubt, throw it out.
6. Is refrigeration working?

Make sure chillers, freezers, display cabinets and other


equipment have not been damaged and will work as intended.
7. Food for sale

Particularly while a boil water notice is in place, think about


providing food that requires minimum handling or is very
thoroughly cooked.
8. Sourcing new supplies

If you are restocking from local suppliers, ensure perishable or


frozen foods were not affected by power outages. Check that
your supplier has taken the steps indicated in 5 above.
9. Do your staff know what to do?

It is important everyone knows what they must do to produce


safe food during an emergency, particularly if there is a
disrupted clean water supply. It is vital hands and food
preparation surfaces are kept clean. Mark different pots and
pans being used to boil or cool water so people know which
ones to use. If in any doubt about what you should do, contact the
Environmental Health Officer at your local council.

FOOD 5.19 page 2 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Guidance
Food basics Reopening a food business after a power
cut or civil emergency checklist
1. Call your local authority 5. Is frozen food okay? If in doubt, throw it out!

Check with your local council before you open up to find Have freezers been damaged? Have contents been
out about any post-emergency provisions it may have for contaminated by water/sewage/debris?
food businesses (e.g. a boil water notice).
Check how long freezers were without power.
2. Check the building condition
If the freezer was full, power was off for less than four days
Can you officially use the building (e.g. has it been and the freezer was not opened during the power cut and
declared safe after an earthquake)? there is no evidence of thawing, contents should be okay
to use.
If yes, make sure that the condition of the building
structure, surface finishes and fittings allow you to If power was off for more than four days, or the freezer
hygienically prepare and handle any open food. Can debris was opened during the power cut, or the freezer was not
drop onto food? Can surfaces used for food be kept clean? full, or there is any evidence that contents have thawed,
3. Check the condition of the services and equipment or thawed and refrozen, then DO NOT USE THE FOOD
throw it out. And dont feed it to pets or send for pig food.
Make sure that services, facilities and equipment are fully This food should not be used.
functioning. Is sewage contained within the pipework and
6. Check all other food
not flowing through the premises? Have power and water
supplies to the building been damaged? If any services Throw out cans that leak and have badly dented seams or
cannot be used, have you made adequate provision for: rims.
electricity Throw out any items with damaged packaging that exposes
gas the food.
7. Cleaning and sanitising
drinking water supply (see also 8 below):
boiling/cooling water Clean food packaging, if required, before opening it.

tankered-in water Check that all stocks of food packaging materials are clean
(e.g. takeaway containers).
bottled water
Clean all food areas and clean and sanitise food surfaces,
disposing of waste water utensils and equipment.
toilets Clean customer areas and clean and sanitise crockery and
hand washing with clean water, soap, towels, hand cutlery etc.
sanitiser 8. Before reopening

disposing of rubbish Check whether food served and stocked could be changed
to a simpler and/or safer option.
cooking, refrigerating and freezing food.
4. Is refrigerated food okay? If in doubt, throw it out! Make sure staff know what to do and understand how your
business will be operating until normal service has been
Have fridges been damaged? Have contents been resumed.
contaminated by water/sewage/debris?
9. Boil the water?
Check how long fridges were without power.
Check whether there is a boil water notice in place
If power was off for less than 24 hours, and chillers for drinking water. Identify who will be responsible for
were not opened during the power cut, contents must be maintaining a supply of boiled water (for drinking and
checked but should be okay. cleaning food surfaces) or chlorinated water (for general
cleaning) and also keep hand-washing facilities stocked
If power was off for more than 24 hours, or chillers were
opened during the power cut (other than to add bags of with soap, clean towels and hand sanitiser.
ice), potentially hazardous food should be discarded. Additional information about food safety when reopening after
an emergency is available from MPI at: www.foodsafety.govt.nz
Throw out all food beyond its use-by date.
If you have any specific food safety questions not covered by
the available advice please phone 0800 69 37 21 for further
information.

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 FOOD 5.20 page 1
FOOD 5.20 page 2 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Guidance
Food basics
Donating food
Act requirements:
Donated food must be safe and suitable and, if applicable, information on keeping the food safe and suitable must be provided.

Food that is donated needs to be safe for human consumption. Food is unsafe if it is likely to cause the person
eating it harm. There may be circumstances when food that is donated or given away could be construed as food
for sale and provisions of the Food Act 2014 would apply. Particular care needs to be taken when donating foods
that need temperature control and/or have a use-by date.

Issues that should be addressed when donating food chilled foods for donation should have been maintained in the
include: chill-chain at or below 5C;
food subject to a product recall for safety reasons must not be
donated; hot foods for donation should have been thoroughly cooked and
kept above 60C.
food marked with a use-by date must either be used or
thrown away by that date. It must not be donated after that date Further tips when donating food include:
because it may be unsafe to eat after this date, even though work closely with the receiving organisation to identify:
spoilage may not be visible; the range of foods that are most useful and can be safely
handled;
where donated food will be safe to eat for only a limited time,
the best or most appropriate times for food collection;
inform the person receiving the food of the time limit;
check that the receiving organisation is aware of what needs to
inform the person receiving the food about any food in a
be done to keep food safe;
donation that requires special handling or storage;
if reusing boxes and packaging, ensure that these have not
food marked with a best-before date can be donated after the
been used for anything other than food and have been made
date has passed, provided it is otherwise fit to eat. There may
clean and hygienic;
be some loss of quality after this date but there should not be
any safety issue with the food; keep food items separated from non-food items;
food withdrawn from sale because of incorrect and/or faulty keep raw food separate from cooked and/or ready-to-eat food.
labelling may be donated; however, correct information about
the food needs to be provided with the food so that consumers Food gifted to family and friends in Care settings
have the information they need to make informed choices; You may want to provide guidance to the families and friends of
for pre-packaged donated food, the packaging, or at least the those in your care on the safe handling of food so that the food
inner wrapping, should completely enclose food. Do not donate they bring in is in the safest condition possible.
any pre-packaged food in damaged wrapping that exposes the
food it may have become contaminated;
food must be clear of mould or slime or other signs of spoilage,
e.g. packaging inflated by spoilage gasses;
cans that are excessively rusty or have been damaged along
seams, or spring at the end, or are leaking must not be
donated;
fresh meat that will be frozen for donation should be frozen no
later than on its best-before date. It should be hard-frozen
when it leaves donor storage;

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 FOOD 5.21 page 1
FOOD 5.21 page 2 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Food basics
Directly importing food
Goal Why?
Act requirements: Everyone who imports food needs to comply with food safety
Food must be safe and suitable. laws.
Records must be maintained to ensure traceability and to All food imported for human consumption must be safe to
demonstrate that processing and handling requirements are eat.
being followed. Certain foods have to be cleared by MPI for food safety
reasons before entering the country.
Food entering the country needs to be correctly labelled so
that the nature of the food can be assessed.

How this is done How this is done


Information on each consignment must be provided, in
Food that a business imports into English, through the Joint Border Management System or
NewZealand needs to be safe. An to a Food Safety Officer. If providing information to a Food
importer can help to ensure this by:
Safety Officer use the Record Imported food consignments:
sourcing food from operators who can
show how they keep food safe; the name of the vessel or the number of the flight on which
making sure that safety of food can the food is imported; and
be maintained during storage and the country of origin of the food; and
transport to New Zealand, and until it the name of the port of loading of the vessel or aircraft in the
is on-sold. country of export; and
Food brought into New Zealand for sale the date of importation of the food into New Zealand, and
can only be imported by a food importer the port of discharge; and
registered with MPI. a detailed description of the food, product type, and, where
applicable, brand name and details of any batch or lot
Food safety information provided with,
identification in relation to the
or about, food is subject to verification
(auditing) to confirm that it is correct. consignment; and
the name of the importer importing the food and the contact
person for the importer (including, in each case, a physical
or postal address, telephone number, and email or fax
Importer registration
details). If the importer is not the registered importer for that
The business must be registered with MPI to import food. particular consignment provide the details for the registered
The business must import food through a registered importer instead; and
importer. the name and contact details of the supplier, manufacturer,
or producer of the food; and
The person who is responsible for making sure that imported the broker associated with the consignment, if relevant; and
food requirements are met is: (insert name and/or position) the applicable tariff code; and
the number of packages (if any) in the consignment and the
weight of each package; and
Identifying safe food to import
the total weight of the consignment; and
The following steps must be taken when selecting products the unique consignment reference.
to import: High or increased regulatory interest imported foods
food, ingredients and manufacturing/handling practices Certain foods need to have been sampled and tested before
must be checked to make sure they comply with New they can be sold in NewZealand. This is because they
Zealand food safety standards present a greater risk to health than other foods. Examples
food composition and labelling must be checked to include: smoked fish, histamine-susceptible species of
make sure that they can meet requirements of the Food fish, bovine meat and meat products, pate, peanut butter,
Standards Code shrimps and prawns, tahine, bivalve shellfish, pepper,
paprika and spices.
suppliers must be asked to provide assurances and
product specifications Further information about these foods and the standards that
they need to meet is at:
checks must be made that food can be kept safe during www.foodsafety.govt.nz
storage and transport to New Zealand
Using imported food
regular checks must be made of the food during storage
and transport to New Zealand The business must have a system to be able to trace
where food came from and where it has gone in the event
records of checks (e.g. temperatures) must be kept to of a recall.
show how food safety has been managed.

Ministry for Primary Industries Food Control Plan Dec 2015 FOOD 5.22 page 1
What if there is a problem?
If the supplier cannot confirm that food has been produced
using safe practices, it must not be imported.
If food has not been stored or transported correctly and has
been made unsafe, it must not be imported.
If the food is incorrectly labelled (e.g. information is not in
English) the food cannot be sold until it complies with the
Food Standards Code. Information about the Code is at:
www.foodstandards.govt.nz

Write it down
Keep a record of the results of the
assessments you carry out to confirm that
the food youve imported is safe and suitable.
This assessment must be done at the point at
which you take responsibility for the imported
food.
See Recall of food and recall of items in
contact with food and Transporting food
Complete the Imported food consignments
record for each batch of imported food to
show the checks carried out confirm that
the food meets imported food requirements.
(This information will need to be kept for four
years.)

FOOD 5.22 page 2 Food Control Plan Dec 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Record

Food Service and Retail Food


Control Plan
Basics Records

Ministry for Primary Industries December 2015 Food Control Plan RECORD 6.0 page 1
RECORD 6.0 page 2 Food Control Plan December 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Record Staff training
Name: Telephone:

Position: Start date:

Address:

Topic Relevant Employee signed* Supervisor signed Date


Essential training
Sickness
Hand hygiene
Personal hygiene
Cleaning
Food allergens
Potentially hazardous food
Training as needed
Preventing cross-contamination
Using shared places for commercial
food
Water supply
Waste management
Pest and animal control
Maintenance
Checking temperatures and calibrating
thermometers
Purchasing and receiving goods
Perishable and shelf-stable food storage
Chilled and frozen food storage
Fruit and vegetables
Food stalls, promotions & tastings
Food vending machines
Making and selling ice
Customers reheating food
Food composition
Equipment, packaging and other items
in contact with food
Food labelling
Transporting food
Customer complaints
Supplying (wholesaling) and tracing
food
Recalling food
Listeria
Importing food
* I acknowledge that I have received training in the procedure and agree to follow it.
The employee has been trained and has demonstrated a good understanding of the procedure and has been observed consistently
following it.
Other training

Date Details

Ministry for Primary Industries December 2015 Food Control Plan RECORD 6.1 page 1
RECORD 6.1 page 2 Food Control Plan December 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Ministry for Primary Industries

Date of

Record
Symptoms (state symptom Date Faecal result Date excluded Date returned
Name if vomited at work) onset notified Action taken (if any) from work to work

Sickness
December 2015
Food Control Plan
RECORD 6.2 page 1
RECORD 6.2 page 2 Food Control Plan December 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Record Transporting potentially hazardous food
Ready-to-eat, potentially hazardous food must be transported:
chilled to below 5oC; or
hot at 60oC or above unless it will be used or eaten within four hours of being at this temperature.
You must use this record when transporting ready-to-eat potentially hazardous food that will not be used or eaten within four hours.

Type of food Food immediately Food after delivery Action taken (if food has been
(e.g. sandwiches, quiche, before transporting before service held between 5oC and 60oC for
Date cooked chicken wings etc) time temp time temp four or more hours)

Ministry for Primary Industries December 2015 Food Control Plan RECORD 6.3 page 1
RECORD 6.3 page 2 Food Control Plan December 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Record
Hot-held food temperature
Food hot-held for longer than 2 hours must be checked to ensure that its temperature remains above 60C. Record hot-holding
temperatures here.

What was done if temperature


Date Food Temperature was below 60C





Ministry for Primary Industries December 2015 Food Control Plan RECORD 6.4 page 1
RECORD 6.4 page 2 Food Control Plan December 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Record Suppliers
Food should be sourced from suppliers that the business is confident can provide safe and suitable food. These are recorded here as the
businesss approved suppliers.

Approved supplier Approved supplier


Business name: Business name:

Contact person: Contact person:

Phone: Phone:

Fax: Fax:

Address: Address:

Lead time for placing an order (e.g. Mon for Wed) Lead time for placing an order (e.g. Mon for Wed)

Delivery day(s): Delivery day(s):


Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun

Goods supplied Goods supplied

Comments Comments

Ministry for Primary Industries December 2015 Food Control Plan RECORD 6.5 page 1
Record Suppliers
Food should be sourced from suppliers that the business is confident can provide safe and suitable food. These are recorded here as
the businesss approved suppliers.

Approved supplier Approved supplier


Business name: Business name:

Contact person: Contact person:

Phone: Phone:

Fax: Fax:

Address: Address:

Lead time for placing an order (e.g. Mon for Wed) Lead time for placing an order (e.g. Mon for Wed)

Delivery day(s): Delivery day(s):


Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun

Goods supplied Goods supplied

Comments Comments

RECORD 6.5 page 2 Food Control Plan December 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Record Suppliers
Food should be sourced from suppliers that the business is confident can provide safe and suitable food. These are recorded here as
the businesss approved suppliers.

Approved supplier Approved supplier


Business name: Business name:

Contact person: Contact person:

Phone: Phone:

Fax: Fax:

Address: Address:

Lead time for placing an order (e.g. Mon for Wed) Lead time for placing an order (e.g. Mon for Wed)

Delivery day(s): Delivery day(s):


Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun

Goods supplied Goods supplied

Comments Comments

Ministry for Primary Industries December 2015 Food Control Plan RECORD 6.5 page 3
Record Suppliers
Food should be sourced from suppliers that the business is confident can provide safe and suitable food. These are recorded here as
the businesss approved suppliers.

Approved supplier Approved supplier


Business name: Business name:

Contact person: Contact person:

Phone: Phone:

Fax: Fax:

Address: Address:

Lead time for placing an order (e.g. Mon for Wed) Lead time for placing an order (e.g. Mon for Wed)

Delivery day(s): Delivery day(s):


Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun

Goods supplied Goods supplied

Comments Comments

RECORD 6.5 page 4 Food Control Plan December 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries
Record Imported Food Consignment Information
Consignment Information
Name of vessel/flight number

Country of origin of food

Export port

Date of importation

Description of food including brand name, batch or lot


identification
Importer name

Importer contact person

Importer contact details:


Physical or postal address
Telephone number
Email or fax number

Name and contact details of supplier, Tick one: Supplier Manufacturer Producer
manufacturer
or producer

Broker (if relevant)

Tariff code

Number of packages (if any)

Weight of packages

Total weight

Unique consignment reference (if known)

Registered importer name (if different to above)

Registered importer contact details (if different to above):


Physical or postal address
Telephone number
Email or fax number

Ministry for Primary Industries December 2015 Food Control Plan RECORD 6.6 page 1
RECORD 6.6 page 2 Food Control Plan December 2015 Ministry for Primary Industries