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Transform your life with Yoga, Meditation and Loving-kindness

WEBSITE SPECIAL EDITION 2008

10 MEDITATIONS
FOR INNER PEACE AND HAPPINESS

Written and Compiled by Dave West

This book cuts through the commercialism that now clouds the real
meaning of Yoga. Beyond the postures and exercises the teachings of
Yoga show us the path to freedom, direct realisation of Truth
and loving union with the Divine.

10 Meditations for Inner Peace and Happiness Website Special Edition 2008
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Swami Shyam Yogi

This book is dedicated to the lineage of


teachers who preserve the ancient wisdom
for the spiritual evolution of mankind.

This book is created with love and distributed free.


It is meant to provide guidance and counsel for those who wish to practise.
Free download of this book is available at www.himalaya-yoga.com
Copyright Dave West Yoga 2007 UK

WEBSITE SPECIAL EDITION 2008

This preview edition has been modified from 300 to 63 pages for quick download.
The complete edition is available free at all workshops and rerteats with Dave West.
For more info about workshops and retreats Email: info@himalaya-yoga.com

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Transform your life with Yoga, Meditation and Loving-kindness

WEBSITE SPECIAL EDITION 2008

10 MEDITATIONS
FOR INNER PEACE AND HAPPINESS
Written and Compiled by Dave West

NAMASTE
NAMASTE Page 4
PREFACE by Martin F. Moore 4
FOREWARD 5
ONENESS WITH NATURE 7
INTRODUCTION TO MEDITATION 8
GENERAL NOTES FOR THE MEDITATOR 13
TRAINING THE MIND 23
10 MEDITATIONS FOR INNER PEACE & HAPPINESS 30
Part One Sitting Quietly in Meditation
Part Two Mindfulness throughout the Day
10 Meditations Affirmation/Technique Chart
Opening Prayers
1. PERSISTENCE Complete Yogic Breathing
2. ACCEPTANCE Chanting Om
3. EQUANIMITY Purifying the Energy Channels
4. PATIENCE - Stillness
5. CONCENTRATION Mindful Breathing
6. LOVE Heart Chakra Awareness
7. KINDNESS Generating Kindness
8. COMPASSION Generating Compassion
9. WISDOM Offering and Receiving
10. ENLIGHTENMENT - Palming
Concluding Prayers
SUMMARY 56
HIMALAYA YOGA 58
REFERENCES 61
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 63

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NAMASTE

Namaste is the traditional way of greeting in India and Nepal. Everyone can say namaste.
You can use namaste as in good morning, good night, thank you or welcome, and it can be used
generously. The action of bowing the head and joining the palms of both hands together in front
of the chest, over the heart, symbolises I recognize the God in you. It is the philosophy of
oneness - You and I are One in heart and mind opening the heart to spread love and peace, and
the ability to offer our help and service to each other. Yoga is an exercise that brings all levels of
our existence, including the physical and intellectual, into balance. The gesture of namaste is yoga
in itself, and many yogic activities begin and end with the performance of this deeply spiritual
gesture. The practice of namaste with clear intentions develops faith in ahimsa - non-violence.

Ahimsa Paramo Dharma Non-


Non-violence is the greatest path

PREFACE
I read a book by Osho, a little while ago, that said, Never believe anything you read nor
believe any words you hear, they are all lies words are only concepts, a substitute for the real
thing. This book is no exception.
Dave West has compassionately put this book together to explain a sequence of
movements and meditations, in his own way, to help show you an understanding, a way for you to
enhance your life. This sequence of movements and step by step meditations can show you a way.
But it is no use just to read about them. Dave West invites you to explore the way he was taught
in the Himalayas, his understanding, part by part, movement by movement, and for you to
experience the results for yourself. Take what you need and leave the rest behind.
If you are expecting instant results, you will be disappointed, you may be surprised, but the
secret is to accept whatever you get. Dave West explains that you are limited only by your own
imagination. However, you must accept your current limitations and capacity, and gradually over
time your stretching will get easier, your understanding will come, as will your energy. In these
times of instant fix it, it will be hard, but again a quote from Osho, To me, only in your loneliness
(meditation) will you be able to know the Truth because you are the Truth Through these
meditations you can find your own Truth. Start the journey now, and every day take another
step
Martin F. Moore
Chi Kung and Meditation Instructor
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FORE
FOREWORD
A long time ago, while walking on the banks of the river Ganges near Rishikesh,
my guru told me that I have to be strong if I am going to choose the path of yoga. Some of
the places he is going to take me; some of the things he is going to show me; I am going to
need strength and I am going to need to trust him.

After travelling extensively in the Himalayan Mountains for three years, I discovered many
ancient secrets to inner peace and happiness. Many of these teachings had been preserved for
thousands of years in remote valleys and villages by yoga masters and rishis. They told me that the
modern teachings of yoga in the West had become distorted by over emphasis on the physical
aspect, resulting in attachment to the body. They instructed me that the time had come for these
ancient healing techniques to re-emerge in their true form as the divine science of life.
The information in this book is based on my understanding of the wisdom I received from
several gurus, and from personal insights gained through meditation. I cannot offer you what I do
not know or what I do not understand at this time. I hope this book may save you some time from
all the searching and wandering that is common when one first steps on to the path.
These pages have been a long time in the making. They have been written after fifteen
years of studying yoga and meditation in different countries. This book is a compilation of great
works from the masters. Its purpose is to put meditation back into the heart and soul of yoga
practice and inspire higher consciousness in daily activities. It contains non-commercial yogic
instruction and is designed to provide simple straightforward illustrated guidance for beginners.
This book is not meant to replace the teacher, or the first hand instruction given in classes. For
safe and effective practice it is recommended that you undertake proper instructions from a
qualified yoga and meditation instructor, and proceed at your own pace, according to your own
experiences and intuition.
Yoga has recently become an internationally accepted health system. However, people
have a tendency to over-simplify things and make definitions fit into their parameters of thinking.
Yoga has also become a casualty of such thinking. In today's fast-paced world, with its quick-fix
solutions for everything, yoga is more and more being branded as a health regime or a solution for
all weight problems, something exciting from the exotic east. In the over-zealous attempts to
spread yoga, its centuries-old meaning and true purpose is being diluted no nutrients, just
calories.
In India my guru explained, Modern yoga in the West can be compared to having a three
course dinner in a nice restaurant. But most people just order the starter over and over again. It
might be very delicious and nutritious but they are missing out on the main course and dessert.
What he meant by this is that people are focusing too much on asana (starter) and not practising
meditation (main course) and therefore missing out on the fruit of meditation (dessert) which is
inner peace, happiness and enlightenment.
A closer look at the original teaching reveals that yoga is the science of bringing
mindfulness into every thought, speech and action. The poses came later as a spontaneous
expression of that centred state. This book has been compiled primarily to educate people across
the world that yoga is meditation, and to dispel existing misconceptions. In the light of so many

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dilutions and variations found in the world today, I here present direct access to the main points
that were passed on to me from the enlightened masters of the Himalayas. This book is a drop of
nectar from the ocean of their wisdom.
Many passages in this book have been reproduced directly from the works of Lord Buddha,
Maharishi Patanjali, Sri Tirumalai Krishnamacharya, T.K.V. Desikachar Sri Swami Sivananda, Swami
Satyananda Saraswati, Bhodidharma, Swami Shyam Yogi, Stephen Levine, Eckhart Tolle, Erich
Schiffmann, Robin S. Sharma, Merta Ada, Martin Moore, Achaan Chaa and Geshe Kelsang Gyasto. I
have referenced their work to help expand the wisdom I received in the Himalayas. Although I did
not have personal contact with some of these masters, I believe they have been with me in spirit
throughout the writing of this book. I have felt their presence and guidance. I have tried to
combine their wisdom with my own understanding for your benefit. I pray that this new collection
reaches you with their blessings, and the blessings from all the holy beings, and assists you
towards perfect health, inner peace and happiness.
In the process of compiling this book, I have tried to keep in mind the words of the
Venerable Myokyo-ni in her Zen classic Gentling the Bull; When we read modern meditation
manuals, the do-it-yourself type, they read like instructions for home improvement. Or like
cooking recipes, they instruct: place the mind here, now place it there, now lift it up from here
and place it there now place your mind nowhere, and just stay like this for an hour or so. It all
sounds so easy until you try to do it. I hope I have at least succeeded in making this book as
interesting as a cooking recipe and less confusing than home improvement instructions. As
Bhodidharma taught, The ultimate Truth is beyond words. They are not the Way. The Way is
wordless. Words are illusions.
Meditation is the art of mindfulness. When you are mindful of all your thoughts, speech
and action and can create love, wisdom and compassion in every second, of every minute, of
every day, then you have not only succeeded in yoga, but you have truly succeeded in life, in
reaching your full potential as a human being. However, do not practise meditation for selfish
reasons, but in order to know and understand yourself, and thus be able to teach others how to
live peacefully and wisely. I here offer guidance and counsel for those who wish to practise and
reach this goal.
It is without any doubt in my heart and mind, that the regular and diligent practice of these
meditations, by everyone on the planet, would produce a significant global reduction in violence,
crime, poverty, disease and deterioration of the natural environment. I encourage you to take
time from the hectic pace of modern living to experience the silence of meditation, combined with
regular classes from an experienced instructor. Integrate these teachings with your personal
practice, discoveries and insights. Find your own Truth and let the light of love shine clear in your
heart.
Dave West
Bali 2007

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ONENESS WITH NATURE
Take a walk in nature, away from the traffic and bustle of city life.
Walk slowly and appreciate the beauty and harmony of the natural world.
As you walk take deep gentle breaths and absorb the natural healing energy of your surroundings.
After walking deep into the heart of Mother Nature, find a place on the ground, perhaps soft grass
where you can sit undisturbed to meditate.
You can even lean against a tree or lie down.
Find a place that feels right for you.
Close your eyes and relax for a few minutes.
Let your breathing become comfortable and quiet.
Let your thoughts settle.
Notice how the ground supports you.
Put your palms down on the ground and sense the mass under you.
Feel the breeze on your skin, feel the temperature.
Notice how you breathe in the air and then expel it out again.
Become aware of the exchange with nature that is always going on.
Listen to the sounds of nature.
Can you hear the wind in the trees, birds chirping, insects.
Allow yourself to experience how you are part of this scene, not separate from it but one with
nature, one with the universe.
Can you experience the ongoing exchange between you and the world without thinking anything
about it?
Let go of any thoughts about yesterday or tomorrow.
Bring yourself to this moment without any purpose or goal.
For this moment, dont think about yourself.
Set aside your usual concerns.
Be fully in the present moment of being an integral part of the outdoors.
Can you be completely here, in nature, in the now?
Simply observe the purity and tranquillity of this moment.
Feel relaxed, feel safe,
Experience the energy you are made of.
Feel what it is like to be you.
Experience yourself as the infinite mind that you are,
Free and fearless, healthy and happy,
Experience a renewal of optimism that will clarify your priorities and aspirations.
Your life will acquire new meaning as you establish the inner conviction that you live in a friendly,
non-threatening, purposeful universe.
Hold this awareness for a few minutes or longer.
Slowly open your eyes.
Join your hands over the heart and bow your head.
Give thanks for nature, our greatest teacher.
Give thanks for the gift of life.

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INTRODUCTION TO MEDITATION
Stop gathering information from the outside and start gathering it from
the inside.
Dan Millman

Meditation traditions of the world are centred on the quest for freedom from sorrow,
liberation and enlightenment. The practice of meditation requires striving to purify the mind and
body, and the intention to turn the mind inwards with techniques that assist us on a journey of
self-exploration, self-discovery and self-realisation. This has a profound effect on the way we
think, speak and act. It peels away the veil of delusion revealing the true majestic nature of our
innermost Self in all its glory. Love, compassion, generosity, dispassion, caring and friendliness all
naturally blossom in everyday life. The fruit of meditation is inner peace, happiness and complete
harmony with the rhythm of nature.
Meditation is a way to see the world directly, as it is, without any judgement or mental
conditioning. It is awareness. It is silence, stillness in the mind; its natural state of being. This is
when the mind ceases its constant vacillation between worry over the future and regrets of the
past, when the whole awareness returns to the present moment. Such beauty and fullness is
found here!
Also termed by athletes as being in the zone, this natural state of awareness accompanies
peak performance in all fields of human endeavour. This presence is stillness inside, alertness,
clarity of mind and peace, even in the midst of dynamic activity. Thus, the human nervous system
is far more effective, responsive, and action far more powerful.
Yoga masters of the Himalayas recognise that every human being evolves in a different way
according to temperament and capacity. They advocate everyone to emphasise the practice of
certain healing techniques over others, depending on individual requirements. They taught me
how to combine meditation with different forms of yoga. This, they said, all helps to make the
purification process deep-rooted and ensures a healthy body, mind and spirit, a prerequisite on
the path to inner peace and happiness. These instructions have been firmly rooted in this book.

Relevance of Meditation Today

The enlightened masters of the Himalayas taught me that being spiritual is not about
locking ourself away on a mountain top for thirty years, chanting and eating nettles. The path to
enlightenment is mindfulness; being aware of the present moment and living a higher
consciousness lifestyle with our families, friends and enemies, in our home, at work, in the
community and environment. Its about creating love and compassion in our normal everyday
lives, working together, playing together and meditating together.
As Bhodidharma, the founder of Zen Buddhism, taught, To find Buddha (awakened mind),
you have to see your nature. Whoever sees his nature is a Buddha. If you dont see your nature,
invoking Buddhas, reciting sutras, making offerings and keeping precepts are all useless. Invoking
Buddhas results in good karma, reciting sutras results in a good memory, keeping precepts results
in good rebirth, and making offerings results in future blessings - but no Buddha.

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Being spiritual simply means, being in the present moment and mindful that our thoughts,
speech and actions are pure, untainted and filled with love. But as cool and romantic as it may
seem, meditation and being spiritual is not about wearing hippy clothes and jewellery from India,
or hanging cosmic mandalas in our living-room, sitting cross-legged and tuning in, turning on and
dropping out. Meditation takes place on the inside and requires regular, diligent practice with
patience and determination before results are noticed on the outside.
Buddha believed that the mind is our greatest resource, and that meditation is the method
that develops the mind correctly to bring about clarity of understanding. This is as relevant today
as it was thousands of years ago. Meditation helps us now, as it did then, to begin to understand
ourselves better, which in itself is a great achievement, because it is our misunderstanding of
ourselves that leads us to disharmony.
Meditation is an ideal way of performing a self-examination, working through unknown
obstacles that are disturbing our life on account of which we are unable to progress. This requires
effort, just like anything we set our heart on to achieve cannot be attained without struggle or
effort from our side. The struggle is for the perfection of ones thoughts, words and deeds. The
effort is towards attaining balance in the different facets of ones personality.
Sri Swami Sivananda of Rishikesh taught, To live harmoniously the mind, body and spirit
must develop in a balanced way according to individual temperament and capacity. This means
that the head, heart and hand must synchronise if we want to realize our goals, whether they be
material, spiritual or both. Meditation provides a suitable environment for this metamorphosis to
take place. A place to accept inherent weaknesses and blemishes, change our outlook and opinion,
and improve ourselves.

Ten Benefits from Daily Meditation

1. Meditation can transform your life in a positive way.


2. Meditation can help you to understand and experience what real happiness is and to truly
enjoy life.
3. Meditation can energise you, filling you with vitality and strength.
4. Meditation can reduce stress and anxiety.
5. Meditation can help you to sleep better.
6. Meditation can help you to become patient and to remain calm in any situation.
7. Meditation can help to develop your intuition, your sixth sense.
8. Meditation can increase wisdom.
9. Meditation can help you to understand the nature of impermanence.
10. Meditation can help to reveal your true nature and attain enlightenment.

What is Happiness?

All of us seek inner peace and happiness because this is what we lack in our lives. William
Hart writes, We all want to be happy; we regard it as our right. Yet happiness is a goal we strive
toward more often than attain. At times we all experience dissatisfaction in life, agitation,
disharmony, and suffering. Even if at this moment we are free from dissatisfactions, we can all
remember a time when they afflicted us and can foresee a time when they may reoccur.
Eventually we must all face the suffering of death.
Geshe Kelsang Gyasto asks, What is the ultimate supreme goal of human life? What is real
happiness? What do you wish for, strive for, or daydream about? Do you want material

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possessions, such as a large house with all the latest luxuries, a fast car, or a well paid job? Or is it
reputation, good looks, power, excitement, or adventure? Do you try to find the meaning of your
life in relationships with your family and circle of friends? All these things can make us happy for
a short while, but they can also cause us much worry and suffering. They can never give us the
perfect lasting happiness that all of us, deep in our heart, long for.
Bhodidharma taught, Once you stop clinging and let things be, youll be free, even of birth
and death. Youll transform everything. However, our ordinary view is that I am the centre of MY
universe and that other people and things derive their significance principally from the way in
which they affect ME. It is this view that is the source of all our selfish intentions and suffering. It is
this view that prevents us from letting go.
We need to free ourselves from the illusion that we are nothing more than this physical
body and mind. When we are free from the illusionary sense of self that governs what we think,
say and do, we free ourselves from the fear that is the consequence of this illusion. This also frees
us from the suffering we unconsciously inflict on ourself and others.
Geshe Kelsang Gyasto answers, The only thing that will never deceive us is the attainment
of full enlightenment. This means living a higher consciousness lifestyle, with love, wisdom,
compassion and non-violence at the centre of our thought, speech and action. Only then will we
be free from desires and delusions, faults and distractions, and possess the qualities necessary to
help all living beings. Through this understanding we can clearly see that the attainment of
enlightenment (higher consciousness lifestyle) is the real meaning of our precious human life. The
path of meditation allows us to reach this supreme goal.

Opening the Heart

Mother Teresa said, Everybody today seems to be in such a terrible rush, anxious for
greater developments and greater riches and so on, so that children have very little time for their
parents. Parents have very little time for each other, and in the home begins the disruption of
peace of the world.
Opening the heart, cultivating love and kindness, and awakening the compassionate spirit
inside our self is the key to inner peace and happiness and the essence of spiritual progress. Love
is a natural occurrence in the world, but bringing it to the forefront of our daily thought, speech
and action involves cherishing others more than we cherish ourself. This can be achieved through
the regular practice of compassionate meditation. Here we can control our ego, eliminate self-
importance and selfishness, and consider the happiness of others throughout our daily activities.
S. N. Goenka believes, When one experiences truth, the madness of finding fault with
others disappears. We all need to heal our life, to understand our sickness, or to heal past
traumatic experiences, for example - family, romantic partners, teachers, and other important
relationships. Meditation is the ideal place where we can examine these experiences and
attitudes, and replace negative attitudes with more positive ones.
Swami Satyananda Saraswati wrote, Self-exploration though regular meditation allows us
to recognise that the faults and failures in our daily life are not in the difficult situations that
confront us, or in the people with whom we have to interact. The problems we face arise from
within. Circumstances only act as a catalyst to bring them to the surface. This means that
everything we feel, think, say, or do is coming up from deep within. Meditation gives us the
chance to reflect on this, and apply the necessary changes to take place within us.
By letting go of our egos reactions and practising forgiveness and acceptance we begin to
experience pure and perfect love. We learn to gladly allow the energy of love to circulate and

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shine through, unobstructed by fear, pain and hatred. Erich Shiffmann wrote, The deeper we
explore, the more we come to realise a very simple truth: Loving thoughts feel good, and unloving
thoughts feel bad. Unloving thoughts are like self-inflicted poison darts, whereas loving thoughts
are the natural response to reality when it is clearly perceived. This simple understanding will
initiate a natural change of mind that will culminate in the most important theme of yoga and
meditation: Learning to love and be loved.
In this way we can begin to discover that suffering is our greatest teacher, and that the
suffering in everyday life gives us many opportunities to live the ideal way. When we experience
our own suffering it is a difficult time, and we tend to become overwhelmed with grief. But this is
also a great opportunity to become stronger, adapt and evolve. In the depths of our suffering we
can learn from the past, accept the difficult present and become stronger for the future.
However, when we help others to feel less suffering, less distress from the inevitable
negatives of life, the tragic losses and frustrations, the moment we do a positive thing for others
without thought or concern for ourselves, in these moments suffering and enlightenment are one.
This teaches us not to live apart from the world, but to live a real and active part of it. We discover
that enlightenment is not some great cosmic peace trip for monks in caves; it is actually found
right in the midst of our daily existence, and that the ultimate ideal of universal compassion can be
approached in small ways, not just as all or nothing.

Journey of Self-Discovery

T.K.V. Desikachar wrote, The journey of self-discovery through meditation takes each of
us in a different direction. As we go deeper and deeper into meditation, we begin to discover our
own truth, our own experience of the soul, life, creation and the cosmos, and eventually it will
bring us to the ultimate truth and divinity of all things. And this is the happiness, freedom and
enlightenment that we all seek.
This book has offered limited explanation on the actual experience of meditation. This is
because everyone is different and will have a different experience, different thought patterns and
interpretations. As Bruce Lee said, I cannot teach you, only help you to explore yourself. Nothing
more. This is the journey you must make yourself, your own discoveries, your own realisations,
your own Truth.
When we begin our journey on the path to enlightenment it is important to re-evaluate our
lifestyle and the direction we are heading with our life. We should examine all activity as it
happens, and how our mind observes and perceives its thoughts, speech and actions, how it
responds, creates and reacts according to different outside or inside stimuli. It is important to slow
down the mind and actually be in the present moment, focusing fully in the here and now.
Robin S. Sharma wrote, In the midst of everyday activities, the mind is kept continually
distracted with details. People move from one thing to the next without a pause. Even at the end
of the day when the mind could take some time to reflect, most people fill their leisure hours with
structured activity. Daily tension and stress does not have any way to release or disperse. They
continue to build and store up within us.
Stillness in meditation directly relaxes the mind, releases tension and stress, and awakens
it to the potentials that are present in each and every person. In meditation we discover how
thoroughly our life is shaped by our thoughts and the way we interpret whats going on. Every
thought, feeling and emotion manifests itself in one form or another in our body and in our life.
We notice this with surprising clarity as we become more sensitive to the inner feeling of who we

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are. When we open our mind to meditation, change becomes possible. Problems dissolve and
deeper wisdom emerges.
Meditation carries us directly to the depths, steering through the continuous flow of
conscious thought, navigating into calm seas, and revealing reality in its crystal-clear reflection.
Meditation helps us to experience emptiness and undergo a profound transformation of our
experience of the world. It is a firsthand method; nothing can substitute for the personal
exploration of our own mind. By regularly practising we can delve into our own consciousness with
meditative exploration and come to our own profound and meaningful understandings. As Sir
Isaac Newton once said, To myself I am only a child playing on the beach, while vast oceans of
truth lie undiscovered before me.
After the regular and diligent practice of meditation considerable changes begin to take
place in the mind, brain and nervous system. New nerve-currents, new cells, new vibrations, new
avenues and new channels are formed. The whole mind and nervous system become remodelled.
We will have a new mind, a new heart, new sensations, new feelings, new mode of thinking and
acting and a new view of the universe. Diligent practice and persistence with meditation produces
results that are permanent and abiding.
The greatest minds of our time, including Gandhi, Osho, Paramahansa Yogananda and
Einstein, have all emphasised that the journey of self-discovery and spiritual evolution is mans
greatest adventure, and should be pursued as the ultimate supreme goal of human existence.

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GENERAL NOTES FOR THE MEDITATOR
The usefulness of a cup is in its emptiness. Zen proverb

The principle goal of meditation is self-realisation. This means understanding our true
nature as a spiritual being, the nature of impermanence and the attainment of enlightenment. But
meditation on any philosophical theme could be a powerful constructive aid on the path of
personal development. It is generally believed that meditation promotes stillness of the mind
through concentration and heightened awareness, whereby a greater receptivity is attained and
previously unknown depths of consciousness can be penetrated. Meditation also leads to
increased ability to think clearly, to make fullest use of imagination and will power, and ultimately
to inner strength and peace. Meditation is the ideal place where we can empty our mind from all
the programming and brain-washing in the world today, and fill it with an inspiring and
enlightened presence. With a clear mind we can then contemplate our life and make positive
changes and conscious decisions towards attaining our full human potential.

The following are certain practical points regarding the basic techniques and lifestyle
necessary for success. They are meant as guidelines for the meditator in the absence of a spiritual
guide or meditation instructor.

Before Beginning
Before diving straight into meditation be aware that it is a long term process. It involves
incorporating a holistic lifestyle, not just sitting quietly for a few minutes each day. This means re-
evaluating all areas of your life and making positive changes where possible, at this time, little by
little. Changes may include moral discipline, diet, cleanliness, truthfulness, non-violence. Before
starting meditation and yoga the stomach, bowels and bladder should be empty. For best results
do not begin meditation or yoga until at least 4 hours after a heavy meal. Early morning practice is
recommended. Taking a cold shower before you begin can make you more alert and greatly
enhance the effect of your practice. Wear loose and comfortable clothes made from natural fibres.
Remove all jewellery, watches and spectacles/glasses. Start your meditations on a new moon to
incorporate the natural flow and cycles of the universe.

Positive Thinking and Determination


There are many obstacles on the path of meditation. It is extremely important to have a strong
determination to succeed while maintaining a positive mental attitude. Positive thinking promotes
mental health and helps to remove negative thoughts, avoiding anxiety and depression through
lifes ups and downs. However, most people are only positive on the surface, with 90% of their
thoughts being negative, for example - fear of failure. Although we appear positive on the outside
it is this underlying negativity that we ultimately attract. Buddha said, All that we are is the result
of what we have thought. Our thought is our own making and it affects all our succeeding
thoughts. It decides the trend of our mind towards integrity or weakness, good or ill. We are the
sum total of all our karma; thought, speech and action. Every moment we are changing the aspect
of our existence. Every moment we are creating our self. We are responsible for our own future

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and for the future of mankind. Determination includes awareness of all thoughts, speech and
actions, and maintaining a high standard of morality. Be positive. Attract positive energy, now! (See
Earth Healing Meditation).

Discipline
To succeed in meditation one must have discipline. Regular, systematic practice is essential.
Discipline also means restraints on behaviour through universal moral commandments, self-
purification and spiritual discipline. Swami Sivananda says To achieve the goal of yoga one must
have constant spiritualisation of all activities and cultivation of virtues such as non-violence,
truthfulness and celibacy. If you are non-spiritual, try to maintain mindfulness by constantly being
in the present moment, aware of all thoughts, speech and actions. Discipline yourself to apply
your best effort in all things throughout the day.

Personal Health and Hygiene


The Greek philosopher Hippocrates said, Natural forces within us are the true healers of disease.
Despite more medical knowledge, technology and health care facilities than ever before, the
health of the Western world is deteriorating at an alarming and ever quickening rate. What most
of us fail to realise is that it is what goes into our bodies (that which we absorb from the air, our
food and water) that affects the internal environment of our bodies and determines the rate at
which we age, and our overall level of health. Toxins absorbed through our external environment
(as well as self administered) include:

 Exhaust and factory emissions.


 Chlorinated, fluoridated and other pollutants in water.
 Chemical sprays and fertilisers.
 Smoking, caffeine, alcohol.
 Hormone enhanced meat and dairy products.
 Processed foods, high sugar and high fat junk food.
 Mental, physical and emotional tension and stress.

Toxins then build up within the body, disrupt the pH level, and cause blood and tissue toxicity. As
these toxins accumulate in our cells, they break down and inhibit the bodys immune system, and
over time damage organs, tissues, arteries, joints and glands. When the body becomes overloaded
and unable to keep up the fight, it is then that disease creeps in. Almost all illness and diseases are
directly related to the health and condition of our bodys internal environment. Toxicity creates a
breeding ground for germs and viruses, allowing them to penetrate a weakened immune system.
Avoiding and removing toxicity from the body is paramount, if we are to regain and maintain
vibrant health, reduce the effects of premature ageing, and ward off illness. In our world today, it
is virtually impossible to avoid toxic contamination. However, with environmental awareness and
yogic training, combined with minor lifestyle changes, such as food and cleanliness, it is possible to
drastically reduce the harmful effects, increase the length and quality of life on this planet, and
live free from sickness and disease.

Healthy Diet
Eat slowly, consciously absorbing prana from your food. Eat a nourishing and well balanced diet,
based on natural foods. Avoid over-eating. Avoid over-fasting. Avoid over-processed foods. Eat
only foods that are freshly prepared and easily digestible. This keeps the body light and supple

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and the mind calm, giving a high resistance to disease. It is essential to drink plenty of water
between meals, especially during periods of intense practice to avoid dehydration and to support
healthy bodily function. Take natural remedies according to your requirements; Ayurveda,
Traditional Chinese Medicine, Homeopathy, Western Herbalism. Avoid pharmaceuticals and
synthetic medicines except in emergencies.

Warning: Consult your medical advisor before making any major dietary changes. A daily diet
should be prescribed according to the nutritional requirements of your individual constitution.

Vegetarianism
It is assumed by many that vegetarianism is an integral part of meditation and yoga practice. This
belief is only partially true, for while yoga views vegetarianism as the most beneficial system of
nutrition, it does not insist that all practitioners of yoga become vegetarians. Non-vegetarians are
heartily accepted as practitioners of yoga. This book, however, is not interested in arguing the
pros and cons of meat verses vegetarianism, but simply to instruct that vegetarianism is the
preferred nutritional system of yoga and
meditation. This is because total body health can be obtained with a vegetarian diet which is
beneficial in preparation for higher forms of meditation and yoga. Many modern food types as
well as meat have a tendency to be a greater repository of toxins and waste products than
vegetarian food and may be detrimental to the purification process of the mind and body. The
ancient gurus and rishis of yoga advise but do not preach vegetarianism. One of the basic aims of
yoga is to tune the body to a high degree of sensitivity and this is more easily achieved by
abstaining from meat. Remember, yoga aims to bring about mental peace and tranquillity as well
as physical relaxation, which is more easily obtained if one does not eat meat. If you are not sure
whether you can obtain all your nutritional needs of the body from a vegetarian diet, then you
should not become one. But if you study any charts given on this subject you will clearly see that
all the bodys requirements fats, carbohydrates, proteins, vitamins and minerals - are obtained
in more than adequate quantities in vegetarian foods. It is recommended that advanced students
should consider a purely vegetarian diet to enhance spiritual progress. Manu, the codifier of laws
in ancient India, summed up the most sensible approach to the whole subject when he said,
There is no wrong in eating meat or drinking wine, but the abstention therefrom gives many
benefits.

Fasting
Digestion is a process which requires considerable energy. Fasting relies on the body having
sufficient vitality to initiate its own cleansing process once the digestive load is removed. It is a
very powerful cleansing technique and should be used with caution. According to Umasvati, the
second century A.D. Jain philosopher of India, fasting has six beneficial effects: you will become
free from all desire, you will not desire a longer life, you will not desire a shorter life, you will not
desire the company of friends, you will not desire any pleasures of the senses, you will not desire
approval. A fast may last from one day to six weeks. There are many different ways to fast that
produce various physical and mental benefits; water, food, juices, brown rice, urine, as well as
practising non-attachment through abstinence. How and when to fast is a personal choice. How
and when to break the fast is also extremely important. Seek proper guidance. It is not just a
matter of starving yourself for a few days. Over-fasting weakens the body. Medical science has
proved that short fasts cleanse the whole system and promotes rejuvenation. The philosophy of
yoga recommends fasting once per month on the eleventh day of the new moon (or according to
your religion).
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Exercise
Regular exercise is essential for a healthy heart, lungs, digestion, muscles and circulation. Regular
exercise relieves tension and stress and induces a good nights sleep. Exercise may include yoga,
jogging, swimming, cycling, sports, or walking in nature. For general health purposes the American
College of Sports Medicine suggests a minimum of 20 to 60 minutes per day of increased
cardiovascular, respiratory and muscular activity, 3 to 5 days per week. Light exercise before
meditation can loosen up the back, neck, hips, knees and ankles, and increases the circulation of
blood and prana. It is far easier to practise meditation when the body is healthy and can sit
quietly, without pain or discomfort, and is fully charged with vitality and strength. In yoga, proper
exercise is given by surya namaskar and asana, which work systematically on all parts of the body,
stretching and toning the muscles and ligaments, keeping the spine and joints flexible, improving
circulation and the flow of prana. This brings steadiness and lightness to the body and mind. Never
exert undue force, as pain is a signal to stop the practice.

Warning: To avoid injury always consult your medical doctor before commencing any health
program. The amount of physical activity you perform should be safely within your physical
limitations. Proceed with a suitable and structured program.
Sex
The philosophy of yoga advises the reduction of sexual activity and thoughts, so that sexual energy
can be conserved and used for spiritual progress. This is the true interpretation of celibacy for the
average practitioner. Complete sexual suppression is not necessary, but it should be reduced and
controlled as much as possible. This will save huge amounts of energy and considerably decelerate
the ageing process. It will also help in reducing the great attachment that people have with sex and
the material world. Advanced students may choose to completely abstain from sexual activity and
thoughts.

Sleep
Sleep is a periodic, natural, reversible loss of consciousness. The optimum amount of sleep varies
with each individual and age, with children requiring more sleep than adults. The National Sleep
Foundation maintains that eight to nine hours of sleep for adults is optimal and that sufficient
sleep benefits alertness, memory, problem solving and overall health, as well as reducing the risk
of accidents. The University of California, San Diego, found that people who live the longest sleep
for six to seven hours each night. The University of Pennsylvania has confirmed that the more one
works, the less one sleeps, and that work is the single biggest factor troubling sleep. Many people
have trouble sleeping, which may stem from a number of issues, including:

 Uncomfortable sleep furnishings.


 Stress from family, job, personal issues.
 Environmental conditions: heat, cold, pollution, noise, bright light.
 Environmental surroundings: tidiness of room, odours, cleanliness.
 Poor body positioning.
 Illness.
 Pain.
 Medicine and drugs: some medications may cause insomnia, or result in dependency on a drug
to fall alseep; others, including recreational drugs, are stimulants that may make sleep difficult
or impossible.
 Improper sleep timing: outside the rhythms of nature.

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The philosophy of yoga recommends early to bed and early to rise. For the average practitioner,
this is approximately 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. This is ample time to get a good nights sleep and gives you
enough time in the morning for meditation and yoga. The regular practice of yogic techniques,
such as corpse pose and yoga nidra, greatly enhances the relaxation and rejuvenation of the mind
and body, and promotes restful sleep. (See Advanced Meditations)

Meditation Room
For success in meditation, it is best to have a proper attitude and environment. The place of
meditation, schedule, physical and mental state should all reflect a readiness to turn inward. Try
to have a separate room for meditation. If this is not possible designate an area especially for
meditation only. Keep your meditation room simple and clean. For inspiration, a simple focus
point may be set up in the room including fresh flowers, or objects and symbols according to your
personal beliefs. As meditation is repeated powerful vibrations will be lodged in the room. In six
months the peace and purity of the atmosphere will be felt.

Regularity
The regularity of practice is very important. It is difficult to focus the mind when it wants to jump
about as soon as you sit down for concentration. Meditating at a fixed time every day conditions
the mind to slow down its activities with the minimum of delay. Not having time or not making the
time to meditate indicates the lack of commitment and you may want to re-evaluate your lifestyle
before continuing. The most effective times to meditate are at sunrise and sunset. The mind will
settle down more quickly when a regular time and place have been established.

Sit on a small Keep the spine There are many


cushion with the legs and head straight, different hand
crossed. Adjust the as if the top of positions. This one
sitting position until the head is being rests the hand on
comfortable. Close pulled up to the the knee with the
the eyes. Relax the sky. Relax the thumb and index
face, shoulders, arms, breathing. Relax finger joined in
stomach and legs. the mind. chin mudra.

Sitting Position
In his rules for Zazen, Mumon Yamada Roshi states, There are four meditation postures: walking,
standing, sitting and lying down. The sitting posture is the most quiet of these four To sit on this
very ground is to become one with this whole universe... The Roshi suggests to commence
meditation training in the sitting position. Enlightenment is extending the meditation beyond
quietly sitting alone, by maintaining the awareness while going about our daily life, being mindful
of all thought, speech and action. By regularly sitting in meditation you will, through
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experimentation, find your most comfortable position. A cushion is a valuable tool in maintaining
a comfortable position. A cross-legged position provides a firm base for the body and makes a
triangular path for the flow of energy. If this is not possible try sitting on a chair. It is not
important to sit in the lotus at this stage. Just try to be comfortable without damaging your knees.
More important is having a good posture in the upright position. The spine and head should be
straight but not tense. Feel as though the top of your head is being pulled up to the sky. You may
like to choose the above suggested sitting position with one of the many thousands of mudras.
Gently rest the tongue against the roof of the mouth. Once you have established a comfortable
position and relaxed breathing do not move the body unless it is absolutely necessary. This helps
to steady the mind and encourage concentration. Metabolism, brain waves and breathing will
slow down as concentration deepens due to a steady sitting position. Before starting, the body
should be relaxed and calm. Command the mind to be quiet. At first the mind will wander and
jump around, but will eventually become concentrated, along with the concentration of prana. If
the mind persists in wandering do not force it to be still. Simply disassociate from it, and observe
it as though you are watching a movie. It will gradually slow down. Be the witness, but without
judgement.

Mudra
The Sanskrit word mudra means psychic, emotional or devotional gesture and attitude. It is also
described as a seal, short-cut or circuit by-pass. Yogis have experienced mudra as attitudes of
energy flow intended to link individual pranic force with universal or cosmic force. Mudras are a
combination of subtle physical movements which alter mood, attitude and perception, and which
deepen awareness and concentration. A mudra may involve the whole or part of the body in
combination with asana, pranayama, bandha and visualisation techniques or it may be a simple
hand position. Mudras can be categorized into five main groups. Between them these groups
engage substantial areas of the cerebral cortex:

Hasta hand mudras


Mana head mudras
Kaya postural mudras
Bandha lock mudras
Adhara perineal mudras

Ancient statues and carvings of yogis and sages have been found depicting a characteristic
mudra. Mudra has symbolic meaning and neuro-psychic implications. If the individual dwells on
and tries to experience the meaning contained within a mudra, he can develop the power to
invoke forces within. In this way it is possible to experience inner forces which otherwise remain
hidden and dormant. Though we cannot normally detect this more subtle aspect of our being,
prana is nevertheless continually flowing within the physical body. For example, the position of the
hands while practicing meditation is very important. Some of the prana is discharged from the tips
of the fingers. The hand mudras are methods of redirecting the prana inwards. The fingers and the
hands in contact with the knees close some of these circuits. The prana is kept within the body
instead of being lost. At first it may seem to be an insignificant aspect of meditative practice, yet it
has been found by the rishis and yogis throughout the ages, that the wrong position of the hands
can affect your meditation. Advanced mudras are introduced after some proficiency has been
attained in asana, pranayama and bandha, and gross blockages have been removed. Mudra is a
higher practice which leads to the awakening of the kundalini. Seek proper guidance.

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Duration
Beginners may start meditating for only 10 or 15 minutes. This gives time for the body and mind to
adapt and evolve to the new demands being placed upon it. As strength and stillness increase so
too should the length of time spent in meditation. Gradually increasing by 5 minutes each week is
a great way to train yourself in meditation. Beginners should aim to sit quietly and still for one
hour, with good awareness. This may take a few months to achieve depending on the capacity and
time available. Do not give up. The 10 Meditations to Inner Peace and Happiness will guide and
support you through many of the ups and downs that beginners usually face when first attempting
meditation. Persist and you will succeed.

Pain
Pain teaches us about suffering, acceptance and compassion, and is an indication that we are
going/have gone beyond our current limitation and capacity. Beginners may experience pain in
the body during and after meditation. This is quite normal in the beginning and should not stop
you from continuing your practice. Pain, discomfort or stiffness may be experienced in the knees,
ankles, thighs, buttocks, back, neck or shoulders. Simple discomfort will soon disappear, usually
after a few weeks of daily practice. As you train the body to sit quietly, the muscles and joints
necessary to hold the body in meditation will develop and strengthen with regular practice.
Experiment by meditating in different positions; lying down or sitting in a chair, but always
meditate everyday without fail. The practice of asana contains several good stretches that can
certainly help you through these first challenging stages of meditation. Massaging the painful
parts of your body before and after meditation with pure coconut oil can help improve circulation
and strengthen your body. Headaches, tensions and depression during or after meditation may
also indicate incorrect practice. If you experience extreme pain anywhere in the body then you
should terminate your practice immediately and seek medical advice before continuing. In TIME
Asia, Pamela Paul wrote, Over the past three years, 13,000 Americans were treated in an
emergency room or doctors office for yoga-related injuries, according to the Consumer Product
Safety Commission.

Expectations
Do not expect overnight results. Disappointment may result from not understanding basic
concepts and theories. It may take many years of discipline to achieve success, and in time you will
understand the need for patience and persistence. Meditation is a skill that responds well to
practice. Be Patient with yourself. As Milarepa, the great Tibetan yogi said, Do not entertain
hopes for realisation, but practise all your life. At the beginning even if your meditation does not
seem to be going well, remember that by applying effort to training in meditation you are creating
the mental karma to experience inner peace in the future. So even if you feel that you are not
making any progress, you are at least sowing the seeds of future happiness. Mumon Yamada Roshi
states, One inch of sitting, makes one inch of Buddha. If we sit while one inch of incense burns,
our spirit naturally becomes clean. After you have been regularly and correctly practising
meditation for only one month you will already begin to notice a deep sense of peace and
harmony emanating from inside you. After several years of regular meditation considerable
changes take place in the mind, brain and the nervous system. The whole mind and nervous
system becomes remodelled. You will have a new mind, a new heart and a new view of the
universe.

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Progress
Nelson Mandela once said, After climbing a great hill, one only finds that there are many more
hills to climb. Progress can be ascertained in different ways. The first sign of progress is waking
up early and practising regularly at the same time every day. Other signs of progress are sitting for
one hour in meditation, sitting for three hours in meditation, etc. But progress also depends on
the quality of practice, not just duration. Correct practice involves a well structured and
systematic program designed for individual requirements. Each of us has a different starting point
depending on temperament and capacity. We begin where we are and how we are, and whatever
happens, happens. We should not compare or compete with others. We should celebrate our
individuality and accept our personal starting point. The actual practice of meditation takes each
person in a different direction. Each of us is required to pay careful attention to the direction we
are taking, so that we know where we are going and how we are going to get there. This careful
observation will allow us to discover something new about ourselves. When we gain more
understanding of ourselves and reach a point we have personally never been before, that is
progress. The more we progress, the more we become aware of the holistic nature of our being,
realising that we are made of body, breath, mind, and more. Reaching our full potential as
complete human beings means incorporating all aspects of ourself, emphasising all aspects of
human life, including our relationships with others, our behaviour, our health, our breathing and
our meditation.

Retreats
Meditation retreats are extremely beneficial to our lives, especially if taken two or three times per
year. They are usually held in a specially designed facility, located in a quite and beautiful natural
environment. They help us to take a break from the hustle and bustle of daily activity, and the
stresses and strains of work and family life. Retreats are a powerful way of programming our
minds and bodies to develop good habits and routines that, upon our return home, help us
through the ups and downs of our normal everyday lives. Usually, all cooking and cleaning is
organised by the retreat manager, giving us the chance to eliminate mundane tasks and
concentrate on the object of the retreat. Light and nutritious vegetarian meals are the usual diet
at retreats. Noble Silence the principle of minimum communication is a powerful technique
practised at most authentic retreats to promote inner awareness. Before undertaking any kind of
retreat, participants must be prepared to develop an attitude of commitment and resolve to turn
their minds inwards for the full duration. Meditation retreats are a time for self-discovery and self-
realisation, where many participants experience profound personal insight and spiritual progress.
Three day retreats are very useful for cleansing and recharging our whole being with
determination, strength and guidance. This may include inspirational and relaxing techniques, as
there is not enough time to go deep into the subconscious, and root-out and destroy our demons.
A seven to ten day retreat is required for learning advanced techniques, deeper self-purification,
and taking our commitment and devotion to the next level. Correct preparation and inner strength
must be developed before undertaking thirty day retreats and longer.

Advanced Yogic Meditation


Central to the philosophy of yoga is the belief that divinity or God is already inside us, but has
remained dormant, veiled by the illusion that happiness can be found in achieving material
possessions and desires. Yogis believe that meditation is the art of controlling the mind in order to
gradually awaken and reconnect us to the divinity within. Initially this brings inner peace and
happiness to our life, but with regular practice the layers of the mind are peeled away, allowing us

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to discover for ourselves deeper realms of consciousness. Advanced Tantra Yoga meditation
techniques involve unblocking and purifying the energy channels and energy centres in the prana
body. This can be symbolised by the awakening of the creative energy sleeping in the base of the
spine. It is then raised up through the spine to the crown of the head, which is the seat of pure
consciousness. The fruit of meditation is the union of this creative energy with pure consciousness,
resulting in complete absorption with the Divine. This process unveils the spiritual potential of
man, releasing us from our attachment to the physical world. By transcending the mental and
physical worlds we attain the realisation known as samadhi, where there is no separation, no
duality between the individual human spirit and the Supreme Universal Spirit, or God. We are One
with the Universe. This is the supreme goal of human life - enlightenment being aware of the
ultimate truth of all things at all times. Depending on the karma, capacity and devotion of the
individual, this may take many years of diligent practice. It may take a second.

Higher Consciousness Lifestyle


Those who truly wish to support and advance their meditation and reach their full potential as
spiritual beings should choose to lead a higher consciousness lifestyle. (See Appendix 3 & 4). This
requires greater self-discipline and may include a strictly vegetarian diet, reducing the hours of
sleep and conservation of energy. Morality plays an important role in spiritual evolution, i.e. not
killing, not stealing, not lying, not committing sexual misconduct and not taking intoxicating
substances. Truly enlightened people, those who experience happiness daily, are prepared to put
off short-term pleasure for the sake of long term fulfilment. They tackle their weaknesses and
fears head on, even if at first the unknown brings discomfort. They resolve to live a higher
consciousness lifestyle, improving every aspect of themself ceaselessly and continuously. In time
things that were once difficult become easy. Fears that once prevented them from all the
happiness, health and prosperity they deserve fall away. As Albert Einstein said, True religion is
real living; living with all one's soul, with all one's goodness and righteousness. Cultivating a
spiritual life is enhanced by giving less importance to the physical world such as materialism,
desires and pleasures of the senses. However, do not meditate so much that you neglect your
obligations to family and employer. Instead incorporate meditation and wisdom into your daily
life, creating peace and harmony. As you become more adept at meditating, extend your
meditations beyond quietly sitting alone. Throughout the day be aware of your thought, speech
and action. Observe your happiness, your suffering, your pleasure and pain. Observe with a
peaceful mind, without reacting. Tune in to your higher consciousness and live a more meaningful
life.

Mindfulness throughout the Day


At the end of sitting meditation it is recommended that you lie down and simply observe the
beauty and joy of the present moment. This is the feeling of inner peace and happiness. While
meditating we are practising being in balance and harmony, so that we have a good idea of where
we are heading and what it is meant to feel like. The goal is to train the mind to maintain this
awareness in every moment, so that we are mindful throughout the ups and downs of daily life,
and spontaneously create compassion and kindness, peace and happiness in all our activities. (See
Advanced Techniques Mindful Walking). Practice makes perfect. Contemplate this for a few
moments before finishing your sitting meditation.

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Searching
Bhodidharma taught, The fools of this world prefer to look for sages far away. They don't believe
that the wisdom of their own mind is the sage . . . the sutras say, Mind is the teaching. But people
of no understanding don't believe in their own mind or that by understanding this teaching they
can become a sage. They prefer to look for distant knowledge and long for things in space,
buddha-images, light, incense, and colours. They fall prey to falsehood and lose their minds to
insanity. Too much searching is a common obstacle and may be caused by doubt, confusion,
greed, fear, etc. Searching is an improtant part of choosing the right path according to your
temperament and capacity. Searching may include reading, attending lectures and classes,
travelling abroad as well as smelling the flowers in your own garden. It is a personal choice which
path you take, which guru you follow, which system you practise. It may include untrodden paths,
new avenues, or personal beliefs combined with world religions and philosophies. It is different for
everyone. We are all different important, aspects of creation, part of the supreme universal
consciouness, and therefore require to satisfy our own understanding and perceptions. The main
thing is to find what works for you, what is suitable for you, what motivates you to get out of bed
every morning and practise. You must decide. It is the regular and systematic practice of this path
that will eventually lead you to spiritual progress. Chopping and changing: this style today, that
style tomorrow, this spiritual guide today, that one tomorrow, is a sure combination for slow
progress. Practising different techniques every day with no thread is the long way round to
achieve success. There is too much searching, wondering, and questions. Changing paths must be
kept to a minimum. As Aldous Huxley said, Man approaches the unattainable truth through a
succession of errors. Therefore, learn from your mistakes. Use the techniques that are available
to you. They are like road maps. They show the most direct way to get where we want to go. Take
your time and make a choice. Question what you are doing and why. Know why you have chosen
this path. Have faith. As you go along make changes according to your individual requirements and
realisations. Keep asking questions, keep exploring and observing. Developing a daily personal
practice is the key to success.

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TRAINING THE MIND
All that we are is the result of what we have thought.

Buddha Shakyamuni

Movement of the Mind and Conceptual Thought

During meditation we learn to develop a highly refined sensitivity of the relationship


between the movement of the mind and conceptual thought. By observing and contemplating our
mental phenomena we can see its basic characteristics: endless flux, stress, tension, joy, sadness,
dissatisfaction, emptiness, etc. When we examine the mind we see a conglomeration of mental
elements. For example, when pleasurable contact takes place with the six senses, the mind is
carried away by the sensation and unable to notice how it happened. When the mind is stirred up
in this way, various mental formations, thought constructions and reactions start arising from it,
building and proliferating continually. The mind becomes occupied only because it misunderstands
and is deluded by these conditioned phenomena. This agitation is the common mental process of
the untrained mind and is a slave to the senses.
The trained mind, however, is at rest and allows all sense contact to pass over without
getting involved. Ultimately things are just as they are only our comparisons cause the mind to
fluxuate. The pure mind knows these mind objects clearly, knows they are not substantial and
does not get carried away by every whim and desire. It remains neutral, calm and wise.
Observing your own mind removes it from the act of controlling mental activity. There is
only observation of the information received from the senses and non-judgemental acceptance.
Similar to the spectator comfortably seated at the cinema watching a movie, so too does the
movement of the mind begin to settle, giving rise to stillness. Here we can realize that there is no
separation between movement and stillness. In the same way the art of walking and meditation
are one, the art of eating and meditation are one. For deep-rooted and lasting inner peace we
must train ourself in mindfulness, not just in sitting meditation but also in the garden, in the city,
in the home. Other terms to describe this process are; awareness, witnessing, acknowledging.
Practice begins in the controlled and quiet environment of the sitting position. With regular
practice these insights and qualities develop into a new way of thinking and acting, and are gently
incorporated into everyday life. They are practised while getting up from the sitting position, while
walking out of the meditation room, while having breakfast, going to work. We become mindful of
our thoughts, speech and action throughout our whole day.

Being in the Present Moment

The present moment is immensely important to meditation practice. Dan Millman suggests
When you truly are in the here and now you will be amazed at what you can do and how well you
can do it, and discover, There are no ordinary moments. Acknowledging the body and mind in
the present moment develops and strengthens momentary concentration. Without
acknowledgement of the present moment, meditation practice cannot progress because

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momentary concentration cannot occur. It must be continuous. Once we rest, after sitting in
meditation, we may do some work or talk without mindfulness. When that happens the mind, not
acknowledging, wanders away, gets distracted, and thus the momentary concentration which has
been developed will weaken. By being mindful and acknowledging all our daily activities, not just
while sitting in meditation, we can live a higher consciousness lifestyle from the moment we wake
up till falling asleep at bedtime.
Eckhart Tolle wrote, Nothing ever happened in the past. It happened in the Now. Nothing
will ever happen in the future. It will happen in the Now. What you think of as the past is a
memory trace, stored in the mind, of a former Now. When you remember the past you reactivate
a memory trace - and you do so now. The future is an imagined Now, a projection of the mind.
When the future comes, it comes as the Now. When you think about the future, you do it now.
Past and future obviously have no reality of their own. This illusion traps the mind in time, living
almost exclusively through memory and anticipation, creating an endless preoccupation with past
and future. This causes an unwillingness to honour and acknowledge the present moment. This is
because you formed your identity from the past, and occupy your mind with hoping for happiness
in the future. But if you maintain momentary concentration in the present moment you are free of
time, and free of much sorrow. Soyen Shaku states, Enlightenment is enlightenment because it
enlightens all our motives, desires, whims, determinations, impulses and thoughts. In an
enlightened mind, a feeling or thought as it occurs is purified and freed from the taints of
ignorance and egoism.
There are many meditation traditions being taught and practised in the world today that
can assist us in achieving stillness in the mind and train us to be mindful in our daily activities. They
all require us to be continually mindful of the present moment. These techniques are designed to
bring about a positive change in all facets of our being, physically, mentally, emotionally and
spiritually, and can lead to living a healthy, happy and more meaningful life. Remember: the awake,
aware mind is already there. All people need to do is attune to it through devotion to meditation.
Nothing else is needed.

Vipassana Meditation

This is one of the most popular techniques in the world today and will be discussed in
detail. Also known as insight meditation, these techniques involve open awareness, generating a
deep sense of relaxation and calm. Acknowledging is the heart of insight meditation. It is the
continual work of mindfulness to be aware and acknowledge. Insight meditation through the Four
Foundations of Mindfulness (See Appendix 5) focuses on the body, feeling, the mind and mind
objects.
1. Mindfulness of the body is to contemplate on bodily actions or sensations.
2. Mindfulness of ones feelings is to contemplate on the feelings of happiness or suffering.
3. Mindfulness of the mind is to contemplate on one thought or the quality in the thought.
4. Mindfulness of mind-objects is to contemplate recognition of other volitional activities.
The goal of insight meditation is to gain a clear, complete understanding of the three
obvious characteristics: impermanence, suffering and non-self. Having gained an insight into the
three characteristics, the meditator realises that everything in this world is transient, subject to
suffering and uncontrollable because it is not-self. Thus, the mind abandons the desire to acquire,
the desire to have and the desire to be. Lord Buddha gave five purposes for practising insight
meditation:

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 To purify the mind
 To get rid of sorrows and lamentation
 To get rid of physical and mental sufferings
 To understand the truth of life
 To extinguish suffering and gain nirvana
All actions, thoughts, speech, sensations and feelings are observed and studied.
Penetration to their origin reveals the nature of their existence and the true nature of things. This
introspection and self-realisation leads to the comprehension of suffering, impermanence and the
nature of emptiness. Open awareness leads us into observing the present moment throughout our
day. Meditations that directly help us to achieve awareness throughout our daily activities include;
Asana, Karma Yoga, Zen tea ceremony, flower arranging, calligraphy, gardening, walking
meditation, as well as spending the day without talking.

Samadhi Meditation

One-pointed concentration, also known as samatha, placement, or calm abiding


meditation, is the principle of training the mind to concentrate on a single point or object, for a
defined length of time. Objects of concentration are used to assist us to achieve control of the
mind. These include a candle, a religious symbol, an object in nature, a mantra, etc. What they all
require is non-judgemental awareness. The key is to focus on the object while keeping emotions
and thoughts at a distance. Concentration on a single object directs our awareness to that object
in the present moment. Maintaining awareness of that object trains us to observe everything that
is experienced at the time it actually happens. Awareness means being mindful, to notice, to feel,
to experience, but without reacting, without getting involved, without becoming distracted away
from the present moment experience. Osho called it witnessing. He said, Witnessing simply
means a detached observation, unprejudiced; thats the whole secret of meditation.
In this way any distractions we experience also become part of the training. The barking
dog outside is the teacher. The pain in the knee is the teacher. The distracting stressful thoughts of
money, relationships, work, these are the teachers. Observation with detachment from these
distractions train us to be aware of what is actually happening in the here and now, not in the past
or the future. The key is to observe all but without getting involved and blindly reacting as weve
always done in the past. In this way we learn mindfulness; to pay close attention to every detail of
each new moment but without reacting. This is how to become patient and develop tolerance,
acceptance, persistence and non-judgement. It is one reason to keep absolutely still in sitting
meditation and not to react to every moan and grumble of the mind or body, but simply to
acknowledge it. We cannot stop them, but with time their distracting power diminishes. As we
become more focused, our attention will not be easily led off track by distractions.
Filling the mind with the activity of deep concentration on a single object can also help us
find our centre, becoming calm and alert. This is the seventh limb of Patanjalis Yoga Sutras
dhyana deep concentration. With regular and diligent practice the mind becomes highly
concentrated and we become totally absorbed in the object. We discover what it is not. We can
witness its reality, its pure existence. We can discover its ultimate truth and the ultimate truth of
existence. This is the eighth limb of Yoga Sutras of Patanjali Samadhi: one-pointedness,
identification. This can develop into a greater understanding or ourself, our environment and of
our existence. These experiences may take time to occur depending on the individual, but
eventually they enable us to progress along the path to perfection, allowing us to reach our full
potential.

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Contemplation Meditation

Contemplation is another part of the seventh limb of Patanjalis Yoga Sutras dhyana. Also
known as analytical meditation, this technique involves contemplating the meaning of a spiritual
instruction, mantra or affirmation that we have heard or read. As in Jnana Yoga, through deep
contemplation we reach a definite conclusion or cause a specific state of mind to arise. We then
concentrate on this conclusion or virtuous state of mind for as long as possible to become deeply
acquainted with it. Next time you meditate take yourself on a journey of self-discovery by
exploring; Who is feeling this pain in my knee? Is it my body, my mind? I am feeling this pain, but
who am I? Am I the leg, the mind? Where does the body end and the mind begin? Where does the
mind end and the I begin? Where is the I? Bhakti Yoga may also be described as contemplation
meditation. Through deepest devotion, the aspirant identifies with a specific divine personality, i.e.
Lord Krshna. The holy name of this divine personality is repeatedly chanted causing a specific state
of mind to arise, aspiring to spiritual heights of ecstasy and illumination.

Compassionate Meditation

Compassion is the essence of spiritual progress. Generosity, open-heartedness and loving-


kindness are all wonderful qualities and virtues that can be developed through daily meditation.
This begins with regular re-programming of the mind by learning to love ourself on the inside,
opening your heart and being kind, compassionate and loving to ourself. This develops into a
greater understanding of human existence and leads to generating love outside the self by
cherishing others more than we cherish oursleves. In this way we can cultivate a compassionate
spirit inside and all around.

Visualisation Meditation

Visualization is the process of creating mental images to manipulate energy or


consciousness. This gives us the ability to attract exactly what we want. Visualisation techniques
allow us to become aware of higher states of consciousness by manipulating the different forces
and systems within us. Any stimulation or manipulation of the nervous system will also have an
effect on the mind, for all the nerves in the body are directly or indirectly connected to the mind.
As we become more sensitive, we also become more aware of subtle energies and channels,
which can then be controlled and manipulated to our benefit. These techniques included
kundlaini yoga, yoga nidra, shamanic journey and positive thinking.

Meditation is Awareness

As you can see the style of meditation differs according to tradition. Bodhidharma taught,
The most essential method, which includes all other methods, is beholding the mind The mind
is the root from which all things grow. If you can understand the mind, everything else is
included.
One of the main differences in these tradition is where and how to focus the mind.
Concentration withdraws the attention from all sides to one point. In open awareness we not only
pay attention to that one point, but also observe all the thoughts, speech and actions without
judgement. Whichever technique we choose it is important not to wrestle with the mind, but to

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slowly tame it by being a witness to all its activity. Ultimately things are just as they are only our
comparisons cause us to suffer.
In this way meditation trains us to develop present moment higher consciousness. This
allows us to become aware of the qualities of the mind and how it works. Stephen Levine suggests,
It is here (sitting meditation) that we can discover for ourselves the subtleties and impermanence
of this mind, this body, this life, this universe. We realise that the mind is made up of wants,
desires, judgements, plannings and measurings. Seeing the scope of our wanting shows us how
deeply and subtly dissatisfaction has created our personal world, and this seeing frees us from
much grasping, from thinking that all our wants have to be satisfied. We realise that we do not
have to compulsively respond to everything that arises in our mind. We see that things can be a
certain way without needing to be acted upon or judged or even pushed aside. They can simply be
observed.
When there is wanting in the mind, that moment feels incomplete, such as boredom,
desires, regrets. Wanting is seeking elsewhere. Completeness is being right here in the now.
When we experience the depth of wanting in the mind there follows a great joy. This is because
we see how wanting obscures the present. We also realise that there is nothing that brings lasting
satisfaction, that the universe is in constant change and that all things are temporary. We can then
work towards our goals with love and gentleness, but without expectation or attachment.
When we start interrupting the normal flow of thought by actually observing the thought,
not by stimulus or response and that automatic reaction, but by observing the effect it takes, then
we are no longer the body-mind conscious emotional person that is responding to its environment
as if it is automatic. By training to be still and observe the present moment we break out of the
normal pattern of accepted reality. We develop a new field of perception. The philosophy of yoga
teaches we are blinded by Maya the veil of illusion. It deceives us from the true nature of
existence which can only be perceived through the enlightened mind.
As a by-product of this new perception we naturally relax the mind and body, and a huge
amount of potential energy is released. This allows our natural pure state of being to re-surface. At
this moment we automatically tune into our higher consciousness, which naturally makes positive
decisions that create harmony and balance; to think, speak and act with love, wisdom and
compassion.
Achaan Chaa said, Of course there are dozens of meditation techniques to develop
samadhi and many kinds of vipassana. But it all comes back to this just let it all be. Step over
here where it is cool, out of the battle.

Successful Meditation
When you meditate you may see images of snow or smoke. You may feel a gust of
wind or a wave of heat. Lightning may seem to flash. These are signs that you are
travelling on the road to God. Gradually your health will improve, your body will lose
weight, your skin will glow, and your voice will become clear and resonant. These show
that you are making progress.
Svetasvatara Upanishad

God does not compel or induce us to practise meditation. He exerts no effort on our
behalf. We are free to practise meditation, or not to practise meditation, as we wish. Success
depends entirely on our own efforts.
At first, meditation practice is not easy. It is frustrating, painful, time-consuming, irritating
and sometimes it feels almost unbearable. Sometimes the last thing in the world we feel like doing

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is sitting still with ourselves. But once we start sitting, we get glimpses of the no-self who is sitting
and we slowly start to realize the delusion of self. Slowly our true nature becomes visible, and the
nature of all things peeks out. Slowly, with much dedication, much toil, and much joy, we wake up.
It is irrelevant if you had a good meditation or a bad meditation, as I often hear people
say after class. When you are in meditation and it feels as if you cannot concentrate, or it is too
difficult, or painful, or boring, just try to observe those feelings. Acknowledge the pain, the
boredom, the distractions whatever they are. They are part of the meditation. They are the
teaching. They are the path to enlightenment.
Each experience brings new insight on the path to enlightenment and we are simply the
witness, observing the Truth without expectation or reaction, whether we had good concentration
or not. As the Tibetan Master Tilopa once said, No thought, no reflection, no analysis, no
cultivation, no intention; let it settle itself. Meditation is not about showing off to your friends the
cosmic experiences you had in your morning practice. Instead, observe the impermanence of this
feeling by quietly accepting that you are feeling in harmony at this time. Be prepared for the
feeling of disharmony that you may experience in the future, and again, observe disharmony,
observe the impermanence.
Bhodidharma taught, Many roads lead to the Path, but basically there are only two:
reason and practice. Realising that we are not perfect human beings and setting our hearts and
minds on improving ourselves with positive thinking and action is half the battle. We are only
limited by our own imagination. The teachings, techniques and motivation are all available to us.
Success is implementing suitable techniques into our daily lives, learning from our mistakes, living
with patience, persistence and gentleness and making lifestyle changes to support our spiritual
growth.
Success in meditation is the act of regularly sitting and practising correctly. As Sri Patthabi
Jois states, Do your practice and all is coming. The experiences and results are simply observed
and accepted, whatever they may be. Success in meditation will be apparent when we notice our
life coming into alignment with the flow of nature and we see ourself living gracefully and
harmoniously, when all our demons have surfaced and been defeated, and when our karmic debt
from past and present lives has been burned in the fire of simply sitting.
When you are mindful of all your thoughts, speech and action and can create love, wisdom
and compassion in every second of every minute of every day, then you have not only succeeded
in meditation, but you have truly succeeded in life, in reaching your full potential as a human
being. As Merta Ada once said, When this happens, please SMS me.
Warning: People suffering with medical conditions of the mind and other mental problems, should
seek professional medical advice before practising meditation.

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GUIDELINES FOR MEDITATION

1. Professional guidance is essential, especially in correctly understanding and applying


fundamental principles. Teachers are very useful especially for beginners in helping them stay
on the path and avoiding misunderstandings.
2. Always practice meditation in a clean and quiet place in nature, sheltered from excess heat,
cold and wind.
3. Beginners should meditate when the stomach, bladder and bowels are empty. This dispels
tiredness and promotes concentration.
4. Wear loose fitting clothing. Sit in a comfortable position with the back and neck straight. Relax
your whole being, but maintain a good posture, as if the top of the head is being pulled up to
the sky. Rest the tongue against the roof of the mouth.
5. The awareness should be so completely centred on the technique that the awareness of the
external environment is lost. The untrained mind may become distracted, whether it is by a
thought, pain or a sound. If this happens simply acknowledge that you were distracted and then
gently return to the meditation technique. Each time you are distracted renew your effort to
stabilize your concentration until it becomes clear again.
6. Do not strain your mind by trying too hard. Moderate your practice and avoid becoming tired
or tense from exerting too much pressure. The effort you apply should be relaxed and steady.
The more you meditate the more natural it becomes.
7. Be in the present moment. Be the observer without judgement. Do not cling to anything,
neither desire nor aversion. Do not become attached to the blissful experience that meditation
brings. Meditation is not escapism, it is the direct perception of Truth. Simply observe,
acknowledge, let go. This process should be natural and effortless. Plant the seed, cultivate
your spiritual garden and let the tree grow in its own time. In this way your practice will be at
peace.
8. The mind is both the thinking process and the knowing. The key is to know the mind, know how
it is when it meets sense objects and how it is when it is apart from them. When the one who
knows observes the mind in this way, wisdom arises.
9. To see things clearly and find the True path depends upon first correcting our views. We must
investigate the very root of suffering, the very truth of our life. We must come to know the
reality of conditioned phenomena, the way things are. Only then can we have peace in the
world.
10. The purpose of meditation is to gain personal experience of all stages of the path to
enlightenment. You can share these insights in the way you live your life. Although it is far
easier to be in harmony when you are sitting quietly alone, your meditation will be worthless if
you do not put your experiences to practical use in daily activities. Be mindful throughout the
day.
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10 MEDITATIONS
FOR INNER PEACE AND HAPPINESS

The mind is our greatest resource, and meditation is the method that develops
the mind correctly to bring about clarity of understanding.
Buddha Shakyamuni

The 10 Meditations for Inner Peace and Happiness are just a few of the many thousands of
techniques that can assist us in training the mind. This particular collection is taken from some of
the great philosophies and traditions of the world, including Yoga, Zen and modern medical
research. They are very powerful ways to transform our life in a positive direction, by giving us the
chance to reflect on who and what we are and where we are heading. Most important, they
systematically help us to apply the changes that are necessary to take place within us. Osho once
said, Techniques are helpful because they are scientific. You are saved from unnecessary
wandering and groping. If you dont know any techniques, the growth, the flowering of meditation
will take longer
The 10 Meditations for Inner Peace and Happiness guide us through the many obstacles
that beginners usually face when we first sit down to meditate. These techniques are designed to
train our mind and body to relax, remove blockages, accept discomfort, concentrate, and to
develop great compassion by cherishing others. They also help us to make positive changes in our
lives, with our family, community and the environment. By developing loving-kindness with daily
action, we can progress on the path to inner peace. We can implement a pure heart that cherishes
all living beings without bias or partiality. We can transform our life, fulfil our true human
potential, and find lasting peace and happiness. By regularly practising the 10 Meditations for
Inner Peace and Happiness we can reach this goal.
His Holiness the Dalai Lama states, We can never obtain peace in the outer world until we
make peace with ourselves. The 10 Meditations for Inner Peace and Happiness support this view.
Peace and happiness can be achieved by practising in two parts, on the inside by sitting quietly in
the meditation room, and on the outside while going about our daily activities. This will eventually
become one continuous meditation.

PART ONE - Sitting Quietly in Meditation

This involves the practice of awareness, being in harmony, relaxation,


pranayama, affirmations, contemplation and concentration techniques.

When sitting in meditation we can train our self to be in harmony. We can train the mind
to be content, to liberate itself from desire, to accept the ever changing universe as it is - this is
happiness. Being in the present moment, experiencing each and every moment with full
awareness - this is inner peace. And these we can not buy with all the money in the world. These
we must earn through the daily practice of meditation and experience it for our self.
Each of the 10 Meditations has a specific affirmation to be contemplated and repeated
three times. These affirmations help us to develop 10 virtues which are necessary for inner peace,
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happiness and spiritual growth. Each affirmation is accompanied by a meditation or pranayama
technique and has a specific awareness technique. Without straining or tension, try your best to
concentrate on this object. At first your mind may become distracted. If the mind wanders off
following a thought, simply acknowledge that you were distracted and then gently return to the
technique. During meditation if you observe a state of tranquility and serenity, do not disturb the
mind. Do not try to get up from your seat. Try to prolong your awareness of this sensation for as
long as possible, observing the joy and harmony of inner peace. Remember, meditation is
awareness, being in the present moment. Everything we need is already inside us. As Jesus Christ
said 2000 years ago, The kingdom of heaven is within. Meditation is simply the process of
training ourself to observe the mind, peeling away the layers and re-connecting with our higher
consciousness. It is waiting for us to re-discover it. Diligent practice and persistence with
meditation produces results that are permanent and abiding.
Before beginning carefully read the section General Notes for the Meditator and Training
the Mind. For success, it is necessary to practise sitting meditation every morning before
breakfast and then again in the evening before sleep.

PART TWO Mindfulness throughout the Day

This involves incorporating into our daily life the training and insights
attained in sitting meditation, by maintaining mindfulness, compassion and
peace throughout the day.

By becoming more adept at meditating, we can begin to extend our training beyond
quietly sitting alone. This can be achieved by training ourself to maintain a peaceful mind while
going about our daily life, becoming aware of our thought, speech and action, observing our
happiness, our suffering, our pleasure and pain. Albert Einstein stated that; True religion is real
living; living with all one's soul, with all one's goodness and righteousness.
Permanent inner peace and happiness can only be attained by persistent training, thus
conquering doubt, hatred, laziness, lust and worry, and by living a virtuous life with morality,
acceptance, love, wisdom and compassion. Meditation helps us to reach this goal by training the
mind to maintain the awareness of itself in every moment.
By extending the meditation beyond sitting, we can observe ourself and the world around
us with an awakened mind, with wisdom and compassion. By observing the mind as it reacts to
information from the senses, with likes and dislikes, desires and aversions, we can become aware
of the conditioned mental process that has kept us ignorant and in darkness.
This daily mindfulness requires a tremendous amount of training and discipline and begins
with small actions in your daily routine. Osho suggested, Start with very simple actions like
walking. You can walk and you can become aware that you are walking each step can be full of
awareness. Eating just the way they drink tea in Zen monasteries they call it the tea
ceremony, because sipping the tea, one has to remain alert and aware.
As you become more and more accustomed to awareness and it becomes just like the
natural process of breathing, you will find that you do not have to make any effort anymore. It
becomes spontaneous. Then, in any act, any work you can be aware. But it takes training and
discipline throughout all your daily activities for this spontaneous awareness to occur naturally.
Osho emphasises, Remember the condition, it has to be effortless; it has to out of spontaneity.
Tuning in in this way allows our higher consciousness to guide us to live a more meaningful
life, by paying attention with awareness to the details of the present moment, instead of blindly
reacting to every contact from the senses. By applying the 10 affirmations as we experience the
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ups and downs of daily life, we can train ourself to create a positive reaction to an unpleasant
situation. We can use the correct affirmation to create inner peace and harmony in that situation.
For example: when we feel our self getting angry, repeat the affirmation from Meditation 4;
Patience is the destroyer of anger. This promotes patience to come to the surface as our mental
programming kicks in with the training from the sitting meditation. The more we practise, the
easier it gets to create patience. The more it becomes our natural state of being. Remember, the
fault is not in the difficult situation that confronts us, or in the people with whom we have to
interact. The problems we face arise from within. Circumstances only act as a catalyst to bring
them to the surface. Everything we feel, think, say, or do is coming up from deep within. Regular
meditation and positive daily action can heal these obstructions and help us to develop a caring
and meaningful life.
In this way enlightenment can be found right here in the midst of our daily existence.
Everyday life gives many opportunities to recognise and experience the inter-connected
relationship of all things. Each individual part is intimately part of the whole, with each system
meaningfully reflecting the others. In a practical sense, we do not prepare and prepare until we
get to another place known as enlightenment somewhere down the road. Instead, living our lives
in the now is a reflection of enlightenment, the thread of the fabric.
Nelson Mandela once said, A good head and a good heart are always a formidable
combination. A trained mind and compassionate heart are not easily lost when they are clear and
focused in the present moment. Everyday problems no longer distract us from the path because
they are the part of it. The observing mind is enlightened, freed from selfish desires and petty
concerns. It is the impassive observer of all, with the welfare of others paramount in our heart.
So cherish the peak moments, which can be mini-enlightenments while continuing to be
mindful of the details of our everyday lives. Meditation is the tool to help us understand the true
nature of happiness and sadness. This understanding evolves as we experience how meditation is
more than just a method. When practised well, we as the meditator are no longer separate from
the act of meditating. Immersed in the moment, we and the world become One. When we can
feel Oneness in ourselves our everyday life is truly enlightened.

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Meditation 1, 2.
Always start with a personal prayer and these two techniques, as they help us to become
centred and relaxed, ready for meditation.
Meditation 3, 4, 5.
These techniques are the core meditations for purifying and focusing the mind, and
developing inner peace. They guide us into a deep state of concentration and awareness.
Meditation 6, 7, 8.
These techniques are the core meditations for generating love, kindness and
compasssion. They should only be practised with pure intentions in heart and mind, and
after having been prepared by the preceding techniques.
Meditation 9, 10.
Always finish with these techniques and a personal prayer to close the session.

In the beginning start with just 15 minutes meditation every day and follow the recommended
schedule below, until you can regularly and consistently meditate for one hour on a daily basis:

First month start with 15 minutes meditation every day:


Meditations 1, 2, 3, 6, 9, 10.
Second month add 4, 5 , for 30 minutes meditation every day:
Meditations 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10.
Third month add 7, 8, for 45 minutes meditation every day:
Meditations 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10.
Fourth month extend each meditation by a few more minutes until you can regularly
practise for 60 minutes daily.
After one year of regularly practising the 10 Meditations for Inner Peace and Happiness,
you may be ready for advanced meditation techniques. (See 10 Advanced Meditations).
Ask your meditation instructor for advice on how to proceed.

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10 MEDITATIONS
FOR INNER PEACE AND HAPPINESS

Dave West Yoga 2007


AFFIRMATION TECHNIQUE
COMPLETE
1. PERSISTENCE
YOGIC
Persistence is applying the best effort in all things BREATHING
throughout the day. Pranayama 1

2. ACCEPTANCE
Acceptance is observing discomfort and distraction CHANTING OM
without reacting.
PURIFYING
3. EQUANIMITY
THE ENERGY
Equanimity is maintaining harmony and balance CHANNELS
throughout the day. Pranayama 2

4. PATIENCE
STILLNESS
Patience is the destroyer of anger.

5. CONCENTRATION
MINDFUL
Concentration is holding the mind on an object for
BREATHING
a defined length of time.

6. LOVE HEART
Love is the true nature of the universe. CHAKRA

7. KINDNESS GENERATING
Kindness is the joyful heart of abundance. KINDNESS

8. COMPASSION GENERATING
Compassion is the essence of spiritual progress. COMPASSION

OFFERING &
9. WISDOM
RECEIVING
Wisdom is the destroyer of doubt and confusion. Pranayama 3

10. ENLIGHTENMENT
PALMING
Enlightenment is being in the present moment,
Pranayama 4
mindful of all thought, speech and action.

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PREPARATORY PRAYERS
On this path effort never goes to waste, and there is no failure. Even a little effort
toward spiritual awareness will protect you from the greatest fear.
Bhagavad Gita

Prayer is a powerful way of affirming your intentions, showing gratitude, or seeking


guidance and blessings. You can pray to someone or something. You can pray to outside of your
being, or inside. You can attract from the outside towards yourself, or you can awaken from the
inside. It is all connected. However you perceive this higher power is up to you. Every individual
will have a different experience and definition, whether you call it God, Spirit, Divine Mother, or
Universal Supreme Consciousness. If you dont believe in anything, then use this time to confirm
your intentions and action before beginning the meditation. You can use the following traditional
Sanskrit prayers from ancient India, or you may wish to compose your own preparatory prayers
according to your personal belief and philosophy.

Namaste
You and I are one in heart and mind. I open my heart to spread love, and peace, and offer my help
and service to all.

Om Om Om
O Creator of the universe, may thy divine healing energy fill us with light and love. May our mind,
body and spirit unite in complete harmony with nature and the cosmic vibration.

Om Ah Hum
From the hearts of all the holy beings, may streams of nectar and light flow down, granting
blessings and purifying our thought, speech and action.

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1
PERSISTENCE

Persistence is applying the best effort


in all things throughout the day.

Govinda Pahir lived in a peaceful valley east of Darjeeling, India. He told me that this
Hatha Yoga technique is very useful if performed at the start of meditation, as it calms the mind
and body from the hustle and bustle of daily life. It distributes a rich supply of oxygen and life-
force energy into the whole being and stretches and relaxes the upper body. Govinda taught me
that it is necessary to straighten and strengthen the back and neck to encourage good posture.
This meditation develops the virtue of persistence. Persistence is not the effort to make something
particular happen. It is the effort to be aware and awake in each and every moment, to overcome
laziness and immorality. It is the effort to make each activity of our day meditation. Deep
breathing and stretching up is the object of concentration.

Breathing in 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 (8-10 seconds)


Hold the breath 1 2 (2 seconds)
Breathing out 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 (8-10 seconds)
Hold the breath 1 2 (2 seconds)

COMPLETE YOGIC BREATHING Pranayama 1


Take a few moments to find a comfortable and stable meditation position.
If you can not sit cross legged on a cushion, then you may want to use a chair.
Relax the body but always keep the spine and head straight,
Feel as if the top of the head is being pulled up to the sky, keeping you perfectly straight.
Rest the hands in the lap or on the knees. Close the eyes.
Gently rest the tongue on the roof of the mouth.
Relax the body. Relax the breathing. Relax the mind.
Make a silent prayer according to your own religion or personal belief.

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Mentally repeat and contemplate the affirmation 3 times.
Persistence is applying the best effort in all things throughout the day.

Repeat the following technique 3 times.


Take a deep slow inhalation through the nose.
Breathing in should take about 8 to 10 seconds.
Be sure to completely fill the lower part of the lungs, middle and upper chest with air.
As you breathe in, feel your whole being renewed with vitality and strength.
When you are completely full of air, but without strain, hold for two seconds 1 2
Now slowly exhale, all the way out, completely empty all of the lungs,
Empty the chest, middle and the lower lungs.
Breathing out should also take about 8 to 10 seconds.
As you breathe out, feel your whole being releasing negativity, distraction and disease.
When you are completely empty, but without strain, hold for two seconds 1 2
Repeat this 2 more times.
Then relax for a few moments.
Feel your whole being relax and calm.
Relax the breathing. Relax the mind.
Now repeat the following technique 3 times.
Take a deep slow inhalation through your nose.
Be sure to completely fill the lower part of the lungs, middle and upper chest with air.
As you breathe in slowly stretch your arms up as high as you can.
Straighten the arms upwards and join your hands above your head.
As you breathe in feel healing energy rising up through your body, revitalizing your whole being.
Breathing in should take about 8 to 10 seconds.
When you are completely full of air, hold for two seconds 1 2
Now slowly exhale, all the way out, and lower your arms down to your side.
Completely empty all of your lungs, the chest, middle and the lower lungs.
Breathing out should also take about 8 to 10 seconds.
Hold for two seconds 1 2
When you have finished raising the arms 3 times return to your meditation position, relax your body
and keep still but not tense.
Feel your breathing slowing down.
Feel your whole being relaxed and refreshed.
You may even feel light headed.
This is the prana flowing around your body, rejuvenating and revitalizing your entire being.
Relax as much as possible allowing this process to complete.
Hold this awareness of the bodys lightness for a few minutes, or longer.

Mentally repeat and contemplate the affirmation 3 times.


Persistence is applying the best effort in all things throughout the day.
Stay alert and relaxed, but do not move or change your sitting position. Feel calm and refreshed.

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2
ACCEPTANCE
Acceptance is observing discomfort
and distraction without reacting.

This Mantra Yoga technique was given to me by a sadhu known as Guruji. He lived very
simply in a Shiva temple near Asi Ghat in Varanasi, India. This technique helps to further relax the
body and breath, and focus the mind. Chanting OM promotes a deep sense of relaxation and
release. It prepares the mind and body for meditation. Guruji told me not to underestimate the
power of OM. When OM is chanted correctly the three syllables of A U M are distinctly
pronounced. OM is the object of concentration. (See Appendix 9). This technique develops the
virtue of acceptance.

Breathing in 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 (8-10 seconds)


Hold the breath 1 2 (2 seconds)
Breathing out AAAAUUUUMMMMM (8-10 seconds)
Hold the breath 1 2 (2 seconds)

CHANTING OM
Sit quietly and comfortably with the eyes closed and the spine and head straight, but not tense.
Relax the body. Relax the breathing. Relax the mind.

Mentally repeat and contemplate the affirmation 3 times.


Acceptance is observing discomfort and distraction without reacting.

Continue to deeply relax the whole body but without moving.


Relax the feet, relax the legs and relax the hips.
Relax the stomach muscles and feel the whole abdomen drop.
Relax the chest, relax the shoulders, relax the arms and hands.
Check your spine and head are straight, but not tense.
Relax the face. Relax the head. Relax the whole body.
Relax the breathing.
When you are completely relaxed, take a smooth, deep inhalation through the nose, for about 8 to
10 seconds. Hold for 2 seconds
Then, gently release the breath in a long, slow exhalation.
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Softly chant AAAAUUUUMMMMMMMM for about 8 to 10 seconds.
Chanting should come from deep within, from the bottom of the lungs.
When you chant use all the breath, but do not strain.
When the breath is empty stop the chant and hold for 2 seconds.
This is 1 round. Repeat this 12 times.
When you have finished chanting be still,
Observe any feelings or sensations with a calm mind.
Feel the vibration in your heart, in your whole body, in your mind. Feel a deep inner release from
tension and stress,
Allow the body, mind and spirit to become quiet, calm and refreshed.
Keep still and observe this feeling of inner peace.
If you become distracted simply observe it, but without thinking about it any more deeply than
acknowledging it.
Be still, calm and relaxed.
Hold this awareness for a few minutes or longer

Mentally repeat and contemplate the affirmation 3 times.


Acceptance is observing discomfort and distraction without reacting.

Stay alert and relaxed, but do not move or change your sitting position. Feel calm and refreshed.

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3
EQUANIMITY
Equanimity is maintaining balance and harmony throughout the day.

I first learned this technique at the Patanjali Yoga Centre in Kathmandu, Nepal. It has many
variations that become progressively more advanced. Here is a simple variation for beginners. This
pranayama technique, also known as nadi shodhana, purifies the energy channels in the body and
mind. It brings about a state of equilibrium in the mind, in preparation for deep meditation. It
develops the virtue of equanimity. For pranayama, as well as meditation, it is extremely important
to sit with the spine and head straight, but not tense. Feel as though the top of your head is being
pulled up to the sky. If one of the nostrils is blocked perform jala neti or breath balancing exercises
before beginning. Seek proper guidance. For beginners the length of breath inhalation, retention
and exhalation should be equal to a ratio of 1:1:1. This means that if you breathe in for the count
of 8, you must hold for 8 and then breathe out for 8. Practise five rounds for the first month,
increasing to ten rounds in the second month, and 15 rounds in the third month, until you can
practise comfortably for 20 minutes. At this point bandha may be incorporated. Seek proper
guidance. The point where the fingers touch the forehead at the eyebrow centre, while counting
the length of each breath, is the object of concentration.

PURIFYING THE ENERGY CHANNELS Pranayama 2


Sit quietly and comfortably with the eyes closed and the spine and head straight, but not tense.
Gently rest the tongue on the roof of the mouth.
Relax the body. Relax the breathing. Relax the mind.

Mentally repeat and contemplate the affirmation 3 times.


Equanimity is maintaining balance and harmony throughout the day.

Raise the right hand to the face and hold the nose-tip position:
Gently rest the index and middle fingers on the forehead at the eyebrow centre.
Place the thumb next to the right nostril and the ring finger next to the left nostril.
The thumb and ring finger control the flow of breath by gently blocking and releasing each nostril
in turn.
The little finger is completely relaxed.
The left hand rests on the left knee with the fingers ready to count the number of rounds.
Keep the head straight. Do not allow it to drop down during this technique.
This is the starting position, known as the nose-tip position.
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Begin by closing the right nostril with the thumb.
Smoothly and softly breathe in through the left nostril.
Breathing in should be quiet and gentle and should take about 8 to 10 seconds. Do not rush. Do not
strain.
As you breathe in start to count, in your mind, from 1 to 8.
When you reach 8, try to have your lungs completely full, but without straining.
Now close the left nostril with the ring finger, so that both nostrils are firmly closed.
Hold your breath and count, in your mind, from 1 to 8.
Then, keep the left nostril closed and open the right nostril with the thumb.
Smoothly and softly breathe out through the right nostril.
Breathing out should be quiet and gentle and should take about 8 to 10 seconds. Do not rush. Do
not strain.
As you breathe out start to count, in your mind, from 1 to 8.
When you reach 8, try to have your lungs completely empty, but without straining.
Now smoothly and softly breathe in through the right nostril.
Breathe quietly and gently.
As you breathe in count, in your mind, from 1 to 8.
When you reach 8, try to have your lungs completely full, but without straining.
Now close the right nostril with the thumb, so that both nostrils are firmly closed.
Hold your breath and count, in your mind, from 1 to 8.
Keep the right nostril closed with the thumb and open the left nostril with the ring finger.
Smoothly and softly breathe out through the left nostril.
Breathe quietly and gently.
As you breathe out count, in your mind, from 1 to 8.
When you reach 8, try to have your lungs completely empty, but without straining.
This is one round.
Begin with 5 rounds.
Count the number of rounds on the fingers of your left hand.

Mentally repeat and contemplate the affirmation 3 times.


Equanimity is maintaining balance and harmony throughout the day.

Stay alert and relaxed, but do not move or change your sitting position.
Feel calm and refreshed.

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4
PATIENCE

Patience is the destroyer of anger.

Martin Moore taught me this simple technique during one of our many sessions. It is a Zen
technique that helps the body and mind to become completely still and silent. This variation
develops awareness of the crown chakra and the virtue of patience. It is a good preliminary
exercise for the practice of Emptiness meditation. (See Advanced Meditations). Maintaining the
stillness of the water is the object of concentration.

STILLNESS
Sit quietly and comfortably with the eyes closed and the spine and head straight, but not tense.
Gently rest the tongue on the roof of the mouth.
Relax the body. Relax the breathing. Relax the mind.

Mentally repeat and contemplate the affirmation 3 times.


Patience is the destroyer of anger.

Keep absolutely still, relaxed and alert.


Imagine there is a small bowl balancing on the top of your head.
In the bowl is water.
Keep the water completely still and without ripples so that the surface is like a mirror.
The slightest movement of the body will create ripples and disturb the surface of the water, so keep
the body absolutely still.
The tiniest thought will create ripples and disturb the surface of the water, so keep the mind
completely focused on maintaining the stillness of the water.
The awareness should be so completely centred on the water that the awareness of the body and the
external environment is lost.
At first the mind may be very busy, and you might even feel that the meditation is making the mind
busier; but in reality you are becoming aware of how busy the mind actually is.
If you discover that the mind has wandered and is following your thoughts gently bring your
concentration back to the water.
Keep the water completely still by not moving or thinking. Be patient.
Keep absolutely still, relaxed and alert.
Stay with the stillness of the water for a few minutes or longer.
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Now imagine that you are sitting on the bank of a calm, clear lake.
Imagine that the surface of the lake is like a mirror.
Completely smooth, completely still.
Feel the stillness inside your body, mind and spirit.
Feel your whole being becoming quiet, calm and refreshed.
As a cloud drifts past, see its reflection in the lake.
As the cloud passes imagine the lake becoming clear again.
Keep reflecting the clouds that pass, but always return to the clear lake.
After a time, the clouds clear and the lake reflects the vast blue sky.
Completely smooth, completely still.
Feel the stillness inside your body, mind and spirit.
Feel your whole being deeply relaxed and refreshed.
Stay with the stillness of the clear lake for a few minutes or longer.
Mentally repeat and contemplate the affirmation 3 times.
Patience is the destroyer of anger.

Stay alert and relaxed, but do not move or change your sitting position. Feel calm and refreshed.

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5
CONCENTRATION

Concentration is holding the mind on an object


for a defined length of time.

This technique was first given to me by Maya, a yogini who lived near Milarepas cave in
Manang, Nepal. She said it is an ancient Buddhist technique that helps to develop concentration
and mindfulness, and is usually practised at the start of vipassana meditation. It relaxes and
focuses the mind, bringing the awareness into the present moment. It is not a breathing
technique. It is a concentration technique. The breathing should be completely involuntary
throughout the practice. The breath is the object of concentration. Simply witnessing the breath in
this way develops the virtue of concentration. The defined length of time is 5 minutes for the first
month, 10 minutes for the second month and 15 minutes for the next month, and so on.

MINDFUL BREATHING
Sit quietly and comfortably with the eyes closed and the spine and head straight, but not tense.
Gently rest the tongue on the roof of the mouth.
Relax the body. Relax the breathing. Relax the mind.

Mentally repeat and contemplate the affirmation 3 times.


Concentration is holding the mind on an object for a defined length of time.

Relax the breathing, allowing the body to breathe naturally on its own.
Become aware of the nose.
Observe the sensation of breath as it comes in and out.
Do not try to control the breath, just observe it.
Let each breath remind you to stay centred and present in the now.
Be in the present moment with the breath.
Breath to breath, moment to moment.
The awareness should be so completely centred on the breath that the awareness of the body and
the external environment is lost.

Now begin counting the breaths backwards from 50 down to 20.


As you exhale observe the breath and mentally count 50,
As you inhale observe the breath and mentally count 49,
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As you exhale observe the breath and mentally count 48,
As you inhale observe the breath and mentally count 47,
Keep counting your breaths but without controlling the breathing.
Just observe the breath as it passes through the nostrils and simply count.
Be the witness of your breath, but without judgement.
If you catch the mind drifting away from the counting, gently bring it back.
When you reach 20 start counting only when you exhale.
As you exhale observe the breath and mentally count 19,
As you inhale observe the breath.
As you exhale observe the breath and mentally count 18,
As you inhale observe the breath.
As you exhale observe the breath and mentally count 17,
As you inhale observe the breath.
Keep counting the breaths until you reach zero, but do not control it.
When you reach zero stop counting, but continue to observe the breath.
Observe each breath as it goes in, and as it comes out.
Continue to observe the breath as it passes through the nostrils, but do not count the breaths.
Do not try to control it, just observe it.
Let each breath remind you to stay centred and present in the now.
Feel the sensation of air as it comes in and pushes out through the nose.
Be in the present moment with the breath.
Breath to breath, moment to moment.
If you catch the mind drifting away, gently bring it back.
Be the witness of your breath, but without judgment.

You may find yourself naturally relaxing.


Your breathing may become deeper and slower.
Allow this process to take place naturally.
Continue the awareness of the breath for a few minutes or longer.

Mentally repeat and contemplate the affirmation 3 times.


Concentration is holding the mind on an object for a defined length of time.

Stay alert and relaxed, but do not move or change your sitting position.
Feel calm and refreshed.

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6
LOVE
Love is the true nature of the universe.

This universal technique is known in yoga as hridayakasha dharana, which means heart
space consciousness. The variation presented here develops the awareness of the love energy
inside us by rediscovering that our whole being is Love - every cell, every molecule and every
particle in our mind, body and soul. Generating love inside us reunites us with the true nature of
the universe. By contemplating the affirmation we can realise that the present and future
happiness of all beings in the universe depends upon loving one another. By developing our own
inner love we can generate an abundance of outer love to cherish others, and we will naturally
perform virtuous actions that will cause them to be happy. There is no higher purpose in life. In
this way we can develop a radiant loving spirit all around. Love circulating through the centre of
your chest is the object of concentration.
HEART CHAKRA AWARENESS
Sit quietly and comfortably with the eyes closed and the spine and head straight, but not tense.
Gently rest the tongue on the roof of the mouth.
Relax the body. Relax the breathing. Relax the mind.

Mentally repeat and contemplate the affirmation 3 times.


Love is the true nature of the universe.

Become aware of your heart in the centre of your chest.


This is your heart chakra, the centre of your love energy.
Your centre of pure love, kindness and compassion.
The centre of love for yourself and for others.
The awareness should be so completely centred on the heart chakra that the awareness of the body
and the external environment is lost.
Feel your heart breathing in and out, freely and easily.

As you breathe, feel the heart centre expanding and contracting.

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As attentively as you can, note the change in sensations in the area of your heart that accompanies
each breath.
Let each breath remind you to stay centred and present in the now.
Do not think about your breaths, or the meaning of love.
Simply experience what is there to be experienced.
Do not think, only feel.
Observe what is happening in the area of your heart.
Be especially on the look-out for pleasurable sensations of warmth, expansion, or spaciousness.
Notice how the movement of breath seems to fan and increase these sensations.

As you breathe in absorb into your heart as much love energy from your surroundings as you can.
With each breath feel more and more love energy entering your heart and body, circulating,
healing.
Feel your heart centre expanding, filling your whole being.
Feel the love energy inside and all around you.
Feel as if you are glowing all over with love.
Do not think about your breaths, or the meaning of love.
Simply experience what is there to be experienced.
Acknowledge this radiant glow of pure love, inside and outside.
Hold your awareness of this radiant glow of love for a few minutes or longer.

Mentally repeat and contemplate the affirmation 3 times.


Love is the true nature of the universe.

Stay alert and relaxed, but do not move or change your sitting position.
Feel calm and refreshed.

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7
KINDNESS

Kindness is the joyful heart of abundance.

Metta is the ancient Buddhist name for meditations that assist us in developing loving-
kindness to all beings. These techniques have been successfully taught by vipassana centres
around the world. The variation presented here is based on the teachings of Merta Ada. It
develops the virtue of kindness by training the heart and mind to cultivate a generous nature.
Everything we possess is only ours through the kindness of others. By contemplating the
affirmation we can realise this, and that the more we help those around us to be happy, the
happier we become ourself. Even the small wisdom that we possess to discriminate what is
beneficial and what is harmful is a worthwhile kindness. This will motivate us to engage in positive
action and create the cause for future happiness. Kindness emanating from the centre of your
chest is the object of concentration.

GENERATING KINDNESS
Sit quietly and comfortably with the eyes closed and the spine and head straight, but not tense.
Gently rest the tongue on the roof of the mouth.
Relax the body. Relax the breathing. Relax the mind.

Mentally repeat and contemplate the affirmation 3 times.


Kindness is the joyful heart of abundance.

Become aware of your heart in the centre of your chest.


This is the centre of your love energy.
Pure love and kindness.
Feel this loving-kindness as a powerful healing energy in the centre of your chest.
The centre of loving-kindness for yourself and others.
Acknowledge this powerful centre of pure love and kindness.

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Now send out your loving-kindness to the twelve directions:
From your heart send out your loving-kindness energy to your whole being. May I be happy,
From your heart send out your loving-kindness energy to everything in this room. May all beings be
happy.
From your heart send out your loving-kindness energy to everything outside this room. May all
beings be happy.

From your heart send out your loving-kindness energy to everything above you. May all beings be
happy.
From your heart send out your loving-kindness energy to everything below you. May all beings be
happy.
From your heart send out your loving-kindness energy to everything to the right of you. May all
beings be happy.
From your heart send out your loving-kindness energy to everything to the left of you. May all
beings be happy.
From your heart send out your loving-kindness energy to everything in front of you. May all beings
be happy.
From your heart send out your loving-kindness energy to everything behind you. May all beings be
happy.

From your heart send out your loving-kindness energy to everything on the earth. May all beings be
happy.
From your heart send out your loving-kindness energy to everything in the sky. May all beings be
happy.
From your heart send out your loving-kindness energy to the whole universe. May all beings be
happy.
Hold this awareness of kindness for a few minutes or longer.

Mentally repeat and contemplate the affirmation 3 times.


Kindness is the joyful heart of abundance.

Stay alert and relaxed, but do not move or change your sitting position.
Feel calm and refreshed.

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8
COMPASSION

Compassion is the essence of spiritual progress.

This is also an ancient Buddhist technique known as metta. The variation presented here
is also based on the teachings of Merta Ada. It focuses the heart and mind on cultivating a
compassionate spirit towards all beings. It improves personal relationships with our parents,
friends, workmates and people we dislike. By contemplating the affirmation we naturally feel
compassion towards everyone who is less fortunate than us, and become motivated to help them
in any way we can. This encourages us to cherish others and reminds us of the importance of
continually improving our consideration, respect and love for them. Compassion emanating from
the centre of your chest is the object of concentration.

GENERATING COMPASSION
Sit quietly and comfortably with the eyes closed and the spine and head straight, but not tense.
Gently rest the tongue on the roof of the mouth.
Relax the body. Relax the breathing. Relax the mind.

Mentally repeat and contemplate the affirmation 3 times.


Compassion is the essence of spiritual progress.

Become aware of your heart in the centre of your chest.


This is the centre of your love energy.
Pure compassion and love for the helpless and the weak.
Feel a desire to help the suffering and the sick people of the world.
Feel a deep need to help them in any way you can.
Feel this compassion in the centre of your chest.
Acknowledge this powerful centre of loving-kindness and compassion.
May all beings be happy.

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Now send out your loving-compassion energy:
From your heart, send out your loving-compassion energy to your whole being,
May I be healthy and happy. May I develop love, wisdom and compassion.
From your heart, send out your loving-compassion energy to your family,
May they be healthy and happy. May they develop love, wisdom and compassion.
From your heart, send out your loving-compassion energy to your friends,
May they be healthy and happy. May they develop love, wisdom and compassion.
From your heart, send out your loving-compassion energy to neutral people,
May they be healthy and happy. May they develop love, wisdom and compassion.
From your heart, send out your loving-compassion energy to people you dislike,
May they be healthy and happy. May they develop love, wisdom and compassion.

Now in reverse order.


From your heart, send out your loving-compassion energy to people you dislike,
May they be healthy. May they be happy.
From your heart, send out your loving-compassion energy to neutral people,
May they be healthy. May they be happy.
From your heart, send out your loving-compassion energy to your friends,
May they be healthy. May they be happy.
From your heart, send out your loving-compassion energy to your family,
May they be healthy. May they be happy.
From your heart, send out your loving-compassion energy to your whole being,
May I be healthy. May I be happy.

May all beings be happy.

If you get lost in thought or distracted, come back to the nose and do mindful breathing (p109) for a
few minutes, or until your mind is clear again, and then resume this technique.

Hold this awareness of compassion towards all beings in the universe for a few minutes, or longer.

Mentally repeat and contemplate the affirmation 3 times.


Compassion is the essence of spiritual progress.

Stay alert and relaxed, but do not move or change your sitting position.
Feel calm and refreshed.

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9
WISDOM
Wisdom is the destroyer of doubt and confusion.

This preliminary Kundalini Yoga technique, also known as prana mudra or shanti mudra,
awakens the dormant prana shakti creative energy, in the root chakra at the base of the spine. It
distributes prana throughout the body and mind, uniting it with shiva pure consciousness, in the
crown chakra at the top of the head. It develops awareness of the most important energy channel
in the body, the sushumna nadi, located along the spine (See Appendix 7). By contemplating the
affirmation we can establish the inner conviction that we live in a friendly, non-threatening,
purposeful universe. This develops the virtue of wisdom by motivating us to make higher
consciousness choices throughout the day. Raising the prana shakti from the root chakra to the
crown chakra, offering and receiving, then returning it to the root chakra - this is the object of
concentration.

OFFERING AND RECEIVING Pranayama 3


Sit quietly and comfortably with the eyes closed and the spine and head straight, but not tense.
Gently rest the tongue on the roof of the mouth.
Relax the body. Relax the breathing. Relax the mind.

Mentally repeat and contemplate the affirmation 3 times.


Wisdom is the destroyer of doubt and confusion.
Place the hands on the ground in front of the body and in line with the spine.
The palms should be facing the body and the finger tips should be almost touching.
In the root chakra at the base of the spine, imagine gathering the prana into the hands.
As the hands are raised up in front of the body, imagine raising the prana up the sushumna nadi
from the root chakra at the base of the spine, up through the centre of the body to the top of head.
As the hands are slowly raised, gently breathe in, smooth and slow.
Briefly acknowledge the prana passing up though each of the chakras along the sushumna nadi. but
do not stop,
Keep raising the prana up to the crown chakra.
At the top of the head open the hands upwards and the arms wide.
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The hands should be roughly in line with the side of the head.
Imagine joining the prana with the pure consciousness in the crown chakra.
Imagine a sphere of pure white light surrounding the head.
Offer your prana to the universe,
Feel it joining with your pure consciousness,
Hold for a brief moment without breathing and acknowledge this higher consciousness experience.
This spiritual energy is your higher self, your full potential as a spiritual being.
Now place the hands in front of the forehead.
As the hands are slowly lowered down the front of the body gently breathe out, smooth and slow.
Briefly acknowledge the prana passing down though each of the chakras along the sushumna nadi.
As the hands reach the floor imagine the prana returning to the root chakra at the base of the spine.
Throughout the practice the awareness should be so completely centred on the movement of prana
that the awareness of the external environment is lost.
This is one round
Do 3 times.

After the third time, return you hands to their normal meditation position and completely relax.
Observe your higher self, your higher consciousness.
Experience yourself as the infinite mind that you are, an enlightened being.
This is your full potential, your true nature.
Experience a renewal of optimism that will clarify your priorities and aspirations.
Your life will acquire new meaning as you establish the inner conviction that you live in a friendly,
compassionate and purposeful universe.
Hold this awareness for a few minutes or longer.

Mentally repeat and contemplate the affirmation 3 times.


Wisdom is the destroyer of doubt and confusion.

Stay alert and relaxed, but do not move or change your sitting position.
Feel calm and refreshed.

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10
ENLIGHTENMENT
Enlightenment is being in the present moment,
mindful of all thought, speech and action.

I spent many months with Swami Shyam Yogi. He lived at a yoga centre by the lake in
Pushkar, India. Although he taught me hundreds of yogic exercises, we always finished the lesson
in prayer, followed by this simple technique. Palming accumulates and concentrates the life-force
energy into the hands, which can then be placed over the eyes and over the whole body. It
distributes healing energy to the eyes, enlightening the mind and revitalising our whole being. By
contemplating the affirmation we can develop the virtue of enlightenment. As we end our sitting
meditation it reminds us to mindful of all thought, speech and action throughout the day. Prana,
the healing energy of the universe, is the object of concentration.

PALMING Pranayama 4
Sit quietly and comfortably with the eyes closed and the spine and head straight, but not tense.
Gently rest the tongue on the roof of the mouth.
Relax the body. Relax the breathing. Relax the mind.

Mentally repeat and contemplate the affirmation 3 times.


Enlightenment is being in the present moment, mindful of all thought, speech and action.
Vigorously rub the palms of the hands together until are hot.
Gently place the palms over the eyes.
As you take a deep breath, feel the warm healing energy being transmitted from the hands to the
eyes, head and whole body.
Feel the healing energy being transmitted to the mind.
Feel the mind becoming enlightened.
Hold for a few moments and gently breathe out.
This is one round. Repeat 3 times.
At the third time feel the healing energy being transmitted from your hands to your eyes and then to
your head.
Feel the healing energy being transmitted to the mind.
Feel the mind becoming enlightened.
Feel the healing energy being transmitted to the soul.
Feel the divinity awakening in the soul.
Feel love all around, inside and out.
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Feel inner peace and happiness.
Hold this awareness for a few moments or longer.
Slowly open your eyes and gently lower the hands down the face, letting the light in slowly.
Rub your hands over your whole body.
Feel the body becoming healthy and strong.
Feel the healing energy circulating around the whole body, healing all sickness and pain.
Feel stronger, healthier, happy and refreshed.
Observe this feeling for a few moments.
Join your hands over the heart and slightly bow the head as you mentally repeat the affirmation 3
times.

Enlightenment is being in the present moment, mindful of all thought, speech and action.
Stay alert and relaxed, but do not move or change your sitting position.
Feel calm and refreshed.

Before finishing your sitting meditation you may wish to say a concluding prayer, according to your
personal belief and philosophy.

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SUMMARY
To live harmoniously the body, mind and spirit must develop in a balanced way
according to individual temperament and capacity. This all helps to make the
purification process deep-rooted and ensure success.

Sri Swami Sivananda

Nothing in this book is original except for the way in which is presented. It is an effective
collection of some of the ancient principles and techniques that our ancestors have passed down
through the ages. They are long-term techniques. Quick-fixes are like headache tablets: they may
get you through the immediate suffering, but they do not investigate the cause of the headache
and do not offer a long term solution to the problem. All lasting inner change requires time and
effort. Meditation is the solution, but in the beginning it is also hard work. Sitting for hours with
full awareness, without judgement, concentrating on being in the present moment, and accepting
pain and discomfort is not easy for beginners. Persistence is the mother of personal change. It is
applying the best effort in all things throughout the day. This does not mean that it will take years
to make profound changes in your life. If you diligently apply these principles and techniques of
mindfulness every day for only one month, you will be astonished at the results. You will begin to
tap into the highest levels of your capacity and begin to enter the realm of the spiritual path and
holistic lifestyle. Do not get hung up on the outcome. Instead, enjoy the process of personal
expansion and growth. The less you focus on the end result, the quicker it will come.
Persist and spend longer and longer periods exploring these meditations. Do not worry if
you do not understand the technique or if you are making progress or not. As the Zen saying goes,
If you understand, things are just as they are... If you do not understand, things are just as they
are. After a week or two you should be able to meditate for twenty minutes without your mind
wandering onto other subjects. This will be your first indication that you are taking back control of
the fortress of your mind. It will then focus only on what you command it to focus on. It will then
be a wonderful servant, able to do extraordinary things for you. Remember, either you control
your mind, or it controls you.
However, if you want to become truly enlightened then you need to know exactly what
you want out of life, emotionally, materially, physically and spiritually. Do not let the past remind
you of what you are not now. Create good karma right now. Aim for the stars and create your own
universe exactly as you dream it to be. You are only limited by your own imagination. Positive
thinking is a powerful tool on the path of meditation and yoga, and in succeeding in life. Johann
Wolfgang von Goethe wrote, Whatever you can do, or dream you can do, begin it. Boldness has
genius, power and magic in it. Begin it now. You can start by following this simple exercise on a
daily basis, or including it as part of your concluding prayers after meditation.

 Be grateful for all that you have in your life.


 Visualise your goals and your dreams.
 Implement an action plan to manifest your goals and dreams.
 Receive, accept and be grateful for what you have attracted into your life.

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Dr. Jon Dispenza suggests, Wake up every morning and consciously create your day
exactly the way you want it to happen It may take a little time for your mind to settle down and
to get to the point where you are actually intentionally creating your day When, out of nowhere,
little things happen that are so unexplainable, you will know that they are the result of your own
creation. And the more you do this the more you build a neural net in your brain that accepts that
this is possible. This gives you the power and the incentive to do it the next day.
Having clearly defined priorities and goals for every aspect of your life will offer you
guidance and refuge when the seas become rough. Lasting happiness comes from steadily working
towards your goals and advancing confidently in the direction of your lifes purpose, with morality,
love and compassion.
Robin S. Sharma wrote, Happiness comes through the progressive realisation of a worthy
objective. When you are doing what you truly love to do you are bound to find deep contentment.
It may require you to step out of your comfort zone. Change is always a little uncomfortable at
first, and a little risky. But it is the surest way to design a more joyful future. Once you master your
body, mind and character, happiness and abundance will flow into your life almost magically. But
for this to happen you must spend some time working on yourself daily, even if for only ten or
fifteen minutes.
At first you will notice that regular meditation makes you feel far calmer. This is because
you have taken a significant step towards erasing the worry habit that plagues most of the
population and you will begin to enjoy more energy and optimism. Most importantly, you will
observe a sense of love and joyfulness entering your life along with an ability to appreciate the
many gifts that surround you.
Benjamin Franklin once said, Life's Tragedy is that we get old too soon and wise too late
Lost time is never found again. Therefore, each day, no matter how busy you get or how many
challenges you might face, return to your meditation. It is your oasis. It is your silent retreat. It is
your island of peace. Never forget that there is power in stillness and silence. Stillness is the
stepping stone to connecting with the universal source of intelligence that pulses through every
living thing. We must use time wisely and forever realise that the time is always ripe to do right. As
Padmasambhava taught, You may try to support your family and friends, but at the time of death
all other actions besides the virtuous practices of Dharma activities (the path of Truth) will have
been pointless. So constantly apply yourself to spiritual practices in thought, word, and deed!
The purpose of meditation is to gain personal experience of all stages of the path to
enlightenment. You can share these insights in the way you live your life. Although it is far easier to
be in harmony when you are sitting quietly alone, your meditation will be worthless if you do not
put your experiences to practical use in daily activities. (See Advanced Techniques Mindful
Walking). Persist with Hatha Yoga for the purpose of general health, but pursue meditation as the
source of Truth and happiness. The key is to discipline yourself to practise correctly and regularly,
to be your higher consciousness in all your daily activities, and to open your mind to your potential
for living a life rich with possibilities.
There are eleven meditations in this book. You are encouraged to use them as a guide, a
lantern to light the way. Ultimately, meditation comes from within. Be patient and enjoy the
journey.

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HIMALAYA YOGA
Transform your life with yoga, meditation and loving-kindness.

Development of Himalaya Yoga

After travelling extensively in the Himalayan Mountains I discovered many ancient secrets
and wisdom hidden in remote valleys and villages. I used this knowledge to develop what I call
Himalaya Yoga. By combing traditional yoga techniques with a transforming spiritual philosophy
from the heart, a powerful healing system for 21st century mankind was formed. The essence of
these teachings and techniques is compiled into this book. This book is an effective collection of
the ancient principles and techniques that our ancestors have passed down through the ages.
They are long-term techniques. The time has come for these ancient secrets to re-emerge in their
true form.
The yoga masters of the Himalayas taught me that to live harmoniously the mind, body and
spirit must develop in a balanced way. They recognised that every human being evolves in a
different way according to temperament and capacity. They advocated everyone to emphasise the
practice of certain yogas over others, depending on individual requirements, by combining Hatha
Yoga with other forms of yoga. This all helps to make the purification process deep-rooted and
ensure success. I was warned about ego and attachment to the body, money, sex, food and sleep.
I was taught to focus on health, loving-kindness, compassion, morality, wisdom and meditation.
Himalaya Yoga is inspired by the great yogi masters of India, Nepal, Tibet and China. It is a
gentle blend of Tibetan Yoga, Raja Yoga, Sivananda Yoga, Bihar School of Yoga and Zen. This
results in a comprehensive guide to the classical yoga and meditation techniques and philosophies
from the Himalayas.
Himalaya Yoga with Dave West allows you to learn about your own body and mind, your
potential and limitation. This assists you in developing a personal practice and holistic lifestyle,
providing a strong foundation for advanced practice. It teaches to be mindful of all your thoughts,
speech and action. This allows you to create love, wisdom and compassion in every second, of
every minute, of every day. In this way, you not only succeed in yoga, but you have truly
succeeded in life, in reaching your full potential as a human being. The regular practise of
Himalaya Yoga brings health, happiness and inner peace to your mind, body and spirit and
illuminates the path of self-discovery and enlightenment.
Himalaya Yoga covers a range of Himalayan techniques and philosophies including the 10
Meditations for Inner Peace and Happiness. By exercising every part of the body, toning the
muscles and joints, the spine, the entire skeletal system, the internal organs, glands and nerves, all
systems are restored to radiant health. Powerful breathing techniques recharge the whole system
with prana - life force energy. Relaxation and meditation techniques bring inner peace to the mind
allowing you to explore higher realms of consciousness.
Regular practice of these techniques will revitalise the body and mind by removing energy
blockages and improving circulation. They release tension and stress, promoting strength and
vitality, weight loss, resistance to disease. They develop love, wisdom and compassion inspiring
self-discipline and spiritual living.

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Himalaya Yoga is undiluted by the demands of commercialism and egoism. For the deep
purification benefits of yoga to become truly effective it is recommended that all students engage
in a holistic and moral lifestyle. This includes becoming mindful of all thought, speech and action,
and reducing the consumption of animal products, alcohol and tobacco.
For maximum effectiveness practice is best made early in the morning, each day around
sunrise, one hour before breakfast, or in the early evening during the hour surrounding sunset and
before eating the evening meal. For comfort practice should take place in loose, comfortable
clothing, and in a clean and quiet environment.
If there are health issues, or medical conditions present, please consult your health adviser
before commencing this program. Himalaya Yoga can bring you health, happiness and inner peace.
Your mind, body and spirit will be lifted as you make your journey towards self discovery and
enlightenment.

Himalaya Yoga Course Overview

Himalaya Yoga provides authentic Himalayan wisdom and yoga training, for your
health and happiness, and for the spiritual evolution of mankind.

LEVEL 1 - BEGINNERS - Vitality and Awareness

Holistic lifestyle: Lifestyle re-evaluation Five Principles of Yoga, Developing patience, persistence
and gentleness

Pawanmuktasana: Removing simple energy blockages in the mind and body

Asana: Basic mobility and flexibility

Yoga Nidra: Physical, mental and emotional relaxation

Pranayama: Correct breathing and equanimity

Meditation: Developing stillness and awareness,


10 Meditations for Inner Peace and Happiness

LEVEL 2 - INTERMEDIATE - Being in Harmony

Holistic lifestyle: Simple living high thinking,


Developing concentration and compassion

Shatkarmas: Six internal cleansings

Asana: Steadiness of the mind and body

Yoga Nidra: Deep relaxation, withdrawal from the senses, Visualisation on the obstructions to
liberation and omniscience

Pranayama: Basic control and regulation of the life-force energy

Meditation: Deep concentration techniques, chakra awareness,


21 Tibetan meditations

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LEVEL 3 - ADVANCED - Path to Enlightenment

Holistic lifestyle: Physical, mental, spiritual and moral discipline

Karma Yoga: Selfless service

Asana: Specific body positions to open energy channels and psychic centres

Pranayama: Advanced control and regulation of the life-force energy

Meditation: 20 Kriya meditations

Primary influences of Himalaya Yoga

Tibetan Yoga
Teachings of Buddha Shakyamuni and Padmasambhava
Dhammapada
Kadam Lamrim
Lojong Tsig Gyema
Five Tibetan Rites

Raja Yoga
Teachings of Maharishi Patanjali and Sri Krishnamacharya
Eight Limbs of Yoga
Siva Samhita
Hatha Yoga
Sadhana

Bihar School of Yoga


Teachings of Swami Sivananda and Swami Satyananda Saraswati
Kriya Yoga
Karma Yoga
Sangha
Holistic lifestyle

For more information about workshops and retreats:


Website: www.himalaya-yoga.com
Email: info@himalaya-yoga.com

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Websites

www.ashtanga.com www.innertraditions.com www.shantigh.com


www.asianart.com www.internaturalhealth.com www.sivananda.org
www.ayri.org www.iyengaryoga.org www.sleepfoundation.org
www.ayurbalance.com www.jelila.com www.sunriseschoolbali.com
www.balimeditation.com www.kadampa.com www.tbsn.org
www.balispirit.com www.karmakerala.com www.thebodytalkcenter.com
www.buddha101.com www.krishna.org www.thesecret.com
www.chakrayoga.com www.kundaliniyoga.org www.tharpa.com
www.chiropractic-asia.com www.kym.org www.time.com
www.completebody.com www.maharishi.org www.veda-balance.com
www.dalailama.com www.mahatma.org www.whatthebleep.com
www.dhamma.org www.medical-clinic.org www.baliyachthaven.com
www.dharmaweb.org www.osho.com www.yogakshetram.com
www.dkinstitute.org www.physiotherapyexercises.com www.yogananda-srf.org
www.gita-society.com www.quantumtouch.com www.yogascope.com
www.godshaer.co.uk www.sacredcenters.com www.zaadz.com
www.himalaya-yoga.com www.sanctuaryresorts.com

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
To Lord Ganesh for teaching me how to clear the way in all I do, ever, and always. To Lord
Buddha for sharing his valuable experiences and teachings. To Lord Shiva for sharing the first
teachings of yoga. To my first guru in India, Swami Shyam Yogi, whose love and devotion inspired
me to practise yoga all those years ago. To all my teachers past and present. To Merta Ada for
offering regular retreats for practice. To Martin Moore for his preface, photos of meditation, and
all his wisdom and encouragement. To all the teachers and students at Sunrise School Bali who
were first to experience the teachings from this book. To Kayti Denham and Barbara Hames for
editing and advice. To Ari for referencing. To Basti my surfing buddy for making my beautiful
website. Grateful acknowledgement to authors and publishers of all the books and websites that
were referenced to help expand the wisdom I received in the Himalayas. To all my friends,
colleagues and students who kindly donated their time and effort. To the people and island of
Bali, where this book was completed, for its spiritual and relaxing vibrations that allowed me the
time and space to practise, work and think. And to my parents for their loving support throughout
my life. Thank you all for creating this book.

WEBSITE SPECIAL EDITION 2008

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