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A4 The Afro-American, July 31, 2010 - August 6, 2010 Volume 118 No. 51 PRINCE
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The Afro-American, July 31, 2010 - August 6, 2010
Volume 118 No. 51
PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY EDITION
JULY 31, 2010 - AUGUST 6, 2010
Black Caddies Seem to be
Disappearing from Golf
C5
B1
Black Russian Wins
Election
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Pr. George’s First African-American Woman Appellate Court Judge

By George Barnette AFRO Staff Writer

Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley (D) has appointed Michele D. Hotten to the Court of Special Appeals for the Fourth Appellate Circuit in Prince George’s County, making her the first African-American woman to be appointed to an appellate court in the state. In a statement, O’Malley said it was an honor to appoint Hotten and that she “will bring to the bench a broad range of legal expertise, a true commitment to public service, and a dedication to upholding the laws of the State.” Hotten submitted an application to be nominated in February. She was nominated for the position on April 12 and O’Malley interviewed her on June 2. The process was not new as she’d been through it before, but it’s still one that humbled her. “I wasn’t intimidated because I’ve been interviewed by governors before,” Hotten said. “You’re always in awe of the office, obviously, but definitely not intimidated.” Hotten was born on April 20, 1954 in Washington, D.C., where she grew up and graduated high school from Immaculate

Conception Academy. She received her bachelor’s degree from the University of South Florida in 1975 and her law degree from Howard University in 1979. At this burgeoning stage of her legal career, Hotten hadn’t set the goal to be a judge. She said just getting her foot in the door was enough for her. “At that point, I just wanted to practice law,” she said. “Litigating cases in court is all I wanted to do.” After passing the Maryland Bar, Hotten began her career in public service as an assistant state’s attorney in Prince George’s County. Hotten served in that capacity from 1985-1989 before moving on to private practice. She began working at Farrington,

Smallwood, Wells & Wyrough in Landover, Md. in 1989 and specialized in civil and criminal litigation until 1992. At that point she

civil and criminal litigation until 1992. At that point she Courtesy Photo/Pr. George’s County Circuit Court

Courtesy Photo/Pr. George’s County Circuit Court

Michele D. Hotten

began her own practice, and became Special Counsel to the Human Relations Commission, Hearing Examiner for the Prince George’s County Board of Education, a deputy for the People’s Zoning Counsel, and Examiner in Chancery for Prince George’s County Circuit Court. In 1994, she became the second African-American woman to become a judge with the District Court for Prince George’s County. Hotten served in that capacity for a year before serving in the same capacity for the Circuit Court, a position she held until her appointment to the appellate court. Hotten, a past president of the Prince

George’s County Bar Association, has won several awards and held many prominent positions. Her appointment confirms she’s one of the more respected legal minds in the state. However, she’s says she’s never been one to attract attention to herself. She just wants to help people and continue to be the best judge she can be. “I love the law and I love what I’m doing,” she said. “I love helping young lawyers, but I don’t appreciate the spotlight for doing it. I prefer to help people and stay behind the scenes.” Hotten will replace the retiring James P. Salmon.

No ‘Big Three’ for Chris Paul

Meeting with GM Suggests He’ll Remain a Hornet

News Analysis

Obama, NAACP Caught by Race Bait

News Analysis Obama, NAACP Caught by Race Bait AP Photo/Steve Cannon Shirley Sherrod answers questions during

AP Photo/Steve Cannon

Shirley Sherrod answers questions during an interview at her home on July 23 in Albany, Ga. Sherrod was fired from her job at the Agriculture Department amid accusations of racism.

By Zenitha Prince Washington Bureau Chief

The trap – a grainy, 2½-minute clip – was rudimentary by today’s technology standards. It even bore a sign, “Trap Herei” – posted as it was on the blog site of a man who has publicly declared his intent to destroy the institutional left. And yet, the Obama administration, blindly followed by the NAACP, fell neatly into the right wing snare that was Shirley Sherrod. But then, they couldn’t see clearly, retreating, as they were, from the unrelenting onslaught of the Glenn Becks, Bill O’Reillys and Rush Limbaughs that have dominated the airwaves, fomenting fear and hysteria. “Everybody’s on the defensive with the

Continued on A6

Your History • Your Community • Your News
Your History • Your Community • Your News
Join the AFRO on Twitter and Facebook
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• Your News Join the AFRO on Twitter and Facebook PGCC Addresses Minority Business Shortage By

PGCC Addresses Minority Business Shortage

By George Barnette AFRO Staff Writer

Prince George’s Community College’s Center for Minority Business Development (CMBD) has a groundbreaking accelerator program which is helping to create minority business opportunities in Prince George’s County.

county, Peterson gave a $5 million grant to the college to help prepare local minority businesses to bid successfully on projects at the harbor. “Certainly, if we build their capacity to build and be successful in the bid, then companies can also begin to bid on other construction or development projects across the county and region,” said

“I’ve put together a program that will help you stay in business and also sustain and grow your business.”

The Peterson Co., which is building National Harbor, in conjunction with the Prince George’s County Council and the Office of the County Executive, realized that there wasn’t enough minority business participation in the construction of National Harbor. So, through the

Charlene Dukes, Ph.D., president of PGCC. “This really is a win-win for the county by recognizing the number of minority businesses we have in Prince George’s County and what those businesses can add relative to the quality of life in the county.”

Carl Brown Jr., executive director of the CMBD, has an extensive background in the private sector, local, state and federal agencies in addition to his time working for the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority. He’s seen minority businesses fail time after time and says he’s put together a plan that will make them successful. “I’ve put together a program that will help you stay in business and also sustain and grow your business,” Brown said. “I’ve seen it up close and personal with successful companies.” One company that has benefited is Warren Brothers Construction. Aaron Warren, who runs the company with his brother Shane, was granted a contract to weatherize homes of low- income families. Warren says in this economy, the training

Continued on A4

By Perry Green AFRO Sports Writer

Sorry, NBA fans, but it appears as if there won’t be another star trio assembled in the league as NBA star guard Chris Paul promised last week, according to several reports. After watching LeBron James, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh group up in Miami, Paul told reporters last week that he wanted to be traded from the New Orleans Hornets so that he can join up with fellow superstars too. But after a meeting with new Hornets General Manager Dell Demps and new head coach Monty Williams, it’s now likely that Paul will be Continued on A4

it’s now likely that Paul will be Continued on A4 AP Photo/Bill Kostroun, File This April

AP Photo/Bill Kostroun, File

This April 3 file photo shows New Orleans Hornets guard Chris Paul watching as the New Jersey Nets shoot free throws during the third quarter of an NBA basketball game, in East Rutherford, N.J. The 25-year-old guard says he loves New Orleans and holds his new coach, Monty Williams, in high regard. But he does want the Hornets to show their commitment to winning by upgrading the roster this summer.

Copyright © 2010 by the Afro-American Company

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The Afro-American, July 31, 2010 - August 6, 2010

AFRO National Briefs

Louisiana Supreme Court Justice, CNN Receive Civil Rights Awards The Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law will honor CNN and Louisiana Supreme Court Justice Bernette Johnson with its Distinguished Civil

Rights Advocate Award at a reception hosted in conjunction with the National Bar Association´s 85th Annual Convention in New Orleans. During the Aug. 11 event, the CNN network and Justice Johnson will be recognized for their civil

rights achievements and efforts to champion equality. “We are delighted to honor CNN and Soledad O’Brien, who will formally accept the award, for their outstanding commitment to coverage of minority and underserved communities,” said Lawyers’ Committee Executive Director Barbara Arnwine in a statement. “Ms.

Executive Director Barbara Arnwine in a statement. “Ms. O’Brien’s groundbreaking ‘Black in America’ and

O’Brien’s groundbreaking ‘Black in America’ and ‘Latino in America’ series were remarkable.” In response, O’Brien said CNN “work[s] hard to live up to our diversity missions…. We are pleased to be recognized by the Lawyers’ Committee for our role in shedding light on people and communities impacted by the important civil rights issues of our day.” The Lawyers’ Committee will also honor Johnson for her advocacy on behalf of the poor and disenfranchized and for youth mentorship. Johnson’s judicial career began in 1984, when she was elected to the Civil District Court of New Orleans, the first woman to hold that office, according to a press release. She has since worked as a champion for social justice, civil rights and community organizing.

Report: Strong Link Between Poverty, HIV The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently issued a first-of-its- kind analysis showing that 2.1 percent of heterosexuals living in urban areas with high rates of poverty in the U.S. are infected with HIV. The findings indicate a massive health concern for many low-income cities in America, who may now face generalized HIV epidemics as defined by the United National Join Program on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS). According to UNAIDS, a generalized epidemic is one that is “firmly established in the general population, with an overall HIV prevalence in the general population of more than 1 percent.” While subpopulations – such as men who have sex with men and intravenous drug users – contribute disproportionately to new HIV infections,

Russia Welcomes First Black Politician

Russian councilman Jean Gregoire Sagbo, seen in this July 20 photo, is Russia’s first Black
Russian
councilman Jean
Gregoire Sagbo,
seen in this
July 20 photo,
is Russia’s first
Black politician.
AP Photo
20 photo, is Russia’s first Black politician. AP Photo Jean Gregoire Sagbo, a 48-year-old African native,

Jean Gregoire Sagbo, a 48-year-old African native, recently made history after he was elected Russia’s first Black politician. Sagbo, who now serves as one of the 10 councilmen in the village of Novozavidovo, aims to use his newly elected position as an opportunity to rescue the village from drug addiction, pollution and poverty. “Novozavidovo is dying,” Sagbo told The Associated Press. “This is my home, my town. We can’t live like this.” Sagbo, a village resident for 21 years, first came to Russia in the 1980s to study economics in Moscow. He later met his wife and the two settled down to have a family. He went on to work in real estate and said he had no intentions of getting into politics, viewing it as a dirty and dangerous business. But the town council and various residents persuaded him to run for office, citing his various contributions to the community. Since his arrival in Novozavidovo, he has donated time and money to improve the village by cleaning up his apartment building, funding street improvements and organizing what is now an annual day of collecting garbage. Sagbo, one of an estimated 40,000 Afro-Russians, is not the only Black to run for office in Russia. Politician Joaquim Crima ran last year but was heavily defeated. Locals viewed Crima as the “Russian Obama” and since Sagbo’s arrival to office, many have given him the same nickname. Sagbo is unhappy with the moniker. “My name is not Obama. It’s sensationalism,” Sagbo told the AP. “He is Black and I am Black, but it’s a totally different situation.”

heterosexual transmission also sustains the epidemic without inclusion of these groups. The analysis revealed that poverty is the key demographic factor associated with HIV infection among heterosexual adults living in inner cities. However, the report found no differences in HIV prevalence by race or ethnicity in low- income populations. “These findings have

significant implications for how we think about HIV prevention. We can’t look at HIV in isolation from the environment in which people live,” said Jonathan Mermin, director of the CDC’s Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, in a statement. “This analysis points to an urgent need to prioritize HIV prevention efforts in disadvantaged communities.”

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July 31, 2010 - August 6, 2010, The Afro-American A3

County Employees Unhappy with Jack Johnson’s Performance

By George Barnette AFRO Staff Writer

As Prince George’s County Executive Jack Johnson concludes his last term in office, there are many who have a bad taste in their mouths about how he’s ending his tenure. Despite some of the gains the county has seen in school performance, public safety and commercial development, some are upset with the way Johnson has balanced the budget, which they say he’s done this at the expense of the 6,000-plus county employees. The crux of the issue is the furloughs county employees have had to endure over the past several years. “We view the Johnson administration as starting off very strong and ending very poorly,” said Andrew Pantelis, president of the Prince George’s County Professional Fire Fighters Association. “We started to make some strides in our working conditions and improving our staff and safety conditions at the beginning of his administration. “However, after the midterm, we started to see decline. What’s been

unfortunate is that this administration – with the exception of the current fiscal year – for the past couple of years has balanced the budget on the back of its workforce.” But people around the county are miffed at the furor over the furloughs. They say they understand and are sensitive to the needs of the county’s employees, but that all decisions were made in the best interest of the county. “The county executive has been a tremendous supporter of Prince George’s County Public Schools for the past eight years,” said William Hite Jr., superintendent of PGCPS. “My fear would be that his educational legacy would be judged on the last year and a half when his ability to fund education was negatively impacted by state and county revenue.” It’s an issue that led to a lawsuit that several labor unions, including the firefighters association and Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 89, filed against Jack Johnson and the Prince George’s County government. The original judgment went in favor of county employees as Judge Alexander Williams Jr. ruled Prince George’s

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County should pay $17 million to the county’s employees. In that judgment, Williams ruled the furloughs as unconstitutional. “While adequate deference must be accorded to the fiscal decisions of government officials, the Court cannot merely give lip service to the fundamental principles that undergird the Contract Clause of the United States Constitution,” Williams wrote. “To do otherwise, even in these severe economic times, would sanction the County running roughshod over the Unions, who in good faith negotiated a binding contract with the County.” However, a federal appeals court in Richmond overturned that ruling on July 20. In his ruling, Judge Robert Bruce King wrote that the furloughs did not impair the collective bargaining agreements of the unions as they all have language that

agreements of the unions as they all have language that AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin Many Prince George’s

AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

Many Prince George’s County workers are unhappy with furloughs Jack Johnson introduced.

says furloughs are possible. Union heads are disappointed about the

decision, saying the county had plenty of funds in reserve to avoid the furloughs. They

believe this was done to protect the county’s AAA bond rating, but the move will come at high political cost. “In terms of the perception of Mr. Johnson’s endorsement, I think it’s a negative,” Pantelis said. “I think people are looking for a fresh start and a fresh face and not an extension of the past eight years.” Johnson supporters refute this. They say that not only does Johnson have a record to stand on, they don’t even know why his name is being brought up in these discussions. “People are saying things that are totally fabricated,” said James Keary, spokesman for the Office of the County Executive. “What’s so amazing is Mr. Johnson isn’t even running for anything. I just wanted to set the record straight because he’s made tremendous accomplishments.”

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The Afro-American, July 31, 2010 - August 6, 2010

The Afro-American, July 31, 2010 - August 6, 2010

Rep. Rangel Seeks Fairness in Ethics Case

By Verena Dobnik Associated Press Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — Some of U.S. Rep. Charles Rangel’s constituents greeted

the embattled politician with

a warm handshake July 24,

saying his decades of public service outshine the ethics cloud hanging over him as he seeks re-election. “Charlie has done as much for this community as any politician has for theirs – or maybe more,’’ Herbert Collins, a retired transportation worker, said after Rangel gave a speech on health care. “He deserves another term because I don’t see anyone out there who can do any better.’’ But outside, in the sweltering heat, another Harlem resident was in no mood for compromise. “I

don’t think he’s fit to serve in Congress, he’s not reliable to represent us,’’ said 27-year- old A.G. Ousmane, who was selling $1 bottles of ice-cold water to passers-by from a cooler. “We need someone young and clear like a bottle of water, with a new swagger

– not with a history like

Rangel’s.’’ With temperatures in the 90s, Rangel arrived at Harlem Hospital dressed all in white, later telling reporters that he is counting on presumption of innocence until proven guilty. “I don’t want any special breaks,’’ he said. “All I want is fairness.’’ Rangel, 80, smiled broadly at supporters in an elevator that took him to the hospital’s second floor, where he spoke at a community health care

forum. He emphasized the need for preventive care – especially for conditions like diabetes, which is more common among Black Americans than others. “Where’s my

congressman?’’ one woman shouted at him before he spoke. “Hi darlin’! What a welcome!’’ he responded, to roars of approval. Supporters handed out fliers showing a picture on Rangel’s face and the words “He Delivers.’’ This was home turf for the politician who was once the youngest member of Harlem’s “Gang of Four’’ – the other three being Percy Sutton, Basil Paterson and David Dinkins. They mentored Rangel into a position of power he had not relinquished until this year. In March, the Democrat stepped down as chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee. And now the main issue for fellow Democrats is whether Rangel’s fight for his political life might weaken their chances of retaining majority in the House in the

November elections. The question is, can he win re-election despite his troubles? “Absolutely! Overwhelmingly!’’ said Sylvia Tyler, 72, a retired schoolteacher and president of the West Harlem Independent Democrats. Street vendor Curtis Parker, 47, said he hadn’t decided whether to vote for Rangel. Still, “I’m cool with him, I like Charlie Rangel; he’s a good guy.”

cool with him, I like Charlie Rangel; he’s a good guy.” AP Photo/Mary Altaffer Rep. Charles
cool with him, I like Charlie Rangel; he’s a good guy.” AP Photo/Mary Altaffer Rep. Charles
cool with him, I like Charlie Rangel; he’s a good guy.” AP Photo/Mary Altaffer Rep. Charles

AP Photo/Mary Altaffer

Rep. Charles B. Rangel, D-N.Y., addresses a health care forum at Harlem Hospital, July 24 in New York. Rangel says he doesn’t want “any special breaks” when it comes to charges that he violated ethics rules. The 80-year-old congressman got a warm welcome when he arrived at a hospital in New York City’s Harlem section on Saturday to speak about health care reform.

The building Rangel calls “my home hospital’’ is across the street from the Lennox Terrace apartments where the congressman is accused of using four rent-subsidized units in violation of New York

City law, according to people familiar with the allegations who were not authorized to discuss them publicly. They say he also is charged with violating ethics rules for use of congressional

stationery to raise money for a university center bearing his name and failure to report income as required on his annual financial disclosure forms. “These are alleged

violations,’’ he said Saturday, adding that stepping aside “wouldn’t really be the American thing to do.’’ The former federal prosecutor said he owes it “to the process’’ to first find out what the House Ethics Committee says, “and maybe, just maybe, I have evidence to prove that it’s not substantive.’’ Rangel said he can’t comment on specific allegations until the committee formally unveils them this week. But the ever- effusive congressman could not hold back his emotions on Saturday. Now more than ever, Rangel said, he is looking for “a lot of love and affection and support’’ from his constituents, which he has enjoyed in the past. He said he is deriving strength from his belief that all Americans have the right to “fairness, fairness, fairness what I’m searching for is fairness.’’

Associated Press Writer Larry Margasak in Washington contributed to this report.

Minority Business Shortage

Continued from A1

has helped tremendously in keeping his business viable. “In a recession, having those smaller, quicker jobs coming through – bringing in quicker revenue while you wait for larger jobs that have revenue come in a lot slower – will obviously help sustain our company,” Warren said. The contractor said because of the increased workload, he’s been able to interview and hire Prince George’s County residents, which he believes brings the program “full circle.” Program officials said the program distinguishes itself because it tailors itself to the needs of each individual company, providing a consulting, assessment and business development plan unique to each business. And it does this at no financial cost to the companies. All the companies have to do is commit to doing community service, commit to the program and complete the assignments they’re given. Warren’s company is just one of seven currently in the program. Dukes said each

just one of seven currently in the program. Dukes said each Courtesy Photo/Mona Rock Prince George’s

Courtesy Photo/Mona Rock Prince George’s Community College Communications

Carl Brown, executive director of the Center for Minority Business Development

company is as enthusiastic about the support they’ve been receiving from the CMBD as Warren. “They all appreciate what we’re trying to do for them,” said Dukes. Brown, however, is not resting. He says he’ll

continue to tweak the program to make sure it stays ahead of the curve. He understands that times change and with that, the program will need to adapt. “I continuously evaluate our programming,” said

Brown. “I continuously evaluate our resource partners that are delivering the educational aspect. I continuously monitor our participants to make sure they’re not just going through the motions.”

make sure they’re not just going through the motions.” No ‘Big Three’ Continued from A1 staying

No ‘Big Three’

Continued from A1

staying put. The three-time All-Star and 2004-05 Rookie of the Year award winner didn’t speak directly to the media, but the team released a statement from him that expressed his interest in remaining a Hornet. “The meeting went well. It was great to get an opportunity to sit down with coach Williams, [team] president [Hugh] Weber and our new general manager, Dell Demps,” Paul’s statement read. “I expressed my desire to win and I like what they said about the direction that they want to take the team. I have been a Hornet my entire career and I hope to represent the city of New Orleans and state of Louisiana for many years to come.” Just days earlier, several reports had Paul requesting the Hornets trade him to either the Orlando Magic, New York Knicks or Portland Trail Blazers. According

to ESPN, he even fired his agent and hired Leon Rose, who also represents LeBron. But trading a player of Paul’s caliber is highly unlikely, and he would have to wait at least two years before he can opt out of his current contract with New Orleans. After their meeting, the Hornets are now confident that Paul will stay in New Orleans longer than two years. “It was a very productive meeting. I was encouraged,” Demps told the media. “It was the first time I met Chris. It was a good opportunity for us to open the lines of communication. Chris had some very good He was energetic. He was open. He was honest. He showed that he wants to win, and that’s what we want to do as well.” Paul has averaged 19 points and 10 assists throughout his five seasons in the NBA, and is regarded as arguably the best point guard in the league.

July 31, 2010 - August 6, 2010, The Afro-American A5

Community Calendar

July 28

For more information: 301-

Ave., N.W. D.C. 6-12 p.m.

$80. For more information:

Metro, 4700 Garden City

area. The evening will be

http://www.meetup.com/

‘Dreamgirls!’

442-9652.

Guests at this fashion show

greenandgorgeous.eventbrite.

Drive, Hyattsville, Md. 8

topped off with dinner at

The

National Theatre,

will witness various pieces

com.

a.m. Attendees will board

Creole Restaurant complete

1321

Pennsylvania Ave., N.W.

Aug. 6

celebrating the colors of

the bus to Harlem, N.Y.,

with live entertainment.

D.C. 7:30 p.m. Experience the hit production of Dreamgirls

Green & Gorgeous Fashion Show

pink and green in honor of breast cancer awareness with

Aug. 7 New York Apollo Theater

and experience a guided tour of the historic Apollo

$110. For more information:

as

it comes to D.C. $56.50-

Renaissance Mayflower

support from the ladies of

Tour and More!

Theater as well as various

SistahsOnTheMove.

$151. For more information:

Hotel, 1127 Connecticut

Alpha Kappa Alpha. $50-

Depart New Carrollton

other destinations in the

1-800-477-7400.

Exhibit: Banned

DC Public Library, Martin

Luther King Jr. Branch, 901

G St., N.W. D.C. 9:30 a.m.-

5 p.m. Witness the work of

local artist Dana Ellyn whose paintings are inspired by notable banned books. For more information: 202-727-

2145.

July 29 Live on the Woodrow Wilson Plaza Woodrow Wilson Plaza, Ronald Reagan International Trade Center, 1300 Pennsylvania Ave., N.W. D.C. 12-1:30 p.m. In this weekly event, enjoy some of the best free performances in the area including hip hop, blues, salsa and swing. For more information: 202-312-1300.

July 31 Fourth Annual Bahama Mama Ladies Night

Northeast Garden Inn,

3400 Fort Meade Road,

Laurel, Md. 8-11 p.m. In this event, enjoy hors d’oeuvres, awesome door prizes, great music and more, all in

celebration of the ladies. $10-

$20. For more information:

443-355-4615.

Personality Traits Workshop Columbia Central Library, 10375 Little Patuxent Parkway, Columbia, Md. 1-3 p.m. Learn about

various personality traits and how each responds

in relationships. For

more information: www. divanetwork.org.

Aug. 1 National Black MBA Association-D.C. Chapter Fish Fry & Crab Boil Eastern County Recreation Center, 3310 Gateshead

Manor Way, Silver Spring,

Md. 12-4 p.m. Join the D.C.

Chapter of the National Black MBA Association in this fun day featuring great food, music, games and more. $5-

$25. For more information:

dcbmbaafishfrycrabboil.

eventbrite.com.

Aug. 2 Good Morning Senior News D.C. Public Library, Anacostia Branch, 1800 Good Hope Road, S.E. D.C. 9:30 a.m. Watch the news and

discuss current events. For more information: 202-715-

7707.

Aug. 3

The National Association of University Women Public Meeting

The Hyatt Regency

Washington on Capitol Hill, 400 New Jersey Ave., N.W. D.C. 7 p.m. The National Association of University Women will hold a public meeting in celebration of their 100th anniversary. At this event, members will be giving away 100 backpacks with school supplies to the Child and Family Service Center. For more information: www.

nauw1910.org.

Aug. 4

Network and Nibble

The City Club, 555

13th St., N.W. D.C. Enjoy delicious food and network with other business professionals in the area. $10.

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A6

The Afro-American, July 31, 2010 - August 6, 2010

July 31, 2010 - August 6, 2010, The Afro-American A3

Obama, NAACP Caught by Race Bait

Continued from A1

right wing media,” said Dianne Pinderhughes, professor of Africana studies and political science at Notre Dame University. “The NAACP had just come out of a dust up with Fox News and the tea party; they didn’t want to be vulnerable. [And] the administration didn’t want the Shirley Sherrod story to step on their lead, which was financial reform. Sherrod would be a ‘race’ story and they didn’t want a race story.” That’s because race, for the administration of the nation’s first Black president, has been the ultimate boogie man. In trying to elude right wing accusations of showing favoritism toward Blacks, the administration pirouettes around the issues – ignoring the need for targeted programs to transform Black communities that are, undeniably, disproportionately poor and disenfranchised, and firing Sherrod before properly

investigating the origin and authenticity of the video clip in which the Georgia-based agriculture official was depicted as racist. Attorney General Eric Holder’s assertion that America is a “nation of cowards” when it comes to race may or may not be true. But the Obama administration has proven that it is, many observers are saying.

Committee of the 1960s. Her reputation within the private sector and government was stellar. And, if they had looked at the entire video, they would have seen a story of racial healing – Sherrod’s father was murdered by the Klu Klux Klan – and a message – “We have to get to the point where race exists but it doesn’t matter” – that could have proven an

ensuring Shirley Sherrod was given a fair hearing, the NAACP, too, allowed itself to be “snookered” by Fox News and Andrew

Breitbart, the tea party supporter who released the misleading clip, into castigating Shirley Sherrod. That reaction was also triggered by fear, Johnson and others said, of Right Wing accusations of reverse racism. In offering his mea culpas, NAACP President Benjamin Jealous later said, “Next time we are confronted by a racial controversy broken by Fox News or their allies in the Tea Party like Mr. Breitbart, we will consider the source and be more deliberate in responding.” But an apology would not have been necessary if the civil rights organization has not been caught up in a “sound bite clash” with conservatives and had been more focused on its mission, many observers said. “We lose when we fight the fight plan of the opponent. They want to trivialize us and have us chasing in a ‘got you’ mentality,” said civil rights leader, the Rev. Al Sharpton on “The Tom Joyner Morning Show” July 21, adding that the Right Wing would only “distort” the truth “and set us up.” “The lesson here is we cannot let them

tell us how to fight our fight

sucked into an atmosphere where we will end up with more casualties than victories,”

“This could have been a wonderful bat to take out the ankles of the tea party, Fox News and the hard right Republican Party.”

“They run from racial issues like illegal

immigrants run from the INS,” said political analyst Jason Johnson, Ph.D., who teaches political science at Hiram College in Ohio. “Obama is an excruciatingly careful and

cautious politician

issues of race – whether it be Skip Gates or this – when there’s a racial issue they will backtrack like nobody’s business.” And so it was that the same element – which tried to dissuade Obama from speaking on race during the Rev. Jeremiah Wright imbroglio – drew and quartered Sherrod, firing her in a phone call while she drove. “They called me twice,” Sherrod told The Associated Press “The last time, they asked me to pull over to the side of the road and submit my resignation on my BlackBerry, and that’s what I did.” According to African-American leaders such as Congressman James Clyburn, D-S.C., and political analysts, such insensitive acts and the White House’s skittishness around race is due to the ignorance of West Wing White guys who have no sense of Black history or the Black community. “I don’t think a single Black person was consulted before Shirley Sherrod was fired – I mean c’mon,” Clyburn was quoted as saying by the New York Times. Even if Google was consulted, administration officials would have found enough information to question the charges against Sherrod: her husband Charles Sherrod was a Freedom Rider and a key member of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating

but when it comes to

invaluable tool. “This could have been a wonderful bat to take out the ankles of the tea party, Fox News and the hard right Republican Party,” said Johnson, much as Obama did when he explained the nuances of race during the Rev. Wright scandal. Instead, this incident will likely alienate Obama even more from his base, which has already begun to question his backbone in dealing with certain issues. “The president’s getting hurt real bad,” Clyburn told the Times’ Maureen Dowd. “He needs some Black people around him. “Some people over there are not sensitive

around him. “Some people over there are not sensitive or we will be “The lesson here

or we will be

“The lesson here is we cannot let them tell us how to fight our

fight

end up with more casualties than victories.”

or we will be sucked into an atmosphere where we will

at all about race. They really feel that the extent to which he allows himself to talk about race would tend to pigeonhole him or cost him support, when a lot of people saw his election as a way to get the issue behind us. I don’t think people elected him to disengage on race. Just the opposite.” Similarly, people depend on the NAACP to be a stalwart arbiter of social and racial harmony and defender of civil rights. Yet, instead of reviewing the video – which belonged to their organization – or even

Sharpton continued. “Our victory is to make sure the government protects us around jobs, around health care, around education and not going tit for tat with those on the Right Wing that only win and are inflated in such fights…. “We have real problems on the ground…. We cannot afford to be diverted with some side discussions; we have to keep our eyes on the prize. We are going to need to be sober and focused if we’re going to keep our people moving forward in this generation.”

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July 31, 2010 - August 6, 2010, The Afro-American

A7

Opinion

Our View

The Great American Racial Abyss

The summer of 2010 will not only be remembered for record-beating heat but also record-baiting racism. It’s ironic that 18 months into the historic presidency of Barack Obama this nation is sweltering in intolerance, ignorance and bickering, the likes of which civil rights icon W.E.B Du Bois might never have imagined would still exist. “The problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line,” Du Bois wrote in The Souls of Black Folks more than 110 years ago. Fast forward and today we are no less inundated with racial hatred and fear mongering antics than he was. Many last week were stirred up by factions of the tea party and conservative bloggers such as Andrew Breitbart; others were stirred up by actions of the New Black Panther Party—all for political gain and to destroy the first African-American presidency? Or, to maintain institutional inequity and racism? Though we are no longer legally segregated, the experiences of many Blacks in America are still demonstratively disparate from their White counterparts. Just check out the growing wealth gap for statistical evidence. This disparity is no accident. But we never make any sustainable headway to solve intractable racial inequities, such as job discrimination, in this nation of rich heritages and diverse ethnic origins. Instead, we get bogged down in knee jerk reactions and the predictable blame game sound bites when superficial instances and images

blame game sound bites when superficial instances and images nation very much divided with deeply embedded

nation very much divided with deeply embedded cultural and historical wounds that have yet to heal. Our elected leaders, clergy, educators and pundits must find a better way to move us across the color line. Simply calling for a national dialogue is clearly not enough when, as dramatized by the events of the past week, such only results in a race-baiting rhetoric spectacle—instead of creating a basis for germinating trust.

burst needlessly into bonfires. This month alone you can begin with the NAACP’s condemnation of racist elements of the tea party, then the tea party’s subsequent condemnation of the NAACP which set off the unethical media feeding frenzy surrounding Agriculture Department executive Shirley Sherrod. That, in turn, caused her swift and unfair firing, which has raised questions about the lack of diversity in the West Wing of the Obama administration. More than enough unproductive finger-pointing has ensued, right and left. Yet, as we wrap up this firestorm, we are no closer to understanding or trusting one another. Shame; yet another learning opportunity lost. Again, we will retreat to our respective corners until the next Molotov cocktail is lobbed on the racial embers. But Americans are destined to dance on the hot coals of race relations until we stop trying to deny that we are still a

Congress Acts to Protect ‘Main Street’ from Wall Street

Congress Acts to Protect ‘Main Street’ from Wall Street Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin Congress recently passed

Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin

Congress recently passed the Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, legislation that will protect consumers, investors and taxpayers by ensuring the financial services industry has the appropriate oversight to avoid the type of financial collapse that has rocked our nation and global markets. Over the last 30 years, our regulatory framework has not kept pace with financial innovations. Decreased

regulation led to irresponsible behavior by many financiers, investors, lenders and consumers. Collectively, we failed to follow established principles of finance – prudence, solvency and accountability. Many people played a part in the crisis – risky mortgage lenders, Wall Street firms, credit rating agencies – and American families and our nation’s economy suffered the consequences. The lesson learned from the financial disaster proves that big business cannot be left to police itself. There must be a regulatory structure that reigns in the financial

Reclaiming Civility

Adrienne

Washington

Sneers, jeers, and outright outrageous shouting. That is the ugly tenor that mars most

political forums during this critical mayoral campaign. It seems that what one lesser-known candidate called “the steamroller of gentrification” demolished Southern gentility along with Washington, D.C.’s “Chocolate City” moniker during this steamy campaign season. With barely six weeks to the Sept. 14 Democratic primary, all that potential voters have learned about the frontrunners, who would shepherd this city through the trying economic times ahead, is that Mayor Adrian Fenty and D.C. Council Chairman Vincent Gray have no great love for one another. At a forum in must-win Ward 4 last week, I was about to pose a question as a co-moderator when a frustrated man felt compelled to come to the podium and ask the audience and the candidates to remember the manners their grandmothers taught them. As I suggested to the civic committee sponsoring the forum at the Takoma Park Baptist Church, they selected written questions from the audience that stuck to what the candidates vow to do as mayor, not what they have done in the past in their respective posts within District government, which fuels the fracas. An anti-Fenty sentiment is more audible and visible than a

services industry without being unduly burdensome.

I believe the bill that passed Congress and has been signed

by the president strikes the right balance. It will put an end to the reckless gambling by Wall Street that created the need to help “too-big-to-fail” financial firms. It also creates the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, a new, independent consumer watchdog that will oversee all financial institutions offering consumers financial services or products. This bill goes a long way to restoring the order we need in

financial markets, improving oversight of the mortgage industry and addressing the numerous other issues that led to the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression.

I am particularly pleased that a bipartisan amendment I

offered to increase transparency in the oil and mining industries was included in the final reform package. My amendment requires all foreign and domestic companies to include in their annual reports how much they pay each government around the

world for access to its oil, gas and minerals. This provision will help ensure that the wealth of poor nations goes to its people and not to corrupt officials.

I was extremely pleased to have had the strong support of

Bono for this amendment. As the lead singer of U2 and head of the ONE campaign to fight poverty and disease, particularly in Africa, Bono worked very hard to build congressional support for my amendment. In addition to providing greater transparency, my amendment will help increase our energy

pro-Gray rally. And this race is tighter than anyone expected given the enormous war chest Mr. Fenty amassed so early on. It doesn’t help either frontrunner that there are so many contenders, including Leo Alexander, Sulaimon Brown, Ernest Johnson and Michael T. Green, crowding the field. The once-populist mayor is very slowly discovering how hard it is to defend a record rather than challenge one. His trademark arrogance is a major turnoff for most. But his detractors appear more angry about his failure to deliver on promises that he would champion the working class and improve their daily lives by creating more low-tech jobs, affordable housing and substantial and sustainable academic achievement unlike his predecessor. Instead, Mr. Fenty has even lost support of the D.C. Chamber of Commerce for his failure to rein in spending and by balancing the budget on the backs of small businesses and individuals by creating hundreds more in “fees,” which are thinly-veiled tax increases that fool no one. As one business owner put it, for example, “It’s one thing to talk about new facilities but there are no programs to go in them…instead of touting neighborhood renewal and creation, how do you create jobs.” Mind you, the District has double-digit unemployment in certain areas, and all the candidates need to do more than give lip service to bringing back vocational education when the job

security and improve overall governance in countries that are often riddled with corruption. I thank Bono for all his support. Two other amendments I introduced had strong bipartisan support and also were included in the reform package. They are:

- A permanent increase of the FDIC and credit union insurance funds that guarantees deposits up to $250,000; and, - An extension of whistleblower protections to employees of credit rating agencies such as Moody’s and Standard & Poor’s. Overestimates of value by these agencies contributed to the housing bubble that resulted in foreclosures and dragged down the housing market. For too long, our nation embarked on a policy of deregulating financial services – from insurance to banking to investing – easing rules and lessening oversight. Unfortunately, Wall Street took advantage and millions of Americans lost their jobs, their savings, their homes and their retirement security. Now it’s time to rebuild our management and oversight of the financial services industry in a way that protects our economy and our citizens. Enactment of this Wall Street reform bill moves us forward in restoring confidence to a badly broken system.

Benjamin Cardin represents Maryland in the U.S. Senate. His web site is: cardin.senate.gov. You can follow him regularly on Twitter @SenatorCardin or look for the latest videos at YouTube.com/SenatorCardin .

growth in the Washington metropolitan area is in highly-skilled, professional careers. This brings me to the most pressing issue apparently on the minds of voters – education. Clearly a factor in the anti-Fenty sentiment can be laid at the doorstep of his equally-arrogant and overrated school chancellor, Michelle Rhee. She unduly interjected herself into this election as if to threaten District voters because she seems to think the city cannot improve without her. It has and it will. Besides, is it possible to sustain lasting improvements by annihilating and alienating the workforce as well as parents under the guise of reform? The latest poor showing in test scores indicate otherwise. As for Mr. Gray, he presented an ambitious educational program designed to create learning opportunities from the cradle to colleges, but has yet to discuss in detail how to pay for it. The rub against the city council chairman is that he takes too long and is too deliberative in his actions. Such delay is frowned upon in instant messaging world and plays right into his detractors’ hands. Also, voters are aware that the city council signed off on the mayor’s initiatives and budgets. It’s time to put the white gloves back on and seriously debate issues – not personalities – with civility.

Adrienne T. Washington is a D.C.-based political commentator and journalism professor.

Letters to the Editor

reading proficiency from 30 to 43 percent and math proficiency from 27 to 44 percent.

I wonder how the Owens and Mr. Steele feel when their conservative savior Rush Limbaugh puts on his blackface parody when mimicking anyone Black? I don’t sound like that. I don’t think the aforementioned trio talks like that and most of the distinguished people he is attempting to humiliate and discredit do not sound and act like his staged buffoonery. I am sure Rush would say, “Oh no harm done; just entertainment folks.” How are Rush’s blackface or Williams’ prolific rants any different from Mel Gibson’s hate-spurring phone conversations? In the wee hours of the night the aforementioned trio must either do some serious soul searching or soul denying. How do you hem and haw with the 10,000-pound racist in the room yet refuse to believe that he/she exists? Someone should help them, seriously. I will do my best. They just need to contact me.

Phillip Ghee phillipghee@yahoo.com

Charter Schools

Erika Wadlington

Washington, D.C.

Every Washington, D.C. resident should welcome the three- year increase in D.C. Public Schools secondary students’ test scores reported in The Afro-American July 15. But the school system’s success during the three years that the mayor has been directly responsible for it is only part of the story. Some 38 percent of D.C. public school children are educated in public charter schools. Publicly-funded, but run independently of the mayor and school system, charters outperform the city-run schools from the fifth grade up. Ahead of the curve in improving student performance, over the last three years charters have raised student proficiency in their secondary schools in reading from 44 percent to 52 percent and in math from 44 percent to 58 percent. Charters’ success deserves to be celebrated alongside the school system’s achievement of taking secondary school

The 10,000-pound Racist in the Room

Please Mr. and Mrs. Owens (the African-American spokespersons for the Tea Party Express), please tell me that you were not completely hoodwinked by the likes of Mr. [Mark] Williams and others like him in your party who are seething racists. How can you be so blind in judgment of character? Or do you just turn a blind eye? Then there’s Michael Steele, the token RNC chairman. That’s not a dig, he knows it and so does his base. Michael Steele proclaims the tea party has no racist agenda. Steele is a man who only sees or acknowledges racism when his authority is questioned or his motives examined. This is a deeply disturbed individual.

A8

The Afro-American, July 31, 2010 - August 6, 2010

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Another Turn at Parenting

By Rev. Dorothy S. Boulware Special to the AFRO

It’s been 15 years since you sent your last child out on his own and turned the bedroom into that den or sewing room with the extra closet space. You take a deep breath to regroup and re-imagine your own life and, without warning, you’re thrust back into the depths of it all with a new twist. Your Temptations and Luther are interrupted

with the strains of Lil Wayne and Rihanna. “Law and Order” is challenged by reality shows and maybe even SpongeBob. Convenient one-pot meals are challenged by McDonald’s and similar demands by people who don’t know that French fries do come from potatoes. There’s a budget to be juggled, a pantry to be restocked, new math to be learned, Internet language to be mastered – a world

to be learned, Internet language to be mastered – a world Courtesy photo Family Matters group

Courtesy photo

Family Matters group and guests attended a “Listen and Learn” session, or a Mom’s Congress, sponsored by Secretary of Education Arne Duncan.

Grandparenting Resources

Baltimore City

Prince George’s County

Baltimore Grandfamilies Program www.baltimoregrandfamilies.org

Progressive Life Center Kinship Care Program www.ntuplc.org

410-381-4800

301-773-1701

Grandparent Family Connections www.family.umaryland.edu

410-706-8716

National

www.aarp.org/relationships/ grandparenting This section of the AARP site presents news, resources, tips and other items of interest to grandparents who are parenting.

Grandparents and Other Relative Caregivers www.lighthealth.org 410-225-2600 x111

District of Columbia

www.childcareaware.org Find best options for child care.

www.cfsa.dc.gov Information on the Grandparent Caregiver program that provides monthly financial assistance for families not in the child welfare system.

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601 E St., NW

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202-434-2296

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Caring Grandparents of America

400 Seventh St., NW, Suite 302

Washington, DC 20004-2206

202-783-0952

Grandparents on the Move Contact: Mary D. Jackson, founder and director 202-575-2811

National Center on Permanency for African-American Children at Howard University www.ncpaac@howard.edu

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8100

www.opm/gov/ employment_and_benefits/ worklife/officialdocuments/ handbooksguides/kinshipcare Kinship care characterizes the relationship of children being raised by relatives or family members other than their parents.

www.chhs.gsu.edu/nationalcenter This site is tasked to improve the wellbeing of children raised in intergenerational families and promote best practices in service delivery and foster research relevant to the formation of sound policy.

www.grandparenting.org The Grandparenting Foundation uniquely pinpoints “Grandparent Power,”grandparenting for

elders with or without biological grandchildren.

turned upside down in a matter of moments with no time to manage the accompanying grief around the circumstances that created this situation. With the onslaught of violence, substance abuse, incarceration and a determined unwillingness to accept parenting responsibility, grandparents and even great-grandparents are finding themselves in the unexpected place of parenting again. It’s not such an unusual situation. More than 4 million grandchildren live with grandparents according to Census statistics published by the National Center on Grandparents Raising Children. Another 1.5 million live with other relatives, all of these called “kinships.” For the District of Columbia that translates into more than 8,000 grandparents who are responsible for meeting basic needs of their grandchildren. For Maryland the number is 50,974 and for Baltimore City, 13,707, according to Census figures posted on

www.grandsplace.org. “I thought I was through,” a common sentiment, was expressed by a Baltimore parenting grandparent who wants to be known as “Bodie” to protect the privacy of her granddaughter. Bodie’s daughter declared she liked her lifestyle – the one she’d adopted under the influence of street drugs – and that she wasn’t going to change. So Bodie found herself raising her 11-month-old granddaughter who had to be weaned off methadone at birth and spent almost an entire month in the hospital. “Her father wasn’t sure he was the father and relinquished all rights to her,” Bodie said. So he and his family were no help in spite of the fact that ultimate DNA testing revealed he was 99.99 percent her father. “It’s been a struggle. They told me she might not mature as fast as other children and that she’d most likely have problems in school,” Bodie said. But that has not been the case. “She’s done well since entering Head Start

the case. “She’s done well since entering Head Start © Photodisc More than 4 million grandchildren

© Photodisc

More than 4 million grandchildren live with grandparents in the United States, according to Census figures.

at 3. She’s had perfect attendance and is on the honor roll and the principal’s list,” Bodie said. “I’ve never even had to help her with her homework,” she says of the now 11-year-old. The 61-year-old grandmother said she

doesn’t know what she would have done without the help she received as a member of the Family Matters group – one of six, led by Annette Saunders. “Every time she finds out about anything, she calls me,” Bodie said. “I’ve had

Continued on B4

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AS2512ST

B2

SENIORGUIDE

The Afro-American, Summer 2010

For Seniors, the Open Sea Awaits

By Paulette Simone AFRO Multimedia Reporter

The rolling water crashes against the stern of the ship as the boarding bridge begins to fold. Loved ones shout their goodbyes from the dock as passengers aboard the

colossal vessel vanish to their staterooms and prepare for

a week on the sea. For seniors trying to escape the monotony of day-to- day life in the Washington, D.C.-Baltimore metro area, cruises are providing an easy, stress free way to travel. Deborah Kennedy, a travel agent in Baltimore City for over 20 years, says cruises are a wonderful way for seniors to travel. “The discounts make many trips affordable for seniors traveling on a budget,” says Kennedy. And with Carnival Cruise Lines and Royal Caribbean excursions leaving from Baltimore’s South Locust Point Cruise Ship Terminal, cruises offer less hassle. So, older adults in the area are casting aside the expense and aggravation of trips by air – with their extra security checks and increased costs – and taking to the seas in droves. Baltimore has seen an incredible boom in the cruise business over the last few years, according to Richard Scher, spokesman for the Maryland Port Administration. Just two years ago an estimated 27 cruise ships left from local ports. In 2010, it has more than doubled to 91. With the new addition of Carnival Cruise Lines’ 2,124-passenger, year-round Carnival Pride cruise program, and Royal Caribbean’s year-round trips, the options offered to Baltimore residents and those nearby are exponentially greater. As the owner of DEK Travel agency and a senior herself, Kennedy is well acquainted with the benefits

offered to older adults cruising out of Baltimore. She and

a group of friends have scoured the Caribbean by way

of cruise trips. They have taken on Hawaii twice, the

Panama Canal, and South America. She is preparing to leave for Alaska next month. “Cruising is fun all by itself,” she said. Like Kennedy’s group of friends, many seniors in the area have caught on to the wave—postponing their regular line dancing classes and card games and scheduling cruises to the Caribbean instead. Ships almost three football fields long feature many activities for the adventure-seeking passenger. Piano, sports and cocktail bars along with golf courses and casinos are favorites of senior travelers. “Shipboard [golf] lessons are conducted at a covered and lighted ‘driving range’ and utilize state-of-the-art ‘V1’ teaching computers featuring side-by-side comparisons with top tour players and sophisticated video analysis,” according to the Carnival Cruise Line Web site. For those looking for a relaxing retreat, one can enjoy the spa, saunas, or lay poolside on one of the boat’s decks. Guests also enjoy top notch dining. For example, in a recent press release, the Carnival Pride said it offers a wide array of mouthwatering options. “In addition to the full-service two-

level Normandie restaurant featuring expansive menus and wine lists, Carnival Pride includes Mermaids Grille, a casual poolside eatery offering breakfast, lunch and dinner alternatives and a 24-hour pizzeria.” The release also notes the ship provides 24-hour service to

The release also notes the ship provides 24-hour service to Photo Courtesy Carnival Cruises The Carnival

Photo Courtesy Carnival Cruises

The Carnival Pride, operated by Carnival Cruise Lines, is just one of several cruise ships sailing from Baltimore.

staterooms as well as vegetarian dining and healthy menu selections on all dining room menus. “These ships now have basically everything for everybody from young children to teens, middle-aged people to elderly citizens. These ships today are not your ships of 30-40 years ago that offered just a handful of activities. These ships offer something for everybody,” Scher said. And so for seniors with available schedules and a passion to see the world, the open sea awaits.

Commentary

What Health Care Reform Means for Seniors

awaits. Commentary What Health Care Reform Means for Seniors By U.S. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski Saving

By U.S. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski

Saving and strengthening Medicare was one of my main goals as we worked to reform health care. Seniors have worked hard and played by the rules all their lives. They paid into the system so they would have health care they can count on. Medicare is not an entitlement, it’s an earned benefit. And we’ve got to

keep it strong. The health care reform law – the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act – will help people like Fran Garfinkle, a 70-year old retired small business owner and cancer survivor from Bethesda, Md. Like so many others, she’s on a fixed income. She and her husband pay for a Medicare plan, Medicare supplemental plan, prescription drug plan, and dental plan. Last year, they also paid 100 percent of her drug costs. Fran and other seniors in Medicare Part D face what’s called the “donut hole” – a gap in prescription drug coverage where Medicare offers no help paying for drug expenses between $2,830 and $6,440 a year. Health care reform begins closing that donut hole that’s been so hard to swallow. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act gives seniors who hit the donut hole relief with a $250 rebate check. Already this year, 80,000 seniors have fallen into the donut hole and began receiving the first rebate checks on June 10. Beginning in 2011, seniors will receive a 50 percent discount on brand- name drugs while in the donut hole, and the donut hole will be completely closed by 2020. In addition to closing the donut hole, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act extends Medicare’s solvency until 2026, provides seniors with new preventative health benefits, improves care coordination and patient safety, and establishes a new voluntary long- term care insurance program to help cover the costs of support services that help seniors age in place. Our seniors’ health care should never depend on the bull of political promises or the bear of the market. Health care reform helps assure that seniors have access to the health care they need and deserve. I will continue to fight to make sure that the federal government is doing all it can to help all seniors live healthy lives. You can count on me to make sure we honor the promises made to our seniors – today, tomorrow and always.

Democrat Barbara Mikulsi represents Maryland in the U.S. Senate.

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Summer 2010, The Afro-American

SENIORGUIDE

B3

Baby Boomers Keep the Spark Alive in the Spa

By Krishana Davis Special to the AFRO

Alive in the Spa By Krishana Davis Special to the AFRO AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee A treatment

AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee

A treatment room in the spa area aboard the Norwegian Epic cruise ship. The spa offers three different kinds of massages, teeth whitening, acupuncture and a medi-spa doctor

on hand to administer Botox and other cosmetic injections.

men and women of varying ages, they service a larger number of more mature clients. Seniors over the age of 55 patronize the Lounge once a month on average and are recommended two specific treatments to keep their bodies looking magnificent.

“Skin’s Swedish Massage is geared towards our senior clients,” explained Mathis, which helps to elevate joints and improve circulation while providing relaxation. Another recommended service for mature adults is the Vitamin Smoothie Facial, which rejuvenates the skin by exfoliating with alpha hydroxyl acids and lactic acids. By resurfacing the skin it improves the client’s elasticity, resurfaces the skin, and enforces skin cell turnover leaving the skin appearing refreshed and younger. Mathis said, “The experience of relaxation, cell renewal and increased elasticity are three of the main essential elements that attract our current and new senior clients.” Skin Beauty Lounge also offers services that can enhance their clients’ love life. Mathis highly recommends Brazilian waxes to her clients.

With new, advancing medical technology allowing “baby boomers” to live longer, healthier lives, older adults are becoming more concerned with keeping their bodies looking as young as they feel – and having their lives and relationships reflect that rejuvenation. That’s why beauty spas in the Washington, D.C. area more and more are offering services to seniors to help improve their lives, including maintaining the spark in their romantic relationships. Among the best treatments is massage. According to the American Massage Therapy Association, in 2008 massage therapy was recommended or encouraged over 57 percent of the time to patients who discussed it with their doctor. Massage therapy has several therapeutic benefits and shown effectiveness in lowering back pain, reducing post-operative pain, decreasing osteoarthritis pain in the knee, lowering

blood pressure, and boosting the body’s immune system functioning—all issues that may ail older adults. Meka Mathis, owner of The Skin Beauty Lounge – a Capitol Hill spa that offers a variety of services including skin waxing, bikini therapy, lash and brow tinting, skin facials, intensive facial treatments and skin body treatments – said while the spa caters to

Skin Beauty Lounge’s services are not just for women. Mathis explained that Skin caters to men, as well. “Our male seniors also have options than can enhance a client’s love life, like having a back wax or back facial – both of which will be appealing to their respective wife, friend, or partner,” said Mathis. Skin Beauty Lounge also does a monthly promotion to provide affordable bonus services to their clientele.

Study: Blacks Slow to Write Living Wills

By Melanie R. Holmes AFRO Staff Writer

Nobody came to help when Tina Jordan frantically called for doctors to assist her grandmother who was flat-lining in her hospital bed. But the doctors knew what Jordan didn’t – her grandmother completed an advanced directive that requested she not be resuscitated if her heart began to fail. “We were so bitter

“Many people do not complete an advanced directive out of fear of the subject of death or the thought of dying.”

so they don’t experience what she did. “An advance directive is a living will,” Jordan said. “It tells the doctor what kind of medical treatment they would like to receive. It’s an absolutely free form that you can download off the Internet, [but] it causes a lot of problems in our community.” Many people do not

anymore problems.” As she completed the four-year program, Jordan had her own set of problems to overcome. She was a single parent who had gone through a divorce prior to the program. She worked as a full-time social worker at the Maryland Department of Human Resources Child Protective Services Division while going to school full time and running a business. And amid it all, she had to deal with the sudden passing of her mother. “But I did it,” she said, noting that only 3 percent of all African Americans have a doctorate of philosophy degree. Originally from Greenville, N.C., Jordan received her associate’s degree in allied human services from the Community College of Baltimore in 1996; her bachelor’s degree from Morgan in 2000; and her master’s in social work from the University of Maryland in 2001. She attended Morgan State University’s doctoral program as a member of the inaugural class approximately four years ago and was also the representative of her class. “Tina, from the beginning of the process, was an outstanding student,” said Jay Chunn, chairman of the committee. “She selected a topic that was very much in demand from the stand point of new knowledge and was able to do a landmark study. She should be able to move it into publication quite rapidly as well as give seminars and workshops to educate not only people in the church but also the public in general.” With her degree, Jordan

plans to hold conferences on the importance of advanced directives as a health initiative, not just

in the event of death, for all people, but within the Black community specifically. She would also like to teach social work at a historically Black college while continuing her research.

“I really wanted to share this because this issue is powerful,” she said. “It’s not just a form to fill out when you’re going to die. It’s just as much a part of health and living as it is in dying.”

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because we didn’t know what this form was,” Jordan, 43, said. Subsequently, Jordan based her doctoral dissertation on advanced directives and the factors that contribute to many African Americans not filing the forms. She successfully defended her research at Morgan State University’s School of Social Work in June, becoming the first person to earn a doctorate of philosophy from the university’s new program. Now, she intends to inform other Black families of the importance of advanced directives

complete an advanced directive out of fear of the subject of death or the thought of dying. However, she says advanced directives are not only important for the individual, but for their family as well. The difficulty in making decisions about caring for an ailing loved one can drive families apart. “That causes people not to speak to one another,” Jordan said. “Those little things cause so much confrontation in our community and we have enough as it is. We don’t need for a small form that is absolutely free to add

B4

SENIORGUIDE

The Afro-American, Summer 2010

Minorities with Cognitive Impairment Live Longer

Older African American and Latinos with cognitive disorders such as Alzheimer’s survive longer and are less likely to be placed in nursing homes, according to new research presented earlier this month at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference on Alzheimer’s Disease 2010. “These results have significant implications for caregiver burden and community resources,” said Maria Carrillo, Ph.D., Alzheimer’s Association’s senior director of medical and scientific relations. “If, as the study suggests, more African-American and Latino families are taking care of their loved ones with significant cognitive impairment in their homes for longer periods of time, there is a greater than anticipated need for culturally-appropriate dementia care resources and home and community- based services for these populations.” The results take on even greater significance given that compared to Whites, African Americans are more than twice as likely and Latinos are 1½ time more likely to develop Alzheimer’s and dementia, Carillo said. In the study, conducted by researchers at the University of California, San

Francisco, more than 7,500 older people, 10 percent African-American and 6 percent Latino, were assessed over an eight-year period to gauge the relationship between significant cognitive decline, nursing home placement and mortality. During the study, 23 percent of participants died and 14 percent experienced significant cognitive decline. The researchers found that the proportion of persons with significant decline did not vary by race. However, of those with significant cognitive decline, older African Americans and Latinos had statistically significant fewer placements in nursing homes compared to older Whites, and were less likely than similar Whites to die during the follow up period. “Our results may indicate that African- American and Latino adults have a higher burden from significant cognitive decline than White older adults,” said Kala M. Mehta, DSc, MPH, one of the researchers. “This may impact the adults themselves, their caregivers and their communities. Thus, our findings support the need for culturally-appropriate dementia care, support services and home care resources for African-American and Latino communities in the U.S.”

Another Turn at Parenting

Continued from B1

a typing class and been able to get a computer for my granddaughter. They’ve sponsored retreats for the children. It’s been a real

blessing to me.” “Grandfamilies,” as they are called, experience all kinds of stress and the inherent trauma in

the circumstances that bring them together. “They’re usually new to the situation when they first come to the group. They’re overwhelmed and frustrated,” said Saunders. “They come looking for answers and resources. They want to know where to find help.” And they find a “sense of relief as they become part of a circle of support,” Saunders said of the groups that have had only a few grandfathers in her six years with the program. Morrisella Middleton found that sense of relief. The grandchildren she raised first lost their father, who had been incarcerated for much of their young lives, to an aggressive cancer and, eventually, their mother to a massive heart attack. So they were also in need of specialized grief counseling. That’s when she found Saunders’ group. “I wasn’t ready to take care of grandchildren,” Middleton admitted. One day she found her granddaughter “standing in trash up to her knees, in filth, with a bag on her arms full of powdered donuts and potato chips,” Middleton said. “I called 911 and when the police officer finally arrived, he said he’d have to take the child out of the house. I told him that was what I wanted.” “I hadn’t been ready for the little girl, and five years later I had to take the little boy,” Middleton said. “Being in foster care where I could get him on weekends was one thing, but when they began to talk adoption, I went and got him.” She says of the support group that has seen her through her grandson’s lead paint poisoning and her own breast cancer, “We became friends, we became compatriots; we became sisters.” Middleton’s granddaughter is now 22; her grandson, 17. “I don’t know where I’d be without the help I received from them.”

Profile: HeartFields Assisted Living at Bowie

By Kiara Shamberger Special to the AFRO

The socialization and interaction between residents and staff also add to the close-knit nature of the community and distinguishes HeartFields, said Executive Director Lisa Leppado. Like other facilities, there are the “social butterflies” and the “grumpy” residents, but somehow they all share a bond. “When I go into the community I see residents as my grandmother or grandfather,” said Joey Estrella, HeartFields’

regional food/dining director. The community also offers an array of services to the residents, including pediatric care, physical therapy and psychiatric care. A medical doctor is

How does one cope with the idea of leaving a loved one in someone else’s

care? For most – not very well. But for children forced to leave parents in assisted living facilities, knowing that father or mother is safe and well attended goes a long way to easing their misgivings. That’s the kind of “five-star” service

HeartFields Assisted Living at Bowie says it offers its clients. Opened in January 1999 on the 7600 block of Laurel Bowie Road in Bowie, Md., the facility offers 24-hour care to 52

residents at a time, including those seniors who need short-term care after a hospital stay, or when family members travel out of town. It is one among 200 independent living and assisted-living facilities operated by Five Star Senior Living. Resident Service Director Daisy Farmer says HeartFields prides itself on its quality of care, and its “people first” philosophy. Compared to other facilities, Farmer said, “They might give five star care … but we don’t only say it, we demonstrate it.” That care begins with the décor. As you walk through the front door, fireplaces, sofas, and dining tables create a family- type, peaceful environment that welcomes residents in.

“The socialization and interaction between residents and staff also add to the close-knit nature of the community and distinguishes HeartFields

on call at all times, along with a nurse practitioner, who is on site once a month. One distinguishing service is the memory care program, Bridge to Rediscovery, which assists residents with Alzheimer’s. The program helps residents rediscover important things in their life that they can connect with through hands- on activities, including special events, such as “An Evening of Elegance,” which helps residents remember a moment in their life when they had to dress up. Said Farmer of the program, “We bridge the past to the future.”

For more information on HeartFields Assisted Living at Bowie, please visit www.heartfieldsassistedlivingatbowie.com.

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July 31, 2010 - August 6, 2010, The Afro-American C1

T he Lake Arbor Jazz Festival was held recently on the grounds of the Lake
T he Lake Arbor Jazz Festival was held
recently on the grounds of the Lake
Arbor Community Center, Mitchellville,
Katherine Williams, Alison
Gentry and Crystal Williams
Capitol Jazz Fest
Md.
It was a day and evening of smooth jazz
Challenge winner
and soulful entertainment that featured some
of Washington, D.C.’s finest contemporary jazz
and R & B groups, including the 2005 Capital
Jazz Fest Challenge winner Phaze II, Jazz
trumpeter Freddie Dunn, Keith Killgo, former
drummer with Donald Byrd; Charles H. Flowers
high school Jazz group, Primary Element and
D.C.’s own Spur of the Moment.
Remarks were given by Pr. George’s County
Executive Jack Johnson and State Del. Aisha
Braveboy and comedian Chris Thomas served
as the host. Delicious food from food vendors
was available as well as arts, crafts, jewelry and
clothing merchandise. The attendees brought
out their blankets and lawn chairs and kicked
back with family and friends to
Phase II performs
contemporary jazz
music.
Under cloudy skies, the jazz lovers
came to out to enjoy the various jazz
musical groups who performed.
Members of the Maryland Park Police also
Comedian Chris
enjoyed the relaxing music.
Lisa Brown, co-producer, and Kevin
Thomas was the
event host.
Alexander, producer of the jazz festival
enjoy the delightful sounds
of jazz in the air.
The Wingfield Family enjoys an afternoon
Jack Johnson, Prince George's County executive, State Del.
High school jazz group Primary Element opened the
of jazz listening.
Aisha Braveboy, and Sheriff Michael Jackson
festival with some smooth jazzy grooves.
O n July 17, members of Zeta
Phi Beta, Eta Pi Zeta chapter
gathered at the East County
musical selections from a DJ and a
raffle drawing.
Zeta Phi Beta Sorority was
founded at Howard University on
Jan. 16, 1920, and is one of the
largest women’s organizations in
the world. The Eta Pi Zeta chapter
was founded in Montgomery
County, Md., in 1973 and was
among the first predominately
African-American social and
community service organizations
established in the county.
R adio One-DC recently held a meet and greet luncheon reception
formally introducing its new Vice President/General Manager Chris
Wegmann. In his new position, Wegmann will oversee the following
Community Center in Silver Spring
for an afternoon of food, music
and camaraderie. In addition to the
assortment of food, guests enjoyed
District-area stations: WKYS-FM (93.9), WMMJ-FM (102.3), WPRS-FM (Praise
104.1), WOL-AM(1450) and WYCB-AM. Community leaders as well as local
media personalities came out to welcome Wegmann. Washington- based
catering company SUGAR provided the luncheon menu as attendees dined
on a very tasty and healthy cuisine. Radio One-DC is a part of Radio One, the
“Urban Media Specialist,” which has over 50 radio stations located throughout
the United States.
Photos by KMG
Peggy Morris,
Sister4Sister
Frances Proctor enjoys
Network; Chris
a succulent crab.
Wegmann; JC,
Praise 104.1
announcer;
Pastor Bob
Mathis, Anacostia
Chapel Church
Eta Pi Zeta member Shaila Jackson
One of the
youngest crab
fest attendees,
Ryyan Brown
Chapter member
Kemah G. Bolokai
serves food to
a long line of
Ron Burke, Washington Informer;
attendees.
Chris Wegmann; Edgar Brookins and
Mayor Grant, Hyattsville, Md.
Isaac Jones Jr., Taneea Byrd, Jessica Jones,
Isaac Jones Sr. and Victoria Johnson
Sheila Stewart,
Dr. Charlene
Dukes,
president,
The Eta Pi Zeta Crab
Prince George's
fest winner walks to
Community
receive her prize.
College and
Tony Lewis,
FAME Music
and Arts
Michael and Regina Winans, Jeanne Theismann
Academy
of Theismann Media and Pastor Timothy Gaines
Eta Pi Zeta member Tanisha
Imani Davis and Carol Kelly-Land
Wright dances with her nephew,
Joseph Wright, 4
Chris Wegmann, vice president and general manager of Radio One-DC; Franklyn
Malone, president/CEO, 100 Fathers; Herman Odom Jr., director, Office of Ex-Offenders
Members of the Eta Pi Zeta chapter. Included in the picture are chapter President
Affairs, District of Columbia and Ray Savoy, Langston Golf Course
Jannina Bryan (first row, third from right) and Zeta Phi Beta Maryland State Director
Gwenneth Corujo (first row, second from left)
Photos by Rob Roberts
Photos by Danita Delaney

C2

The Afro-American, July 31, 2010 - August 6, 2010

C2 The Afro-American, July 31, 2010 - August 6, 2010

July 31, 2010 - August 6, 2010, The Afro-American C3

Extras on Afro.com: Film Review Salt
Extras on Afro.com: Film Review Salt

Singer Ne-Yo Talks Life, ‘Libra Scale’

By AFRO Staff

R&B crooner Ne-Yo is known for his catchy hits, dashing good looks and songwriting skills. But the popular singer said he’s more than a passing pop music fad in a recent interview with ESSENCE.com. The 30-year-old Nevada native is preparing for the release of his fourth album, Libra Scale, which is based on a sci-fi story he wrote. “The story of Libra Scale follows an average joe garbage man named Jerome and his two buddies, Clyde and Leroy. The three guys, when not busting their butts working their crummy 9 to 9, regularly sit around and talk about what each of them would do if they had money, power and fame,” Ne-Yo told ESSENCE. com. “Opportunity knocks one night when a being from the stars named Numinous comes to the guys with the promise of the money, power and

comes to the guys with the promise of the money, power and Courtesy Photo Ne-Yo told

Courtesy Photo

Ne-Yo told ESSENCE.com that he wants to keep his personal life personal.

fame they’ve always wanted, under one condition; they have to agree to become superheroes and protect the city from an unknown evil that’s on its way to the planet with the potential to destroy it. “Time passes and the guys are getting everything they always dreamed of, when Jerome gets something he didn’t bargain for -- an instant infatuation with a young woman…Ultimately, Jerome is forced to choose. Weighed on a Libra’s scale, is it love, or money, power and fame? The singer went on to call the album, which will be released in September, “seasoning salt” for a “bland” music industry. When he’s not creating music, Ne-Yo prefers to stay out of the public eye and admits he has difficulty finding balance between the humdrum of the celebrity world and personal time.

In an interview with EBONY, the singer-songwriter announced he and girlfriend Monyetta Shaw were expecting a child and the father-to- be said he’s in a “really good place right now.” As he prepares for the release of Libra Scale, Ne-Yo said he wants fans to focus on one particular aspect of his life. “I want people to look at me for what I give them to look at: my art, my music, my creativity. My personal life is not for display. I don’t ask you about who you take to your bed at night or what happens when you get there, so what makes you feel that you have the right to know that about me, or the right to even ask? I love my fans, I love being an artist, but I’m a person first,” Ne-Yo told ESSENCE.com. “And just like all people, there are some elements of my life that are just none of your damn business.”

Prison Realities Explored in New Poetry Collection

By Krishana Davis Special to the AFRO

NAACP Image Award winner Reginald Dwayne Betts has returned to bookshelves with a powerful collection of poems in his latest work Shahid Reads His Own Palm. Through his poetry, the national spokesman for the Campaign for Youth Justice recounts his personal experiences and those of other inmates he encountered during a nine-year stint in some of Virginia’s most dangerous adult prisons. Betts was sentenced to

jail after carjacking a man in December 1996 at the age of 16. He kept his sanity in prison by devouring one book at a time, and eventually uncovered his gift for writing poetry. In Shahid Reads His Own Palm, Betts allows his readers to become engulfed in the minds and experiences of different men that have been imprisoned and their perceptions of judgments imposed upon them from the outside world. The poems, in often graphic detail, explain the chilling truths of prison lives weighed by lost dreams and regret.

“Each poem is just there to present the humanity of

the people that live there [in prisons], the humanity and the brutality… All of the poems try to get at what I

experienced as witness and prisoner,” Betts told the AFRO. In thought-provoking poems such as “What your Mother Asks, and What I Never Say,” Betts sheds light on controversial subjects such as homosexual experiences in prison. Although Betts said he does not favor any of his poems over another, he is

currently contemplating, “Ode to a Kite,” which illustrates the stunting of one’s dreams while he
currently contemplating, “Ode
to a Kite,” which illustrates
the stunting of one’s dreams
while he or she is imprisoned.
Betts said he has grown fond
of “the way

that it captures the importance of the written word and what words can do.” Since prison, Betts has revitalized his life. As a May 2009 graduate of the University of Maryland, College Park, Betts gave the student commencement

Courtesy Photos

Local author R. Dwayne Betts returns with collection of poems.

speech as his graduation. He has been awarded the Holden Fellowship from the Warren Wilson MFA Program for writers, the Soros Justice

Fellowship from the Open Society Institute, a Cave Canem Fellowship and a scholarship to the Bread Loaf’s Writer’s Conference.

Reggae Star Gyptian Flies High with New Release

By AFRO Staff Reggae crooner Gyptian, known for his hits “Beautiful Lady” and the socially
By AFRO Staff
Reggae crooner Gyptian, known for
his hits “Beautiful Lady” and the socially
conscious “Serious Times,” released his
latest album Hold You on July 20. The
CD
features 15 tracks and two iTunes
exclusives.
Gyptian exploded on the reggae
scene in 2005 and released several
internationally popular songs
like
“My Name is Gyptian,” “Is
There a Place” and “Mama Don’t
Cry.” The dreadlocked singer,
nicknamed Gyptian as a child
because he frequently tied a
shirt around his head like
an Egyptian pharaoh,
is
currently touring
the
United States
through October.
As he continues
to develop
a
strong
a new genre, “sexy reggae music.”
His latest hit “Hold Yuh” featuring
rapper Nicki Minaj, peaked at No. 91 on the
Billboard Hot 100, No. 33 on the Billboard
R&B/Hip-Hop Chart, No. 6 on the
Billboard Heatseekers Songs
Chart and had been at the top
of the Reggae Digital Songs
chart for nine consecutive
weeks, according to a press
release.
Born in 1983 as
Windel Beneto Edwards in
Jamaica, Gyptian was raised
by his Christian mother Pauline
and his Rastafarian father, Basil.
While neither parent pressed
their religious beliefs on
Gyptian, he grew up
influenced by both his
parents’ backgrounds
and allows these
elements to influence
his music today.
American fan
base, media
outlets are
calling Gyptian
the
forerunner in
For more
information about
Gyptian visit gyptian.
com
Gyptian
Courtesy Photo

‘Love, Peace and Soul’ Comes to DVD

‘The Best of Soul Train’ gives rare glimpse into an ‘American institution’

By AFRO Staff

From oversized bell bottoms to massive afros, “Soul Train” is synonomous with Black fashion, soul and above all, music. The TV series, hosted by pop icon Don Cornelius for more than two

Courtesy Photos Don Cornelius
Courtesy Photos
Don Cornelius
Cornelius for more than two Courtesy Photos Don Cornelius marketing/strategic partnerships, said he looks forward to

marketing/strategic partnerships, said he looks forward to developing a new generation of “Soul Train” lovers. “Time Life is proud to bring back one of the most enduring and culturally relevant shows in television history with The Best of Soul Train,” said Mitchell in a statement. “‘Soul

Train’ was ‘must see’ television in black households across America in the 70s and it also had strong crossover appeal. ‘Soul Train’ fans have been waiting for years to re- live this exciting time!” Similarly, Cornelius applauded the new project and said The Best of Soul Train offers a “rare insiders view of the golden era of Soul, marking a classic time and place which can never be duplicated.”

decades, aired its final episode in 2006 after a successful 40- year run. However, a new DVD from Time Life will revive the “Soul Train” line, the popular scramble board and nostalgic images that made the show an American institution. The Best of

Soul Train, a three-DVD boxed set, captures the performances, vintage commercials and performances from some of America’s leading entertainers. The DVD also includes a rare performances – some which have not been made

public in over 30 years – from performers who went on to revolutionize the music industry, including The Jackson Five, Marvin Gaye, the O’Jays, Smokey Robinson, Aretha Franklin, Stevie Wonder, Sly & The Family Stone and more. In all, there are 50 performances covered in eight hours of classic R&B, funk and soul music from the series’ 40-year history. Michael Mitchell, Time Life vice president of

C4

The Afro-American, July 31, 2010 - August 6, 2010

Community

Dr. Ro, UDC Looking to Get ‘Kidz’ Fit

By AFRO Staff

Nationally recognized nutritionist and author Dr. Rovenia Brock, aka, “Dr. Ro” teamed with the University of the District of Columbia’s Center for Nutrition, Diet and Health (CNDH) July 22 to promote Fit Kidz™, a new inventive program designed to help kids understand how to live a healthy and active lifestyle using fitness and food. The purpose of the series is to help kids understand the importance of nutrition and

fitness by showing them a plethora of fun activities and introducing them to a new approach to life. “From 2007 to 2008, obesity rates among children between the 14-19-year-old range doubled,” said Dr. Ro to My Fox Channel 5. “If we don’t do something now, we’re talking about an entire generation that will have to deal with early death.” More than 300 kids showed up to watch a screening of Fit Kidz as well as a panel discussion on

Thursday on UDC’s campus. Dr. Lillie Monroe-Lord, head of UDC’s Center on Nutrition Diet and Health, directs the center’s efforts to provide local residents with the skills, knowledge, and behaviors necessary for a healthy lifestyle. She praised Fit Kidz for raising the issue of nutritional value. “We are excited to preview Fit Kidz, which brings home the importance of nutrition in a fun and creative way that kids and families will enjoy,” said Monroe-Lord in a statement.

Madame Tussauds Celebrates Area Teachers with Free Admission

By AFRO Staff

Madame Tussauds is paying homage to licensed teachers (must show license) in Washington, D.C., Virginia and Maryland by offering them free admission throughout the summer until Aug. 28. Madame Tussauds located at 1001 F St., N.W., is a fully interactive attraction presenting a new way to experience the worlds of American history, sports, pop culture, music, fashion and Hollywood, including wax figures of U.S. President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama, ‘King of Pop’ Michael Jackson, teen sensation Selena

Gomez, and a host of other celebrities. “Madame Tussauds Washington, D.C. is thrilled to offer this opportunity to area teachers in recognition of their efforts and roles in educating

future generations,” said General Manager Colin in a statement. Family members accompanying teachers will receive a $5 admission discount as a part of the offer.

Family members accompanying teachers will receive a $5 admission discount as a part of the offer.

Courtesy Photo

admission discount as a part of the offer. Courtesy Photo Fit Kidz is a series of
admission discount as a part of the offer. Courtesy Photo Fit Kidz is a series of

Fit Kidz is a series of episodes, currently only available on DVD, targeted to 8-10-year-olds and 2-5-year- olds. The screening of the first season of Fit Kidz featured “Captain Ro” (played by Dr. Ro) and her team of intergalactic space agents as they travel to Earth looking

Fit Kidz is the newest among several initiatives geared toward increasing physical activity among children
Fit Kidz is the newest among several
initiatives geared toward increasing
physical activity among children and
fighting obesity.

Stock image

for Fit Kidz who can help them save the unhealthy children on Planet Obesia. In front of the camera Dr. Ro may be portraying a make- believe character, but off the screen she is serious about motivating children to realize the power they have to take charge of their own health.

“I’m on a mission to stop obesity in its tracks with children,” said Ro to My Fox Channel 5. “We hope to get it into every school in America … and because of the CDNH, at the University of D.C., they helped us make it possible to get Fit Kidz on the air and to make it a DVD series.”

Prince George’s Man Graduates Air Force Basic Training

By AFRO Staff

Man Graduates Air Force Basic Training By AFRO Staff Ryan Cureton Courtesy Photo Air Force Airman

Ryan Cureton

Courtesy Photo

Air Force Airman Ryan Cureton, a 2008 graduate of Grace Brethren Christian School in Clinton, Md., recently graduated from basic military training at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas. Cureton completed an intensive, eight- week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness, and basic warfare principles and skills. Airmen who complete basic training earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force. Cureton is the son of Richard Cureton of Fort Washington, Md., and grandson of Althea Thompson of Washington, D.C.

National Association of University Women Celebrate their Centennial Anniversary

By AFRO Staff

From Aug. 2-8 the National Association of University Women will hold their 67th National Convention to celebrate 100 years of service in Washington, D.C., at the Hyatt Regency on Capitol Hill. Founded in 1910, NAUW’s goal is to stimulate young women to attain professional excellence, exert influence in movements for civic good, and promote a close personal and intellectual fellowship among professional women. Events for the convention include a Founder’s Luncheon, Centennial Celebration Gala, President’s Luncheon, Awards and Youth Luncheon, and a visit to the grave of one of the founders, Mary Church Terrell. A Public Program and Reception planned for the night of Aug 3. at the Capital Hyatt, is open to District residents. If you are interested in purchasing tickets to any of the luncheons or dinners please contact the National Headquarters at 202-547-967 or Linda Ester at 708-868-2528.

Giant Food, Phillips Seafood Launch ‘Ultimate

Crab Challenge’

Phillips Seafood and Giant foods recently announced plans to launch the “Ultimate Crab Challenge,” a recipe contest for crab lovers and cooking enthusiasts. Community members are invited to submit their favorite, original recipes to compete for a $1,000 prize and a spot on Phillips Harborplace’s menu. Entries will be accepted online at www. UltimateCrabChallenge.com beginning July 16 through Aug. 15 at 11:59 p.m. A panel of Giant and Phillips Seafood chefs will serve as preliminary judges. The top three finalists of the recipe contest will participate in a cook-off on Sept. 11 at the Maryland Seafood Festival taking place at Sandy Point State Park in Annapolis, Md. The following rules apply for all participants:

Courtesy Photo
Courtesy Photo

and submitted electronically at www. UltimateCrabChallenge. com by 11:59 p.m. on Aug. 15.

• Crab meat must be the primary ingredient and recipes must call for at least one pound of crab.

• Recipes can be for a hot or cold dish.

• Preparation time, including cooking time, must not exceed 30 minutes.

• Three finalists will be selected by a panel of Giant and Phillips

Seafood chefs; if selected as finalists, participants will be allowed 30 minutes to prepare their original crab creations

during a cook-off at the Maryland Seafood Festival on Saturday, Sept. 11.

• All U.S. residents of at least 18 years of age and

of the legal age in their state are welcome to participate.

For contest rules and additional information, visit www.UltimateCrabChallenge. com.

• All recipes must be original creations

July 31, 2010 - August 6, 2010, The Afro-American C5

July 31, 2010 - August 6, 2010, The Afro-American C5 British Open Winner Sheds Light on

British Open Winner Sheds Light on Black Caddie Issues

Where have they gone and why?

By Perry Green AFRO Sports Writer

Louis Oosthuizen completed a dominating victory at the British Open on July 18, some Blacks in that country may have withheld their cheers for the White athlete—until learning that his caddie, Zack Rasego, is a Black native of their country. Oosthuizen’s win came on the same day that legendary former South Africa President Nelson Mandela celebrated his 92nd birthday, and the image of White and Black South Africans succeeding together is an ultimate reflection of the legacy Mandela helped create during his tenure in office. In a country once ruled by apartheid, Mandela was one of many activists who helped change South Africa from a racially segregated environment to a land now considered by its residents to be a “rainbow nation.” “As South Africans, we are a rainbow team,” Rasego told The New York Times. “But really it’s politics aside. It’s a sport. We cannot put politics into sport.” Rasego told reporters that there is no emphasis on race in his relationship with Oosthuizen, another symbol of how far South Africa has come from its era of racial tensions. “When I look at Louis, I look at him as a person, and he looks at me as a person,” Rasego said. “It’s not our backgrounds or anything. At the end of the day, he’s my boss, and I respect him as a boss, and it’s not about color. I mean, if I do good, then he appreciates what I do. It’s totally not about color.” But while Rasego’s relationship with Oosthuizen isn’t about race, his presence as one of the very few Black caddies on the PGA Tour sheds light on the issue in that sport. Similar to Oosthuizen, golf legend Gary Player— considered the most successful South African golfer in PGA history—also employed a Black caddie. Alfred “Big Rabbit” Dyer was one of the first African-American caddies on the PGA Tour, and served Player during an era when Blacks dominated the caddie industry in the U.S. But over the last few decades, Black professional caddies have become nearly extinct. According to Rodney “Binx” Watts, an African- American professional golfer from Maryland, the huge decrease in Black caddies is mainly due to the large increase in salary for the job. That increase has generated far more competition for the caddie position than in the past. “Just think about how much money is made on the PGA tour; the average salary is about $800,000 to $900,000 for a golfer, and they pay their caddie about 10 or 15 percent of their earnings,” Watts told the AFRO. “But during the days when most caddies were Black, it wasn’t nearly as much money in the game and the caddie position was

nearly as much money in the game and the caddie position was AP Photo/Alastair Grant South

AP Photo/Alastair Grant South

Africa’s Louis Oosthuizen, right, celebrates on the 18th green with his caddie Zack Rasego after winning the British Open Golf Championship on the Old Course at St. Andrews, Scotland, July 18.

perceived in a less dignified, demeaning light.” Watts said far more Whites apply for caddie jobs today

because the position can now pay $300,000 or more, and the caddie’s importance in planning a golfer’s approach

to a course has increased. But if there’s more money

and respect offered to such

a position, why aren’t more

Blacks interested in retaking their position as majority? Watts said that touches on an even deeper issue. “The problem is there aren’t nearly as many golf

programs in place that would attract and engage the interest of African-Americans and train and support them while learning the sport,” said Watts, a member of Morgan State University’s 1967 CIAA Golf Championship team. “I’ve been playing golf for more than 50 years, but when

I was coming up, we had

golf teams at college, in high school, and at clubs around the neighborhood. Now, most Blacks can’t play golf in public school even if they wanted, because the teams are

gone.”

‘The other side of the ball’ In this issue, my counterpart at this sport’s desk

‘The other side of the ball’

In this issue, my counterpart at this sport’s desk did an interesting piece on Black caddies and the South African connection. I thought it would do to refresh your memory of the trials and tribulations of the African-American men who stood on the other side of the ball. This saga begins in 1896 at the US Open. The Open Championship is an event that is open to any golfer who can qualify to enter the field. John Shippen qualified and was tied for first place on the second day of the event. However, on the unlucky 13th hole, his ball landed in the sand and it took him 11 strokes to complete the hole, thus shattering his hopes for victory. African Americans not only played the game of golf, but were instrumental in other areas affecting the game. In 1899

Dr. George Grant invented the golf tee. Until that time a little mound of dirt served the purpose of teeing up the ball. Grant registered his invention with the US Patent Office, but never marketed it. Twenty-five years later a White golfer registered his version of the golf tee and followed up with a successful marketing campaign. For this reason he was given the credit for the invention and Grant became a footnote in golf annals. In 1946 Bill Powell designed and opened Clearview Golf Course, in Bayside, N.Y. This course became a stage for many African-American youth to hone their games. It is interesting that Joseph Bartholomew designed and built several courses during his lifetime, but was denied the privilege of playing on any of them. Teddy Rhodes was the Tiger Woods of his era. However Jim Crow prohibited him from pitting his skill against White golfers. In 1948 he, Bill Spiller and Madison Gunther filed a civil lawsuit against the PGA. Slipping through a loophole,

the PGA changed its format to “invitation only” and was able to continue the stand of serration that had been in place since 1934 and lasted until 1961. In 1954 Harold Dunovant turned professional, and although not a member of the still segregated PGA, was able to attend the PGA Business School in Long Beach, Calif. He became head pro at Minorcas Golf Course in Winston

Continued on C7

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C6

The Afro-American, July 31, 2010 - August 6, 2010

Faith Pulse

Haiti Forum Reveals Lack of Funds and Slow Progress

Special to the AFRO

started to appear asking those non-governmental organizations, ‘How much have you spent in Haiti?’ The percentage of that money gathered here, as we’ve found out, is about 15 percent that these big organizations have spent in Haiti,” remarked Joseph. “So it’s not my job getting the money refunded to you; it’s the job of your government… to start acting and [asking] what have you done with the money collected for Haiti?,” said Joseph, who also cited unfulfilled pledges by countries as another hindrance to progress. “When we went to the United Nations on March 31, we were looking for $3.9 billion over the next 18 months to start the recovery effort. The international community loved the Haitian plan. They pledged $5.3 billion, but we were looking for only $3.9 billion. But of the $5.3 billion pledged, how much have been put into the trust fund of the World Bank?” asked Joseph, who also praised Brazil for making the first deposit of $55 million. Walters raised a concern

the first deposit of $55 million. Walters raised a concern Photo by J.D. Howard Squatter’s area

Photo by J.D. Howard

Squatter’s area in front of LE Plaza Hotel. Haitian officials and humanitarian groups are concerned about getting displaced Haitians into more permanent living quarters before the hurricane season.

about shelter, another pressing issue with regard to Haiti’s recovery. “Have we created a nightmare with the tents? How long can Haiti exist inside the tents?” Rev. Dr. Michael Coppege, a panelist, of the NorthStar Church Network in Annandale, Va., replied, “Obviously, the tents are not the solutions, but they were expedient.” He added, “My immediate

concern is the weather. We’re in the hurricane season now. They’ve had four or five hurricanes in a few years to go across the island. The tents will not withstand that. So the first hurricane that hits I suspect that we are gong to have another emergency crisis on our hands, and I’m not so sure we’re ready for that.” Rev. Dr. James Graham, who visited the region two times since the earthquake,

agreed that the tents should only be temporary but also questioned the pace of progress. “They don’t need

to be living in those tents for long periods of time. The problem is very complex; there are no easy solutions. But quite frankly, I just don’t believe the international community in collaboration with a systematic approach with the government of Haiti is moving fast enough,” he said. “The people are suffering and paying the consequences of that,” added Graham, who is also pastor of the host church, which has been aiding Haiti since 1995. According to Joseph, more collaboration is also needed amongst organizations helping Haiti, instead of each trying to accomplish its own agenda, for “in unity there is strength.”

For more information on the “Haiti: Let’s Not Forget” forum, contact Mt. Pleasant Baptist at (703) 793-1196.

Mt. Pleasant Baptist Church, of Herndon, Va., recently presented its “Haiti: Let’s Not Forget” forum. Panelists included Haiti Ambassador to the United States Raymond Joseph, clergy and other guests who are involved in humanitarian efforts to the country after a 7.0 magnitude

earthquake struck its capitol, Port Au Prince, on Jan.

12. Moderated by Emmy-

award winning journalist Del Walters of WTOP Radio Station of Washington, D.C., panelists discussed a range of topics, including donations and pledges, restoration progress, and organization collaboration. In answering a participant’s question about refunding texted donations

because of lack of progress, Ambassador Joseph also responded to what he thinks is the root cause of stalled restoration efforts. “More than $2 billion were collected for Haiti—not by the Haitian government, but collected by NGOs. Do you know how much of that $2 billion Haiti has seen? Less than $20 million; and stories

Church Briefs

Compiled by Herb Quarles

Bible Study The Rev. Maude Harrison Hudson will be the facilitator for the discussion on “Developing a Personal Prayer Life,” part two at 6:30 p.m. on July 29 in the Corbin Lounge of at Peoples Congregational UCC located at 4704 13th St. N.W. The discussion, based on Matthew 21:22, is a part of the Bible Study Series that will continue on each Thursday through Sept. 23. The Rev. Dr. Michael Murphy will be the facilitator on Aug. 5 when he leads a discussion on “Keeping In Touch,” based on James 5:16. During the series, the questions and concerns about prayer in the life of believers and the life of the church will be addressed. This ministry is open free of charge to the community and all are

necessary tools to battle those struggles while still honoring their parents and honoring God. The play, written by Joshua Jenkins, the son of Pastor John K. Jenkins Sr., is open free of charge to the community. Call Karen Cheeks at 303-386-9433 for additional information. Her e-mail address is kcheeks@ fbcglenarden.org. First Baptist Church of Glenarden, under the leadership of its pastor, is

a

life-changing, vibrant

91-year-old church with more than 10,000 members and over 100 ministries that meet the diverse needs of both its

members and the community.

Vacation Bible School Vacation Bible School will be held from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. from Aug. 2 through Aug. 6 at Peoples Congregational Church located at 4704 13th

welcome. Call the church office at 202-829-5511 for additional information.

Fund Raiser Breakfast The fifth annual Kericho, Kenya Foreign Mission Fund Raiser Breakfast will be held from 9 a.m. to noon on July 31 at Central Baptist Church of Camp Springs located at 5600 Old Branch Ave. in Camp Spring, Md. Call 202- 439-3812 for information on the requested tax deductible donation. Also, visit maplespringsbaptistchurch. org for additional information on the mission.

Youth Explore Issues The youth and drama

St.

at 8 a.m. and late pick up at 6 p.m. Youth in the community are invited to enroll to participate in a variety of activities including field trips instruction in art, music, religion and much more. Snacks will be served twice a day. Call the church office at 202-829-5511 for registration fee and other information.

N.W., with early drop off

Historic Site Visited Members of the community are invited to go with area United Church of Christ members to visit the Franklinton Center located at 281 Bricks Lane in Whitakers, N.C. The tour

will include a worship service with the Rev. Dr. Michael

ministries of First Baptist Church of Glenarden will present the dynamic play, Broken House, at 7 p.m. on July 30 at the FBCG Ministry Center located at 3600 Brightseat Road in Landover, Md. The play addresses issues that include the lack of love, trust, character and communication often found in homes. It exposes the pain that often tears families apart. The play is featured as a part of the youth ministry’s BAM JAM event, which occurs on the fifth Friday of every month. BAM JAM gives youth an opportunity to explore tough topics with their peers in a safe, non- traditional church atmosphere. Broken House will surely be a hit at this year’s BAM JAM, as the play’s message sheds light on the struggles that kids face on a daily basis, and equips them with the

C.

Murphy, senior minister

at Peoples Congregational Church, preaching; workshops; tours of the Center, activities for children; an induction of emerging leaders. Vendors and food will be available. Franklinton Center traces its beginnings to the founding

of the Franklinton Christian College in 1871 and the Congregationalist Bricks School in 1895. The Center is related to the United Church of Christ and is managed and staffed by the denomination’s Justice and Witness Ministries. Bus will depart at 6:45 a.m. Aug. 7 from Peoples Church located at 4704 13t

h

St. N.W and return by 10

p.m. Parking available at the church. Call Onra Dillard at 202-543-3918 for cost and additional information.

Church Elects First Female Bishop

(NNPA) -- The Rev. Dr. Teresa Snorton has been elected

the first female bishop of the Christian Methodist Episcopal (C.M.E.) Church. Snorton was one among several elected bishops during the congregation’s 36th quadrennial session and 37th General Conference, which convened in Mobile, Ala., early this month, it has been

announced. The conference theme was “An Essential Church: Poised for 21st Century Ministry.” A fourth-generation, life-long CME member, Bishop Snorton has long prepared for this moment. She is executive director of the national Association for Clinical Pastoral Education (ACPE); the former executive director of the Emory Center for Pastoral Services in Atlanta, Ga.; and former director of Pastoral Services at Crawford Long Hospital. She has been adjunct instructor in pastoral care at Candler School of Theology at Emory University. According to a release announcing her election, she is descendant of a

great-grandfather, a father and an uncle who were all CME pastors. Her grandmother was an active missionary. Her two sisters are also CME ministers. As an ordained minister in the Christian Methodist Episcopal Church, she has served as a pastor in Kentucky. Before moving to Atlanta, she was also a psychiatric staff chaplain in Louisville and on the adjunct faculty of the Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary in Kentucky. She was also on the faculties of the Patient Counseling Program at the Medical College of Virginia and the School of Theology of Virginia Union University, both in

Richmond. Bishop Snorton has a bachelor’s degree from Vanderbilt

University, a master’s degree in divinity from Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary, a master’s in theology in pastoral care from Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, a post-graduate certificate

in patient counseling from Virginia Commonwealth University, and doctorate in ministry from United Theological Seminary in Dayton, Ohio. Amid a plethora of activities and memberships, she is a member of the International Congress of Pastoral Care and Counseling, the Society for Pastoral Theology, and business manager of the Journal of Pastoral Care and Counseling. Also an author, Bishop Snorton is co-editor of a book, Women Out of Order: Risking Change and Creating Care in a Multi-Cultural World, co- edited with Dr. Jeanne Stevenson- Moessner and published by Fortress Press last year. Bishop Snorton is married to Charles Short. They have three sons and

three grandchildren. The Christian Methodist Episcopal Church, under the leadership of Senior Bishop Thomas L. Hoyt Jr. and its College of Bishops, is a 139-year old historically African- American Christian denomination with more than 1.2 million members across the United States. It has missions and sister churches in Haiti, Jamaica, Ghana, Liberia, Nigeria and the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Sudan/Egypt, Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda Rwanda and Burundi.

Republic of the Congo, Sudan/Egypt, Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda Rwanda and Burundi. Dr. Teresa Snorton Courtesy Photo

Dr. Teresa Snorton

Courtesy Photo

Children’s Equestrian Camp

The Rev. Robert E. Slade, senior

attend each year, including children from North Carolina. The camp, held during the last week of July, was held in Prince George’s County at 16001 Tanyard Road

in Upper Marlboro, Md. Contact Slade at 202-271-4062 for additional information about this community outreach ministry.

pastor at the historic Mount Zion United Methodist Church in Georgetown (Northwest Washington), has opened his home and farm to his parishioners’ children for one week each summer to conduct an equestrian camp. The camp, in its fourth year, attempts to introduce African-American children to an equine lifestyle that is unfamiliar to many of them. Each summer, friends of his and the church members volunteer time to make this event a success. This year, Catholic Charities heard about the event and volunteered to assist. The camp’s notoriety has grown and Slade’s church has also opened up the camp to include inner-city youth.

About 40 children ages 8-15

to include inner-city youth. About 40 children ages 8-15 Courtesy Photo Area youth enjoy the experience

Courtesy Photo

Area youth enjoy the experience of riding horses during their visit to the equestrian camp hosted by Pastor Robert Slade.

July 31, 2010 - August 6, 2010, The Afro-American C7

‘The other side of the ball’

Continued from C5

Salem, N.C., and founded the National Black Golfers Hall of Fame. While we marvel over the barrier placed before Black men in the professional golf ranks, there was quite a bit of adversity placed before women who were able to compete at the pro level. In 1950 Ann Gregory broke the color barrier by being allowed entry in to a USGA event. Although some doors had been opened, Gregory’s ride wasn’t as

smooth as one would hope. In 1963 Gregory was competing in an event in Williamstown, Mass. While walking down the hall dressed in white, a White

contestant, Polly Riley – who was unpacking at the time – shouted, “Hey, can you bring me some hangers?” Moments later Gregory returned with

a hand full of hangers, and at

this time Riley noticed that the white gear was golf attire. They both tell the story and have shared many laughs about the incident. Gregory was known for her pleasant demeanor as

well as her talent on the golf course. Her deportment lead to a softer position held for other Black women golfers wanting to compete on the next level. Most notably of these were Renee Powell and Althea Gibson. Gibson was already well known for her skill at tennis, having won Wimbledon. She acquitted herself well

as a professional golfer, and is arguably the best female athlete of her time, being compared only to Babe Didrikson Zaharias.

To be continued

Magic Johnson Made Similar Choice to LeBron’s

By AFRO Staff

Johnson Made Similar Choice to LeBron’s By AFRO Staff Magic Johnson Courtesy Photo Los Angeles had

Magic Johnson

Courtesy Photo

Los Angeles had to do

a coin toss with Chicago in

1979 for rights to the No. 1 overall draft pick. Chicago, who was one of the worst teams in the league at the time, picked heads and lost. LA went on to draft Magic,

allowing him to team up with Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, already

a MVP award winner and

up with Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, already a MVP award winner and Courtesy Photo LeBron James NBA champion.

Courtesy Photo

LeBron James

NBA champion. Together,

they went on to win five NBA titles. But imagine if Chicago did win that coin toss… “I wouldn’t have played in [Chicago],” Johnson said in the vintage Times article. “The only reason I came out was to play with Kareem and

the Lakers.”

NBA legend Magic Johnson joined fellow basketball great Michael Jordan in claiming he wouldn’t have made the choice LeBron James made

by linking up with superstars to win a championship. “We didn’t think about

it ‘cause that’s not what we

were about,” Johnson told the

media at Baruch College in New York, as first reported by Bloomberg News. “From college, I was trying to figure out how to beat [fellow NBA legend] Larry Bird.” His comments follow Jordan’s claim that he wouldn’t done so either. “There’s no way, with hindsight, I would’ve ever called up Larry [Bird], called up Magic [Johnson] and said, ‘Hey, look, let’s get together and play on one team,’” Jordan said during a short NBC interview after playing in a celebrity golf tournament

in Nevada. “But

different. I can’t say that’s a

bad thing. It’s an opportunity these kids have today. In all honesty, I was trying to beat those guys.” But according to a 1991 Los Angeles Times article dug up by ESPN’s research advisors, Magic made a choice very similar to LeBron’s controversial decision. Magic told the Times’s Mike Downey nearly 20 years ago that if the Los Angeles Lakers didn’t win

a coin toss for the No. 1

overall draft pick, he would have foregone the draft and returned to Michigan State. “I’d have stayed in school,” Johnson told the newspaper a day before Game 2 of the NBA Championship against the Bulls in 1991. “A coin toss changed the course of my whole life.”

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The Afro-American, July 31, 2010 - August 6, 2010

C8 The Afro-American, July 31, 2010 - August 6, 2010

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1-800-638-2102. Online reservations: www.holidayoc.com LEGAL NOTICES S uperior Court of the District of D istrict

LEGAL NOTICES

S uperior Court of

the District of D istrict of Columbia P ROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C.

2 0001-2131

A dministration No.

00663ADM10

M ajory W White M arjory Wolter White Decedent N OTICE OF

A PPOINTMENT,

NOTICE TO C REDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS

D avid R. Kaminsky,

whose address is 14

P arkside Road, Silver

S pring MD 20910 was

appointed personal re-

resentative of the

state of Marjory Wolter

White aka Majory W.

W hite, who died on June

2 4, 2010 with a will, and

will serve without Court

s upervision. All un- known heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are

u nknown shall enter

their appearance in this proceeding. Objections t o such appointment (or

to the probate of de- c edent´s will) shall be f iled with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th

S treet, N.W., 3rd Floor

W ashington, D.C.

20001, on or before

J anuary 16, 2011.

Claims against the de- cedent shall be pre- s ented to the under-

s igned with a copy to the

Register of Wills or filed

ith the Register of Wills

ith a copy to the under-

w

w

e

p

signed, on or before J anuary 16, 2011, or be f orever barred. Persons

b elieved to be heirs or

l egatees of the decedent

w ho do not receive a

c opy of this notice by

m ail within 25 days of its

f irst publication shall so inform the Register of

W ills, including name,

a ddress and relation-

ship.

D ate of Publication:

J uly 16, 2010

N ame of newspaper:

A fro-American

Washington Law

R eporter

David R Kaminsky

P ersonal

R epresentative

T RUE TEST COPY

REGISTER OF WILLS

7 /16 7/23 7/30

Superior Court of t he District of

D istrict of Columbia P ROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C.

2 0001-2131

A dministration No.

00656ADM10

R uth E Jones a ka R uth Elizabeth Jones

Decedent

N OTICE OF

A PPOINTMENT,

NOTICE TO CREDITORS A ND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS

Sheila Corbin Campbell,

w hose address is 4706

J ean Marie Drive Ft.

Washington MD 20744,

w as appointed personal

r epresentative of the estate of Ruth E Jones aka Ruth Elizabeth J ones, who died on Feb- r uary 16, 2009 with a

will, and will serve with-

o ut Court supervision.

A ll unknown heirs and

heirs whose whereabouts are un-

k nown shall enter their

appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such appointment (or t o the probate of de- cedent´s will) shall be

f iled with the Register of

W ills, D.C., 515 5th

Street, N.W., 3rd Floor

W ashington, D.C.

20001, on or before January 16, 2011. Claims against the de- cedent shall be pre- sented to the under- signed with a copy to the Register of Wills or filed with the Register of Wills with a copy to the under- signed, on or before January 16, 2011, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of this notice by mail within 25 days of its first publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name,

address and relation- ship. Date of Publication:

July 16, 2010 Name of newspaper:

Afro-American

Washington Law

Reporter

Sheila Campbell Personal Representative TRUE TEST COPY REGISTER OF WILLS 7/16, 7/23, 7/30

Superior Court of the District of District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C.

20001-2131

Administration No.

2010ADM545

Edith J Rose Decedent

Julius P Terrell 1455 Pennsylvania Av NW Suite 400 Washington DC 20004 Attorney NOTICE OF

APPOINTMENT,

NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Phyllis D Goldsmith,

LEGAL NOTICES

w hose address is 10308

Richmanor Place, Upper

M arlboro 20772 was ap-

p ointed personal repre-

sentative of the estate of

dith J. Rose, who died

n May 22, 2010 with a

will, and will serve with-

o ut Court supervision.

A ll unknown heirs and

heirs whose

w hereabouts are un-

k nown shall enter their

appearance in this

p roceeding. Objections

to such appointment (or

to the probate of de-

c edent´s will) shall be

filed with the Register of

W ills, D.C., 515 5th

S treet, N.W., 3rd Floor

Washington, D.C.

2 0001, on or before

J anuary 16, 2011.

Claims against the de-

edent shall be pre-

ented to the under-

signed with a copy to the

R egister of Wills or filed

with the Register of Wills with a copy to the under-

s igned, on or before

January 16, 2011, or be forever barred. Persons

b elieved to be heirs or

legatees of the decedent

w ho do not receive a

c opy of this notice by

mail within 25 days of its

f irst publication shall so

inform the Register of Wills, including name,

a ddress and relation-

s

c

o

E

ship. Date of Publication:

J uly 16, 2010

Name of newspaper:

Afro-American

Washington Law

R eporter

Phyllis D Goldsmith Personal Representative

T RUE TEST COPY

REGISTER OF WILLS

7/16, 7/23, 7/30

S uperior Court of

t he District of

District of Columbia P ROBATE DIVISION

Washington, D.C.

2 0001-2131

A dministration No.

0 0657ADM10

D orothy I Height

Decedent

J oan M Wilbon Esq

1120 Connecticut Ave

N W #1020 Washington DC 20036

A ttorney

N OTICE OF

APPOINTMENT, N OTICE TO C REDITORS AND NOTICE TO U NKNOWN HEIRS

lexis M Herman

ranklin, whose address

892 Linganore Drive,

M cLean Virginia 22102

w as appointed personal

representative of the

e state

H eight, who died on

A pril 20, 2010 with a will,

and will serve without

C ourt supervision. All

u nknown heirs and heirs

whose whereabouts are

u nknown shall enter

t heir appearance in this

p roceeding. Objections

to such appointment (or

t o the probate of de-

c edent´s will) shall be

filed with the Register of

W ills, D.C., 515 5th

S treet, N.W., 3rd Floor

Washington, D.C.

20001, on or before

J anuary 16, 2011.

C laims against the de-

cedent shall be pre-

ented to the under-

igned with a copy to the

Register of Wills or filed

with the Register of Wills

w ith a copy to the under-

s igned, on or before

January 16, 2011 or be f orever barred. Persons

b elieved to be heirs or

l egatees of the decedent

w ho do not receive a

copy of this notice by mail within 25 days of its

first publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relation- ship. Date of Publication:

s

s

is

F

A

of Dorothy

I

July 16, 2010 Name of newspaper:

Afro-American

Washington Law

Reporter

Alexis M Herman Franklin Personal Representative TRUE TEST COPY REGISTER OF WILLS 7/16, 7/23, 7/30

SUPERIOR COURT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA CIVIL DIVISION Case No. 2010 LIT33 Jerry L. Hunter Personal Representa-

tive of the Estate of James Whigham

1822 11th Street NW

Washington DC 20001

v.

Marion Whigham Last Known Address

4301 Ord Street NE

Washington DC 20019 ORDER OF PUBLICATION Plaintiff is the Personal Representative of the Estate of James Whigham. On June 16, 2010, Plaintiff filed a Complaint on for an Or- der of Determination of

Death of the sole heir of the Estate of James Whigham. The Complaint states, among other things, that the de- cedent’s son, Marion Whigham, died sometime