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Playing the Trompowsky

By

Richard Pert

Quality Chess
www.qualitych ess.co. uk
First edition 20 1 3 by Quality Chess UK Ltd

Copyright 20 1 3 Richard Pert

Playing the Trompowsky


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Hardcover ISBN 978- 1 -907982-76-7

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Contents
Key to Symbols used & Bibliography 4
Preface 5
Introduction 7

1 2...e6 3.e4 11
2 2...e6 3.tlld2!? 47
3 2...c5 3.tllc3!? 61
4 2...c5 3.d5 79
5 2... tlle4 3.if4 c5 4.d5 93
6 2...tlle4 3.if4 c5 4.f3 107
7 2...d5 3.ixf6 141
8 2...d5 3.e3 157
9 2...tlle4 3.if4 d5 4.e3 171
10 Rare 3rd Moves 193
11 Rare 2nd Moves 201
12 2.ig5 against the Dutch 211
13 l .d4 d5 2.ig5 233

Variation Index 263


Key to Symbols used
;!; White is slightly better a weak move
+ Black is slightly better ?? a blunder
White is better a good move
+ Black is better !! an excellent move
+- White has a decisive advantage !? a move worth considering
-+ Black has a decisive advantage ?! a move of doubtful value
equality # mate
with compensation with an attack
t
00 -+

with counterplay with an initiative


00 unclear N new move

Bibliography
Alburc, Dzindzichashvili & Perelshceyn: Chess Openingsfor Black Explained (2nd Edition), CIRC 2009 .
Alterman: The Alterman Gambit Guide - Black Gambits 2, Quality Chess 20 1 2 .
Avrukh: Grandmaster Repertoire 11 Beating l . d4 Sidelines, Quality Chess 20 1 2 .
-

Cox: Dealing with d4 Deviations, Everyman Chess 200 5 .


Davies: Th e Trompowsky (2nd Edition) , Everyman Chess 200 5 .
D e l a Villa: El Ataque Trompowsky, Evajedrez 200 1 .
Dembo: Fighting the Anti-King's Indians, Everyman Chess 2008.
Gallagher: Th e Trompowsky, The Chess Press 1 99 8 .
Hodgson: Secrets o fthe Trompowsky, Hodgson Enterprises 1 997.
Lakdawala: A Ferocious Opening Repertoire, Everyman Chess 20 1 0 .
Palliser: Starting Out: The Trompowsky Attack, Everyman Chess 2009.
Schandorff: Playing l.d4 - The Indian Defences, Quality Chess 20 1 2 .
Wells: Winning with the Trompowsky, Batsford 2003.
Williams: Play the Classical Dutch, Gambit 2003.

Periodicals
New In Chess Yearbooks
ChessBase Magazine

Electronic/Internet resources
ChessPublishing.com
Martin: The Trompowsky: The Easy Wtzy, ChessBase 2006.
Williams: Killer Dutch, Ginger GM 20 1 0 .
Preface
As this is my first book, I really want to cake chis opportunity to thank the people who have
supported and helped me in chess, both on and off the board.

Firscly I would like co start by thanking the Quality Chess team, particularly Andrew Greet who
has made it so easy for me to write chis book.

Lee me now tell you a quick story. When I was five years old I went on a family skiing holiday to
Sweden . As it turned out there was no snow that year, so my dad took the opportunity to teach
my twin brother and me how to play chess. The pair of us were hooked, and my brother, GM
Nick Pert, has proved a worthy (sometimes too worthy) opponent for me ever since. My parents
contributed significancly to my chess career by giving up much of their free time driving Nick
and me to many chess events when we were youngsters . I know my dad would much rather have
spent that time sailing! One other person I want to mention from my childhood is FM Kevin
O'Connell, who lived on the same road as us. He gave up a lot of his time to coach both Nick and
me, and it is unquestionable in my mind chat without his support we would never have reached
the standard that we did. Kevin is still very active in FIDE, although recencly he has relocated to
France.

My wife definitely deserves praise, as she has had to put up with my chess bug which I can't seem
to shift (I'm sure some of you will know what I 'm talking about) . She actually didn't know I
played chess when we first started dating, but despite this she has been very patient with me over
the years when on occasion I have left her to handle the kids whilst I have gone off to play. My
kids, Nina (aged five) and Max (aged three) are fantastic and they are my biggest supporters. I 'd
also like to mention Brian Smith, who has supported me through his Wood Green team for many
years now. I 've lost count of how many London League, 4NCL and National Club tides we have
now picked up, but no doubt Brian will be able to tell you!

Away from the chess board, another person that I want to mention is IM Ali Mortazavi, who
despite his arrogant and cavalier appearance had enough heart to take me from working in a
burger bar and sit me down at a city trading desk! He still reminds me of that from time to time!
It still surprises me even today how many people from the chess circuit are willing to go out
of their way to use their time and contacts to try to help me out in my career path away from
the chess board. Without naming them all, a few examples from j ust this year alone are Paul
Littlewood, Ian Reynolds and Dilys Tan.

I 've made many other friends through chess and it is impossible to mention chem all, ranging
from the guys who used to support myself and Nick when we started out playing in Ipswich as
kids, through to the Essex contingent nowadays. I do however want to quickly mention a couple
of ocher guys, firstly GM Danny Gormally who along with his parents gave me a place to stay
when I first came to London looking for work as a 2 1 -year-old lad. Actually the plan was chat
6 Richard Pert - Playing the Tro m powsky

I was going to get a flat share with Danny, but he dropped all his money on a tennis bet and so
we ended up staying at his parents' house for a while instead! I also want to mention GM Simon
Williams - along with my brother I have probably been to more tournaments with him than
anybody else. We've had some good times and near scrapes over the years, including a manic trip
to Budapest, several visits to the South of France, a fun holiday/tournament in Norway (with
Mark Hebden and Adam Hunt) , and a dodgy week in Sheffield amongst many other trips. Simon
is a real enthusiast for the game and it rubs off. One final guy I want to mention away from the
chess board is my mate Dan Gray, who has always looked out for me over the last fifteen years,
and now looks out for my kids as well. Dan j ust got engaged to his girlfriend Rhiann in March
this year, and I want to wish them all the best in the future.

That's enough of me boring you with my life story - now you'd better go and learn how to play
this opening!

Richard Pert
Billericay, June 20 1 3
Introduction
If like most players you have a limited amount of time that you can spend studying chess openings,
but still want to push for an advantage with White, then the Trompowsky is a great choice. Despite
the opening not being as well investigated as a lot of the main lines, it is still a very attacking
opening that is tricky for Black to face. I have no doubt that when I made this opening my main
choice some fifteen years ago, it significantly improved my performance with White.

In this opening White stamps his mark on the position from the second move with 2.ig5 . I have
focused on providing an in-depth White repertoire in the Trompowsky, l .d4 lll f6 2.ig5 , with a
couple of choices for White against several of Black's key options. On top of that I have also taken
the time to give a repertoire versus the Dutch Defence, l .d4 f5 2.ig5 , which seems to me to be very
strong, and had a look at the Pseudo-Tromp, l . d4 d5 2.ig5 , which leads to interesting positions.

This is my first book and I really haven't held anything back in my quest to make it as good
as possible. The book is packed with novelties and new ideas, whilst also taking into account
previous work. I am confident that this book will contribute significantly to the future theory of
the Trompowsky. It's my belief that this book is suitable for players ranging from club players all
the way up co top grandmasters. With firsthand experience of playing this opening against several
of the world's top players, and having studied it over such a long period, I believe that puts me in a
strong position to know which paths White should choose.

The Trompowsky really took off in England in the 1 990s, during which time GM Julian Hodgson
used it as his main weapon and GM Mickey Adams added it to his repertoire. I remember watching
Hodgson win British Championship after British Championship using this opening. It got to the
point where everyone knew what was coming, but no one knew what to do about it. This popularity
continued into the early 2000s with excellent books on the opening from GMs Joe Gallagher and
Pete Wells. By chis stage I would say that the majority of leading English players had at least taken
the opening out for a test run at some point. The popularity may have dwindled slightly over the
last decade, but I very much hope this book will help return it to the forefront again.

I have been fortunate enough to get the chance to play this opening against four of the five leading
English GMs in FIDE-rated games in recent years, Mickey Adams, Luke McShane, David Howell
and Gawain Jones. Despite English players being the leading experts on the Trompowsky, it is
interesting to note that all four of them chose relatively quiet lines against me, even though they
must have expected the opening. That certainly gives backing to my belief that White is doing
quite well in the main lines. Incidentally, I would just mention that this opening can be particularly
effective against players from outside Britain, many of whom have not studied this opening in
much depth.

Let me briefly tell you about the layout of the book. It is a White repertoire book, yet despite this
I have tried to give the reader a choice of lines against many of Black's main continuations in the
8 Richard Pert - Playing the Trompowsky

Trompowsky. For example, in the main line which continues l .d4 lll f6 2.ig5 lll e4 3.if4 c5, I have
actually given the reader three choices - sacrificing two pawns for a massive attack, sacrificing one
pawn for some initiative, or sacrificing no pawns but instead looking to obtain a small but solid
edge. Often I think it is useful to have a second choice in your back pocket for surprise value.

I haven't offered as much choice against l . . . f5 and l . . .d5, focusing more on providing one good
repertoire. I'm particularly pleased with my work against the Dutch and it looks to me that after
l .d4 f5 2.ig5 Black is struggling to hold the balance. I've also given a repertoire against l .. . d5, and
whilst I think that White may not be able to prove an advantage here against accurate play from
Black, the positions look interesting and fully playable.

Book Structure

Personally I read a lot of chess books on the train, as I have commuted on virtually a daily basis over
the past ten years. As a result I have a good knowledge of the books I find easy to read, and the ones
I struggle to find my way around.
I have tried in this book to lay everything out as logically as possible. I have taken time at the
start of each chapter to give an overview of Black's possibilities, showing clearly all his options and
highlighting any transpositions, and also showing where a second option is offered for White. One
further thing I've done is to make it clear which move I think should be played in each position.
I have seen several previous authors take the approach of putting a collection of model games
together, but have then found that I ended up not knowing what the right move was in each
position.
To help you find your way around the material, let me tell you some more about the chapters.

Chapter 1 : 1 .d4 f6 2.igS e6 3.e4


2 . . . e6 is one of Black's most solid choices and has risen in popularity in recent years to the point
that it is now Black's second most popular response to the Trompowsky. Black's idea is to prevent
his pawns being doubled by taking the time to protect the f6-knight with his queen . That said, the
move is slightly passive and gives us the chance to grab the initiative.
Here I have given two choices for White. The main move which I focus on in this chapter is
3 . e4, grabbing space in the middle of the board. My idea is to follow 3 . . . h6 4.ixf6 Wxf6 with the
modern 5 . c3 , where I have extensive personal experience. Although Black is quite solid, I believe
that White has good chances of an advantage.
The chapter also features new ideas against 3 . . . c5 , where I have a very powerful idea in the main
line.

Chapter 2: 1 .d4 f6 2.igS e6 3.d2


The second option against 2 . . . e6 that I cover is the flexible 3 .tll d2! ? . This approach has become
popular amongst the world's elite in recent years, particularly in blitz and rapid games.

Chapter 3: 1 .d4 f6 2.igS cS 3.c3


With 2 . . . c5 Black indicates he is ready to do battle! This uncompromising move was suggested by
Dembo in her highly-rated book, Fighting the Anti-King's Indians, which came out in 2008 .
In this chapter I take a look at a repertoire involving the quirky 3 .tll c3 !? which I have played on a
Introductio n 9

number of occasions myself. I have found a major improvement in the main line which makes this
whole variation playable, where previously it was considered doubtful. Black must walk a tightrope
to make it out of the opening, and even if he does then White's chances look reasonable.

Chapter 4: 1 .d4 c!ll f6 2.igS c5 3.d5


My main recommendation against 2 . . . c5 is to play 3.d5, taking control of the centre of the board.
In this chapter I have a couple of seriously good novelties, particularly in the Vaganian Gambit
which arises after 3 . . . '\Wb6 4. lll c3 . I think these improvements will send shivers up Black's spine!
Note that it is important when reading this chapter to check out the introduction, as transpositions
to variations elsewhere in the book are rife.

Chapter 5: 1 .d4 c!ll f6 2.igS c!ll e4 3.if4 c5 4.dS


2 . . . lll e4 3 .if4 c5 is the main line and is considered by many as the best way to handle the
Trompowsky. I give three distinct ways of tackling this opening. In this chapter I look at 4.d5. Then
after 4 . . . %%6 White may sacrifice the b2-pawn in return for the initiative with 5 .lll d2! ? .
It i s also possible to defend the pawn with 5 .ic l , and this variation i s closely related t o one of
lines examined in Chapter 6 (with 7.ic l ) .

Chapter 6 : 1 .d4 c!ll f6 2.igS c!ll e4 3.if4 c5 4.f3


White may also meet 2 . . . lll e4 3 .if4 c5 with 4.f3, and after 4 . . . Wa5 t 5 . c3 lll f6 6.d5 Wb6 I offer
another choice.
Firstly, 7.ic l seems quite solid for White and gives a reasonable chance of sneaking an advantage.
Finally I've extensively analysed the fascinating double pawn sacrifice which occurs after 7.e4
Wfxb2 8 .lll d2 '1Wxc3 9 .ic7!?. My analysis on this line is much deeper than has previously been
published, and I think it looks really interesting for White.

Chapter 7: 1 .d4 c!ll f6 2.igS d5 3.ixf6


2 . . . d5 is another solid option for Black. It is his third most popular move against the Trompowsky
and it was the choice of both Michael Adams and David Howell against me in 20 1 0 . I offer White
two full repertoires against this line, covering 3 .ixf6 in this chapter.
After 3 . . . gxf6!? I have some exciting unplayed analysis which looks good for White.
Against the rock-solid 3 . . . exf6 I suggest a repertoire that involves playing g2-g3 and building
queenside pressure.

Chapter 8: 1 .d4 c!ll f6 2.igS d5 3.e3


The second option which I cover against 2 . . . d5 is the flexible move 3 .e3 . This was a regular choice
ofTrompowsky expert Hodgson (in fact he played it against me once!) .
Transpositions are possible to a Veresov o r to lines elsewhere i n the book (for example, 3 . . . lll e4
4.if4 transposes directly to Chapter 9), so the introduction to the chapter should be read closely
if this is to be your main choice.

Chapter 9: 1 .d4 c!ll f6 2.igS c!ll e4 3.if4 d5


This variation combining . . . lll e4 with . . . d5 is becoming increasingly popular. This set-up is not
as aggressive as those involving . . . c5, and not as solid as those with 2 . . e6 or 2 . . . d5 - it is somewhere
in the middle. Unlike the other main variations where I have given White a second choice, here I
10 Richard Pert - Playing the Trompowsky

have chosen to look deeply at just one line involving 3 . e3 followed by a plan of id3 and ixe4, as I
feel happy about White's chances of gaining an advantage in these positions and it seems to me to
be the best line. Actually it was a game in this variation which was probably my main inspiration
for taking up the Trompowsky when I witnessed Mickey Adams wipe out Xie Jun in the 1 996
Hastings Premier.

Chapter 10: Rare 3rd Moves


Black has tried many other moves after 2 . . . llie4 3 .if4, from the provocative 3 . . . g5 through to
the ridiculously new 3 . . . e5. Generally in these lines White's chances look preferable, nevertheless
it is worth looking at the sidelines in this chapter - even strong players will sometimes resort to
them, for example Luke McShane tried 3 . . . d6 against me in an important last round clash in a
tournament in Denmark.

Chapter 1 1 : Rare 2nd Moves


We finish up our round-up of Trompowsky odds and ends by looking at various 2nd move
options, the old-fashioned 2 . . . g6 being the most common of these.

Chapter 12: 2.igS against the Dutch


2.ig5 against the Dutch Defence has gone from once being a sideline to now being one of the
most dangerous moves for Black to face. I think White's prospects in this line are excellent and I
have used this move on a number of occasions myself with great results. I feel confident offering
just one repertoire against this variation as it seems to me that Black is really struggling to hold the
balance. So much so that a good friend of mine, Simon Williams, who is well known for his Dutch
exploits, now regularly plays I . . . e6, looking to transpose into the classical Dutch via a different
move order specifically aimed at avoiding this line.

Chapter 13: 1 .d4 dS 2.igS


In our final chapter we look at 2.ig5 against I. .. d5 - known as the Pseudo-Tromp. I don't
believe that 2.ig5 is as accurate here as it is against I . . . lli f6 or I .. .f5 , and with correct play I think
that Black can reach a balanced position. That said, it can be a good practical choice as it is low in
theory and the positions are interesting and imbalanced. This line was particularly popular with
top English GMs Mickey Adams, Julian Hodgson and Tony Miles during the 1 990s. I do not offer
White as many choices in this line as I do in the Trompowsky, but instead focus on picking out my
favourite variations for White.
After studying this variation in detail I have come to the conclusion that 2 . . . h6 and 2 .. .f6! are the
two choices for Black which are most difficult to prove an advantage against. I feel quite happy with
White's prospects of gaining an advantage against Black's numerous other second moves.
After the main move 2 . . . h6 I suggest a variation which was a firm favourite of Hodgson's. White
sacrifices a pawn in the centre of the board but gets a huge amount of play for it, and from a
practical viewpoint I really like it for White.
I have come round to the view that the rarely played 2 .. .f6! (only the fifth most popular choice)
may actually be Black's best. Because it seems the critical move, I have spent quite a lot of time on it.
I look at the three responses 3 .ih4, 3 .if4 and 3.id2, all of which are playable for White, though
being honest I would have to say that in each line the chances look balanced.
Chapter 1

2 ... e6 3.e4

1 .d4 f6 2.i.g5 e6 3.e4

A) 3 ... c5!? 4.d5 13


Al) 4 ... d6 14
A2) 4 ... h6 16
B) 3 ... h6 4.i.xffi xf6 5.c3!? 20
Bl) 5 ... c6 21
B2) 5 ... c5 23
B3) 5 ... d5 6.d2 c5 7. gf3 24
B3 1) 7 ... cxd4 8.ll:)xd4 i.c5 9,ll:)2b3!? 25
B3 1 1) 9 ... i.xd4 26
B3 12) 9 ... i.b6 27
B32) 7 ...ll:)c6 8.i.b5 cxd4 9,ll:)xd4 i.d7 1 0.0-0!? 28
B32 1) 1 0 ...i.e7 30
B322) 1 0 ...d8 31
B4) 5 ... d6 6.i.d3 32
B41) 6 ... e5 34
B42) 6...g6 7,ll:)e2 i.g7 8.0-0 e5 9.f4 36
B42 1) 9 ... exd4 37
B422) 9 ... e7 40
B422 1) lO.ll:)d2 41
B4222) 1 0.fS! 44
12 Richard Pert - Playing the Trompowsky

1.d4 tll f6 2.i.g5 e6 have noticed this line is becoming increasingly


popular amongst the world's elite in blitz and
rapid games, and perhaps it will become a line
for the future.

3 ... h6
This is Black's main move, looking to win
the bishop pair. John Cox also gives this as his
recommendation in his 2005 book, Dealing
with d4 Deviations. Rather complimentary
to me in his introduction, John says his
inspiration for writing the book was "being
utterly slaughtered by Richard Pert in a
London League match" . Well John picked a
solid system for Black, but nevertheless we will
This rock-solid positional choice is one try to put it under pressure.
of Black's most popular responses. It seems
strange for Black to self-pin his f6-knight, but The interesting sideline 3 . . . c5 ! ? is growing in
his motivation is to prevent White doubling popularity, having been recommended by De
his pawns, as he will be able to meet a future Dovitiis in his articles in New in Chess Yearbooks
ixf6 with . . . \Wxf6. It is no surprise to notice 92 and 93. It has also been recommended in
that this move has been the first choice of the Alterman Gambit Guide - Black Gambits 1.
Karpov, who is renowned for never allowing However I have a seriously strong idea in the
pawn weaknesses if he can help it. That said main variation which may force Black to have
though, Black does hand us the short-term a rethink here.
initiative with this approach, allowing us to
gain a lead in development and more space - it 4.Lf6
is up to us to try to take maximum advantage 4.ih4? is not possible as Black simply wins a
of that. pawn with 4 . . . g5 5 .ig3 lLi xe4 .

3.e4 4 ...xf6
This direct and logical move is the main line The main position of this variation.
and is my personal preference. I am going to
focus on it in this chapter. In choosing this
approach we allow Black to take the bishop
pair away from us, but in return we get quick
and easy development and that should be
enough for us to claim a small advantage.

3 .lll d2! ? is another option for White, which I


shall look at in the next chapter. This flexible
move looks to take advantage of Black's passive
response to the Trompowsky, eyeing up a
future e2-e4 without yielding the bishop pair. I
Chapter I - 2 . . . e6 3 . e4 13

5.c3!? 1 .d4 tlif6 2 ..igS e6 3.e4


I plan to base our repertoire on this pawn
move. It is not as common as 5 .tll c3 or 5 .tll f3 ,
but it is my favourite. White sets about a
simple plan of playing id3 , tll e2, 0-0 and f2-
f4 , grabbing space on the kingside. Black often
finds his queen misplaced in these variations as
it is a target for White's advancing pawns, and
so he has to rake yet more rime out to move the
queen back to d8, giving us an even bigger lead
in development.
I was amazed to find that I have played this
position in excess of 1 5 0 times (including blitz
and rapid games) . In fact my games alone
make up one sixth of the total number of
games featuring this position in my database.
Hopefully this experience should mean that I
am well placed to discuss the position, and at
points I go into quite a bit of detail (perhaps I would like to j ust briefly mention 3 . . . ie7.
even more than is needed) about how I feel Although quite often played, it looks way too
White should play this position. I have laid it passive to me. White has a pleasant choice:
all out very logically so that everything is easy
to reference, and there are plenty of new ideas a) 4.tll d2! ? transposes into a favourable version
in there which should leave you well equipped of the 3 . tll d2-variation, which is covered on
to play this position. page 48 of the next chapter.

b) The alternative is to take on the challenge


with 4.e5 ! ? immediately: 4 . . . tll d5 5 .ixe7
Wfxe7 6.c4 tll b6 7.tll c3 d6 8 . tll f3 tll c6 9 . exd6
(or 9 .id3 !?) 9 . . . cxd6 1 0 .id3N;!; With 0-0
followed by l:!e l coming soon, this looks to
favour White.

A) 3 ... cS!?

This is an ambitious attempt to attack the


centre. It has gained in popularity over the
last decade as Black looks to soften up White's
dark squares before going about netting his
dark-squared bishop. However, I have a new
idea in the main line which should send Black
back to the drawing board.

4.dS
14 Richard Pert - Playing the Trompowsky

'a' A :\tit
s z,!a'(

1 l .ixe4 d6 1 2 .l'!e l ie6 1 3 .tlJ g5 tlJ c6
.a. r.iJS M
7 %lfi" ,,7, -.--.
1 4 .id5 ixd5 1 5 .l'!xe7t ixe7 1 6.ic3 ic4

" '!af'a
,,,,,;m.-
1 7.Wg4 b5 1 8 .l'!e l tlJ e 5 1 9 .ixe5 dxe5
6
5 -0
20.'1We4 0-0 2 1 .'1Wxh7# Gonzalez de la Nava

8m
- Hens bergen, Lisbon 200 1 .

W
3 , ,,,x c ,;,,,Y,
7 . f4 d6

4
. .
Play has transposed into line A 1 2 of
Chapter 4 (see page 82) .

2
'
WM -
or@o- 0 -
[j[j[!j
flt) 1mJl
4 . . . exd 5 ? ! 5 . e 5 !

1
5 . exd5 '1W b 6 6 . tlJ c3 '1Wxb2 7 . tlJ ge2 i s also
possible, with good compensation for the
a b c d e f g h pawn.
It's probably j ust a matter of taste, but
personally I really like this move as White
keeps control of the important d5-square. 4.e5
is the major alternative, but it looks a bit ugly
to me.

We shall now examine Al) 4 d6 and A2)


...
4 h6, after a quick look at a couple of other
..
options.

4 . . . \Wb6
This is liable to reach a line of the Vaganian
5 . . . We7
Gambit that is favourable to White.
5 . . . h6? doesn't work here: 6.exf6 hxg5
5 . tlJ c3 Wxb2 6.id2
7.We2t+-
6.'1We2 h6 7.if4
Here we see one of the Trompowsky's leading
experts at the wheel.
7.ixf6 is given by Alej o de Dovitiis in New
in Chess Yearbook 93 as another way to gain
the advantage. His analysis runs: 7 . . . gxf6
8 . tlJ c3 fxe5 9 . tlJ xd5 Wd6 1 0 .0-0-0t
7 . . . tlJ e4 8 . f3 tlJg5 9 . tlJc3 d4 1 O.tlJd5 Wd8
1 1 .e6
Direct chess from Hodgson.
a b c d e f g h 1 1 . . .d6 1 2.ixg5 hxg5 1 3.exf7t 'i!lxf7 14. 0-0-0t
White's safer king position gave him an edge
6 . . . \Wb6
in Hodgson - Belkhodja, France 1 999.

..
6 . . . ttJ xe4? is possible as Black will regain
the piece, but he is left so far behind in
development that it is not advisable: 7.tlJxe4
Al) 4 d6
'1We5 8 .id3 exd5 9 . tlJ f3 '1We7 1 0 . 0-0 dxe4
Chapter 1 - 2 . . . e6 3 . e4 15

8.e5!
White blasts open the position at the expense
of a pawn.

8 . a4 has also been played, but I do not find


it convincing: 8 . . . 0-0 9 . lll f3 ixb5 1 0 .axb5"
Miladinovic - Aleksic, Cutro 200 I.

8 ... dxe5 9.Lf6 Lf6


9 . . . gxf6? looks somewhat shaky: 1 0 .Wfh 5 t
'i!lf8 1 1 .0-0-0

5.tll c3 i.e7!
5 . . . e5 looks a little slow to me as Black
has spent two tempos advancing his e-pawn.
6.ib 5 t id7 7.a4 ie7 8 .lll B 0-0 9 .h3 ic8
I O.ie3 White had a clear lead in development a b c d e f g h
1 I. . . Wfe8 1 2 .Wfh6t @f7 ( 1 2 . . . 'i!lg8 ? 1 3 .d3 +
and stood better in R. Pert - S. Berry, Liverpool
2008.
and here come the troops) 1 3 .ie2;!; White
keeps ongoing pressure.
6.i.b5t i.d7
6 . . . lll bd7? is not advisable: 7. dxe6 fxe6
8 .ixf6 gxf6 (8 . . . ixf6 9 .Wfxd6) 9 .Wfh5t
White forces the black king to move, and is
ahead in development as well.

7.dxe6 fxe6

a b c d e f g h
16 Richard Pert - Playing the Trom powsky

1 O.ixd7t has been tried before but White's 1 5 .tll f3!N


advantage is minimal: 1 0 . . . Wxd7 ( l O . . . tlJ xd7 1 5 . h400 was played in Aronian/Gaerths/
1 1 .Wh5t g6 1 2 .Wg4 We7 1 3 . lLi f3) 1 1 .tlJ e4 Zeitz - Nisipeanu/Figura/Mattick, Berlin
0-0 1 2.Wxd7 tLi xd7 1 3 . 0-0-0 ad8 1 4 . tlJ f3 2009, and White went on to lose the game.
White has a tiny advantage, though a draw
looks the most likely result with accurate play. 1 5 a6 1 6 .ia4 ghf8
.

1 6 . . . ih6t 1 7.@b l hf8 1 8 .Wh3


1 0 ... g6 1 1 .Wlg4 tlJ c6 12.0-0-0
1 2.ixc6? does not work out: 1 2 . . . ixc6 17.WlgS Wlxg5t 18.tll fxgS h6
1 3 .Wxe6t We?+

l 2 . tlJ e4
This is playable immediately and is likely
to transpose, but it does give Black an
additional option.
1 2 . . . 0-0
1 2 . . . Wa5 t ? is not a good idea: 1 3 . b4! Wxb4?
1 3 .c3+-
1 2 . . . We7 1 3 .0-0-0 transposes to the main
game.
1 3 . 0-0-0 tLi d4 ! ? 1 4.ixd7 Wxd7 1 5 . c3 Wd5
1 6 . cxd4 cxd4 1 7.@b l ig7
The threat of . . . f4 offers Black some
compensation for the piece, though probably
not quite enough.

12 Wf e7 13.e4 0-0-0 14.c3 .ig7


..
A2) 4 h6 5 .ixf6 Wlxf6 6.tll c3
..

So far we have been following what appears


to be a consultation game between teams of
three, and here I would like to suggest an
improvement.

6 a6
..

A blitz game of mine highlights the danger


if Black fails to cover the b5 -square: 6 . . . d6
Chapter 1 - 2 . . e6 3 . e4
. 17

7.i.b 5 t ctJ d7 8 .dxe6 fXe6 9 . ctJ f3 a6 1 0 .e5 Wi'g6 This new idea is seriously powerful. I
( 1 0 . . . W/f4 l l .g3 Wi'f7 1 2.i.xd7t i.xd7 1 3 .exd6 remember when this position appeared on
i.xd6 1 4.Wi'xd6 Wi'xf3 1 5 .l:%fl and White's better the board in my game against Alex Wohl in
pawn structure gives him an edge) l l .i.d3 Hastings 20 1 0, I was very excited by the
Wi'xg2 1 2 .l:%gl Wi'h3 1 3 .i.g6t c;f?ds 1 4.l:%g3 1 -0 prospect of playing this move. This position
Antidrome - CofC-SCal, Internet 2009. can very quickly become winning for White.
By the end of this book you will be used to my Sadly I cannot claim the move as my novelty;
Internet Chess Club handle of''.Antidrome" , as I have discovered that I was only the second to
I have often called upon my vast number of play it. But the first time it was played, White
blitz games to fill gaps where ideas have not yet immediately followed up incorrectly and so
been played in FIDE-rated games. its strength was not apparent - see the note to
White's 1 0th move below.
7.ctJf3 d6
This line has been played against me by two 8 ... dxe5 9.e2
Australian players, GM Ian Rogers and IM I believe that White should aim for a standard
Alex Wohl. It is obvious that they believed plan here of playing 0-0-0, g2-g3 (preventing
it to be a reasonable way of handling this . . . W/f4t) , i.h3 and l:%he l ; I will call this Plan
position, but after the shock Alex received A. Going for an early ctJ e4 may look tempting
against me in the opening, I fancy they may but is often a mistake, as White should stay
turn to different ideas in the future. This line flexible and try to keep all his options open.
is also the recommendation of De Dovitiis in It's uncomfortable for Black to know that he
New in Chess Yearbook 93, but he did not pay could be hit by ctJ e4 at any moment.
sufficient attention to my next move.
9 ... tli d7
7 . . . e5 is a commitment Black does not want to This looks to be critical, though Black has
make yet. He would rather stay flexible with several other options.
his pawn on e6 where he can make the choice
between opening or closing the e-file at any 9 . . . i.d6 1 0 . 0-0-0! 0-0 l l .g3 l:%d8 1 2 .i.h3 b5
given moment. White can continue with 8 . a4 1 3 .l:%he l

.1att
d6 9 .i.e2;!; with ctJ d2-c4 on the cards.

..
. . : l'
s

7
-% Y,
8.e5!!
-- . xr

:,,.,-
4
- --
..... r. ..... r.
:"'/ w; n

,: Q:J .t
2 88"/i" ld r.
3

a b c
r
1 x - x
d e f g h
White's Plan A worked well in this example,
quickly leading to a winning position: 1 3 . . . b4
1 4. llJ e4 Wi'e7 1 5 .ctJxd6 l:%xd6 1 6.ctJxe5+
Antidrome - sovaco, Internet 2009.
a b c d e f g h
18 Richard Pert - Playing the Trompowsky

9 . . . b5 10. 0-0-0 .ib7 This was the move my opponent chose the
I O . . . b4 I 1.lll e4 first time I played this line in a tournament.
As you will see I was winning shortly after
the opening, and it's absolutely criminal
that I failed to win the game - but that's
chess!
I O .'Wxe4 .id6 1 l .dxe6 'Wxe6 1 2. 0-0-0 'Wxe4
1 3 .lll xe4 .if4t 14.@b l lll d7 1 5 .g3 .ic7
1 6 . .ih3 lll e5 1 7 . .ixc8 xc8 1 8 . lll x e5 .ixe5
1 9 .d5!

6 rr1-0 a r
- - j
:::
-
0 .
"a lti -
"
I 1 . lll xb5 !
r.: n
...

Showing a benefit of n o t playing lll e4 too s


4
" -
-
early.

2 8 8- o
l l . . . e4 3

1 - -- --:
l l . . .'Wf4t?! 12.'ll d2 axb 5 1 3 .Wxb5 t 'll d7
14.dxe6 0-0-0 1 5 . exd7t xd7 16.g3 Wf5

h
1 7. f3
a b c d e f g
1 2 . liJ d2 axb5
1 2 . . . exd5 13 .lll c7t e7 1 4.lll xa8 .ixa8 Black is about to lose two pawns.
1 5 . f3+- 19 . . . .ib8 20.lll xc5 0-0 2 1 .e l ?
12 . . . We5 13.lll xe4 .ie7 14.lll c7t Wxc7 Although White is still winning after this,
1 5 . d6 'Wc6 16.dxe7+- 21. lll xb7+- is simple and strong.
13 .Wxb 5t lll d7 1 4.dxe6 fxe6 I 5 .Wxb7 b8 21. . ..ia7 22. 'll d3 c7 23.c3 g6 24.c2
16.'Wxd7t xd7 17.lll xe4t 'Wd4 18.xd4t g7 2 5 .de5 h5 26.e7 fc8 27.lll f4 xe7
cxd4 1 9 . .id3;!; 2 8 . xe7 .ixf2 29.'ll h3 f6 30.xb7 .ie3
White's passed pawns on the queenside are 31.d3 e8 32.b4 f5 3 3 . lll fL. .ih6 34. lll e4
more than enough for the exchange. d8t 3 5 .d4 xd4t 36.xd4 g4 37.c4 f5
3 8 .c5 fxe4 39.c6 e3 40.c7 e2 41. c8=Wt
9 . . . e4
Chapter 1 - 2 . . . e6 3 . e4 19

Somehow, despite being a queen down, This was Paci - F. Berend, Nancy 2008.
Black manages to wriggle away with a draw. White now missed a chance to gain a decisive
That Mr. Wohl is a slippery character - I advantage:
really thought I had him in this game! 14.d7t!N ixd7 1 5 . lll xe6+-
41. . .c;!/f3 42.1Wc6t c;!/f2 43.Wf6t <itig l 44.'1We6
c;!/f2 45 .Wf6t c;!/g l 1 0 ...J.e7
Yz-Yz R. Pert - Wohl, Hastings 2010. Against the alternatives the standard
treatment yet again does the job:

7
8

r.
i.-.t
: .
-- - - Z r
10 . . . exd5 11. lll xd5 1Wd6 12.g3 ie7 13 .ih3
0-0 14.Elhel;!;

65 . t---%-% 8 tj;...J'

10 . . . b5 1 Lg3! ib7 12.ih3 Eld8 13.lll e4 Wg6

----%
14. lll h4 1Wh7 15.dxe6+-

4 1 1 .g3

3nm
------- -% -
White sticks with Plan A - I've included a

---efr
8 ---% (b:r,(r
;Z ----Z
couple of my blitz games as there have been
2 8 1W 8 r no tournament games in this variation to show

lf - mn how effective this line is.

a b c d e f g h 1 1 0-0
..

10.0-0-0 l 1 . . . h 5 12.ih3 0-0 13 .Elhe l b5 14.c;!/b l c4


It is inaccurate to play: 15.lll e4 Wg6 16.dxe6 fxe6
10 .lll e4?! '1We7 11.0-0-0 f5 ?!
This is too weakening.
1 l . . . b 5 ! ?N followed by . . . ib7 seems fine for
Black; the threat to the d5-pawn will divert
White from Plan A.
12.d6 Wd8 ?
12 . . . Wf7 was necessary to defend the light
squares.

12.ih3 ges
12 . . . exd5 13. lll xd5 Wd6 14.Elhel;!;

1 3.ghel J.f8 1 4.dxe6 fxe6 15.tlie4 Wg6


1 6.t/Jh4 Wf7
20 Richard Perr - Playing the Trompowsky

B) 3 ... h6 4.i.xf6 Vfxf6 5.c3!?

a b c d e f g h

17.i.g4! tli f6 18.tlixf6t Vfxf6 19.i.hS gds


20.gxdS Yfxd8 2 1 .VfxeS
As is typical in these lines, White regains the As I mentioned in the introduction, my
e5-pawn at his convenience and still holds all preference is to support the cl-pawn with this
the other advantages of the position, including move, planning to continue with id3 , tLl e2,
a better structure with fewer pawn islands, and 0-0 and then f2-f4 .
the more active pieces as Black's bishops are
hampered by his pawns. Black now has several reasonable alternatives
and we shall investigate B l ) 5 ... tli c6, B2) 5 ... c5
and B3) 5 ... d5, before coming to Black's most
popular choice of B4) 5 ... d6. We first take a
quick look at a couple of rarer moves:

5 . . . b6 6 .id3 ib7 7 . lLi e2

7 . . . c5
I 've included one of my blitz games to
show what can happen if Black opts to play
slowly here: 7 . . . d6 8 . 0-0 Wi'd8 9 . tLl d2 ie7
10 . f4 tlJ d7 11. f5 exf5 12.l'!xf5 lLi f6 13 . tLl g3
Chapter 1 - 2 . . . e6 3 . e4 21

White's kingside pressure gives him good 7.cxd4 ib4t 8 . ll'l c3 0-0 9.e5 Wg6 1 0.id3
prospects. 1 3 . . . Wd7 1 4 .ib5 c6 1 5 .ic4 d5 Wxg2 1 1 .i'!g l Wh3 1 2 .i'!g3 ixc3t 1 3 .bxc3
1 6.exd5 ll'l xd5 1 7 .ixd5 cxd5 1 8 . ll'l f3 0-0 Wh5 1 4.Wb3
1 9 . ll'l e5 We6 20.Wfl id6 2 1 .i'!e l i'!ae8 White clearly has great play for the sacrificed
22 .i'!e3 ib8 23.i'!ff3 ixe5 24.i'!xe5 Wd7 pawn.
2 5 . ll'l f5 i'!e6 26.i'!g3 i'!g6 27.ll'l e7t 1 -0 l 4 . . . d6? l 5 .ig6
Antidrome - GreenSkull, Internet 20 1 2. 1 -0 Argandona Riveiro - Argaya Urdaniz,
8 . 0-0 ll'l c6 9.e5 We7 1 0 . ll'l d2 d6 l l .f4 dxe5 Amorebieta 2006.
1 2. fxe5 Wd7 1 3 . ll'l f3 i'!d8 1 4.We l cxd4
1 5 . ll'l exd4 ll'l xd4 16. ll'lxd4 ic5 1 7.@h l 0-0 Bl) 5 ... c6
1 8 .i'!f4 We7 1 9 .Wg3
Yi-Yi R. Pere - Flumborc, Patras 200 1 .
Looking back, I chink setding for a draw
was premature - the position remains finely
balanced bur certainly looks easier for White
to play with ongoing kingside pressure.

5 . . . e5 6 . ll'l f3
White can also claim a slight plus with:
6.dxe5 Wxe5 7. ll'l d2 ic5 8 . ll'l gf3 We7
9.id3;!;

6.eS
This must be the right way co cry to cake
advantage of Black's previous move.

6 ...fle7
Black has also tried:
6 . . . exd4
6 . . . Wg6 7 . ll'l d2
6 . . . d6 7.ll'lbd2 g6 8 .ib5 t c6 9 .ie2 ig7
This was White's most recent choice.
1 0 .dxe5 dxe5 l 1 . ll'l c4 0-0 1 2 .Wd6 Wf4
An alternative of roughly equal value is
1 3 .0-0 Wxe4 1 4 .id3 Wd5 1 5 .Wxd5 cxd5
7 . ll'l f3 ! ? d6 and now:
1 6 . ll'l cxe5 tll c6 1 7.i'!fel;!; Duong The Anh -
a) 8 . ll'l bd2 transposes to 7 . ll'l d2 d6 8 . ll'l gf3
Eperjesi, Budapest 2008.
as considered below.
6 ... ll'l c6 7.ib5 (7.d5 ll'l e7 8 . ll'l bd2 ll'l g6
b) 8 .id3 Wxg2 9 .i'!g l Wh3 1 0 . ll'l bd2 must
9 . g3;!; preventing . . . tll f4) 7 . . . exd4 8 . cxd4
offer White some compensation.
a6 9.ia4 ib4t 10 . ll'l c3 0-0 1 1 . 0-0 ixc3
c) 8.h3!? looks strange, but there is a reason
1 2 .bxc3 was pleasant for White in Kaufeld
behind it: 8 . . . id7 9 .id3 Wxg2 ? ? 1 0 .i'!h2
Cekro, Belgium 20 1 2.
picks up the queen .
22 Richard Pert - Playing the Trompowsky

7 . . . d6 8 . f4 l 1 . tll gf3 f6 12 .b4 ie8 13 .b5 tll b8 14.Wa4 Wa3


White may also consider 8 . tll gf3 id7 9 . tll c4 I 5 .Wb3 tll d7 16. tll c4 We7 I 7.a4 fxe5 l 8 . tll cxe5
ie7 10.id3 Wxg2 1 1.:B:g l , followed by tll x e5 19 .tll xe5 g5 (19 . . . Wf600 intending . . . id6
taking on g7 with the initiative. would have been stronger) 20.ic4!;!; White
8 . . . id7 9.Wf3 0-0-0 seized the initiative and went on to win in
Hodgson - Rowson, Birmingham 200 I .

7 ... d6 8.ib5 .id7 9.exd6 cxd6


9 . . . Wxd6 was played against me in a blitz
game, but Black's queen finds itself awkwardly
placed in the middle of the board: 10. 0-0 ie7
1 I . tll bd2 Wd5 12.ic4N (12.c4 Wf5 13 .:B:e l
was also slightly better for White in Antidrome
- Guineo, Internet 2011) 12 . . . Wh5 13.ie2
Wf5 14.tll c4;!; and the black queen remains a

b d f g h
target.
a c e

10 .id3 f5 l 1.exf6N 1 0.0-0 a6 1 1 ..ia4 tl)a7


This looks tempting to me as now Black's

.1 --
%'
"0,,;/. ..tJiiLt.
plan of putting his bishop on c6 can be met
8
;! .,, . , , , , , , Y,
r, ..,.
- -
.t. ,,%-w.,...%
by blocking with a piece on e4.
1 I .tll e2 tll e7 12 .0-0 ic6 was unclear in 1
6
7:....%
Gogolis - Drenchev, Neos Marmaras 2012 .
11. . .Wxf6 12. 0-0-0 tll e7 13 .tll e2 ic6 14.ie4 % ,..,%


!o

White's lead in development gives him an
edge.
: r - %


3- r - ,,..% mct:Jm
2 ltwri - ftwtj
1d-''=--
a b c d e f g h
1 2.dSN
This looks the right idea, aiming to limit
Black's dark-squared bishop.
12 . tll bd2 ixa4 13.Wxa4t Wd7 14.Wb3 ie7
15.tll c4 tll c8 16. tll e3 (16.d5N may still be
the way to go: 16 . . . e5 17.a4;!;) 16 . . . 0-0 I 7.c4

a b c d e f g h
b5 18.d5 bxc4 19.Wxc4 tll b6 20.Wg4 if6
21.:B:ad l a5 22.dxe600 Rowson - Cherniaev,
7.tl)f3 London 199 9 .
Julian Hodgson went his own way here and
grabbed some space on the kingside: 7.h4!? 1 2 ...eS 13.tl) bd2 .ixa4 1 4.xa4t d7
d6 8.f4 dxe5 9.fxe5 id7 10. tll d2 0-0-0 1 5.xd7t @xd7 16.tl)c4 @c7 1 7.a4
Chapter 1 - 2 . . . e6 3 . e4 23

B2) 5 ... cS a) 7 . . . exd5 8 . exd5 tll e5 9 . tll x e5 Wfxe5t


1 0 .ie2 id6 l 1 .tll a3 ! Making short work

8 .i-.i. - of Black's plan to block the position up.

" x '
7- '"S'"1"
1 1 . . . 0-0 1 2 .tll c4 Wff6 1 3 . 0-0 b5 1 4. tll xd6
Wfxd6 1 5 .ixb 5 :!::1b 8 1 6.Wfd3 a6 1 7 .ic4


: ,' ,!"
:!::1x b2 l 8 .:!::1a b 1 :!::1x b 1 l 9 .E1xb 1 E1e8 2 0 . g3
g6 2 1 .a4 @g7 22.h4 h 5 23.a5 Wc7 24.d6

Jo!
Wi'xa5 2 5 .Wff3 f5 26.Wf d5 :!::1f8 27.Wi'e 5 t @h6

O"
4
28 .Wff4t 1 -0 Hebden - A. Grant, Isle of Man

3 - d ---- "
- ,,,, r
2002.

JfJ Uwrf!J\Jl
!JI
2
tt:JV.i. J:. b) 7 ... tll e5 8 .ie2 tll xf3 t 9 .ixf3 exd5
1 0 .Wfxd5 We6 1 l .Wi'd3 ie7 1 2 . 0-0 0-0

1
1 3 . tll d2 b5 1 4 .:!::1 fe l :!::1 b 8 1 5 .e5 c4 1 6 .Wfd4
m Wb6 1 7.Wi'xb6 :!::1x b6 1 8 .a4 a6 19 .axb5 axb5
a b c d e f g h 20.E1a7 :!::1e 8 2 l .id5 ic5 2 2 .:!::1a 8;!; Mark came
This was tried against me at the end of 20 1 2 through with flying colours and notched up
by Arianne Caoili who at the time was playing an impressive victory in Hebden - Adams,
for an IM norm. She is the girlfriend of Lev Kilkenny 2006.
Aronian and so I am not sure if he had any
influence in her opening choice in what must 7 ...a6 8.Lc6 bxc6
have been an important game for her, Black nets the bishop pair against White's
knights, bur I still had a lead in development
6.tlia tli c6 7.J.hS!? and so looked to make that count.
White has a major alternative here in the
.i .i.-
,
more commonly played 7,d5 which is the
8
76 -
A U-AUAE

]----/,'//
first choice of English GM Mark Hebden, I
know Mark quite well and can confirm that
he knows his systems very well, so for him ,,.

,
5 ---J '.,,


to use this move on several occasions means
it has to be taken seriously. Here are a couple
,,
8
4

' !
of examples from him, including the ultimate

3 rd---- -,,,, r
r[j m
jJiill
test as he faced England's number one Mickey
Adams.
2 r
1 ;=----%-
d
m, ,
b f g h
,_ _ _ _ Y, ,., %

a c e
_ _

9.0-0 cxd4 1 0.cxd4 cS 1 1 .eS Wff5 12.tli bd2


ih7 13Jkl
Black sank into thought here as it became
obvious that untangling her position was going
to be trickier than she originally expected.

1 3 ...ie7
24 Richard Pert - Playing the Trompowsky

Eventually Black decided to j ust give me a B3) 5 ... d5


pawn and accept a worse position.
This is probably Black's most critical move as
1 3 . . . cxd4 1 4.E:c7! was my intention with the he looks to stake a claim over the centre rather
idea: 1 4 . . . ic6?! ( 1 4 . . . id5 1 5 .Wa4;!;) than let White have it all his own way.

6.d2
Hodgson's regular choice was to advance in
the centre:
6.e5
I prefer to delay this move; we can always
close the centre later. But it can be
particularly useful to have the option of
opening the position, especially since we are
likely to castle first while Black's king may be
left in the middle.
6 . . . Wd8 7 . f3 c5 8 . dxc5

8 .1 .t--
7 ,,
3 . - .....
. . . 7. . , Y. ., v.
6 '- 7.'0
T ---

s i
14.dxc5 0-0 1 5 Jfol f6
4 - . .0J
--
3 -P-
2 efrg, efrg, efrg,
1 ,.:: ftl)-.lr 1tR1
a b c d e f g h
8 . . . lll d7! ?
8 . . . ixc5 9 .id3 lll c6 1 0 . 0-0 id7 l 1 . tll b d2
Wc7 1 2.We2 ie7 1 3 .E:fe l a6 1 4.E:ac l E:c8
1 5 .lll b3 Wb6 1 6 .ib l lll a5 1 7 . lll x a5 Wxa5
1 8 . lll d4 ig5 1 9 .E:cd l ia4 20. lll b 3 Wb6
2 1 .E:d4 ixb3 22.axb3 ie7 23 .ic2;!; with
a b c d e f g h
ongoing kingside pressure, Hodgson - Tan,
Scarborough 200 1 .
1 6.c6! J.xc6 17. d4 Wfd3 1 8.xc6 dxc6 9 .b4 ie7
1 9.exf6 !xf6 20.e4 Wfxdl 2 1 .xf6t E:xf6 9 . . . g6 1 0 .tll bd2 ig7 1 l .ib5 0-0 1 2 .ixd7
22.E:exdU ixd7 1 3 . 0-0 Wc7 1 4.E:e l ;l; Milov - Epishin,
In R. Pert - Caoili, London 20 1 2, Whi te Amsterdam 2000.
had achieved a comfortable advantage and I O .id3 Wc7 1 1 .We2 a5 1 2. 0-0 0-0 1 3 . lll bd2
virtually no losing chances. b600 Rogers - Epishin, Castrop Rauxel 200 1 .

6 ... c5 7.gf3
Chapter 1 - 2 . . . e6 3 . e4 25

9 . . . ib4 1 0 .ib5t
1 0 .Wa4t? is well met by 10 ... tDc6+.
1 0 . . .id7 1 1 . ltJ xd7 ixd2t 1 2.Wxd2 lD xd7
1 3 .ixd7t
1 3 . 0-0?! d8 1 4. f3 Wg5 ! 1 5 .Wb4 exf3
I 6 .xf3 We7+
1 3 . . . 'it?xd7
This is the line given by Palliser. I had a quick
look at this position and think that Black can
follow up . . . hd8 and . . . c;!,ie8 against most
White plans and be absolutely fine.

7 . . . a6 looks a bit slow. White can choose


between 8 .id3 cxd4 9 . cxd4 dxe4 1 0 .ixe4!;!;
as given by Tzermiadianos, and 8 . dxc5 ixc5
9 .id3 lD c6 1 0 . 0-0 0-0 1 1 .We2 ia7 1 2.fe l
id7 1 3 .ad l ad8 1 4 . ttJ fl with an initiative
for White, Karttunen - Hellsten, Plovdiv
2003 .

B3 1 ) 7 ... cxd4 8.xd4

8 . cxd4 dxe4 9 . lD e 5 ! ?

8 . . . tDc6 9.ib5 transposes to variation B32


below.

9. 2b3!?
This is my computer's choice and was also
suggested as worthy of further investigation by
Andrew Greet.

h
9 . ltJ 4f3
b d f g
a c e
A solid alternative.
This is an interesting idea suggested by Nigel 9 . . . lD c6
Davies and supported by Tzermiadianos. Play has transposed into a game in which the
But to be honest, it's not quite good enough young Magnus Carlsen was Black. We shall
and both Cox and Palliser show support for have a quick look at the opening in which
Black's position. White managed to get an edge.
26 Richard Pert - Playing the Trompowsky

I O .id3

1 0 . . . 0-0
This was Carlsen's choice.
1 o . . . d4 is my computer's suggestion, when
White has various options:
a) 1 1 .c l is solid: 1 1 . . .dxc3 1 2.xc3 ib4
The other bishop retreat of 9 . . . id6 ?! does not
1 3 .c2 0-0 1 4. 0-0 id7 1 5 .1We2 and the
really make sense. For example: I O .ib 5 t id7
position looks balanced, although White's
1 1 . exd5 We5 t 1 2 .We2 Wxe2t 1 3 .ixe2 exd5
play may be slightly easier.
b) l 1 .e5 is playable: 1 1 . . . tll x e5 1 2 .ib5t id7
1 4.if3;!; with a clear advantage for White who
can heap pressure on the d-pawn .
1 3 .ixd7t tll xd7 1 4 .cxd4 ib6 ( 1 4 . . . ixd4?
l 5 .tll e4+-) 1 5 . 0-0 0-000
B3 1 1) 9 .ixd4
...

c) 1 l . tll c4 is my personal preference,


preparing the advance of the e-pawn:
Black may have thought that White's last move
1 1 . . . dxc3 (Black can't stop White's plans
was not possible as this reply appears to win a
with 1 l . . .e 5 ? 1 2 . b4 ie7 1 3 .b5 tll d8 1 4 . 0-0
pawn, but White can create counter-threats to
[or 1 4. tt:l cxe5 !?] 1 4 . . . dxc3 1 5 .1Wb3;!; and
win the pawn back.
Black is struggling to hold the e5-pawn)
1 2 .e5 We7 1 3 . bxc3 0-0 1 4. 0-0 White is
10.tlixd4
well placed for a kingside attack with 1We2-
1 0 .Wxd4 Wxd4 1 1 .tll xd4 dxe4 1 2. tll b5 lll a6
e4 on the cards.
1 3 . tll d6t <;tie? 1 4 . lll xe4 is playable for White,
1 1 . 0-0 ib6 1 2 .We2 Wf4 1 3 .ad l id7 1 4.ic2
but it looks very drawish.
fd8 1 5 .exd5 exd5 1 6.1Wd3 ie6 1 7.Wh7t <j;ifg
1 8 . tll b3
1 0 ... dxe4
White holds a small advantage with play
1 0 . . . 1We5 1 1 .id3 ! This clever move prepares
against the isolated queen's pawn.
to hit the queen with tll f3 which would leave
1 8 . . . Wf6 1 9 . tll bd4 lll xd4 20. tll xd4 ac8
White with better pieces and more space.
2 1 .d3 ixd4 22.xd4;!;
1 l . . . dxe4 1 2.1We2 f5 1 3 .f3 e3 1 4 . 0-0-0 0-0
In Rahman - Carlsen, Dresden (ol) 2008,
1 5 .he l f4 1 6.g3 lll c6 1 7.tll xc6;!; White is
White went on to make a draw, an excellent
going to win back his pawn and will have
result against an opponent who was soon to be
greater piece activity and a clear advantage.
the world's top-ranked player.
Chapter 1 - 2 . . . e6 3 . e4 27

1 1 .tll b5 B3 1 2) 9 ...J.b6
This knight lunge looks prom1smg for
White, threatening both lll c7t and lll d6t . This tricky computer-favoured move looks to
use tactics to avoid having to clarify things in
the centre.

10.J.h5t!?
Black's clever idea comes into play if White
takes the cl-pawn:
1 0 . exd5

l I . . .ll:la6 allows White a choice of invasions


on the d6-square:
10 . . . 0-0!
a) 1 2 . lll d6t rJJ e 7 1 3 .tll xe4 We5 ! ( 1 3 . . . Wf4?
After 1 0 . . . exd5 l l .i b 5 t lli c6 1 2 .We2t;!;
1 4.Wa4 d8 1 5 .Wa3t rJJ e 8 1 6 .ib 5 t id7
White's advantage is clear, with future
l 7.lll d6t+-) 1 4.We2 f5 l 5 .lll d2 Wxe2t
pressure to come against the d5-pawn.
16.ixe2 lll c5 1 7. 0-0-0 with a balanced
l l .dxe6
endgame.
White may be able to claim a tiny edge with
b) 1 2.Wd6 ! ? We7 13 .d l id7 1 4 .Wd4!;t
l l .Wi'f3 Wi'xf3 1 2 .lll xf3 exd 5 , though Black
can achieve quite active development.
l l .ie2 allows Black to avoid being saddled
12.tll d6t <tie? 13.tll c4 Wld5 14.Wlc2
Also possible is 1 4.Wb3! ? Wc5 15.d l lll c6
with the isolated queen's pawn: 1 1 . . . eS
16.ie2 b6 l 7.Wc2i with decent compensation
1 2 .lll f3 e4 1 3 . lll fd4 Wg5 and Black regains
for the pawn.
the pawn with an edge.
l I . . .ixe6 1 2 .Wi'f3 Wi'xf3
14 ... tll c6
1 2 . . . We5t 1 3 .Wi'e2 Wi'f6 1 4. lll xe6 e8
After 1 4 . . . f5 1 5 .d l Wc5 1 6. b4 Wc7 1 7.ie2
1 5 . 0-0-0 xe6 1 6.Wi'c2 lll c6 1 7 . f3 a5 with
followed 0-0 and f2-f3, White clearly has good
unclear play.
compensation.
1 3 . gxf3 lll c6 1 4. lll xe6 fxe6
Black should be able to win his pawn back
1 5 J:dl Wlf5 1 6.Wi'a4
as the doubled f-pawns are weak; a draw
White threatens Wa3t and looks to have
seems the most likely result here.
more than enough compensation for the pawn.

16 ...Wlc5? 17.b4 Wlg5 1 8.b5 tll e5 19.Wlb4t+- 1 0 ... J.d?


28 Richard Pert - Playing the Trompowsky

8 i.- - --
7 wi{t- --,wr
6
. . . -----7,w.....
L.7-w


w "%

:
--
.
/,, , ,,;


!
3" w- ---7, wv-0

2 .8JllB"
.... Ji!
-


1 -
a b c d e f g h

I definitely prefer White here. Black is facing


a long and uncomfortable task of trying to
hold his weak d5-pawn, while White has the
d4-square totally covered and can bide his
time.
1 1 ... tll xd7 1 2.exd5 We5t
1 2 . . . exd5 1 3 .We2t We5 1 4.Wxe5t lli xe5 B32) 7 ... tll c6 8.J.h5 cxd4

8 . . . a6 9 . .lxc6t bxc6 1 0 .Wa4 .ld7 l 1 . lli e5;!;


1 5 . 0-0-0;!;

Trying to avoid an isolated pawn with


8 ... J.d7 9 . 0-0 cxd4 1 0.llixd4 is j ust a
1 2 . . . e5 is dangerous here as Black can 6ncl
himself too far behind in development: l 3 . lli f3
transposition.

( 1 3 .We2 0-0 1 4. lli c2;!; also looks better for


9.tll xd4 J.d7 1 0.0-0!?
White) 1 3 . . . e4 1 4 . tli fd4 We5 1 5 .Wg4! Wxd5
1 6 . 0-0-0 Black is rather underdeveloped
and so really has to get the queens off to
avoid further problems. 1 6 . . . Wg5 t 1 7.Wxg5
hxg5 1 8 . f3!;!; Even with the queens gone,
Black's king in the middle causes him some
difficulties.

1 3.&ile2
I like this move which forces Black to accept
an isolated queen's pawn.

1 3 .We2 Wxd5 1 4. 0-0 0-0 1 5 .!!ad l llif6


1 6. lli b 5 We4 1 7.Wxe4 lli xe4 1 8 .!!d7 leads to
an unclear endgame.
have considerable experience of this
13 ... exd5 14.0-0 0-0 1 5 .tll ed4 tll f6 16.el position, both over the board and in internet
Wf4 17.Wf3t games. B32 1 ) 10 ... J.e7 has been the choice
Chapter 1 - 2 . . . e6 3 . e4 29

of my highest-rated opponents, while B322) dangerous for Black as his king gets stranded
10 ... YNdS is the move I faced most recently. in the middle of the board whilst White's
There are also a few other options to be king is safe as houses.
considered briefly. 1 1 .ixd7t ii xd7 1 2 .cxd4 Wxd4 1 3 .exd5 Wxd5
1 3 . . . exd 5 ? 1 4.Wb3 and with a rook quickly
1 0 . . . id6?! ( l O . . . ic5 ?! receives the same coming to d 1 , Black will do well to make it
treatment) l 1 .exd5 exd5 1 2 .l:'!:e l t ie7 ( 1 2 . . . f8 out of the opening.
1 3 .Wb3;!; R. Pert - Eames, London 2008) 1 4 .Wa4t


1 3 .Wb3;!; Antidrome - AndrewMartinIM,
8

z
Internet 20 1 2.
z
7 t. , , if-JI
6 . . . . r. -
. . .. r.f
1 0 . . . a6?!
This move has now been played against me

54 1
by three grandmasters in blitz games and I


31
hold a 1 00% record, so the signs are good.
1 1 . exd5 axb5
- "
"- , .
, " '"
" -
8 Z B - i- ' Z 2 !::i f 8
7 .r.ra- - . . ' "
1 1g{ -. ,:=
h
6 .;. .. . . r.. b d f g
z,. . 7.


,,. a c e

-- " "
: -


1 4 . . . Wc6


After 1 4 . . . b5 White has a whole host of

3 - '
if/j-
options, such as l 5 .Wa6, 1 5 .Wf4 or 1 5 .Wa5 ,

2 8
ref
if
\.
, .
,, "'
if
8
all of which give promising play against the
black king. However, my preference is for
1 m r.&ii,r:: 1 5 .Wg4, eyeing g7 should Black move his
a b c d e f g h f8-bishop. For example:
a) 1 5 . . . Wf5 1 6.We2 id6 1 7. lll e4 l:l:hd8
1 2 . lll x b5 !
1 8 .l:'!:fd l e7 1 9 . lll xd6 l:l:xd6 20.l:'!:xd6 <itixd6
White already has a n advantage.
2 1 .a4 l:'!:b8 22.axb5 Wxb5 23 .Wd2t Wd5
1 2 . . . 0-0-0
24.Wf4t e5 2 5 .Wg4t with ongoing pressure.
1 2 . . . l:'!:c8 1 3 . lll e4 We5 1 4.dxc6 l:'!:xc6 1 5 .Wd3
b) 1 5 . . . id6 1 6.l:l:fd l
l:l:b6 1 6.a4 ie7 1 7.l:'!:fe l Antidrome -
c) 1 5 . . . h 5 1 6.We2 e8 1 7.l:'!:fd l Wb7
Molton, Internet 20 1 1 .
1 8 . ll:\ e4--+
1 3 . dxc6 bxc6 1 4. ll:\ e4 Wg6
d) 1 5 . . . e8 1 6.l:l:ad l Wc6?! 1 7. lll f3
1 4 . . . We5 1 5 .lll ed6t ii b8 1 6.ll:\xf7 Wxb5
1 5 .Wf4 ii e8
1 7.lll xd8 ii c7 1 8 . lll f7 l:'!:g8 1 9 .l:'!:el Wf5
1 5 . . . f6 1 6 .l:'!:ac l Wd6 1 7.Wa4t e7 1 8 .l:'!:fd l
20.lll e5 ic8 2 1 .Wa4 1 -0 Antidrome -
@ f7 1 9 .lll e4 Wf4 20 .Wd7t
shade, Internet 20 1 2.
1 6.l:'!:ac l Wd7 1 7.l:'!:fd l l:'!:d8
1 5 .lll bd6t c7 1 6.Wd4 l:'!:a8 1 7.l:'!:fd l +
A clever move from Black as he plans to meet
R. Pert - Rowson, Internet 200 1 .
l:'!:c7 with . . . id6, but nevertheless it will not
1 0 . . . ll:\ xd4 be easy for him to withstand the pressure.
This may objectively be a reasonable move, For example:
but from a practical viewpoint it looks very 1 8 .Wf3 ie7? 1 9 .lll e4 Wa4 20.l:'!:xd8 t ii xd8
30 Richard Pert - Playing the Trompowsky

2 1 .Wf4!+- 1 2 .Wi'b3
lhe white queen penetrates to c7 or b 8 . I have also played 1 2 .lll 2b3 0-0 1 3 .e l and
now:
B32 1) 1 0 ...i.e7 a) 1 3 . . . id6 1 4.Wh5 a6 1 5 .ifl lll e5 1 6.h3
fe8 1 7.ad l e7 1 8 . lll c2 Wf4 1 9 .g3 Wf6
20 .ig2;!; Antidrome - Pinkalmykia (GM) ,
Internet 2009.
b) 1 3 . . . a6 1 4.id3 id6 1 5 .ic2 fe8 1 6.Wi'd3
lll e5 1 7.Wi'h7t;!; Antidrome - Adaptation
(Caruana) , Internet 20 1 0 .
1 2 . . . 0-0
1 2 . . . Wd6 1 3 . lll 2f3t
1 3 .lll 2f3 ad8 1 4.Wxd5 ie6 1 5 .Wi'e4 id5
1 6 .Wi'f5 Wi'xf5 1 7.lll xf5;!;
R. Pert - Adair, Sheffield 20 1 1 .

1 1 ... eS
1 1 . . . 0-0 1 2 . lll xc6;!; bxc6 1 3 .ixc6 ixc6
1 4.Wxc6 d4 1 5 .lll f3 dxc3 1 6 .e5 '1Wg6 1 7.Wi'xc3
leaves White a pawn up.

1 l . . .c8 1 2 .ixc6 ixc6 1 3 . lll xc6 bxc6


1 1 .'1Wa4!? 1 4 .'1Wxa7 0-0 1 5 .a4 and White is a pawn up
I think this is the critical option. here too.

1 l . exd5 12.exd5 exd4


This is certainly playable and I have even
managed to get an advantage on three
occasions in this line. That said, having
looked at the position more deeply I now
slightly prefer the queen move.
1 1 . . . exd5

1 5.dxc6 bxc6
Chapter I - 2 . . . e6 3 . e4 31

1 5 . . . ixc6 1 6.ixc6 Wxc6 1 7.Wxc6 bxc6 1 1 .lLi4b3!?N

.i U. w.r

1 8 .cxd4 1:%fd8 1 9 .1:%ad l
8
----
76 - z. . .- - -
:r
I6.xd4 UdS 1 7.J.fl
.-
The smoke has cleared and White is a pawn
: f

" "' .
5-
up, Antidrome - arrowshot, Internet 20 1 1 . z....

-- 1
-

4 -" j.
B322) 1 0 ...dS

3 ,.,,,,R." "
z

2 8f1
-Jllx

This move was sprung on me by the talented
Chinese IM Gao Rui in a British league game
z t A t-
-----"v!=---

: : oz 0 7-0''
at the start of 20 1 3. 1
a b c d e f g h
Another way to keep the pieces on. The idea
is that if Black avoids an isolated d-pawn by
taking on e4, then White can try and land a
knight on c5.
l l ... dxe4
The immediate 1 1 . . .a6 might be more
accurate, attacking the bishop when
retreating to a4 is not an option. 1 2 .ie2
ie7 ( 1 2 . . . dxe4 1 3 .lLi xe4 We? 1 4.Wd3 ie7
1 5 .1:%ad l 1:%d8 1 6. llJ d6t ixd6 1 7.Wxd6
Wxd6 1 8 .1:%xd6 looks marginally favourable
for White) 1 3 . exd5 exd5 1 4. lLi f3 Although
my computer thinks this is equal I prefer
White, who has lasting pressure against the
isolated d-pawn.
1 2 . lLi xe4 We?
1 2 . . . Wb6 1 3 .We2 a6 1 4.ia4 ie7 ( 1 4 . . . Wc?
l 1 .Wb3
1 5 .1:%ad l b5 is well met by 1 6. lLi bc5 ixc5
Permitting the minor piece exchanges looks
1 7. lLi xc5) 1 5 .1:%ad 1 seems slightly more
to be heading pretty quickly to a dead drawn
pleasant for White.
position.
1 3 . lLi bc5 ixc5 1 4.lLixc5 1:%d8 1 5 .We2 0-0
l 1 . . .lLixd4 1 2 . cxd4 ixb 5 1 3 .Wxb 5 t Wd7
1 6.1:%ad l;l;
1 4.Wb3 ie7 1 5 .1:%ac l dxe4 1 6 .lLixe4 0-0
1 6 . . . b6 1 7.1:%fd l 0-0 1 8 .d5 exd5 1 9 .1:%xd5
l l ... dxe4 1 2.tlixe4 c7 13.d2N
and a draw looks likely.
l 7.lLi c5 ixc5
I believe this would have been stronger than
what I played, as it makes it more difficult for
1 7 . . . Wxd4 1 8 .1:%fd l Wf4 1 9 .g3 Wg4 20.1:%d7
Black to castle kingside whilst targeting the
ixc5 2 l .1:%xc5 b6 22.1:%cc7 and White will
d6-square.
regain the pawn.
1 8 .dxc5 Wc6 1 9 .1:%fd l
1 3 .We2 ie7 1 4 .1:%ad l 0-0 1 5 .1:%fe l 1:%fd8= led
Again i t looks pretty even, although White
to a draw in R. Pert - Gao Rui, Daventry 20 1 3 .
may be a smidgen better.
32 Richard Pert - Playing the Trompowsky

1 3 ...i.e7 1 4Jffd l 0-0-0 6 . . . g5


1 4 . . . i:!d8 1 5 .lll d6t ixd6 1 6.Wxd6 Wxd6 It is not uncommon for Black to play this
l 7.l'!xd6 rJJ e 7 1 8 .i:!ad l;!; The queenside move along with . . . e5 in order to stop
majority and slightly better coordination give White's plan of advancing his f-pawn. This
White some advantage, although it's not a lot. may seem like a sensible approach, but when
you look more deeply at the position it
1 5.e3 @bs 1 6.b4!;!; becomes obvious that the weakness on f5 is
Again this looks slightly preferable for White. a big problem for Black.
7.lll e2 lll c6 8 . 0-0 e5
B4) 5 ... d6

8 .i .i.--
7 w6i' . ;
, _ _, .
, , Y.-. ..
_
6 .
%.. % %

. . .. ,% , .. . ,% , .... %
.... .... % , .

5
-
4
.. . %8
-%" -
3 wP 'lir% ?i
. f)jl!r
.

2 w,-J%J
tt:Jif m J.. m .:
9 .ib5 !
A n important move t o remember in this type
a b c d e f g h of position. White turns his attention to the
queenside, looking to force an exchange of
So we reach Black's most popular choice in
light-squared bishops and make f5 a gaping
this variation of the Trompowsky. Often Black
hole for one of the white knights.
is looking to set up flexibly, fianchettoing his
9 . . . id7 1 0 .d5 lll e7
kingside bishop and supporting the move
1 0 . . . lll b8 is possible, so as to avoid moving
. . . e 5 . Our standard plan here is to play id3 ,
his king, but it leaves Black underdeveloped
lll e2, 0-0, f2-f4 and if Black lets us then e4-
and with no cover of the important f5-
e 5 . Usually Black will rake steps to address this
square. White replies l 1 .Wb3;!; and will then
plan by trying to play . . . e5 himself, although
explore lll g3-f5 ideas.
he will have to worry about his queen on f6
1 1 .ixd?t rJJ x d7 1 2.Wa4t rJJ d 8 1 3 . lll a3
which will be lined up with our fl -rook. I have
Black's king is misplaced and the f5-square
tried to go into quite a lot of derail in a few of
is still a problem. White's plan is to play his
Black's specific set-ups, so by the end of this
knights to e3 and g3 and then land one on
chapter you should have a good idea of how to
f5 .
handle White's position.
1 3 . . . h5 1 4.lll c4 g4
Black does everything in his power to stop
6.i.d3
the knights from landing on f5. He aims
The main moves now are B41) 6 ... e5 and
B42) 6 ... g6 , although in practice they both to hit the g3-knight with . . . h4 and the e3-
knight with . . . ih6 before they both settle.
often lead to the same position. We first take a
Unfortunately for Black he has been so
look at Black's various alternatives.
Chapter 1 - 2 . . . e6 3 . e4 33

focused on countering White's plan that he l l .e5 0-0-0 1 2.lll c4 g5 1 3 .exd6 cxd6 1 4 . fxg5
has failed to develop any pieces and has left White can safely grab a pawn.
his king stranded in the centre. 1 4 . . . b8
14 ... hxg5 ? ? 1 5 .gxf7! wins inscancly.
1 5 .g6
R. Pere - Pokorna, Hinckley Island 2009.

6 ... lll d7 7. lll e2 g6 8 . 0-0 ig7 9 . f4 0-0 1 0 .lll d2


We7 Here we see Black once again delay . . . e5,
chis time heading kingside. Two top players
have notched up victories as White by playing
a structure with e4-e5, and I have included
both games for you to have a look.

w$!
1 5 . f4!
1s J
t ' r'S)gi '
6 ,,. , .,,, ..... ,,.,., ,, "

,, .
Blasting open the position.
7: ..Y. 7: z
5 . - ,,
1 5 . . .Wg6 1 6. fxe5 Wxe4 1 7.exd6 cxd6 1 8 . lll g3 . . ..

u. . %
4
Wxd5 1 9 .gad l Wc5 t 20.h l lll c8 2 1 .gxf7
8
.

Black's king is helpless against the coming


3 1wJ :r,,, ,,. . ,,
.

..Y.,, ...
2
attack.

: .... . . ,, ,= . . .
..

2 1 . . .Wc6 22.Wa5t e8 23.Wf5 ie7 24.Wg6
8 r ltJ 8
l
Wd8 2 5 . gxe7 Wxc4 26.gxb7
.

h
.

b d f g
1 -0 R. Pere - D. Ledger, London 2009.
a c e

6 ... lll c6 7. lll e2 g6 8 . 0-0 ig7 9 . f4 id7 1 0.lll d2 a) 1 1 .We l b6 1 2.Wg3 ib7 1 3 .e5 gad8
We7 1 4.lll e4 b5 1 5 .gae l b4 1 6 .h4 bxc3 l 7.bxc3
When Black opts for the common plan of Wh8 1 8 .h5 gxh5 1 9 .Wh3 h4 20.exd6 cxd6
playing . . . g6 and . . . ig7, he should usually 2 l .f5 d5 22.f6 lll xf6 23.lll xf6 ixf6 24.lll f4 gd6
aim to play an early . . . e 5 . If he (or she, in 25 .ic2 gg8 26.lll h5 ig5 27.Wd3 f6 28. tll xf6
this case!) decides not to play ... e5, then we ixf6 29.gxf6 Wg7 30.Wf3 gc6 3 1 .gf7 gxc3
should cake the opportunity to advance our 32.gxg7 gxf3 33 .gh?# Hodgson - Rowson,
own e-pawn. Oxford 1 998.
b) 1 l .e5 b6 1 2 .ie4 gb8 1 3 .Wa4 a6 1 4 .gae l
b5 1 5 .Wc2 c5 1 6. W h l d5 1 7.if3 b4 1 8 .c4 ib7
1 9 .cxd5 ixd5 20.ixd5 exd5 2 1 .f5 gxf5 22.lll g3
cxd4 23.lll xf5 Wg5 24.lll f3 Wd8 2 5 .lll 3xd4
gb6 26.e6 fxe6 27.lll xe6 gxe6 28.gxe6 Wh8
29 .gfe l if6 30.lll h4 :ggs 3 1 .lll g6t g7
32.lll e7 lll f8 33.lll f5t hs 34.gd6 1 -0
Laznicka - Moiseenko, San Sebastian 20 1 2 .

6 . . . Wg5
This move is played every now and then.
Personally it never worries me when my
34 Richard Pert - Playing the Trom powsky

opponent wants to grant me a massive lead This is a common choice, although it is


in development in return for a pawn. likely to transpose into other variations. Let's
7 . tlJ f3 have a quick look to see what else may come of
7.g3 has been White's most popular response, this move order.
but it really isn't in the right spirit.
7 . . .'Wxg2 8.:!'!gl Wh3 9 . tiJ bd2 7.e2 tic6

J.. - z
7 . . . g6 is most popular, when 8 . 0-0 ig7
8
'!!I'
A -
ml.JLl51' 0:

takes us directly into line B42 below.
7 w&ri
. , . , ;< '
. , . , , ;< -,m
. , . , ;<.
6
"..- , . , ?. @i . , . , 7 . . . Wid8
Black has also tried dropping his queen back
: - , followed by . . . ie7 and castling, but White's
rd' - ?. standard approach will allow him to take a
3 -Jz! ! lead in development.
2 8 ef!J tfj t 8 . 0-0 ie7 9 . f4 0-0 1 0 . tiJ d2 if6

1 d - - ?.Mvr:-f- - - - 9,"
1 0 . . . exd4?! l l . cxd4 tlJ c6 1 2 .a3 ig4 1 3 . tiJ f3

b d f g h
<Jih8 1 4 .ic2 d5 1 5 .e5 already looked highly
____

a c e
promising for White in Rausis - David,
In return for a pawn White has a huge France 2000.
lead in development. Black hasn't got any l l . tiJ f3
weaknesses but nevertheless he is totally l l . fxe5 is also possible although it seems a
undeveloped. I've included a blitz game of bit committal: l l . . . dxe5 l 2.d5 c6 1 3 .tiJ g3
mine against a talented IM as an example of tiJ d7 1 4.<Jih l a5 1 5 .Wif3t Milov - Moor,
what may happen. Switzerland 200 1 .
9 . . . tlJ d7 1 0 .'We2 g6 1 1 . 0-0-0 ig7 1 2 .'We3 l l . . . tlJ c6 1 2 . h3 g6
e5 1 3 .:!'!g3 Wh5 1 4.ie2 exd4 1 5 . tlJ xd4 Wa5 1 2 . . . a6 1 3 .Wd2 exf4 1 4. tlJ xf4 ig5 1 5 . tlJ xg5
1 6. tlJ f5 if8 1 7 . tlJ c4 Wi'xa2 1 8 .e5 dxe5 1 9 . tlJ xe5 Wxg5 1 6.:!'!f3 tiJd8 1 7.'Wf2 tlJ e6 1 8 .h4 We?
'We6 20 .ic4 Wi'xe5 2 1 .ixf7t @xf7 22.:!'!xd?t l 9 . tiJ d 5 Kosten - Spiridonov, France 1 99 8 .
ixd7 23 .'Wxe5
1 -0 Antidrome - MegaZZ, Internet 20 1 0 .

B41) 6 ... eS
Chapter 1 - 2 . . . e6 3 . e4 35

1 6 .a3 tll a6 1 7.e5i Tugui - Van Wely,


Germany 20 1 1 , is murkier, but still seems to
favour White.
1 3 . . .J.g7 1 4.l'!ae U

8.0-0 J.d7
Black creates a threat to the d4-pawn as we
shall no longer have J.b5t at the end of the
sequence to pick up the queen.

8 . . . g5 is also common, taking us directly into a b c d e f g h


the note on 6 . . . g5 on page 32. 1 2.J.xd7t
Surprisingly, l 2 .Wlb3! ? may be White's
best as 1 2 . . . b 5 ? ! doesn't work: 1 3 .c4 bxa4
1 4 .W/b7
1 2 . . . tll xd7 1 3 . tll g3 h5 1 4 . tll a3 g4 1 5 . f3 Wfg6
l 6. tll c4 J.h6 l 7. fxg4 hxg4 l 8 . tll f5 tll c5
l 9 .W/e2 ig5 20 .W/xg4 b5 2 l .tll a5 if4 22.l'!xf4
exf4 23.W/xf4;!; 0-0-0 ?
It was a blitz game!
24. tll e7t
1 -0 Antidrome - D-Ruzele, Internet Chess
Club 20 1 0 . I n fact, Darius Ruzele was the first
grandmaster I ever scored a draw against in
FIDE-rated play, when I played a tournament
in Germany as a young child.
9.J.b5
This looks right to me. 1 0 . . . b5
It seems logical to force the white bishop
My computer suggests 9 . d 5 , which is certainly back.
playable, but I do not find it convincing: l l .ic2 g5 1 2.a4 l'!b8 1 3 .axb5 axb5 1 4.d5
9.d5 tll e7 1 0 . f4 tll g6 l l . fxe5 Wlxe5 1 2 .tll d2 tll e7 l 5 .l'!a7 <it>d8 l 6.tll a3
ie7 1 3 .tll g300 Rodi - Shumyatsky, Brasilia This looks to be slightly better for White,
20 1 1 . although it is a bit murky.
1 6 . . . h5
9 ... a6 10.J.a4 V9g6
This was tried in a recent game.

1 0 . . . g5
This advance is again similar to 6 . . . g5 (see
page 32) , but I would j ust like to include
a blitz game I played against a strong
grandmaster in this line.
l l .d5 tll b8
36 Richard Pert - Play ing the Trom p owsky

1 7.f3!N 1 6.dS i.dS


This is a good practical choice as Black is After 1 6 . . . !!c8 1 7. lll f3;!; White has a
now struggling co gee in his plan of . . . h4 comfortable space advantage and a lead in
followed by . . . g4. development.
l 7 .id3 h4 l 8 . f3 g4 l 9 . fxg4 Wfg5 20. lll c2 h3
2 l .g3 :!'!h7 22.:!'!a5 ih6 was unclear in Papa
- Pelletier, Zurich 2004.
1 7 . . . h4
17 . . . g4 1 8 .Wfd3 Wfg6 ( 1 8 . . . gxf3 1 9 .:!'!xf3
Wfg6 20.:!'!a5 b4 2 1 .lll b5;J;) 1 9 . f4t
1 8 .h3;!;
Black's kingside play has been halted.

l l . d2
White protects the e4-pawn whilst keeping
f2-f4 on the cards.
I l .d5 also looks fairly sensible: I 1 . . . lll b8
1 2 . lll g3t with lll f5 to come. a b c d e f g h
17.:Sxf7!
1 1 ...VNhs 1 2.f4 exf4 This tactic secures a plus for White.

17 ... xf7 1 8.xc7t g6 19.xaS i.aS


1 9 . . .ig4 20.:!'!fl ig5 2 1 .lll c4 :!'!xa8
22.lll xd6;!; looks promising for White with his
mobile central pawn mass.

20.c4 :Sxa8 2 1 .dS

B42) 6 ...g6 7.e2 i.g7 8.0-0 e5 9.f4

13 ...YAlxdl 14.:Saxdl i.e7 15.i.b3!


1 5 . lll d5 id8 1 6 .:!'!f2 0-0 1 7.:!'!dfl also gives
White a little edge to play with.

1 5 ...i.gS
1 5 . . . 0-0 ? 1 6. lll g6+- is the point.
We are at a crossroads. We shall first look 1 5 . lli d 5 gxf4 1 6. lli exf4 lli xe5 1 7.xc7 i.g4
at B42 1) 9 exd4, before turning to B422)
... 1 8 .i.e2 V!! g 5 1 9 .i.xg4 lli xg4 20.h3 llie5
9 V!! e7, which Pete Wells himself- the author
... 2 1 . lli h 5 +- Hodgson - Ward, Millfield 2000.
of the excellent Winning with the Trompowsky
in 2003 - chose against me in 20 1 1 . 10 . . . 0-0 l 1 .lli bc3 i.g4 1 2 .e5 dxe5 1 3 . fxe5
V!! d B (The queen must choose a passive square
B42 1) 9 exd4 10.cxd4
.. because 1 3 . . . V!! b 6 1 4 . lli d 5 ! is good for White
- see the note to Black's 1 3th move below. )
1 4 .f4 i.xe2 1 5 .V!!xe2 lli c6 1 6.V!! e4 e8
1 7.afl and White had a strong attack in
Antidrome - A- 1 , Internet 2009.

1 0 i.g4
. 1 1 .e5!
1 O . . . lli c6?! simply doesn't work as Black can I hope to breathe life into this rarely-played
no longer swing his queen over to b6 after he move with which White takes up the challenge.
takes on e5 . From here Trompowsky expert Previous authors have written off this move, but
Julian Hodgson won an important game in the I believe it has been underestimated because
British Championships: 1 l .e5 V!! d 8 1 2 . lli bc3 White has never followed it up correctly in
0-0 1 3 .cl dxe5 1 4.dxe5 g5 tournament play. I intend to show you how
to do this.

The main move (and the choice of Tromp


owsky expert Pete Wells) has been 1 l .V!! a4t .
The idea is t o provoke . . . lli c6 s o that Black
can no longer swing his queen to b6 after
he exchanges on e 5 . That said, it is a bit of a
concession to place our queen out on the edge
of the board. Play may continue:
a) l I . . .lli d7 1 2. lli bc3 0-0 1 3 .e5 dxe5
1 4 . fxe5 V!! g 5 1 5 . lli f4 lli b6 1 6.V!ib3 i.f5
l 7.i.xf5;l; Wells - Fish, Germany 2002.
38 Richard Pert - Playing the Trompowsky

.i a ?it ..
..
s
.
b) l I . . .lll c6 1 2.lll bc3 0-0 1 3 .e5 dxe5
1 4.dxe5 Vfie700 Cebalo - Almasi, Reggio
. r'1r r.t.t
7 . J,m/. J -
.
... . . % .
6
Emilia 2008. Y.

g -0
,, .

. ... /.

: n fm
It is perhaps worth pomtmg out that the

.. -
natural developing move l I . lll bc3 ? allows

3 m
.. . .. :-
l I . . .V!ixd4t.

1 1 ... dxe5 1 2.fxe5 Wb6 13.lll bc3! 21 !


. { 31lri""
White focuses on developing and doesn't take
time out to protect his centre. This approach a b c d e f g h
is likely to be particularly effective against a 1 4 .lll d 5 ! Vfixd4t
player who has his king in the middle of the Black might think that this clever move,
board and is unlikely to have spent much time forcing an exchange of queens, would leave
studying the position. him in pole position with a two pawn
advantage - but he is wrong. White's lead in
development still takes its toll even with the
queens off.
1 4 . . . ixd4t?! 1 5 .@h l Vfic5 1 6.ib5t+-
1 5 . lll xd4 ixd4t 1 6.@h l ixd l 1 7.:!:%axd l ib6
l 8.:!:%de 1 t 'itid8 1 9 .:!:%xf7
White is winning back his pawns while
retaining a huge initiative.

l 3 . . . lll c6

B .i -JY
,,7 J-i f %'" " "

a b c d e f g h
6
"
. ,,s. . -,. .
z
13 ...he2
5 .
. .. .. ..

4 -. - 3.!.
This is the right move for Black, though

' - -w.
probably not easy to work out over the board.

-m:r
3

f 1ir
With 1 3 . . . 0-0 ? Black admits defeat and doesn't
try to take advantage of his queen's positioning:
b d f g h
Y. ' "
1 4 .lll d5! Vfia5 1 5 .Wb3 lll c6 1 6. lll f6t ixf6

a c e
l 7.:!:%xf6 and Black is in trouble.
Black tries to strike in the centre with his
1 3 . . . ixe 5 ? knight, but the tempo allows us to cause
Th i s i s a natural response, hoping t o show some havoc.
that White should have taken time to 1 4.lll d 5 ! Wa5 1 5 .ic4 0-0-0
stop the queen going to b6. However, 1 5 . . . 0-0?! looks wrong: 1 6.b4 lll xb4
Black is about to find himself in some 1 7.lll e?t @h7 1 8 .ixf7;!;
trouble. 1 6 . b4 lll xb4
Chapter 1 - 2 . . . e6 3 . e4 39

Black should take on the challenge - if he 20.lll c7t e7 2 1 .lll xa8 xa8 Black has decent
tries to ignore this move he will find his compensation for the exchange.
queen misplaced: 1 6 . . . Wa3 ?! 1 7.b l hf8
1 8 .f4;!; 1 5 ...VNxd4
l 7.lll e7t b8 l 8 .a3 It's amazing that the seemingly prudent

-1f
""ef
l 5 . . . ig7? gets totally wiped out!

ft-""''"ai
8 -r,1- ,
'''''"%'"/
%
1. % 1..... m..
6 .. . ..% % % "
8
61 ""'" - -
1 .. %.
1i1 r .. %
- ef""'
B.\ rn 1.i
%... /, . . .

5
. ,,. w.-J. ..
%. . . ..

L
aY:j_f ..t..
.... .. .. %. :
. . . %

4
..

3 . . . . .. 7.
0". .
. . ..

2 L . 7. -
3 ? . .. :
-
ii
f'" - ?%' 2 8 j, 8 .

f"{ ii
l
.
. .

.;:o(
.
%

a b c d e h f g 1
/. . . . .

a
els
.

b c d e f g h
The knight has effectively been trapped on
b4. 1 6.ib 5 t and Black is going to find his
1 8 . . . Wb6 ! ? king helpless in the middle of the board:
1 8 . . . ll:\ c6? 1 9 . lll xc6t bxc6 20.b l t 'it?a8 1 6 . . . c6 1 7.We l t 'it?f8 ( 1 7 . . . d8 1 8 .xf7 e8
2 1 .Wc2 gives White a winning attack. l 9.Wg3+-) l 8 .We6 Wc7 l 9 .ic4 f5 20.Wxg6+-
1 8 . . . ll:\ a6? 1 9 .b l is also crushing.
1 8 . . .ixe2 1 9 .Wxe2 xd4 20.axb4;!; I6.Wb3 o-o
1 8 . . . ixe5 1 9 .axb4 Wb6 20.ll:\d5;!;

s .i. m
ii -- .
Y.-
l 9 . axb4 ixe2 20.Wxe2 he8 2 1 . lll d5
Things are complicated round here, but
essentially White holds the advantage with 7
6
. ;
% . -
. .%
. . . . . %

-0 ....
his extra well-placed minor piece counting
':

u. - m
for more than the black pawns.
sm
- -.....
2 1 . . .Wxd4t 22.'it?h l ixe5 23.ad l Wh4 24.g3

3 rw!
4

,u u
1rN''
ixg3 2 5 . ll:\ f6! h8 26.lll d7t a8 27.ia6!
27.id 5 ! is also possible; with either move
White holds some advantage.

rt/ Jn ., j
2

I
14.ixe2N
. . . .
1 4 .Wxe2! ? is also interesting. After 1 4 . . . ll:\ c6 .
1 5 .'it?h l 0-0 1 6 .e6! lll xd4 1 7.exf7t xf7 a b c d e f g h
1 8 .Wg4 White had good play for the pawn in 17.gxf7! gxf7 1 8.gfl if6 19.ic4
Reich - M. Bauer, email 2007. l 9 .Wxb7 c6 20.Wxa8 Wb4 is unclear; White
has regained the sacrificed material, but at the
1 4 ... ixe5 1 5.@hl cost of misplacing his queen.
After 1 5 .lll d5 Wxd4t 1 6.Wxd4 ixd4t
1 7 .'it?h l ie5 1 8 .ib5t lll d7 1 9 .ae l c6 1 9 ... @g7 20.ixf7
40 Richard Pert - Playing the Trom p owsky

With Black playing all the right moves, the B422) 9 ...We7
position is starting to look more balanced.

.i ..t-
Wi{'
%,,,, % & ,;W,,,,,%
ilt{----- ,,Y,_Y.
20 ... tli d7 8
7 -
-
,,,,,%
ei
6
Black still has to play actively to stay on

5 '-'
terms.
' '
------
4 :
2 1 .gdl


f t!J f,,,,,
%
2 1 .Wxb7 :gfg 22 .i.b3 Wd3 23.Wb5 is level.

2 1 . .. tlic5 22.'Wc2 'Wg4 3wii' ' "' 11


2
{)' -!
s -,i
m-P.
m
-m
1 mltJ_V_ n
-
- -
,%-
1 w%,,,,
% l. f,,,,,
% a b c d e f g h
6
5 --- ' Here White has two main plans. The first is to


1
run the b I -knight to f3 , move the queen up to
d2 or c2 and then play the a l -rook somewhere
4 ., .
.
.
central, usually e 1 . If Black does not meet this


3 -,_,,,; % plan accurately then White can have a great

2 8 fii Bw
game, and I have included my game against
-----%
t!J
-

---- Dave Ledger from Southend as an example.



1
a
nb
-@
c d e f g h
However, things can be a bit trickier if Black
employs a plan involving . . . ll'l d7 and . . . c5. This
is exactly what GM Pete Wells did against me
23.tli ds gds in 20 1 1 . I switched my play to the queenside as
23 . . . xf7 24.lli xf6 i>xf6 looks dangerous, recommended by Richard Palliser in his book
but Black seems able to survive: 2 5 .:gfl t \t>g7 Starting Out: The Trompowsky Attack, but got
26.Wxc5 Wd7 and White should probably absolutely nowhere. Admittedly I might have
settle for 27.Wc3t @h7 28 .Wc4 g7 29 .Wc3t misplayed it - the game see-sawed back and
forcing a draw. forth and eventually ended in a draw.

24.!fl tli e4 25.tlie3 gd2 The second plan is the one I am going to
25 . . . Wh4?! 26.i.xg6! lli g3 t 27.@gl Wg5 recommend as my main choice - to advance on
28.:gf3 is promising for White. the kingside with f4-f5 . This looks a little anti
positional, but can be tricky for Black to face.
26.Wxc7 Wd7 27.Wf4 Wxf7 2s.Wxe4 h5 In fact after my game with Pete Wells we had a
29.h3 chat about this line and came to the conclusion
Finally things have settled down and a fight that f4-f5 is probably the way to go for White.
can ensue from here.
We shall start by looking at B422 1) IO.tlid2,
which keeps White's options open and can lead
to either plan, before going on to the more
accurate B4222) 10.f5!.
Chapter 1 - 2 . . . e6 3 . e4 41

B422 1) 10.tLl d2 Richard Palliser came to the same conclusion


in his book as I did over the board, that this
was the right way for White to go. But I
made no progress in this game.
Perhaps it's still not too late to switch to
the plan of advancing the f-pawn: 1 4. f5
b5 1 5 . dxe5 lll xe5 ( 1 5 . . . dxe5 1 6. fxg6 fxg6
1 7.ixb5t) 1 6. tll f4 lll xd3 1 7.Wxd3 c4
1 8 .Wd2 gxf5 1 9 . exf5 Wa7t 20.'itih l t
1 4 . . . cxb4 1 5 .cxb4 b 5 1 6.E!:c l E:b8 1 7.E:c7 Wd8
White is going nowhere, though the position
is probably still equal .
1 8 .E:fc l ?!
1 8 .E!:c6 would have been safer.
1 8 . . . exd4
Now I have to watch out for tactics involving
. . . tll c5 .
1 9 .E:7c6
1 O . . . ig4 is possible, thanks to White's choice Black now takes over the initiative.
of 1 0th move, although White's chances look 1 9 . . . tll b6 20. tll exd4 ib7 2 1 .E:6c2 tll c4
preferable: l 1 .Wb3! ixe2 1 2 .ixe2;!; 22.Wf2 E:e8
Suddenly things are starting to feel a bit
1 o . . tll d7 1 1 .tll f3 ! ?
.
uncomfortable.
White's obvious choice, b u t not m y first
choice . . . at least, not anymore! 8 E1 i
Y. '> -
;. ,1 -
I believe White should play 1 l . f5 tll f6
76 ... ...
, - - ...

1 2 . fxg6! fxg6 1 3 .Wb3, when we have


5 ,I. rw
W.
U
,,,,,/, w."' I. W..t

transposed to the position after 1 0 . f5 tll d7

tei t
-r
4
1 l . fxg6 fxg6 1 2 .Wb3 tll f6 1 3 .tll d2 in line

.<.. i.m1
-
- - - wi jrJ ,,
B4222 - see page 45 for the continuation.
1 1 . . . 0-0 1 2 .Wd2 c5 1 3 .E:ae l a6 3
rw.z.I.
2 :
.

1 ta

a b c d e f g h
23.E:e l E:c8 24.E:ce2 tll a3 2 5 . E:e3 Wb6 26.e5
dxe5 27.fxe5 tll c4 28 .E:3e2 E:cd8 29.ixc4
bxc4 30. tll c2 Wxf2t 3 1 .'it>xf2 E:d3 32. tll e3
E:c8 33. tll g4 c3 34.tll f6t 'it>f8 3 5 .E: c l h5
36. tll g5 h4 37. tll g4 E:c4 3 8 . h3 E!:xg4 3 9 . hxg4
ih6 40. tll h7t!
Perhaps my opponent had missed this move
as the balance of power now starts to shift in
1 4. b4 White's favour.
42 Richard Pert - Playing the Trompowsky

40 . . . 'it>g7 4 l .g5 'it>xh7 42.gxh6 gg3 43. 'it>fl


xh6 44.gec2 gg5 45 .gf2 gg3 46.gxf7
Avoiding the repetition.
46 ... i.xg2t 47.'it>f2 id5 48 .gd7 gd3 49.'it>e2
gd2t 50.'it>e l gd3
-Y2 R. Pert - Wells, Hinckley Island
20 1 1 . I no longer saw any good way to avoid
a repetition of moves, missing 5 l .e6! with
excellent winning chances for White.

1 1 .fS
I now think this is the right way to go.

l 1 . lD f3
This is the start of my game against Dave
Ledger which I would really recommend
1 4 . . . gxf5
playing through if you have time.
1 4 . . . tlJ d7 1 5 .tlJ g3 i.xf3 1 6.gxf3 a5 1 7.gafl
l 1 . . . lD c6
tlJ f6 1 8 . c4 b6 1 9 .b3 tlJ d7 20.Wf2 g5 2 1 . f6
1 1 . . . i.g4 has also been tried:
tlJ xf6 22.tlJf5 Wi'd8 2 3 . lD xg7 lD g4 24.Wf g3
a) 1 2 .Wfd2 tlJ d7 1 3 .h3 i.xf3 1 4 .gxf3 c5
1 -0 Antidrome - niccroad, Internet Chess
1 5 .dxe5 dxe5 1 6.f500 Nakamura - Anand,
Club 20 1 1 .
Monaco (blindfold) 20 1 1 .
1 5 .exf5 c6 1 6.i.e4
b) 1 2.h3! ixf3 1 3 .gxf3;!; Doric - Meszaros,
1 6.Wi'a4?! would work well after 1 6 . . . i.xf3
Austria 2008.
1 7 .gxf3 cxd5 1 8 . f6 i.xf6 1 9 .Wfg4t i.g7
However, I think l 1 . . .tlJ d7 is Black's best
20.gg3 -+ , but is not so clear if Black responds
choice here, transposing to the Pert - Wells
1 6 . . . h5! 1 7.We4 cxd5 1 8 .Wfxd5 tlJ d700
game given above.
l 6 . . . cxd5 l 7.i.xd5 tlJ d7 l 8 . lD g3 lD f6 l 9 .Wi'd3

a b c d e f g h
1 2 .Wc2!
White's grip on the light squares ensures an
I came up with this clever move at the board.
edge.
It aims to play d4-d5 followed by f4-f5; then
1 9 . . . gad8 20 .gae l
Black can no longer exchange on f5 and then
20.lDd2! Wc7 2 1 .lD de4 may be more
play . . . e4, as we have that square guarded
accurate.
with our bishop and queen .
Chapter 1 - 2 . . . e6 3 . e4 43

20 . . .Wc? 2 1 .h l Wa5 22.ib3 :B:fe8 23.tll h4 the move order involving an early f4-f5 to
d5 24.h3 ih5 2 5 .tll xh5 combat Black's plan involving . . . c5 . 1 3 . . . ie6
Things are about to hot up as White's attack 1 4.ic4 ixc4 1 5 . tll xc4 :B:xfl t 1 6.E:xfl h7
starts to flow. l 7. tll e3 White's advantage is obvious, with
25 . . . tll xh5 26.f6! e4 27.We3 ixf6 2 8 .E:xf6! a lead in development and a knight ready to
tll xf6 29 .Wxh6 :B:e6 30.tll f5 tll e8 3 1 .Wg5 t j ump in. 1 7 . . . exd4 1 8 . tll d5 Wd7 1 9 .E:f8 h5
f8 32.Wh4! :B:g6 20.tll f6t ixf6 2 1 .E:f7t+- Pixton - Barbosa,

'I)-
Chalkidiki 2003.

Y. , 7,
8
1 A ..
. . . .
12.Wb3!?
6
. . ?. l
s s T
1 2 . fxg6 fxg6 1 3 .Wb3t h7 1 4 .:B:xf8 tll xf8

.
<
1 5 .E:fl Wg500

. . .
4 ,
. ,., .
T 12 ... gxf5
3 _,t -
.
,

7. % -
..

..
I very recently faced:

2 Wj /f- .7.

1 2 . . . h?! ? 1 3 .E:ae l c6 1 4. tt:l c4 tll f6

1 - . B<it> s ,1 .i. U,
b d f g h
7 wif
t .rY.
r . .1..,;.
a c e

A good training exercise is to spot White's 6

5 .... . 7..8 . . . .
move here! .

-87..
3 3 .:B:xe4 We? 34.Wh8t :B:g8 3 5 .:B:xe8t xe8
4

WW/f:f m
35 . . . :B:xe8 36 .Wh6t E:g7 37.Wxg?#
3

2 Jfl- ..7.
Jt3
36.WxgB t
36.ia4t f8 37.Wh6t E:g7 3 8 .Wxg?#
36 . . . d? 37.Wxf7t
1

r
h
1 -0 R. Pert - D. Ledger, Southend 20 1 0 .
a b c d e f g

1 5 .Wa3 !N
This is the right way to go.
My approach in the game was too slow:
1 5 . tll g3 ?! b5 1 6.tll e3 id? 1 7.d5 c5 and
Black was absolutely fine in R. Pert -
H . Hunt, Daventry 2 1 03 .
1 5 . . . c 5 1 6.tll b6 axb6 1 7. fxg6t fxg6 1 8 .Wxa8
cxd4 1 9 .cxd4 exd4 20.Wa3 tll g4 2 1 .E:xfB Wxf8
22.E:fl;l;
Black has some compensation for the
exchange, but White's chances look preferable.

1 3.exf5 exd4 1 4. e4
White musters up an attack.

14 ... dxc3
44 Richard Pert - Playing the Trom p owsky

1 4 . . . tll c5 1 5 . f6 Wxe4 1 6.ixe4 tll xb3 I O . . . gxf5 1 l . exf5 e4?! 1 2 .tll f4


1 7.axb3 e8 1 8 .tll g3 ih8 1 9 . cxd4 e6 20.d5
xf6 2 1 .fc l;!; I O . . . exd4?! 1 l .cxd4 tll c6 1 2 . tll bc3 tll xd4 1 3 . f6
tll xe2t 1 4.ixe2 ixf6 I 5 .tll d 5 +-
15.<lD2xc3 c6
After 1 5 . . . We5 1 6 .'tt> h l c6 1 7.ae l White 1 0 . . . 0-0 1 1 .Wb3
has ample play for a pawn. l l . fxg6 ! ? is an additional possibility gained
via this move order, bur Black may be able
1 6.ael h4 17.f6 to hold the balance: l l . . . fxg6 1 2 .xf8t
White has a strong initiative. Wxf8 1 3 .Wb3t 'tt> h 7 1 4. tll a3 We7 1 5 .fl
if6 ( 1 5 . . . tll d7?! 1 6.Wf7 Wxf7 I 7.xf7
B4222) 1 0.f5! a6 l 8 .ic4 h5 l 9 .id5 b8 20. tll c4 'tt> h 6
[20 . . . c6 2 1 .tll xd6] 2 1 . h3;!;) 1 6.tll c4 tll d7

, , , , , ;- -- -,--rds
s -1.-.t- 1 7.tll e3 c6 1 8 .@h l tll f8 1 9 .Wc2 h5 20.a4
''''' Y. 'tt> g7 Yi-Yi Doric - Nikolov, Zadar 200 5 .
1 . , , % i r,
, ,,Y,_
6 - -B - - - - %i
_, ,% .1 .t -
.....-
'. % %
8

5 ' !
-d ----%- 7 ... i
J % "r
ml
. ... i
%.,,m -,.
6
".. . %f% ".. . %
-JrJ

%

4- -

J1
3 -%'f .i.-
"" - _:w. - - 3 ,--
lilriF' '"" '

!" j-
'% . .
2 z >1: ,.%
%

a b c d e f g h 1 . 'ICZJ
b d f g h
, Y.

a c e
Advancing the f-pawn immediately is the
l l . . . Wg5
most accurate move order. However, I think
This does not turn our well, so Black may
it is particularly important for readers to check
want to look to the alternatives here, though
out the comments on line B422 1 ) I O . tll d2 to
White still seems able to keep an edge.
realize why I have come to this conclusion, and
1 1 . . . 'tt> h 7 l 2 . fxg6t fxg6 l 3 . xf8 and Black
to fully understand the resulting positions.
suffers from not having his knight on d7
ready to recapture: I 3 . . . ixf8 I 4. tll a3 tll d7
1 5 .fl t
1 0 ... tll d7
Playing Harriet Hunt in a recent Sunday
I l . . .gxf5 1 2. exf5 exd4 1 3 .cxd4 tll c6 1 4.Wh l
morning 4NCL march (see page 43) , I casually
tll xd4 1 5 . tll xd4 ixd4 1 6.tll c3 Wh4 1 7.f3--+
played I O . tll d2 instead of I O . f5 . She told me
1 2 .f3 'tt> h 7 1 3 .tll a3 tll d7 1 4.afl tll f6
after the game she intended to meet I O . f5 with
1 5 . tll g3 h5 1 6.ic4 d5
I O . . . tll d7, which frustrated me as it could well
Desperation, bur Black has no good way to
have taken us into the main line given below.
defend against l 7.ixf7, which is even the
I expect she wouldn't have been alone in her
reply to l 6 . . . h4 .
choice as many Black players would find it
l 7.ixd5
daunting to castle here, though that may be
Kanep - A. Smirnov, Tallinn (rapid) 200 5 .
Black's best chance.
Chapter I - 2 . e6 3 . e4
. . 45

1 1 .fxg6! surprised if Black actually chose this move in


The idea of taking on g6 and then going tournament play, as he has nothing else that
Wlb3 to stop Black from castling isn't obvious, looks reasonable and so could play this move
but it seems effective as it suddenly becomes without much thought.
very awkward for Black to complete his
development. 14 . . . b5 is my computer's recommendation,
but it hardly looks convincing: 1 5 .tt:\a5 id?
1 1 . .. fxg6 12.Wb3 tll f6 l 6.a4 a6 l 7.axb5 cxb5 ( l 7 . . . axb 5 ? l 8 . tt:l xc6+-)
1 2 . . . tt:l b6 does not really work: 1 3 .a4 a5 1 8 .c4!
1 4 . tt:l a3 ie6 1 5 .ib5t c6 1 6.ixc6t

13.tll d2
This position can also arise from line B422 l
after 1 0 . tt:l d2 tt:l d7 l l . f5 tt:\ f6 1 2. fxg6 fxg6
1 3 .Wfb3, but with the current move order we
have cut out a lot of Black's options.

1 3 ... c6
1 3 . . . b6 1 4 .ib5t;I;

Conclusion: We started by looking at the


interesting A) 3 . . . c5 ! ? which has grown in
popularity in recent years . After 4.d5 Black
may choose the solid A l ) 4 . . . d6, though in the
main line White has 8.e5! weakening the black
pawn structure and securing an edge. Against
Black's other main option of A2) 4 . . . h6, White
can again land 8.e5!! in the main line, with
even greater effect; Black does well to avoid
being blown away.

1 4 . a4 ie6 1 5 .ic4 ixc4 was not so clear in Turning to the standard 3 . . . h6, after 4 .ixf6
Rusev - Cebalo, Zadar 2007. W/xf6 5 .c3 !? Black has a wide choice of 5 th
moves, but White seems able to claim a
14 ... i.e6? comfortable plus against the minor options.
This obvious developing move for Black With the critical B3) 5 . . . d5 Black is looking
has a massive pitfall. However, I would not be to equalize, in contrast to some of the other
46 Richard Pert - Playing the Trompowsky

lines where he is looking to counterattack. I


.

like the approach with 6 .ltJd2 c5 7.ltJ gf3,


keeping the centre fluid and using our lead
in development and stronger king position
to create problems from as early a stage as
possible.
Finally we looked at Black's most common
option of B4) 5 . . . d6. White's standard plan
of playing i.d3 , ltJ e2, 0-0 , f2-f4 seems
promising, especially if Black then allows e4-
e 5 . The critical set-up by which Black prevents
this advance is B42) 6 . . . g6 7 . ltJ e2 i.g7 8 . 0-0
e5 (which can also be reached by a 6 . . . e5 move
order) . We examined this in detail, and I
believe that the accurate 9 . f4 Wf e7 1 0 . f5 ! offers
White a significant advantage.
Chapter 2

2 ... e6 3. d2!?

1 .d4 f6 2 . .tg5 e6 3.d2!?

A) 3 ... c5 4.e3 49
Al} 4 ... cxd4 49
A2) 4 ... b6!? 50
B) 3 ... d5 52
C) 3 ... h6 4 . .th4 54
Cl} 4 ... d5 54
C2} 4 ... c5 56
48 Richard Pert - Playing the Trompowsky

1 .d4 lll f6 2 ..ig5 e6 3.lll d2!? 4 . . . h6


Having looked at my main recommendation
of 3 . e4 in the previous chapter, we move on to
offer players a second option with this flexible
move. In the last year alone, this move has
been played by Morozevich, Nakamura and
Vitiugov, to name j ust a few. They have mainly
used this line in blitz and rapid games, but
nevertheless the fact they are using it makes me
stand up and take note. Whilst 3.e4 remains
my main choice, I certainly think this move
looks interesting.

s .1 -.x,
.,. ;_,% ,,--, .

5 .ixf6
Nakamura opts for the direct approach,
7
6

5
.
.
-
. .
/. .....,
-
, -
taking on f6 in order to avoid spending a
move retreating his bishop.
Bjorn Thorfinnsson, who is a keen

. n n
Trompowsky player (in fact he played it

4
against me some years ago) , preferred to

3 .,
W, '"'/,,
%?, '

A % Wi*l
keep his bishop with 5 .ih4 and obtained

2
A0 %'0% A A
a perfectly playable position: 5 . . . b6 6 . lll gf3
; 0 i0% %'0% 0
: . .. . %-=j
ib7 7.id3 d6 8 .We2 lll c6 9 . c3 a6 1 0 . 0-0

1
e5 1 1 .dxe5 lll xe5 1 2.lll xe5 dxe5 1 3 .:gfd l;!;
Bj . Thorfinnsson - Butt Khalil, Beij ing
a b c d e f g h 2008.
5 . . . ixf6 6.c3
Unlike the previous chapter where I went
I half expected Nakamura to follow up
into very specific detail in many of the lines,
with an immediate 6.e5 ie7 7.Wi'g4t,
in this variation you are far more likely to
which would have been in keeping with his
enter unchartered positional territory at an
aggressive character, but he had different
early stage, and so I have tried to explain ideas
ideas.
instead of showing exact moves. That said,
6 . . . d6 7.f4 e5 8 . lll gf3 lll c6 9 .ib5 0-0
we are still going to cover Black's three major
options of A) 3 ... c5 B) 3 ... d5 and C) 3 ... h6,
after a brief look at a fourth option.

3 . . .ie7
This move looks a bit passive to me, but it
was the choice of Kramnik as recently as
20 1 2, so we had better check it out.
4.e4
4 . e3 is also possible, but it seems rude not
to take the centre when our opponent is
offering.
Chapter 2 - 2 . . . e6 3 . llJ d2!? 49

I O .ixc6 bxc6 I l .dxe5 dxe5 1 2 .fxe5 ih4t bishops followed by landing the knight on f4,
1 3 .g3 ig5 1 4. llJ b3 Wi'e7 1 5 .Wi'd4 ig4 1 6 . llJ xg5 which can make White's life awkward. There
WI'xg5 I 7. 0-0 1'%fe8 1 8 .1'%f4;!; are two sensible ways of dealing with this plan
White had managed to obtain an advantage which I want to touch on.
and went on to win in Nakamura - Kramnik, In our main line White will exchange his g5-
Moscow (blitz) 20 1 2. bishop for the f6-knight; this may be followed
by castling either side.
A) 3 ... c5 4.e3 A rarer option is to develop with lLi e2,
keeping an eye on the f4-square.
This is not really a position for exact
moves, but more for understanding ideas and
choosing a route that you like. I have offered
you different ways of playing, so take your
pick!

6.tll gf3
White goes into a line that may also come
about from the Torre Attack.

6 .id3 ! ? seems an interesting way to avoid


Torre theory: 6 . . . b6 7 . lLi e2 As mentioned
above, Vitiugov's idea is to keep the f4-square
is under control.

. . i(
Black's most common move here is
Al) 4 ... cxd4, but sometimes he forgoes the
exchange with A2) 4 b6!?. 8 -- p{"'ii" Y.
..
.1 ..t
..
7 J - zA]
z. ..
t
%
..

.
... . .

6
. . % .
. ... . .

Al) 4 ... cxd4 5.exd4 fi.e7


. . . . . . :m
s w -
',

4
:r

. . Jfi. J.,, W"'
3
2 f[j
W"' % tfJt[j t
w-
1 : %vm . . %r
. .

a b c d e f g h
7 . . . ib7 8 . 0-0 lLi c6 9 . c3 lLi d 5 I O .ie3 0-0
1 1 . lLi f4 lLixf4 1 2 .ixf4 d6 1 3 . lLi c4 e5 1 4. dxe5
dxe5 1 5 .ig3 g6 1 6.ie4 f6 1 7.Wi'c2 'kt>g7
1 8 .1'%ad l Wi'c8 1 9 .1'%fe l 1'%d8 20.lLie3 id6
2 1 .1'%d2 lLi e7 22.1'%ed l White's advantage was
obvious in Vitiugov - Kulaots, Aix-les-Bains
20 1 1 .

6 b6 7.fi.d3 fi.b7 8.ixf6 !i.xf6


..
50 Richard Pert - Playing the Trompowsky

1 5.g4!?N
1 5 .tt'l eg5 h6 1 6.ie4 Wd7 1 7.ixb? Wxb7
1 8 . tt'l e4 tt'l d5 was comfortable for Black in
Ivanisevic - Gashimov, Internet 2006.

1 5 ... c7 1 6.g5
White has the initiative.

A2) 4... b6!?

s- -- - ---
.i ,,7, -.--
.i.Bti .'
7
- - -- %p % .,,,J -- --%
-
6 1
W/ {0
s m% -if

- --%%% ,;, ,
9.e2
9 . c3 d6 1 0 .We2 tt'l d7 1 l .ie4 White goes
for a positional approach which will involve
4
.% , ,. ll
3. ll
castling kingside. l l . . .ixe4 1 2 .tt'lxe4 ie7
l 3 . a4;l; Gormally - Palliser, Isle of Man 2000.
w- 0 A ,0
A --
fl
if
2 0 iOz % -,, /----7.w A
0
- - i'=
9 a6 10.c3 d6 1 1 .0-0-0 O : iOz 0 r.Oz


1
.

Castling chis side is more aggressive.

b d f g h
/, , , , , v. /,, , , , 7, 0. . ,, . .

a c e
1 1 b5 12.b l tll d7 13.tll e4 ie7 14.h4
.

c!LJ b6 Black aims to do without exchanging on d4.


1 4 . . . ixe4 1 5 .ixe4 d5 1 6.id3 b4 l 7.c4 dxc4 Whilst it is impossible for me to cover every
1 8 .ixc4 tt'l b6, and now 1 9 .ib3 gave White eventuality, I shall show you one idea which
an edge in Mamedov - Hammer, Lubbock you can use against this set-up.
2009, but I prefer the more direct: 1 9 .d 5 ! ?N
exd5 20 .ixd5 tt'l xd5 2 1 .We4 0-0 22.:gxd5;!; 5.tll gf3 ib7 6.J.d3 ie7 7.c3 0-0 8.0-0
Chapter 2 - 2 . . . e6 3 . tlJ d2!? 51

As I write this, I am actually watching a posmon looks balanced, although White


live game between lvanchuk and Aronian in may hope to be able to muster up some
this line in the Candidates Tournament in kingside play in the future.
London. It seems to me that the attacking 1 2 . . . 'it>xh7 1 3 .h5 'it>g7 1 4.hxg6 l:!h8 1 5 .gxf7t
approach by lvanchuk is rather optimistic, and Wxf7 1 6 .Wi'g6t We7 1 7.l:'!:h7t l:!xh7 1 8 .Wi'xh7t
that he hasn't followed up correctly. I shall be 'it>d6 1 9 .Wi'h2t We7 20 .Wi'h7t Wf8 2 1 . tlJ e4
seriously surprised if lvanchuk goes on to win The game looks likely to end in a perpetual
the game. (Should that happen, then I hope check at some point.
that the Quality Chess team will edit out these
comments!) 8 ... tli c6
8 . . . cxd4 9 .ixf6 ! ? (9.exd4 tll d5 1 0 .ixe7
8 .ixf6 ixf6 9 . h4 tll c6 1 0 . tll g5 g6 Wi'xe7 1 1 .l:'!:e l with balanced play) 9 . . . ixf6
I O . exd4t takes us to a position similar to those
s .1 B
1 . " v,
in line A l , with Wi'e2, a2-a4 and tll e4 all on

.. . %.
1..fr. f
the cards .
6
. .
5 . . . % . . .
.

.....

3 .
,.
4 -:f
.....
. . .

2 'f
o aW" ":
'- %w.
_ i.0% o

1 -- .. n= n :a:
a b c d e f g h
I l .Wi'g4!N
This would have been a much better follow
up to the knight lunge.
The game continued: I l . f4? tll e7 1 2 .Wi'g4
h5 ( 1 2 . . . tll f5 !+ looks strong) 1 3 .Wi'h3 cxd4
1 4. exd4 b5 1 5 .a3 ?! Too slow. 1 5 . . . Wi'b6
9.a3!?
1 6 .l:!g I ? White denies himself the option of
This is an interesting idea, looking to take
castling. 1 6 . . . tll d5 1 7.tll ge4 ig7+ lvanchuk
advantage of Black not having clarified the
- Aronian, London 20 1 3 .
centre. White prepares expansion plans on the
I 1 . . .l:!c8
I I . . . tll e7?! looks to get another piece to the
queenside with b2-b4.
kingside as Aronian did in the game, but it is
9 ... cxd4 10.cxd4
a bit clumsy here as Black temporarily loses
White can now switch plans and take with
control of the g5 -square, allowing the pawn
the c-pawn.
advance: 1 2.h5 ixg5 1 3 .Wi'xg5 tll f5 1 4.W/g4;!;
and White has ongoing kingside pressure.
10 ... tli d5 1 I ..ixe7 flxe7 12.ic4 tli f6 13.e4
1 2 .tll xh7
White can play a normal move like 1 2.tll df3
d6 14.kU
Hebden - Grooten, Cappelle la Grande
threatening h4-h 5 , against which Black
2006. White's chances are preferable, with
should probably play 1 2 . . . h5 himself. The
more space and slightly better development.
52 Richard Pert - Playing the Trompowsky

B) 3 ... d5 6 . . . h6 7.ih4 ie7 transposes to variation C l .

- --, - - -% , _
,
6 . . . id6 7.id3 0-0 8 . 0-0 e5

7
i. -.i.B9
s Black plays ambitiously in the centre, but

f
,
Y. .
y,
White can counter effectively.
6
"" "
s m - ,
" 9 . dxe5 lLi xe5 1 0 .lLi xe5 ixe5

, E r
. . %
';-, , , , , ;,,_,..<: .0

4 - - % .. ,, Y.m
6 H-
L. % - -atl f
3 w- ,, ,,

"- "'" UW' ""

w- ....%
,,,,.

p - '
2 0 iOz. %
A A A A fl 5
ff%_ fl
r"

--- ml:m!
O ;. : 0 iOz 0 r.Oz 4 .
W-% W-%
.%
1
3
.

b d f g h w-. m -t w-
t::i. -tJ"
! Jw - " t::i -t%
,, , , . , y, z .. 7'-. . . . .

a c e
.
2
This line has the ability to transpose to line 1 r . {' .. %.vw:rd
1 -. , . .. . .
b d f g h
. . . . . Y. z z

Cl at any point if Black flicks in . . . h6, but I a c e


wanted to look at it independently because
I I . f4 ! ? id6 I 2 . e4 c4
White has a fantastic trap he can set if Black
1 2 . . . dxe4 1 3 .ixf6 gxf6 1 4.lll xe4;!; Dobrov
chooses not to play . . . h6 at all.
Toufighi, Abu Dhabi 2005.
1 3 .ic2N
4.e3 c5 5.c3 tll c6
1 3 .ixf6 Wxf6 1 4.e5 ic5 t 1 5 .\t>h l W/b6
5 . . . lLi bd7 6 . f4 (6.id3 ie7 7.lLi gf3 reaches
was fine for Black in Samoilov - Beresrnev,
a position played many times, usually arising
Kolomna 20 1 0 .
from a Torre move order. One possible
1 3 . . . ig4
continuation is: 7 . . . b6 8 . 0-0 ib7 9 . lLi e5
1 3 . . . W/b6t 1 4.lifh l Wffx b2? 1 5 .ixf6 gxf6
lLixe5 I O .dxe5 lLi d7 1 l .ixe7 W/xe7 1 2 . f4
1 6.exd5 Wxc3 1 7. lLi e4 Wb4 1 8 . lll x f6t+-
0-0-0 1 3 .Wie2 f6 1 4.exf6 gxf6 1 5 .e4t) 6 . . . ie7
1 4.W/e l ! W/b6t 1 5 .\t>h l Wxb2 1 6.:B:cl
7.id3 b6 8.lLi gf3 ib7 9 . lLi e5 0-0 1 0 .W/f3 h6
White has good attacking chances.
I 1 .h4 lLie8 1 2 .ixh6 gxh6 1 3 .W/h5 f5 1 4 .g4-+
G. Mohr - Anand, Belgrade 1 9 8 8 .
7.i.d3
6.tll gf3
I have decided to stick with this solid option.
As in the previous note, switching to
a Stonewall set-up with 6.f4!? is a major
alternative, one example being: 6 ... h6 7 .ixf6
W/xf6 8 . lLi gf3 id7 9.ib5 id6 1 0 . 0-0 Wid8
1 1 .ixc6 bxc6 1 2 . lLi b3 c4 1 3 . lLic5 0-0 1 4. lLi b7
W/b8 1 5 . lLi xd6 Wxd6 1 6.b3 cxb3 1 7. axb3;!;
White's knight dominated the black bishop in
Granda Zuniga - Miguel Aparicio, Peru 1 99 5 .

6 ...i.e7
Chapter 2 - 2 . . e6 3 . tll d2! ?
. 53

7 ... 0-0 1 5 .a4 looks too dangerous for Black, so he


Black can play about with his move order, should settle for 1 4 . . . 0-0 1 5 .Wi'h 5 , though
but more often than not we end up at the White keeps attacking chances.
same thing: 9 . . . c4 1 0 .ie2 0-0 1 l . b3 gives White an
7 . . . b6 8 . 0-0 ib7 initiative.
8 . . . 0-0 transposes to the main line. 1 o. tll e5

9 .Wi'a4 ! ?
White has a few interesting choices here,
all of about equal value, but I can't cover 8.0-0 b6 9.lLie5 h7
everything so I will j ust mention the other 9 . . . ll\ xe5 1 0 . dxe5 lLl d7

va .tX.....]zY.Fi
ideas and you can investigate them further

.. . . v. .
on your own if you wish to take that route. s

67 t. . . z.U.'Slll)

W." i t. .. . . z
i
.

9 . lLl e5 ll\ xe5 transposes to the position .

. . . zt0 m
z
reached in the note to Black's 5 th move
.

5 0 f

4 w-0 . z ..... z t....
above by the move order 5 . . . ll\ bd7 6.id3

.

m0
ie7 7.ll\ gf3 b6 8 . 0-0 ib7 9.lLle5 lLl xe5 .

9 .Wi'b l ! ? was recommended b y D e Dovitiis
in New in Chess Yearbook 97. White's idea 3 m J8l!J.m 0 m0
!::::, if!j . if!j !::::, i
.. . . ....
1 { RtiiRi
2
is to stay flexible, intending to expand with
b2-b4 on the queenside. Another point is

.
h
z

b d f g
that White may later play lLl e 5 , and if Black
. . .

a c e
exchanges on e5 then the f6-knight would
be driven away from the defence of the h7- 1 1 .if4 Kasparov himself shows the way.
pawn . ( 1 l .ixe7 Wi'xe7 l 2 . f4 f5 1 3 . exf6 ll\xf6 1 4. ll\ f3
9.a3!? also intends queenside expansion with ib7 1 5 .Wi'e l tll d7 1 6.Wi'g3 gfe8 1 7.Wi'h3t also
b2-b4. looks playable, Hoang Thanh Trang - Daulyte,
9 . . . 0-0 Tbilisi 20 1 1 ) 1 1 . . . f6 1 2 . lLl f3 fxe5 1 3 . ll\ xe5
9 . . . Wi'd7 1 0.dxc5 bxc5 1 1 .gad l 0-0 1 2 . ll\ b3 lLl xe5 1 4 .ixe5 if6 1 5 .Wi'h5 g6 1 6.ixg6
Wi'd6 1 3 .ixf6 ixf6 1 4 .Wi'b5t and White hxg6 1 7.Wi'xg6t <Jih8 1 8 . f4 ixe5 1 9 . fxe5
wins a pawn . id7 20 .Wi'h6t 'l!lg8 2 1 .gf6 gxf6 22. exf6
9 . . . a6 1 0 .ll\e5 b5 1 1 .Wi'd l ll\ xe5 1 2 .dxe5 ll\ d7 Wi'f8 23 .Wi'g6t 'l!lh8 24.WTh s t <Jig8 2 5 .gn
1 3 .ixe7 Wi'xe7 1 4. f4 and now 1 4 . . . 0-0-0 ? Wi'f7 26 .Wi'g5 t 'l!lf8 27.gf4 'l!le8 28.gh4 ic6
54 Richard Pert - Playing the Trompowsky

29.l:'l:h8t 1 -0 Kasparov - Maiques, Cordoba 4 ..ih4


(simul) 1 992. Black now must choose between the solid
Cl) 4 ... d5 and the more complex C2) 4 c5 . ..

I O.%Ya4!
This seemingly innocent move has a hidden Cl) 4 d5 5.e3
..

sting in the tail.

m s R
s
,Jx.i..
/, .t.v.r.t.
f
J

%,,,,,,_ ,_,,.,, .. /,-


1
,, . , , ,,,,, ,

5 ---.. ,""'
4
, ,
,,
iii J 'iii'%
3 ,,, ,J%J% '0 /,'0

2 0A Fi'
0%
P,,J W A
0% 0 0%

,, % ,,,, ;t , ,/,
b d f g h

a c e
5 c5
..

10 xe5? Black usually carries out this advance at an


Black should prefer: I O . . . Wc7 I I . f4 (or
.

early stage, but he can try to do without it:


1 1 .tLl df3 !?) l l . .. a6 1 2 .l:'l:ae l b5 1 3 .IWd l This 5 . . . ltJ bd7 6.lLi gf3 ie7 7.id3 0-0 8 . 0-0 b6
certainly looks pleasant enough for White,
although a hard-fought game may lie ahead.

1 1 .dxe5 tll d7?


Black can set a counter-trap with I 1 . . . lLi h 5 ! ?
1 2.ixe7 Wxe7. Then 1 3 .g4? f5 ! 1 4.gxh5 1Wg5t
1 5 . <J;l h l d4t 1 6. f3 1Wxe3 would turn out well
for Black. However, the more circumspect
I 3 .ie2 highlights the poor position of the
knight on h5 and give White a clear advantage.

12.%Yh4!
Threatening mate on h7. 9 . lLi e5
Here Vitiugov carries on as normal with our
12 ... h6 13 . .ixe7 %Yc7 14.ixf8+ standard plan.
White is a full rook up. 9 . c4!? was Hodgson's choice, which is
generally a good recommendation: 9 . . . ib7
C) 3 ... h6 1 0 .cxd5 lLi xd5 I l .ig3 c5 1 2 .a3 cxd4
1 3 .exd4 a6 1 4.l:'l:e l (Ir looks interesting to
This looks critical, hitting the bishop play 1 4. lLi c4!?N before Black gets a chance
immediately. to stop it with . . . b 5 . ) 1 4 . . . b5 1 5 .1We2
Chapter 2 - 2 . . . e6 3 . tiJ d2!? 55

b6 1 6 .E:ad l E:fd8 1 7.ib l E:ac8 1 8 . lli e5 9 . lli gf3


tll f8 1 9 .Wh5 f5 20.Wf7t mh8 2 1 . lli df3 I 'm not sure about this move.
Hodgson - Larsen, London 1 990. 9 .We2 would at least slow down Black's
9 . . llixe5 1 0 .dxe5 lli d7 1 1 .ixe?
. plans: 9 . . . cxd4 1 0 . exd4 a6 1 1 .lli gf3 ib5
Here 1 l .ig3 is not as effective as in the Zaichik - A. Ivanov, Kostroma 1 9 8 5 , and
main line, as Black has the option of playing now I propose 1 2 . 0-0N lli c6 1 3 . lli e5
. . . lli c 5 . ixd3 1 4.Wxd3 with a good fight to
1 1 . . .Wxe? 1 2 . f4 Wb4 1 3 .E:b l Wa4 come.
9 . . . cxd4 1 0. exd4 ib5 1 l .ic2 a5 1 2 .a4 ia6
1 3 .ixf6 gxf6 1 4 . lli fl
Morozevich finds his own way to arrange
to castle.
14 . . . lli d? l 5 . lli g3 h 5 l 6 . lli e2 h4 1 7. 0-0
White went on to win in Morozevich -
Bologan, Beij ing (blindfold) 20 1 2 .

7.tll gf3 J.e7


On to another Morozevich game:
7 . . . id6
Black chooses to aim for . . . e5 without
1 4. c4!N taking any time out to block the bishop pin.
1 4. b4? a5 1 5 . b 5 lli c5+ Vitiugov - Savchenko, 8 .id3 0-0 9 . 0-0 e5 1 0. dxe5 lli xe5 1 1 . lli xe5
Serpukhov 2008. ixe5 1 2 . f4 id6 1 3 . e4
14 . . . Wxd l Morozevich plays directly and gets an edge;
1 4 . . . Wxa2 ? 1 5 .Wc2 looks seriously risky for we saw a similar approach in the note to
Black. Black's 6th move in line B .
1 5 .E:bxd l
White has the initiative.

6.c3 tll c6
Bologan has tried delaying the development
of this knight and playing a French-like plan of
exchanging light-squared bishops on the b5-
square:
6 . . . ie7 7 .id3 Wb6 8 .E:b l id?

a b c d e f g h
1 3 . . . c4 1 4.ie2 Wb6t 1 5 .if2 ic5 1 6.e5
1 6. exd5 ! ? ixf2t 17 .E:xf2;!; is also promising.
1 6 . . . lli e4 1 7. lli xe4 dxe4 1 8 .ixc5 Wxc5t
1 9 .Wd4 Wxd4t 20.cxd4 ie6 2 1 .f5;!;
Here too, White went on to win m
Morozevich - Alekseev, Moscow 2008.
56 Richard Pert - Playing the Trompowsky

s.i.d3 0-0 9.0-0 b6 10.tlies White has a strong attack in this position. I
White seems to score amazingly well in these shall j ust briefly give a couple of examples of
positions. how che attack may develop.

1 3 ... c4
1 3 . . . h8 1 4.ad l We? 1 5 .Wh5 c4 1 6 .ic2
lll c5 1 7. lll f3 Wc8 1 8 .ih4 We8 ? 1 9 .if6! ixf6
20. exf6 lll d7 2 1 . fxg?t c;i> xg7 22.Wg4t c;i> h8
23 .Wih3 c;i> g? 24.Wg3 t c;i> h8 2 5 .d4 Wd8
26. lll e5 lll f6 27.h4 lll g8 28.g4 f5 29.g?
1 -0 Aleksandrov - Rakhmanov, Zvenigorod
200 8 .

14.i.c2 tll c5 1 5 .gadl V9c8 1 6.i.f4 Wh8


17.VNhS tll d3 1 8.hh6! gxh6 19.'9xh6t
@gs 20.i.xd3 cxd3 2 1 .f4
1 -0 Andres Gonzalez - Nunez Munoz,
Collado Villalba 2002.

C2) 4 ... cS

1 1 .dxeS tll d7 1 2.i.g3


1 2 .ixe? Wxe7 1 3 . f4 is another good way to
play: 1 2 . . . ib7 1 4.Wh5 fd8 1 5 .f3 f5 1 6 .g3
d4? l 7. cxd4 cxd4 1 8 .e4 with a winning attack,
Mehmeti - Boshku, Bar 2008.

1 2 ...i.b?
1 2 . . .f5 1 3 .exf6 lll xf6 1 4. e4t

1 3.V9g4

a b c d e f g h
5.e4!
This advance, aiming to generate a quick
attack, has recently become popular. I really
like this idea for White as he can put immediate
pressure on his opponent.

5 .e3 is also possible, after which 5 . . . cxd4


6. exd4 ie7 7. lll gf3 b6 is similar to line Al (see
page 49) . But I think this version is slightly
preferable for Black because he has managed to
Chapter 2 - 2 . . . e6 3 . ltJ d2!? 57

get . . . h 6 in. In l i n e A l if Black follows u p . . . c5 1 0.ib5


with . . . h6 we would simply take on f6, which 1 0 . li:) e2 li:) c6 l l . li:) f4 li:) dxe5 1 2. li:) b3 id7
is one of White's main plans anyway. 1 3 .c3 Wf6 1 4.ib5 a6 1 5 .ia4 ih6 1 6. li:) d3
li:) xd3t 1 7.Wxd3 0-0 1 8 . 0-0 if4 1 9.l:%ad l
; ... cxd4
5 . . g5 6.ig3 cxd4 7.e5 is j ust a transposition
l:%ad8 20 .We2 li:)e5 2 1 .ixd7;!; Nakamura -
.
Caruana, Moscow (blitz) 20 1 2. The moves
ro the main line. look far from forced, but Black's weakened

5 . . . d5
king is always likely ro offer White a small
advanrage.
This has rarely been played, but it was
1 0 . . . li:) c6 l l .li:) e2 li:)xc5 1 2. 0-0 a6 1 3 .ixc6t
Caruana's choice on two occasions so should
bxc6 1 4.c4 a5 1 5 . li:) d4 Wb6 1 6.Wc2 li:) d7
be taken seriously.

a b c d e f g h
I 7.Wd3
6.e5
Vitiugov must have been tempted by
6.exd5 ! ? can lead ro a French Tarrasch-rype
l 7.li:)xe6! ? immediately: l 7 . . . fxe6 l 8 .Wg6t
position: 6 . . . Wxd5 7.li:) gf3 cxd4 8 .ic4
cjfds l 9 .Wxe6
Wc5 !?N (8 . . . Wa5 9 . 0-0 li:) c6 l O. li:) b3 Wb4
1 7 . . . ia6 1 8 . li:) xe6
l 1 .We2 ie7 1 2 . li:) bxd4 li:)xd4 1 3 . li:)xd4 0-0
Given a second chance, he now goes for the
1 4. c3t Yemelin - Neverov, St Petersburg
sacrifice.
20 1 1 ) 9 .ixf6 gxf6 1 0.We2 li:) c6 1 1 . 0-0
1 8 . . . fxe6 1 9 .Wg6t @d8 20.Wxe6 ie7 2 1 .l:%fd l
ie7 1 2 . li:) b3 Wb6 1 3 .l:%ad l e5 1 4.c3 dxc3
d4
1 5 . bxc3 l:%g8 1 6.@h l ig4 1 7.h3 ih5
1 8 .We4oo
6 . . . g5 7.ig3 li:) fd7 8 . h4 g4 9 . dxc5 h5

a b c d e f g h
58 Richard Pert - Playin g the Trompowsky

Now instead of 22.c5 ?! Vitiugov - 1 1 .Wf3 ! ?


Caruana, Reggio Emilia 20 1 1 , White should 1 1 .g6! ?N fxg6 1 2.Wg4 :B:g8 1 3 .id3 gives
play 22.Wf5N intending e5-e6 with good White good attacking chances.
compensation. 1 1 . . .Wxf3
After 1 L. . ei c3 ! ? 1 2 . ei c4 Wxa2 1 3 .:B:cl
6.e5 g5 7.i.g3 c!ti dS 8.h4 ib4 1 4.:B:xh6 it's not easy for Black to take
advantage of his discovered check.

s
7
i. - ..t. Se
6 " ,, /, ,,
,,, , , ,


6 ' ' -f ..
.J. .
fi -
..... % -
.z
s .... %
'0

4 .
'
3 w-0
7,

2 8 rw
8m"'"//, ".J-w
8;./ m
.z - - - - %
- - - - ef - %% .,,, '
1 b d f g h
%

t 1fif n a c e

a b c d e f g h 1 4 . . . ei b 5 t ( 1 4 . . . ei e4t? 1 5 . d l ei c3t
1 6.Wxc3 dxc3 1 7.:B:xh8t rll e 7 1 8 . ei d6+-)
8 ... gxh4
1 5 .rll d l :B:g8 1 6.id3 ei c3 t 1 7.rll e l ei e4t
It is interesting if Black opts to grab the b2-
1 8 .rll fl ei xg5 1 9 .Wf4 and White has a huge
pawn.
initiative.
8 . . . Wb6 ! ? 9 . hxg5 ! ?
1 2. ei gxf3 ei c6 1 3 . ei e4 ei c3 1 4.eixc3 dxc3
This was tried recently in a clash between
The situation remained unclear in Ivanisevic
two high-rated players and looks extremely
- Jobava, Plovdiv 20 1 2 .
murky.
9 .ic4!? was another high-profile clash: 9Jlm4 c!ti c6 10.lDgf3 d6
9 . . .Wxb2 1 0 .ixd5 exd5 1 1 . hxg5 ei c6 This looks natural but I believe White's
1 2.:B:b l Wxa2 1 3 .ei gf3 b6 1 4. 0-0 Wa3 chances are still preferable.
1 5 . ei b3 was very unclear in Morozevich -
Ponomariov, Moscow (blitz) 2007. 1 0 . . . ie7
9 . . .Wxb2 1 0 .:B:b l Wa3 This was tried against me by Gawain Jones
1 0 . . . Wxa2 1 l .ic4 in 20 1 1 , but it is not convincing as the move
holds an empty threat.
Chapter 2 - 2 . . . e6 3 . 4J d2!? 59

l 1 .lll c4!N 1 1 . . .id7 1 2 . exd6 a6 1 3 .ixc6 ixc6 1 4.lll c4


Very strong, as Black can't take that rook ib5 1 5 .Wxd4 leaves White a pawn up,
without some serious suffering. Vitiugov - Maslak, Moscow 20 1 1 .
l 1 .:B:h5 ?! Wa5 1 2.id3 b5 1 3 .ie4 lll e3
1 4 . fxe3 dxe3 1 5 .if400 R. Pert - G. Jones, 1 2.xeS J.d7 1 3.J.xc6 hc6 14.VlYhS gh7
London 20 1 1 . 1 5 .gxd4 VlYaS?!
1 1 . . .ixh4?! 1 2 .ixh4 Wc7 1 3 .lll xd4 lll xe5 1 5 . . . Wb6 1 6. lll b3
1 3 . . . lll xd4 1 4. lll d6t c;t> fg l 5 .Wxd4
1 4 . lll b5 Wc5 1 6.c3 J.e7 17. dc4
14 . . . Wb8 ? 1 5 .ig3 f6 1 6.Wh5t c;t>e7 l 7. lll xe5 With a winning position for White who has
fxe5 1 8 .ixe5+- all sorts of threats, including lll xf7.
1 5 .lll bd6t
1 5 . lll xe5 is less accurate as 1 5 . . . Wb4t picks 1 7 ...VlYbS
up the bishop on h4.
1 5 . . . c;t> fg 1 6 . lll e4 Wc7 1 7.ig3
White pushes Black around with his
powerful knights.
l 7 . . . d6 l 8 .lll cxd6+-

1 0 . . . :B:g8 looks interesting, eyeing up a


potential exchange sac for the g3-bishop :
l 1 .:B:h3 ie7N ( l 1 . . .d6 l 2.ib5 id7 l 3 . exd6
e 5 ? was too loosening in Girya - Bodnaruk,
Tyumen 20 1 2; 1 4.'1We2!N would have been
very strong, as 14 . . . ixh3 l 5 .lll xe5 gives White
a winning attack.) 1 2 .a3 Wa5 1 3 .id3 b6
1 4.We2 and White has an initiative.

H .J.hs

18 ... 0-0-0 19.he7 llixe7 20,gxdSt @xd8


2 1 .0-0-0t +-
Vitiugov - Wang Hao, Ningbo (rapid) 20 1 0 .
Black's king is helpless against the oncoming
attack.

Conclusion: The lines in this chapter are


relatively undiscovered bur that said, the
resulting positions seem quite promising for
White, and the endorsement of so many strong
players in recent years in blitz and rapid games
indicates this may well be a line of the future!
Chapter 3

2 ... c5 3. c3!?

1 .d4 f6 2.i.g5 c5 3. c3!?

A) 3 ... cxd4 4.Nxd4 c6 5.Nh4 63


Al) 5 ... bS!? 64
A2) s ... d6 65
A3) 5 ... e6 6.e4 i.e7 7.0-0-0 68
A3 1) 7 ... 0-0? 68
A32) 7 ... d6 69
B) 3 ... d5 4.i.xf6 gxf6 5.e4!? dxe4 6.dxc5 72
Bl) 6 ... YNaS 73
B2) 6 ... f5 74
C) 3 ... YNaS 76
D) 3 ... Nb6 76
62 Richard Pert - Playin g the Trompowsky

1 .d4 tlif6 2 . .ig5 c5 This quirky little sideline is a personal

...t
,. . 15l
'l!i' W
favourite of mine. It is relatively unexplored

,
a. mi:
and I have come up with some new ideas to
8 'ili' W !VB
7 " " ,/._.
breathe life into this variation. I hope that

'"af ,....:- ' ,Y.


6
the new analysis included in this book will

0 w .
give you plenty of opportunities to catch your

s em .... -

, ....Y._
. opponents out.

4
L. J a) 3 cxd4 is Black's main response and

will make up a large part of this chapter. It


3

'wffH- 'WffW is Black's most direct move and Dembo's
2 z .Z "
O :?.'O::< O
" 0[ . . xz .,,,;,z "
O :?.'O::< O :?.'O::< recommendation. Play typically continues

1 et:J v m .: 4.Wlxd4 lLi c6 5 .Wh4 and we will cover an


assortment of 5th moves for Black.
a b c d e f g h
This is Black's most aggressive response, b) 3 ... d5 is met by 4.ixf6 and now 4 . . . exf6?!
immediately challenging the white centre. 5 .e3 and 4 . . . gxf6 5 . e3 are both covered in line
It is his fourth most popular answer to the B of Chapter 8 (see page 1 62) . Answering
Trompowsky (after 2 . . . lLi e4, 2 . . . e6 and 4 . . . gxf6 with 5 .e4! ? is an interesting alternative
2 . . . d5) and has been growing in popularity which I will touch upon in this chapter.
recently, perhaps in part due to being Dembo's
recommendation in her excellent book on c) 3 %Va5 is examined towards the end of this
..

Fighting the Anti-King's Indians. chapter.


Transpositions are rife in this variation to
chapters elsewhere in the book, so make sure d) 3 %Vb6 can be met with the Vaganian
.

you take the time to read this introduction to Gambit, 4.d5 Wlxb2 5 .id2 , which is starting
ensure that you are fully covered. to look quite promising for White according to
my analysis - this is covered in the next chapter.
3.tlic3!? For those who want an alternative approach, I
I am going to recommend White's most have mentioned an unexplored idea involving
direct move 3.d5 as our main choice, and I 4.ixf6 at the end of this chapter.
shall cover it in the following chapter.
Chapter 3 - 2 . . . c5 3 . lli c3 ! ? 63

1 .d4 llif6 2.J.g5 c5 3.t'ii c3!? because White's 3rd move is relatively rare. The
line has several pitfalls for Black to avoid and
even if he steers his way through the mines then
White still has a chance to claim a very small
advantage; from a practical point of view it
seems a decent choice for White. The first two
times I played this line in tournament play I was
winning straight out of the opening and won
easily. It was only on the third occasion that my
opponent had a clue what he was doing; even
then I got a tiny advantage due to an important
novelty which I played in the main line.

4.xd4 t'ii c6
a b c d e f g h Black can try to play without this, but it
We shall look at A) 3 cxd4, B) 3 ... d5, C)

doesn't seem advisable. One example in which
3 ... a5 and D) 3 ...b6, bearing in mind that I myself showed the way was: 4 . . . Wa5 5 .Wh4
lines B and D will often transpose into other Intending e2-e4 with easy play. 5 . . . tll d5
chapters. 6 ..id2! tll b4?! Black tries to upset White's
plans, but he is too underdeveloped and pays
3 . . . e6 is another move that will usually the price. 7.E:cl tll x a2 8 .Wc4! tll x c l 9 .Wxc8 t
transpose elsewhere: 4.d5 (4.tll e4! ? is Wd8 I O.Wxd8t @xd8 1 1 ..ixc l tll c 6 1 2.e4
interesting alternative if you want to avoid the White was already close to winning in R. Pert
transposition) 4 . . . d6 5 . e4 Play has transposed - Jaunooby, Canterbury 20 1 0.
into line Al of Chapter I.
s.h4
A) 3 ... cxd4
64 Richard Pert - Playin g the Trompowsky

5 . . . h6 was the choice of Sakaev, a strong Al) 5 ... b5!?


grandmaster, and so should be looked at, but
this game is typical of this variation - if White This has been recommended by some authors.
plays simple moves he will stand better.

,v.
, ,
% -. . %.
-
z. 3 , ..
s z ..t I]
7

.,,.,%

:4
.,a
.
,,,, % ...... .
.
..

F'" . ,

%Q.;Q
'K(8
!!
.
.

%Jiefifi!r .
1 di.kl
a b c d e f g h
6. 0-0-0 W'a5 7. lli f3 lli h7 8 .id2 g5 9 .W'c4
W'b4 1 0 .W'xb4 lli xb4 l l . lli b 5 lli a6 1 2 .ic3
i:%g8 l 3 . e4 (White should probably take
time out for 1 3 .h3!;!; to stop the g-pawn, but
either way he is doing well) 13 . . . g4 1 4.llih4
lli g5 l 5 .id3 lli e6 1 6.b4 lli ac7 l 7 . lli f5 lli xb5
6 . . . b4!?
1 8 .ixb5 a6 1 9 .ic4 b5 20 .id5t Moiseenko -
This looks more to the point.
Sakaev, Moscow 2003 .
7.llid5 W'a5 8 .ic4
This makes sense, covering the a2-pawn.
5 . . . W'a5 is reasonably common and has
8 . 0-0-0 is possible, and now:
been awarded an exclamation mark in Chess
a) 8 . . . b3 9 . cxb3 ! ? (9.axb3 makes the
Openings for Black Explained by the American
possibility of . . . W'a l t a constant worry:
grandmasters Alburt, Dzindzichashvili and
9 . . . lli xd 5 1 0 . exd5 lli b4 l l .Wd4 ib700)
9 . . . tli xd5 1 0 . exd5 lli b4 l l .id2 i:%b8 1 2 . a3
Perelshteyn, but after 6. 0-0-0 d6 7.e4 it is
nothing more than a transposition to line A2
W'c7t 1 3 .ic4 lli xd 5 1 4 .@b a White's lead
below.
in development gives him an edge.
Black does not benefit from avoiding the
b) 8 . . . W'xa2 9 . lli c7t @d8 1 0 . lli xa8 W'a l t
l l .@d2 W'xb2 1 2.id3 ib7 1 3 . lli e2 ixa8t
transposition: 6 . . . b5 7.@b l i:%b8 (7 . . . b4 is met
by 8 .ixf6 followed by lli d5) 8 .ixf6! gxf6 and
The position is messy, but here too I slightly
now 9 . e4 is possible with advantage, thought
prefer White due to his lead in development.
personally I prefer 9 . e3t, which can be seen
c) 8 . . . ib7 9 . @ b l (White could consider
as giving fewer targets for counterplay. White
9 .ixf6 ! ?N gxf6 1 0 .@b l ) 9 . . . b3 1 0 . cxb3
lli xd5 l l . exd5 lli b4 1 2 .a3 lli xd5 1 3 . lli f3
has the better pawn structure and thus the
better position. Black has no real attack, while
e6 1 4 .ic4 f6 1 5 .ic l ie700 Solaesa
on the other hand Black's king must choose
Navalpotro - Morales Rivera, Madrid
between staying in the centre and going to the
2002.
kingside, and neither of those options offer
8 . . . W'c5
him a problem-free future!
8 . . . b 3 t ? 9 .id2t
Chapter 3 - 2 . . c5 3 . tlJ c3 ! ?
. 65

8 . . . ttJ xd5 was played in Lindam - Evertsso n , 7.lll f3 is a common alternative, but I believe
Internet 2 0 0 3 , a n d n o w 9 . exd5N tlJ e 5 that White should keep the option of playing
1 0 .ib3 would give White a n edge. f2-f4.
9 .ib3 ! ?
Th i s leads t o a position where White gives 7 ... h6
up a pawn but has a lead in development. 7 . . . d6 8 . f4 Wa5 9.@b l ie6 (9 . . . b4 1 0 .ixf6
9 . b 3 ! ? also looks playable: 9 . . . lll e5 1 0 .ie3 gxf6 1 I . lll d5) 1 0. f5 ic4 1 I .lll f3 White's
Wi'a5 ( 1 0 . . . Wc6 l I .lll f3 lll xc4 1 2.lll d4 Wi'b7 lead in development and additional space
1 3 . bxc4) l I .if4 lll xc4 1 2.lll c7t @d8 ensure a small advantage.
1 3 . lll xa800
9 . . . lll xd5 1 O.exd5 lll d4 s.tilf3 g8s 9 ..bf<i gxf6 10.tilds d6 1 1 .ttl d4
tilxd4 1 2Jhd4 Wa5 1 3.f4 b7 14.@b l
s .i B .i. -
, , , %..
6 r.r.- , , , %.
xd5 1 5.gxd5 ks 1 6.Wfl k5 17.e2

1 %,,,,% -,v. White has the safer king and the better
bishop, Berkes - Tolstikh, Zalakaros 1 99 9 .

5 -----
7.-

7,.ill ,,,,,%Ji. A2) s ...d6 6.e4
3 ''l, , ,; ,. -
&m 8-
:ef
4



s 1. m ..t. -
! ! -r1'""%!"'{""% l{t -- ---.--.
:
2

.
1
1 6
:%,. .0. . . . . :.
-- -,'
, f
/:ii--
""{"'%
. .

b d f g
..
"


.%

5 R R 8 R'-'" '"
a c e

4
1 I . lll f3 lll xc2t 1 2 .ixc2 Wxc2 1 3 . 0-0 f6
1 3 . . . ib7 1 4.l:'!fd l Wi'f5 1 5 .ixe7 ixe7
1 6.l:'!e 1 is unclear.
1 4.ie3
3 m
w%" ' HW"
--- %
White has decent compensation for the
pawn.
r r11m.
a

b c d e f g h
6 ... Wa5
Black's plan here is to encourage White
to castle queenside and then to play . . . ie6,
. . . l:'!c8 and . . . lll b4 with an attack. Although
it looks slightly awkward for Black to ignore
the development of his f8-bishop, we cannot
afford to be careless.

6 . . . ie6 7. 0-0-0 l:'!c8 8 . f4 Wi'a5 9 . a3 transposes


to our main line.

a b c d e f g h
7.0-0-0 e6
Black can also seek to clarify matters on the
7.0-0-0! kingside:
66 Richard Pert - Playing the Trompowsky

7 . . . h6 8 .ixf6 gxf6 9.@b l N Trompowsky bishop before Black invests time


Sidestepping . . . \Wg5 t . with . . . h6. 8 . . . gxf6 9.'it>b l f5 This leads to a
9 . f4 ie6 1 0 .a3 transpose t o the note to slight advantage for Black according to analysis
Black's 8th move in the main line. in the aforementioned book.
9 . . . g8
9 . . . ie6 1 0 .lll h3!? White uses his crafty 9th s .. Jks
move to switch plans and send his knight Black may also try:
to the f4-square. 1 0 . . . g8 l l .ie2! 0-0-0 8 . . . h6
( l l . . .xg2 1 2. lll f4 g7 1 3 .lll xe6 fxe6 The idea is to force White to capture on f6
1 4.ic4 looks very unpleasant for Black) so that Black has time to get the . . . f5 pawn
1 2.lll f4;!; break in before White clamps down with
1 0 . f4 id? l 1 . lll f3 0-0-0 1 2 .f5 @b8 1 3 .'1Wh5 f4-f5 .
ie8 1 4.g3 9 .ixf6
To allow the development of the fl -bishop. 9 . f4? lll h7! 1 O .lll f3 f6 was the embarrassing
14 . . . c8 1 5 .ib5 a6 1 6.ixc6 xc6 1 7.lll d5;!; finish of Krgovic - Pantelic, Obrenovac
20 1 1 ; White's once-proud bishop is trapped!
9 . . . gxf6 1 0 . f4
1 0 .lll h3!?N seems an interesting way to
try and take advantage of our lead in
development: 1 0 . . . g8 l l . f3 c8 1 2 .lll f4
and the position looks slightly more pleasant
for White.
1 0 .. . f5
Although Black gets this move in, White still
has ways to obtain good play.

8.a3!
This seems to be strongest, although it is
not mentioned in Chess Openings for Black
Explained. An important point is that it covers
the b4-square, countering Black's plan of
playing . . . lll b4 followed by . . . xc3 .
a b c d e f g h
l l .ib5 ! ?N
8 . @b l ?! can be met by 8 . . . lll xe4 ! ? 9 .lll xe4
'1Wxa2t 1 0 .'it>c l \Wa l t l 1 .@d2 Wxb2. The
Putting the pressure on immediately.
engines prefer White's position, but in a
l l .exf5 looks reasonable too: l I . . .Wxf5
practical game I can imagine that Black would
1 2.id3 Wg4 ( l 2 . . . Wc5 and l 2 . . . Wa5 are both
be happy as he has already three pawns for the
playable and may be slight improvements;
piece and the white king is exposed.
in both cases the position look more or
less balanced, though White may hold a
8 .ixf6?! There is no need for us to give up our
Chapter 3 - 2 . . c5 3 . 4J c3 ! ?
. 67

tiny pull due to his lead in development.)


1 3 .Wif2 .ig7 1 4.c!Oge2 .if5 1 5 .c!Od5;!; Sanchez
Enriquez - Ossa, San Jose 2009.
I I . .id3!?N is also interesting, and after
I l . . .g8 1 2 .4Jge2 White's superior structure
gives him a slight edge. Grabbing the g-pawn
can lead to some strange tactics: 1 2 . . . xg2?!
1 3 .'1Nh3 g5 ! ? This wacky move is the
only way to defend the f5-pawn . ( 1 3 . . . g8
1 4.exf5 allows White a clear advantage.)
1 4.fxg5 fxe4 1 5 .'1Nh4 exd3 1 6.gxh6;!; The
position remains complicated, but White's
h-pawn looks dangerous. a b c d e f g h
I I . . . fxe4 9 ... h6
I l . . .a6 1 2 .exf5 .ixf5 1 3 .ixc6t bxc6 1 4 . 4J f3 9 . . . c!O b4? doesn't work: I O .axb4 Wfa l t
b8 ( 1 4 . . . .ig7 1 5 .he l .ie6 1 6 . c!O d4;!;) I l .@d2 Wxb2 1 2 . .ixf6 gxf6 1 3 .ib5t @d8
1 5 .c!O d4 .id7 1 6.he l;!; 1 4. ltJ ge2+- and Black runs out of steam.
I l . . . .ig7 1 2 .exf5 .ixc3 ( 1 2 . . . .ixf5 ? 1 3 .d5)
13 . .ixc6t bxc6 1 4. fxe6t 1 0.i.xf<>
1 2. f5 The immediate I O . f5 ! ? is interesting, but
risks losing control: I O . . . .id7 ( 1 0 . . . c!O xe4 ?!
doesn't work: I l .'1Nxe4 .ixf5 1 2.'1Ne3 hxg5
[ 1 2 . . . .ixc2 1 3 .d5 '1Nd8 1 4 . c!O b 5 +-J 1 3 .d5)
I l . c!O f3 ( I 1 ..ixf6 returns to the main line)
I 1 . . .hxg5 ! ? 1 2 .'1Nxh8 g4 followed by 1 3 . . . lll e 5 ,
a n d Black obtains good activity in return fo r
the exchange.

a b c d e f g h
1 2 . . . .id7
After 1 2 . . . .ixf5 ? 1 3 .d5! the double threat
of xf5 and .ixc6t wins material.
1 3 .'1Nxe4
White holds the initiative.

9.f4!
This covers some key central squares. I also
like the idea of delaying the development of
the g l -knight as in some cases it can be useful
on the el-square to defend against . . . xc3 a b c d e f g h
sacrifices.
68 Richard Pert - Playin g the Trompowsky

1 1 .fSN
I recommend limiting Black's activity in this
way.
1 1 .lll f3 was played in Meszaros - Dory,
Hungary 1 99 8 , allowing Black to play 1 1 . . . fS ,
although the idea we saw in the note to Black's
8th move, 1 2 .ib 5 ! ? may then give White
chances for an advantage.

1 1 ... id7 12.CLJf3 lll e5 13.CLJxe5 fxe5 14J;d5


We can't allow the exchange sacrifice on c3 .

14 ...b6 1 5.d3;!;
White has a pleasant position.
The point White can maintain his
momentum without taking time out to move
A3) 5 ...e6 6.e4 ie7 7.0-0-0 his bishop. I have had this position numerous
times in blitz and have included some of those
games as examples.

9 ... hxg5
9 . . . lll h7 I O .ixe7 Wxe7 I I .Wxe7 lll xe7
1 2.e5 f6 ( 1 2 . . . f5 1 3 . lll b5 b6 1 4 . lll d6 a5
I 5 .ib5 lll d5 1 6.lll xc8+- Antidrome - CofC
Bercys, Internet 20 1 0) 1 3 .lll e4 fxe5 1 4. fXe5
E:b8 I 5 .ib5 E:d8 1 6. lll c5 lll f8 I 7.lll d4 a6
I 8 . lll dxe6 dxe6 I 9 .E:xd8 axb5 20.E:fl lll eg6
2 1 . lll xe6 ixe6 22.E:xb8+- Antidrome -
rpenquin, Internet 20 I 0 .

a b c d e f g h
9 . . . d 6 I O.e5 lll d5 1 1 .lll xd5 exd5 1 2 .ixe7
We shall now look at A3 1) 7 ... 0-0? and lll xe7 1 3 .id3;!;
A32) 7 ... d6.
9 . . . Wb6 I O .e5 We3t 1 1 . <ii b l hxg5 1 2 . lll xg5
7 . . . Wa5 is quite often played, but then 8 . f4 d6 lll xe5 1 3 . fxe5 Wxe5 1 4.id3 g6 1 5 .Wh6 E:d8
is j ust a transposition to line A32. I 6. lll ce4 lll xe4 I 7.Wh7t lii f8 I 8 .Wxf7#
Antidrome - TacticFreak, Internet 20 I 0 .
A31) 7 ... 0-0?
10.CLJxgS
This is a common and serious mistake, castling The important thing to remember in this
into the attack. In fact it happens nearly 2 5 % line is to meet . . . g6 with Wh6. By keeping the
of the time according t o m y database, so it is a possibility of Wh7t available, this avoids the
chance to gain some quick wins! threatened . . . lll h 5 . White may then continue
with E!:d3-h3 followed by mate.
8.f4 h6 9.tDf3!!
A32) 7 ...d6 8.f4 'Wa5

Black sensibly delays castling i nto the line of


fire and keeps his options open.

9.f3

9 ... h6
This leads to the critical line.
l l .e5 xe5
After 9 . . . a6 White should take the chance to
vacate the h4-square for the bishop: I O JWe l !
h6 1 I .i.h4 g5 1 2 .fxg5 hxg5 1 3 .ixg5 id7
1 4.@b l E:c8 1 5 .Wd2 E:c7 1 6.i.d3 CLJ b4
1 7.a3 CLJxd3 1 8 .cxd3 b6 1 9 .E:hfl E:g8 20.h4
ic8 2 1 .E:cl ib7 22.c;t>a2 1 -0 Miladinovic -
Dragojlovic, Kragujevac 2009; Black has no
good answer to the threat of 23.b4.

9 ... i.d7 1 0 . CLJ d2! This move has rarely been


played but the knight will be strong on the c4-
square. 1 0 . . . E:c8 1 l .CLJ c4 Wc5 White can now
embarrass the black queen:

12 ... exd5 13.fxe5 'Wxe5 14,gel 'Wf5 1 5.gxe7


White had a huge advantage in Krasenkow -
Degraeve, Cappelle la Grande 1 990.
70 Richard Pert - Playin g the Trompowsky

1 2.a3!N ( 1 2 . ll'l a4?! Wb4 was unclear in Sell - 1 6 .xd6 gS 1 7.We l g4?
S . Berger, Germany 1 999) 1 2 . . . 0-0 ( 1 2 . . . b S ? This game highlights the dangers for Black if
1 3 .ll'lxb S ! +-) 1 3 .eS! dxeS 1 4. b4 ll'l xb4 l S . fxeS he plays one wrong move.
ll'l fdS 1 6.ixe7 ll'lxe7 l 7 . axb4 Wxb4 l 8 . ll'l a2+- Black should have tried l 7 . . . Wg7, although
White is still doing well after 1 8 .fl '\W cS
1 0.e5! 1 9 .d2.
White sacrifices a central pawn but in return 1 8 .l'!fl WgSt 1 9 .Wb l a6 20 .id3 ll'l e8 2 1 .d4
the black king will be nudged over to f8 where f5 22. lll a4
it sits uncomfortably. With a huge lead in development and
the black king stranded in the middle of
1 0 ... dxe5 l 1 .fxe5 .!ll xe5 12.ll'lxe5 '1Wxe5 the board, White's advantage is totally
13.!b5t overwhelming.
22 . . .Wg7 23 .Wb4t We7 24.Wc3 eS
1 -0 R. Pert - Perez, London 20 1 1 .

a b c d e f g h

I 5.Wg3!
This move keeps the whole variation alive for
White - so far I am the only person to have
played this move. The reason it is so strong is
that it keeps the eS- and c7-squares covered so
that White can play ie3 , leaving Black with
no decent square for his queen.

Previous games had seen only l S .We l , which


is at best unclear for White, but may even
be slightly worse. One example continued:
1 S . . . a6 1 6.id3 id7 1 7.fl ic6 1 8 .g4 d8
1 9 .ie3 Wes 20.Wf2 ib4 2 1 . lll e2 d7 22.h3
We8 23 .id4 'IWdS 24.ixf6 gxf6 2 S .Wb l ie7
26.lll f4 WcS 27.WxcS + Yi-Yi Miladinovic -
Gustafsson, Fuerth 2002.
1 5 ... h5 22.ie2) 2 1 . .. b5 22 . .if3;!; White stands better
The reason why everyone presumed White as Black is struggling to hold everything
could not play 1 5 .Wi'g3 . together.

If Black does not force the exchange of queens


he will pay the price: 1 5 . . . g5 ? 1 6.ie3 Wfb4
1 7. h4 and White is winning already!

16.YNe3! YMxe3t
1 6 . . . lt:lxf4? allows White to demonstrate the
point:

a b c d e f g h
1 8Jhfl !?N
1 8 .id4 was my choice when I reached
this position in tournament play: 1 8 . . . lt:l d 5
( 1 8 . . . a 6 l 9 . .ie2 @g8 2 0 .E:hfl transposes
to the line after 1 7 . . . @g8 i n the previous
note) 1 9 . lt:l xd 5 N ( 1 9 . lt:l e4 ? ! a6 20 .ie2 id?
allowed Black to untangle i n R. Pert - Ziska,
Sunningdale 20 1 2) 1 9 . . . exd5 20.E:hfl ie6
17.i.xe3 My computer prefers White here, though I
A pawn up with the queens off, Black might
would consider a draw the most likely result.
think he is safe, but actually his complete lack
of development and precariously placed king
1 8 ... e5!
provide sufficient compensation for White.
Black has to play this as he has no other
My computer slightly prefers White in this
reasonable plan of development available.
position.
Driving White's bishop away does not help
17 ... f6! matters as it can redeploy to the f3-square:
17 . . . g6? 1 8 .E:hfl @g7 1 9 .id4t if6
1 8 . . . a6 1 9 .ie2 e5 20.if3;!;
20.E:xf6+- j ust doesn't work for Black.
19.d5 j,g4
17 . . . g5 1 8 .ie2 lt:l f6 ( 1 8 . . . lt:l f4 1 9 .if3 'itig7
1 9 . . . lt:l xd 5 2 0 . E:xd5 if6 2 1 .id?!;!;
20.lt:lb5;!;) 1 9 .id4;!;
20.tll xe7 hdl
1 7 . . . @g8 is a plausible attempt by Black to
20 . . . @xe?? ? 2 1 .ic5 t leads to mate.
untangle himself: 1 8 .E:hfl a6 l 9 .ie2 lt:l f6
20 .id4 @h7 2 1 . lt:l a4 (if he wishes White
2 l .j,c5
can make a draw here with 2 1 .id3t @g8
72 Richard Pert - Playin g the Trompowsky

s B -
,i0 %.,,,J.J,, . . "'
1 : .. -
. r. %_
6
.-.. .
%,, % /, , , , , , ,, .

5

,,,, ,,,,,%

Y,
4
,,,,, ,, , , . %


3

2 J[!J
8 , 8
. . . ..%%= r
, . . .
8 J[!J%
1
. %

a b c d e f g h a b c d e f g h
2 1 . ..J.h5 24.tll g6t
2 1 . . . a6 22.id3 ig4 23.tll d5t 'tt> g 8 24.gxf6 24 .id3 tll d7 2 5 .tll g6t 'tt> g 8 2 5 . lll e?t also
gxf6 2 5 . lll xf6t 'tt> g7 26.tll xg4 gae8 27.ie4 leads to a perpetual.
reaches an unusual type of ending with three
minor pieces for two rooks which looks to be 24 ... <>gs 25.tll e7t <i>f8
slightly in White's favour. With a perpetual - avoiding it with 2 5 . . . <i>h?
is dangerous for Black: 26 .id3t g6 27. lll xg6;!;
2 L .ig4 22. tll d5t (22.ge l e4 2 3 . tll g6t 'tt> g8
24.tll xh8 'tt> x h8 25 .id4 if5 26.ic4 ig6 is B) 3 ... d5
roughly balanced) 22 . . . 'it>g8 23.gxf6 gxf6
24. tll xf6t 'tt> g7 2 5 .tll xg4 reaches a similar
ending in which I would rather be White.

22.gfS
22.tll d 5 t ! ? leads to another version of
the above ending: 22 . . . 'tt> g 8 23.gxf6 gxf6
24. lll xf6t 'it>g7 2 5 . lll xh5 t 'tt> g6 26.g4 f5
27.id3 e4 28 .ie2 fxg4 29 .ixg4 ghe8 30 .ie3
Here too, my preference would be for White.

22 ...J.g4
22 . . . a6 23 .ia4 b5 24.ib3 'tt> e 8 25 .id5
lll xd5 26. lll x d5 <i>d7 27.gxh5 'tt> c6 2 8 . tll b6
'it>xc5 29. lll xa8 gxa8 30.gxe5 t 'tt> d 6 results in
a drawn rook ending.

23.gxe5
After this a perpetual becomes inevitable. 4.Lf6 gxf6
23. tll d5t <i>g8 24.gxf6 is the last chance to 4 . . . exf6? is a structural mistake. White replies
head for the unbalanced ending. 5 .e3, transposing to line B (note to Black's 4th
move) of Chapter 8 on page 1 62 .
23 ... a6
Chapter 3 - 2 . . . c5 3 .tiJc3!? 73

5.e4!? 1 3 .lll xc3 We5t 1 4 .We3 Wxe3 t 1 5 .fxe3 ie6


I would like to take a quick look at this 1 6. 0-0;!;
aggressive option which is available to White White's lead in development gives him an
after this particular move order. advantage.

5 .e3! ? is a reasonable alternative which is again 6.dxc5


a transposition to line B of Chapter 8 . Black now chooses between Bl) 6 ...Wa5
and B2) 6 ... f5.
5 . . . dxe4
5 . . . cxd4 6.Wxd4 dxe4 7.ib 5 t ! ?
Bl) 6 ...Wa5
Th i s looks a n interesting option for White.
7.Wxd8t mxd8 8 . 0-0-0t gives White a safe
but small advantage: 8 . . . lll d7 9 .lll xe4 me?
1 0 .lll f3 e6 1 1 . lll d4 a6 1 2 .ie2 b6 1 3 .ih5;!;
Ibragimov - Sirigos, Peristeri 1 99 3 .
7 . . . lll c6
7 . . . id7 8 . 0-0-0 lll c6 9 .Wxe4 f5 1 0 .Wc4 e6
1 l .ixc6 bxc6 1 2 .lll f3;!; looks very pleasant
for White.
8 .Wxe4 Wd6
8 . . . id7 9 . 0-0-0 e6 1 O.ixc6 bxc6 1 1 . lll f3;!;
9 .lll ge2 f5 1 0 .Wf3 ig7 1 1 .l:"!:d l Wc5

8
J i -J.: :z
. , . % -...f. %....
7 f%
-,,.
.

6 1 --
: , . . J
3 1
2 -t. . ". '=
"'" -ctJf
-.:
-
1 ,.
. % ...%

'
b d f g h
z

a c e

1 2 .b4!?N
This daring move looks promising.
1 2.l:"!:d5 Wb4 1 3 .a3 Wxb2 1 4.0-0 0-0
1 5 .l:"!:b l Wxa3 1 6 .l:"!:b3 Wa l t 1 7.l:"!:b l Wa3
1 8 .l:"!:b3 Wa l t 1 9 .l:"!:b l Y2-Y2 Miroshnichenko
a b c d e f g h
- Parligras, Kon ya 20 1 1 .
1 2 . . . ixc3 t 8 . . . id7
The b4-pawn is untouchable: 1 2 . . . Wxb4? After 8 . . . lll c6 9 .lll ge2 f5 1 0 . 0-0-0 ie6
1 3 .ixc6t+- 1 l .g4 fxg4 1 2 .l:"!:hg l White has a strong
1 2 . . . Wb6? also loses: 1 3 . lll d5! Wd8 initiative for the pawn: 1 2 . . . Wc? ( 1 2 . . . 0-0
1 4 . lll f6t ! +- walks into 1 3 .ic4 ixc4? ? 1 4.Wxg4+-)
74 Richard Pert - Playin g the Trompowsky

1 3 .llixe4 1We5 1 4.1Wxe5 ixe5 1 5 .lli g5 if5 8.0-0-0!


1 6. f4t White sets a trap.
9 .ic4N
This very tricky 9.1Wg4 should be reserved
for blitz games, as it doesn't quite cut it:
9 . . . g8 1 0 .d l ( 1 0 .0-0-0? ih6t-+)

%!. '" -.i


s ,i- ;
1 t i -
.. .... .
..t f
{@. iW .. . . i
6
.. .
. . . . . .
% % %

s SJ'
.
%

4 -. . . . .r
1
3

2 8;
,d' ....
-
.. . . f" {
1 : : :h
% % ' ""

a b c d e f g

1 O . . . f5 !+ Black's only move, but it does


the job as the weakness of the c3-knight
8 . . . f5 avoids the trap, but 9 . lli h3 heading for
comes i nto play. (Clearly Black cannot the g5-square looks better for White.
play 1 0 . . . .ixb 5 ? ? 1 l .1Wc8t 1Wd8 1 2.1Wxd8#
nor 1 0 . . . Wc?? 1 1 .lli d 5 1Wxc5 1 2 .1Wf5 '1Mfxc2 9.clll xe4! 1Wxh5 I O.tLJxf6t e7 1 I .ttlxh5+
1 3 .llixe?+-.) Ibragimov - Schut, Rochester 200 1 .

B2) 6 . .. f5

This looks critical and was Avrukh's


recommendation in Grandmaster Repertoire
11.

a b c d e f g h
9 . . . 0-0 1 0 .0-0-0
Black struggles to complete his development
as the b8-knight is temporarily tied to the
defence of the d7-bishop.
1 0 .. .f5 1 1 .lli h3!
Here comes the attack.
I l . . . h6 1 2 .g4 fxg4 1 3 . lli f4 1Wc7 1 4. lli g6
Black is in big trouble.
7.xdSt c.tlxd8 8.0-0-0t i.d7 9.g4!? 1 6.hxg4 ixg4 1 7.ih3 ixh3 1 8 .E:xh3 h6 From
I think this is White's most interesting here, 1 9 .a3 E:d8 20.:B:gl E:xd5 2 1 .:B:xg? E:f5 led
option. eventually to a win for Black in Wielecki -
Sherbakov, Polanica Zdroj 1 99 8 , but instead
9 . f3 has been the most common move, but 1 9 .E:g3 ! ?N would have kept a small advantage
Black has more than one playable response: for White.
a) After 9 . . . e3! ? White struggles to prove
an advantage and a draw looks the most 1 0.gxf5 i.xc3 1 1 .bxc3 c.tlc7 12.ll:ie2 i.xf5
likely result, for example: 1 0 .ib 5N ( 1 0 . f4? 13.tll d4 i.g6 14.h4 h5 1 5Jgl ll:id7
e6 l l . ll:i f3 ixc5 1 2 .ib5 @e7+ Saptarshi -
Iuldachev, Mumbai 2009) 1 0 . . . e6 ( 1 O . . . E:g8
l 1 . ll:i ge2 E:xg2 ? 1 2 .E:d3! @c7 1 3 . ll:i d 5 t @c8
1 4.ixd?t ll:i xd7 1 5 . ll:i df4 E:f2 1 6.:B:hd l +-)
l I . ll:i ge2 @c7 ( l L .ixc5 1 2 .:B:xd?t ll:i xd7
1 3 .:B:d l a6 1 4.:B:xd?t @c8 1 5 .ia4 b5
1 6.E:xf7 is given by Avrukh) 1 2 .E:d3 ixc5
1 3 .ixd7 ll:i xd7 1 4. ll:i b 5 t 'itic6 1 5 . ll:i bd4t @c7
1 6. ll:i b 5 t with a repetition of moves.
b) 9 . . . ig7! is the main line given by Avrukh,
and his analysis runs: 1 0 . ll:i ge2 exf3 l l .gxf3 e6
1 2 . f4 if8 1 3 .ig2 'itic7 1 4 . b4 a5t and Black is
doing well.

1 6.c6!?
Setting a trap.

1 6 ... tll e5
1 6 . . . bxc6?

9 . . . fxg4 1 0 .h3!N gives White a good initiative.

9 . . . ih6t looks an important alternative:


1 0 .@b l ig7 l 1 .ll:i ge2 fxg4 1 2. ll:i xe4 ll:i c6
a b c d e f g h
1 3 .h3 @c7 1 4 . ll:i f4 E:ae8 1 5 . ll:i d 5 t @c8
1 7.xg6! fxg6 1 8 .lll e6t i>c8 1 9 .i.a6t+- 1 8 .a l is also good) . . .i.f5 1 8 .i.d5 Wd8
l 9 . h4;!; De la Villa Garcia - Wiersma, Berlin
1 7.cxb7 i>xb7 1 8.fol 1 997.
White's ideas of i.g2 and f2-f3 or f2-f4 may
give him a tiny edge. After 5 . . . d5 White can choose between the
greedy 6.dxc5 e6 7.1Mf d4 g8 8 .Wfh4 lll c6
C) 3 ... Y!las 9.1Mfxh7;!;, and the sensible 6 .lll ge2 followed by
g2-g3 , i.g2 and 0-0 with an edge.

6.exd4 d6 7.i.bSt i.d7 8.i.xd7t lll xd7


9.Y!la e6 10.lll ge2

8 .1 m -
7 .,_, _ , , -- , Y,
6 ---
.. ..%

5 7: ... . % 7: .. . . %
,E-
4
r
3 ,,,.. ,%n f
.. .. % m
; m

W .. . . . , ,
2 8 f 8 -ltlf 8
af ... . %m =% .... %.lt .
.

I
a b c d e f g h
4.i.xf6 gxf6 5.e3 cxd4
5 . . . e6 6 . d 5 ! ? Switching back to the central White stands slightly better with superior
advance is a clever way to exploit Black's last coordination and more space. I 've left the rest
move. of the game in as White played the whole game
well, and playing through it should give you a
good understanding of the position.

10 dS 1 1 .0-0 i.b4 12.lll dl Y!lc7 13.tll e3


..

i.d6 14.h3 f5 1 5.c4 f4 1 6.cS fxe3 17.cxd6


Yllxd6 1 8.fxe3 0-0 1 9.facl f5 20.Y!/f4 Y!lxf4
2 1 .tll xf4 @f7 22Jk7 i>e7 23.gxb7 gab8
24.gc7 gxb2 25.tll d3 gb6 26.tll eS gd6
27.gb l c.i>d8 28.gbb7 tll xe5 29.dxeS gb6
30.gd7t i>c8 3 1 .gbc7t
h
1-0
a b c d e f g
De la Villa Garcia - Glavina Rossi, Mondariz
6 . . . i.g7 (6 . . . f5 7 .1Mff3;!;) 7.lll ge2 lll a6 8 .g3 1 997.
lll c7 9 .i.g2 lll b5 1 0 . 0-0 lll xc3 l 1 . lll xc3 f5
1 2 . e4 fxe4 1 3 .lll xe4 0-0 1 4 . c3 1Mfb6 1 5 .b l D) 3 ...Y!lb6
d6 1 6.dxe6 i.xe6 l 7 . lll g5 ( l 7.1Mf xd6 i.xa2
In this position my main recommendation is
4.d5 going into the Vaganian Gambit - see the
next chapter. The position after 4.d5 can also
be reached via the more common move order
l .d4 ttJ f6 2.ig5 c5 3.d5 Wb6 4.ttJc3 , and so 8 ... l2J a6
forms a key part of your repertoire whether 8 . . . ie7 9 . ttJ d6t ixd6 I O .Wxd6 We7
you choose 3 . ttJ c3 or 3 . d 5 . 1 1 .Wd2 ttJ c6 1 2. e4;!;
Th a t said, I would like t o touch upon the
following line which is made available to us 9.l2Jxc5 l2Jxc5 10.Wd4 b6 l l .e3;!;
by the uncommon move order with 3 . tlJ c3 . In This is all unexplored. My gut feeling is
my opinion it is not as good as the Vaganian Black should be able to equalize, but if you
Gambit, but those looking to take play off the fancy entering new territory then it is worth
beaten track may be attracted by the scarcity of investigating further.
games played in this area.
Conclusion: After the quirky 3 . ttJ c3 ! ? the
4.Lf6 gxf6 main line of A) 3 . . . cxd4 4.Wxd4 ttJ c6 5 .Wh4
4 . . . Wxf6 5 . e3 cxd4 6.Wxd4 Wxd4 7.exd4 often gives Whi te a dangerous kingside attack,
leaves White ahead in development: 7 . . . e6 especially if Black castles too early. Black avoids
8 . ttJ f3 ib4 9 .i.d3 ttJ c6 1 0 . 0-0 ixc3 1 l . bxc3 this pitfall in the critical line A32, but still has
0-0 1 2 .l'!ab l;:!; to plot a fine line through the complications
in order to make it out of the opening. Even
s.l2Jd5 Wds if he does White often retains a tiny advantage
5 . . . Wa5t 6.Wd2 Wxd2t 7 . xd2 ttJ a6 8 . e3 due to the important 1 5 .Wg3 , with which
l'!b8 9 . tlJ e2;!; This knight is heading to f4, I improved on previous practice. So from a
while the d5-knight makes it tricky for Black practical viewpoint, this is a useful tool to have
to complete his development. in your armoury.
Black's other options against 3 . ttJ c3 ! ? tend to
transpose to other chapters, but I have pointed
out some unexplored possibilities such as B)
3 . . . d5 4.ixf6 gxf6 5 . e4!? which may catch out
an unprepared opponent.
Chapter 4

2 ... cS 3.dS

1 .d4 f6 2.g5 c5 3.d5

A) 3 ... b6 4. c3 xb2 5.d2 b6 6.e4 80


Al) 6 ... d6 7.f4 81
Al l) 7 ... c7 82
A12) 7 ... e6 82
A2) 6 ... e5 7.f4! d6 8.f3 84
A2 1) 8 ... exf4 85
A22) 8 ... bd7 9.fxe5 dxe5 10.!bl 86
A22 1) 1 0 ... d8 87
A222) 1 0 ...c7 88
B) 3 ... d6 90
80 Richard Pert - Playin g the Trompowsky

1 .d4 tll f6 2.J.g5 c5 3.d5 1 .d4 tll f6 2.J.g5 c5 3.d5


We shall examine Black's most popular
choice of A) 3 ... b6 before taking a quick
look at B) 3 d6. The other main option of
..

3 . . . lll e4 4.J.f4 is covered in the next chapter.

A) 3 ...b6 4.tll c3

3 ...b6
This is Black's most popular response and
Dembo's recommendation in Fighting the

b d f g h
Anti-King's Indians - I've got some really good
a c e
ideas in this line so it's one to look forward to
playing. The Vaganian Gambit, which can also be
reached via the move order l .d4 lll f6 2 .J.g5 c5
3 . . . lll e4 4.J.f4 transposes into Chapter 5 . 3 . lll c3 '1Wb6 4 . d 5 , and so is a key part of your
repertoire whether you choose 3 . lll c3 or 3 . d 5 .
3 . . . e 6 4.e4 transposes to line A o f Chapter 1 -
see page 1 3 . 4 xb2
..

Taking the pawn is the only critical way


3 . . . d 6 doesn't look particularly scary; I 'll touch to play, as otherwise White obtains an easy
upon this line at the end this chapter. advantage: 4 . . . d6 5 . e4 lll bd7 6.b l g6 7. lll f3
J.g7 8 .J.e2;!; with lll d2-c4 to come later.
4.tll c3
The Vaganian Gambit. 5.J.d2
I experienced firsthand what it was like to
4 xb2 5.J.d2
. play the black side of this line against possibly
This brief introduction should help you the best ever Trompowsky player, Julian
successfully navigate your way around this Hodgson - I didn't last long! White's lead in
chapter and its transpositional possibilities. development and additional space gives him a
We are now going to start looking at some huge initiative, and I for one feel much more
lines - so enjoy! comfortable playing the white side. Some of
the lines of theory are quite long, but the key
thing to remember is to keep developing; if
you stay ahead in development then Black will
struggle to live with you.
Chapter 4 - .
2 . . c5 3 . d 5 81

s ...Wb6 6.e4 7 . . . ig4?!


Black now chooses between the old main I personally suffered retribution for this
line of Al) 6 ... d6 and the modern A2) 6 ... e5 . incorrect move:
8.ie2 ixe2 9.Wfxe2 a6 1 0 .:!'!b l Wi'c7 I l . e5 dxe5
Al) 6 ... d6 7.f4 1 2.fxe5 ll'lfd7 1 3 .ll'lf3 e6 1 4 . 0-0 exd5 1 5 .e6
fxe6 1 6.Wfxe6t ie7 l 7.ll'lxd5 Wi'd6

.1 -
'1rw.r --,v.
8

,.. .,.... . .
7

6
%.

5 w.---
4
- - - "


3
2

8 8 (%
8 r
!"
r-.rm h
1 ....
a b c d e f g

1 8 . ll'l g 5 ! ll'l c6 I 9 . ll'l c7t V!fxc7 20.Wf7t ct?d8


2 1 . ll'l e6t ct?c8 22.ll'lxc7 xc7 23 .if4t
1 -0 Hodgson - R. Pert, Bradford 200 1 .

7 . . . g6 ?!
7 . . . e5 gives White a choice of transpositions Talk about asking for it - Black makes no
into various lines: attempt to address the situation in the centre
of the board:
8 . e 5 ! dxe5 9 . fxe5 lli fd7 I O . ll'l f3 ig7 1 1 .:!'!b I
V!id8

.1 .t. -
7 &6i" i)-
8

6 " " - - - - - " . . .


5 u. -
W"
4 . . . ..8 !....
-- -
3 ltj
b d f g h
;
?J
2 8 -''8 ' 8 1r
, ra1r1:
a c e

a) 8 . ll'l f3 reaches line A2 on page 8 5 .

h
b ) 8 . dxe6 fxe6 9.l:!b l Wc7 1 0 . ll'l f3 a6
b d f g
transposes to line A l 2 on page 83. a c e

c) 8.fxe5 is also liable to result in a 1 2.e6 fxe6 1 3 . ll'l g5 ll'l f6 1 4.ib 5 t ct?f8 1 5 .dxe6
transposition: 8 . . . dxe5 9 . ll'l f3 id6 (9 . . . lli bd7 a6 1 6.ie3 W!a5 1 7. 0-0 h6 1 8 .Wd3
1 0 .l:!b l V!fc7 transposes to line A222 on White keeps the pressure up and Black
page 88) 1 0 .ic4 ll'l bd7 1 1 .:!'!b l Wi'd8 transposes simply crumbles without ever getting into
to line A22 1 on page 87. the game.
82 Richard Pert - Playin g the Trompowsky

1 8 . . . <.:!?g8 1 9 .V!fxg6 ixe6 20.llixe6 Elh7 9 dxe5


.

2 1 .Elxf6! lli d7 22 .ixd7 9 . . . lli fd7?! looks far too passive: 1 0 .ie2!?
1 -0 Vaganian - Kupreichik, Leningrad dxe5 ( 1 O ... ixf3 1 l .exd6 exd6 1 2.ixf3 ie?
1 974. 1 3 .V!fe2 lli f6 1 4.g4!-t) l 1 . lli b 5 V!fd8 1 2. lli xe5
ixe2 1 3 .V!fxe2 lli xe5 1 4 . fxe 5
Al l) 7 ...V!f c7
10.fxe5 .ixf3 l I .Vffxf3 V!fxe5t 12 ..ie2

8
7 :,
. ;!ifJ-l,J-
,,.,,%.r r
6
,,
. , . , %- ,,,. %. , . ,. %
5 -
,., . % rn
4
-
3m iftJ
, . ,. % m

*' " 11 ."'

r& ilmfiR
,,

a b c d e f g h

This was discussed by Vilela in New in Chess


Yearbook 86, but it hasn't caught on. Black's
plan is to delay committing his minor pieces,
with the idea of meeting lli f3 with . . . ig4.

s.llif3 13.gbl g4 14.V!fd3 .ig7 15Jxb7 0-0 1 6.h3


8 .ib 5 t ? ! was Vilela's own choice in practice, The simple 1 6. 0-0! ?N;t should perhaps be
but it looks wrong to give up your light preferred.
squared bishop so cheaply: 8 . . . lli bd7 9 . lli f3 a6
1 0 .ixd7t lli xd7 1 1 . 0-0 g6 1 2 .e5 ig7 1 3 .e6 16 ... hS 1 7.hxg4 hxg4 1 8.g3 lli bd7 1 9 ..if4
fxe6 1 4.dxe6 lli f6 l 5 .We2 b5+ Vilela de Acuna White may still have an edge, though Ehlvest
- Gonzalez Vidal, Barcelona 2007. - Kudrin, Reno 200 5 , soon finished in a
draw.
8 ... .ig4 9.e5
I like this ambitious advance. A1 2) 7 ... e6 8.gbl V!fc7 9.f3 a6

9.h3!? also provides reasonable compensation, Black has also tried:


netting the bishop pair along with more 9 . . . exd5 1 0 .ib 5 t ! ?
space and a lead in development: 9 . . . ixf3 1 0 .e5!?N may b e even better: 1 0 . . . dxe5
1 0 .V!fxf3 a6 l l . a4 g6 1 2 .ic4 lli bd7 1 3 .a5 ig7 l l . fxe5 lli e4 1 2 .lli xd5 Wd8 1 3 .if4 lli c6
1 4 . 0-0 0-0 1 5 . lli a4 !!ae8 1 6 .!!ab l e6 1 7.dxe6 1 4 .ic4 and White's centralized pieces give
fxe6 1 8 .e5 dxe5 1 9 .Elxb7 V!f d6 20.V!f d3 V!f c6 him more than enough compensation for
2 l .ixa6 exf4 22. lli b6;t Solak - Romcovici, the pawn.
Calimanesti 1 999. 1 o . . . lli c6!?
.
Chapter 4 - 2 . . c5 3 . d 5 83

Th i s unlikely-looking move i s probably 1 1 .eS dxe5 1 2.fxeS g4 13.id3


Black's best try. White is ready to sacrifice a second pawn,
1 0 . . . .id? l I .e5 dxe5 1 2. fxe5 tll e4 1 3 .tll xd5;!; confident that his huge lead in development
and Black is way behind in development. will be sufficient for an advantage.

8
.a.A.
'SI jjW tk.W
i v , , a
!a'!

1 ,,, , ,/, m
Ui"B , , , , , % .i
. Y,m'
6
r%
s

lf r% lf m
%

4 . Ji 7:---- r
..
3 m.... ;'-r

8m
2 -8
, , , Y,W0-<.
8 r8%. %
...
'

l I . tll xd5 1 U M miV M


l l .exd5 a6 1 2.e2t ie7 1 3 .ia4 b5 a b c d e f g h
1 4.ixb5 axb5 1 5 .tll xb 5 d7 1 6 .dxc6 xc6
1 3 ... xeS
1 7 . 0-0 tll e4 1 8 .gfe l f5 1 9 .c4=
1 3 . . . c4 1 4.ie4 tll d7 ( 1 4 . . . ic5 1 5 . tll g5 .if2t
l I . . .tll xd5 1 2. exd5 a6 1 3 . .id3 til e? 1 6.'it>fl lll xe5 l 7.'kt>xfL. 0-0t 1 8 .'it>e l +- and the
1 3 . . . tll b4 1 4.ixb4 cxb4 1 5 . 0-0 .ie7 1 6.e2
white king is quite safe) 1 5 . 0-0 ic5 t 1 6.'it>h l
0-0 1 7.e4 g6 1 8 .xb4t
tll fL.t 1 7.gxfL. ixf2 l 8 .tll g5 tll xe5 1 9 .ixh?
1 4.c4;!; id4 20. tll ce4 White's attack is overwhelming
White's lead in development is well worth
and even returning the exchange will not save
a pawn.
Black. 20 . . . gxh? 2 1 . tll xh? tll f7 22.h 5 +-

1 3 . . . tll d? 1 4 .e2 tll dxe5 1 5 .tll xe5 tll xe5


1 6. 0-0 tll x d3 1 7. tll d5 e5 1 8 .Wxe5 tll xe5
1 9 . tll c?t 'kt>e7 20. tll xa8;!;

14.ie4 tli bd7


Black is also in serious danger after:
1 4 . . . id6
84 Richard Pert - Playin g the Trom powsky

1 5 . 0-0 0-0 1 5.0-0 tlif7


a) 1 5 . . . lll g4?! 1 6.lll g5!
b) 1 5 . . . lll xf3t ? ! 1 6.Wxf3 f8 ( 1 6 ... !i.xh2t?
Black hasn't got time for all this. 1 7. ii h 1 !i.e5
1 8 .ixb7 a7 1 9.!i.xc8 Wxc8 20.Wh5t +-)
1 7 .Wh5 t g6 1 8 .!i.xg6t!

8 .. ..:
.1 .t . . ,v,
7 ...
6 , .
J0
@.i'%""'"
..t

: 1

3Rm. . ,:0 -"'
-
8
. Y. %- . . %
. . .
>,

2 8D 8
1 g
a b cg hd e f g

1 8 . . . hxg6 1 9 .Wxg6t ii d7 20.xf8 ixf8 1 9.llixf7 iixf7 20.he5 !i.e7 2 1 .YNhSt @gs
2 1 .Wf7t+- 22.!i.xf6 gxf6 23Jxf6
c) 1 5 . . . g6 1 6. lll x e5 fi.xe5 1 6.Wf3! and White 1-0
has a huge initiative. Moskalenko - Erdogdu, Ankara 20 I 0 .
1 6 . lll xe5 xfl t 1 7.iixfl ixe5 1 8 .ixh?t!
iixh7 1 9 .Wh 5 t ii g8 20 .We8t iih7 2 1 .lll e4! A2) 6 ... e5

A u% i;
2 I .Wh 5 t is a draw by perpetual check, but

,y,

- - ' ., --
'l!i' -
White has much better.
2 l . . . !i.f4 22.b3 8 B. : .JL
w
7

'!S m W '
Threatening h3t.

6
22 ... e5 2 3 .ixf4 exf4 24.lll g5t @h6 2 5 . lll e6!

7:. .. .
,.,.,,
5 .,
ixe6 26.l.Wxe6t g6
,% 7: . . . . %

: m. i
r""
2 8 a 8 r[j 8 r[j

... .
r ;m.

-Vm!
'y

1 ,
b d f g h
,, , , , Y, ,,, , , % % ..

a c e

This move has been recommended for Black


by several authors, most recently Dembo in
Fighting the anti-King's Indians. Dembo's idea

27.Wf6!+- is at a later point to drop her queen back to


And 28.h3t will win. c7 and place her bishop on e7, with the idea
of transferring her knight to d6 to create a
blockade. However, we intend to scupper .
7 . . d6 s.tlia
those plans well before she gets a chance to do
all of that.

7.f4!
I believe that this is objectively White's best
choice, although you might feel a bit spoilt for
choice here as White has another way to act
against Black's plans involving . . . Wlc7.

7.Ei:b 1 ! ? Wlc7
Black can only choose this if he is happy
to draw, although White does not have to
take the draw but can instead claim a small
advantage.
7 . . . Wld8 8 . f4 d6 9 . lD f3 lD bd7 1 0 . fxe5 dxe5
would transpose to line A22 1 below.

. :st. -.--.
z tt

s

6 .....7.. . . . . .. .
7
z,,,,% % A2 1 ) 8 . . exf4

5
w
-i.i%ef"""
i-.i% lS A useful tip for White in this line is that before
4 %,,, - "---- recapturing on f4 he should first play Ei:b 1

2
mlS i lS
3 lS -


while the d2-bishop is dissuading . . . Wla5 .

8 f if!1 ',, , , , , :f"'x - -%

1 nra1mtn
a b c d e f g h
8 . lD b 5 ! Wlb6
Playing for the draw is the best option, but
it hardly going to appeal to Black if he is the
stronger player.
With 8 . . . Wld8 ? Black tries to play for the win
but it is about to go all wrong: 9 . d6! lD a6
1 0.ic4 g6 1 1 . lD f3 and Black is already in
serious trouble.
9 . f4!?
Of course taking the repetition with 9 . lD c3
Wlc7 1 0. lD b 5 is possible. 9.eS!?
9 . . . d6 1 0 . lD f3 lD bd7 White can also nudge the queen immediately:
1 0 . . . a6? 1 1 . lD xd6t Wlxd6 1 2 . fxe5+- 9.Ei:b l ! ? Wld8
1 1 . fxe5 dxe5 1 2 . lD a3 Wlc7 1 3 .id3 ie7 9 . . . Wlc7?! 1 0 .ixf4 ig4 l 1 . lD b 5 ! (stronger
1 4. lD c4;!; than 1 1 .h3 ixf3 1 2 .Wlxf3 a6 1 3 .ie2 lD bd7
White has a comfortable plus. 1 4.0-0, although this also gives White
86 Richard Pert - Playing the Tro m powsky

reasonable compensation) l l . . . a5t


1 2.d2 xd2t 1 3 . tll x d2 <i>d7 1 4.tll c4 and
Black was struggling to keep all the threats
under control in Pankov - Frolochkin, St
Petersburg 2009.
1 0 .ixf4 ie7

1 0.ixf4 dxe5 l I .tll x e5 tll x e5 l 2.ixe5 f6


l I .ib5 t
1 3 .ig3 (The immediate 1 3 .ib 5tN is also
White has more than o n e way t o demonstrate
interesting: 1 3 . . . id? 1 4.h 5 t d8! [ 1 4 . . . g6
compensation for the pawn :
l I .id3 0-0 1 2 .0-0 tll bd7 1 3 .h3 tll e8 1 4.e5
1 5 .e2] 1 5 .ixb8 ixb 5 1 6.ig3;!;) 1 3 . . . id6
l 4.ib5t Perunovic - Ostoj ic, Kragujevac
dxe5 l 5 .tll x e5 tll x e5 l 6.ixe5 id6 l 7.e2
2009.
Nguyen - Karatorossian, Budapest 2004.
l 1 . e5!?N dxe5 1 2.tll x e5 0-0 1 3 .ie2 offers
1 0 Yds
Both 1 0 . . . c? l I .tll b5 and
..

good compensation as Black has to keep an


1 0 . . . a5
eye out for d5-d6 at any moment, making it
1 I .tll b5 are clearly good for White.
hard for him to develop with . . . tll bd7.
1 1 . . .tll fd?
l l .ib5t J.d7 1 2ixf4
1 1 . . . tll bd? 1 2 . 0-0 0-0 1 3 .e5? This is the
Black is already struggling to contain White.
wrong moment as Black can now take with
his knight, easing the pressure on his position
A22) 8 ... bd7 9.fxe5 dxe5 lOJbl
by an exchange of pieces . ( 1 3 .a4 would
offer White reasonable compensation.)
13 ... tll x e5+ De Prado Rodriguez - Milchev,
Arteixo 2007.
1 2. 0-0 0-0 1 3 .e5 dxe5 1 4.tll x e5;!;
White held a slight advantage in Antidrome
- Tripy, Internet 20 1 2.

9 ... g4
After 9 . . . dxe5 1 0 .tll x e5 White keeps good
pressure, for example: 1 0 . . . id6 l I . tll c4 d8
1 2 .tll b 5
Chapter 4 - 2 . . . c5 3 . d 5 87

s
Black now withdraws the queen with A22 1 )
1. ,, ,, , ;/,
..ts
- v. ,, l,W

7 , , , , , ,
1 0 ...Wff d8 or A222) 1 0 ...Wff c7.

A22 1) 10 ...Wff d8
6
[
14
- -: Ii% ll -
5 m''8"."""-""'%
:i /i
% %'"//, -- , ,
This used to be considered Black's main choice,
but it fell a bit out of favour after the strong 4

3 - , mtt:Jm
:
grandmaster Nij boer lost twice at the hands of
up-and-coming youngsters.
2 /8 ,
1 1 .i.c4 i.d6
When the queen is on d8 , the bishop belongs
on d6 to blockade the d-pawn .
1
1:: M1W
a
ph;''
:m
b c d e f g h
1 4 ... a6
1 1 . . . i.e7?! I also looked at:
Black is mixing his systems here. 1 4 . . . lll b6
1 2 .ig5 h6? Black tries to untangle himself at the
Black should probably admit his mistake expense of weakening his protection of f6.
and play 1 2 . . . id6, accepting the loss of a 1 5 .Wd3!
tempo. I like the idea of not allowing Black to
1 3 .d6! exchange his bishop via . . . i.g4 .
Suddenly White breaks through with a 1 5 . . . lll xc4
decisive attack. After 1 5 . . . ig4 1 6.lll d2 g5 1 7.if2 ih5

tJj!.,,
-
1 8 .a4t Black's position is littered with
8

7 .... .
-n,,.,,
Y.. ... .
weaknesses for White to attack.

6 1 6.Wxc4 b6
. .. ... . .- .
% % . %

1 6 . . . a6 1 7.a4 b8 1 8 .Wd3t with lll d2-c4


5 -- ; % ""'"
% . . % , . ,.,
to come.

: i!-
%
1 7.a4 i.b7 1 8 . lll b5 We? 1 9 . lll d2 g5 20 .ig3
,.,,,

lll h5 2 1 .Wb3 lll f4 22.lll c4t

2 !., - --01.!
w----
.: if
1 5.a4 Wffa5
l 8- .l:
a b c d e f g h
1 5 . . . Wc? 1 6. lll d2 lll h7 was played in Avila
Jimenez - Movsziszian, Tarragona 2007, and
now 1 7.ie2!Nt intending lll c4 looks good.
1 3 . . . hxg5 1 4.lll xg5 0-0 1 5 . 0-0 lll b6 1 6.dxe7
Wxe7 l 7.xb6 axb6 1 8 . lll d5 lll xd5 1 9 .Wh5
1 6.i.el Wffd8 17.tll h4
Wxg5 20.Wxg5 lll f4 2 1 .Wxe5 ie6 22.xf4
White can of course repeat the position with
ixc4 23 .Wh5 xa2 24.h4 a l t 2 5 .@f2 f5
1 7.i.h4, but Nakamura has more ambitious
26.Wh7t @f7 27.exf5
ideas in mind.
1 -0 Bruzon - Nij boer, Wijk aan Zee 2004.
1 7 ... tli e8 1 8.tll fS
1 2.0-0 0-0 1 3.i.gS h6 14.i.h4
88 Richard Pert - Playing the Trom p owsky

8 .i jj
,,,,,/,]'!ll --
v,

38.ge4!! gf5 39.WxfS !xf5 40.gxc4 tlif4

7 F
41.e4 !8 42.xg3 !d7 43.tlih5

,,,,.
%

,
- ! .
1-0
6
- -
m ,, .,,
Nakamura - Nijboer, Wij k aan Zee 2004.

5 - --8
4 8t 8

A222) 10 ...Wc?

3 Dembo's recommendation, but Black is about



,, W/'"'1
to come under some serious pressure.

2 % ., . .flj
- .a: "if .a: =
1 1 . h5 Wbs
In Fighting the Anti-King's Indians, Dembo

b d f g h
says "Note that 1 1 . tll b5 is met, as explained
a c e
above by 1 1 . . . Wb8" and ends her analysis
White's passed d-pawn, his lead in there. But anyone blindly following her book,
development and greater space offer good which on the whole is very good, is about to
compensation for the pawn. Obviously there get a shock!
is plenty of play left here, but I favour White.
In the rest of the game White failed to keep Black's best is probably 1 1 . . .Wb6, begging for
control and Black gained a decisive advantage, a quick draw, but White should turn down
before he in turn went astray. I have given the repetition. We reached this position by a
the remaining moves so you can see how different move order in the note to White's
Nakamura triumphed in the end - it's worth 7th move on page 8 5 , and pointed out that
playing through if you have the time. 1 2 . tll a3 Wc7 1 3 .id3 ie7 1 4 . ll:i c4;!; gives
White a comfortable plus.
18 ... df6 1 9.e3 !e7 20.!g3 d6 2 1 .Wd3
tli d7 22.f5 i>h7 23Jf3 g6 24.xd6
!xd6 25.!fl f6 26.h3 h5 27.!e3 gbs
2s.gbfl f6 29.Wd2 g5 30.h4 g4 3 1 .g3f2
f5 32.exfS g3 33J'!f3 Wxh4 34.gel Wxc4
35.!xh6 !xf5 36.!xfS gxrs 37.Wg5 !g6

12 . . . tll xe4 1 3 . tll c7t d8 1 4 .llixa8 Wxa8


( 1 4 . . . ixd6 1 5 . tll g5 tll xg5 1 6 .ixg5t f6
Chapter 4 - 2 . . . c5 3 . d 5 89

1 7.ie3 ie3 1 8 .Wg4) 1 5 .ic4 lli xd6 1 6.id5;!;


Although Black has three pawns for the
exchange, White's huge lead in development
gives him the advantage.

1 3 ..ia5
White hits the d6-bishop, which cannot
move due to the need to keep the c7-square
under control.

13 ... rtle7
The other way of defending the bishop looks
very risky:
1 3 . . . ctJ xe4
I think it unlikely that Black would play this
in tournament play.

14 .. f8
J

1 4 . . . ctJe8 1 5 .ic4+-
1 4 . . . b6 1 5 . llixf7 <tlxf7 1 6.llixd6t <tle7
l 7 . ctJ f5 t;!;
1 4 . . . h6 1 5 . lli xf7 <tlxf7 1 6.tt::l xd6t <tlg6
1 7.ic4 <tlh7 1 8 . 0-0;!;

a b c d e f g h
1 4. lli g5 !
White aims t o deflect the e4-knight so that
he can pick off the d6-bishop.
1 4 . . . tt::l xg5
After 1 4 . . . lli df6 1 5 . lli xe4 lli xe4 1 6.Wd5
Black can save his piece with 1 6 . . . a6! but
then l 7 . ctJ xd6t llixd6 l 8 .Wxc5 lli f5 l 9 .ic7
Wa7 20.:B:b6;!; leaves the black queen shut
out.
l 5 . lli xd6t <tle7
l 5 . . . <tif8 1 6.llixb7 <tle7 l 7 . ctJ d8 Wd6
1 8 .Wxd6t <tixd6 1 9 .:B:d l t rj;; e 7 20.llic6t
'it>e8 2 1 .ic4;!;
1 6. lli f5 t <tif8 l 7.ia6 1 5 .. xf7?!
J

Black is totally tied down and has various Black should return material with 1 5 . . . 'it>xf7,
threats to worry about, including ixb7 though 1 6. lli xd6t is clearly good for White.
followed by Wxd7.
90 Richard Pert - Playing the Trompowsky

1 6.c!lixd6 Wxd6?! ixb2 1 3 . tll xd6t @e7 1 4.b l ( 1 4. tll ge4!?


Letting White demonstrate the point of his is interesting, as 1 4 ... ixa l ?! 1 5 .W/xa l leaves
combination, though by now Black's position the black king very exposed) 1 4 . . . lilxd6
.
is beyond saving: 1 6 . . tli b6 1 7. tll xf7 +- l 5 . tll e4t @c7

. -
:.A .tU.
s x B
.,/
17.i.dst
-- . ..%. iw..%
_]': . . . .... %
61 U.
This picks up the black queen.
A
17 ... xdS 1 8.Wxd6+-
5 -!
-
! "
-- - .!.

u. . . .
B) 3 ... d6 4.c!lic3 4

WA iw.WM WM;,
3
2 o n
o
?? ru?. o ru,,

1
m':f ii= { "m
"lt
h
r

a b c d e f g

Gormally now went for the throat with a


risky piece sacrifice. 1 6 .d6t (the sensible
l 6.xb2 should suffice for an advantage)
1 6 . . . ltic8 1 7. 0-0 id4 1 8 .c3 ic6 1 9 .Wid3
White went on to win in Gormally - Mason,
Canterbury 20 1 0, but at this stage it was not
at all clear.
7.id3 ig7 8 .tll f3 0-0 9 . 0-0 tll d7 1 0 .tll d2 a6
l l . a4 tll e5 1 2 .ie2 f5

s i. U..t%
4 ... g6

6 ------ .,v,,
r
l - .
Black has also tried:
7
,.
4 . . . h6?!

s L-"f
To be honest, I am amazed how often this

"" ' " ' - -


move has been played - it looks all wrong to
me as Black takes time to force us to play a
move that we want to play anyway!
: i m i
2 efw.-8 ,, .,,,/, W-"''
'm.iJ 8 efw.-
Funnily enough, the two games I have

,- - ?.
-v-:m 3
chosen to illustrate this line, Gallagher -
Knott and Gormally - Mason, both won 1 .
b d f g h
,,. . . /,
prizes (for White!) as "Game of the Day" a c e

in the British Championships, in 200 1 and


1 3 . exf5 gxf5
20 1 0 respectively.
Black can't recapture his pawn with
5 .ixf6 exf6 6.e4 g6
l 3 . . . ixf5 as his pieces gets in a tangle: l 4 . f4
With 6 . . . f5 Black sacrifices a pawn, and
tll d7 l 5 . g4 and the bishop drops.
whilst the bishop pair does give him some
1 4 .a5 b5 1 5 . axb6 Wlxb6 1 6.a2 e8 1 7.@h l
compensation, I have to favour White.
Wd8 1 8 . f4 tll g4 1 9 .ixg4 fxg4 20.tll ce4 f5
7.ib 5 t tll d7 8 . exf5 ie7 9 . tll ge2 a6
2 1 .tll g3 a7 22. tll c4t
1 0 .ixd7t ixd7 l 1 .tll g3 if6 1 2. tll ce4
Chapter 4 - 2 . . . c5 3 . d 5 91

Gallagher - Knott, Scarborough 200 1 ; 6 ... 0-0


White's position is preferable as he has the Although this is natural, Black may prefer
better pawn structure. not to submit to a kingside attack and instead
search for an alternative:
5.e4 6 . . . Wb6!? 7.ib 5 t
White intends to take a very direct approach 7.id3!?N may be appropriate for the more
against Black's fianchetto. attack-minded player: 7 . . . Wxb2 8 .Elb l Wa3
9 .tll f3
s ....ig7 6.VNd2 7 . . . id7 8 . a4 ixb 5 9 . axb5 lll bd7
White may also look to expand on the
kingside:
6 . f4 ! ?

a b c d e f g h
1 0 .lll f3N

h
1 O .ih6? is too direct and doesn't fir in with
b d f g
a c e
White's previous three moves in which she
6 . . . h6!? was playing positionally on the queenside:
Immediately putting the question to the 1 0 . . . 0-0 l 1 . lll ge2 ixh6 1 2 .Wxh6 a6
white bishop seems a critical option for 1 3 .bxa6 Wxb2! 1 4. 0-0 Elxa6+ Stefanova -
Black. Vallejo Pons, Gibraltar 20 1 1 .
6 . . . 0-0 7. tll f3 a6 (7 . . . b5 8 .ixb 5 tll xe4 1 0 . . . 0-0 1 1 . 0-0 a6 1 2. bxa6 Elxa6 1 3 .Elxa6
9 . tll xe4 Wa5t 1 0 .@fl;j; Bosiocic - Rezan, Wxa6 1 4.h3 Ela8 1 5 .b3
Sibenik 2008) 8 . a4 tll h5 9 . f5 tll d7 1 0 .ie2 White has a slight initiative.
Elb8 1 1 . 0-0 lll hf6 1 2 .We l Ele8 1 3 .Wh4;!;
With ih6 and tll g5 on the cards, White has
attacking chances, Hodgson - Hjarrarson,
Bermuda 1 997.
7.ih4 Wa5
7 . . . Wb6 8 .ib5t id7 9 . a4 a6 1 0.a5t
8 .Wd2 lll h5 9 .ib5 t id7 1 0 .ixd7t tll xd7
l l . tll ge2 tll xf4! l 2.Wxf4
1 2.tll xf4 g5 1 3 . tll h5 ixc3 1 4. bxc3 gxh4
l 5 .tll g7t is also unclear.
1 2 . . . g500
Gelashvili - Kourkounakis, Leros 2009.
92 Richard Pert - Playing the Trompowsky

7.ih6! hh6 8.%Vxh6 a6 9.tlif3 tli bd7 Conclusion: It has to be said that White gets
10.tligS ges 1 1 .ie2 tlif8 12.h4 excellent play for the pawn in the various lines
White's Route One tactics will prove difficult of the Vaganian Gambit. So much so that I
for Black to stop. imagine even the more risk-averse of you
might be willing to give it a go! The key thing
to remember when investing material for an
attack is always look to develop; if you apply
that principle then White will have ample
compensation. I would draw your attention
once again to the strength of the novelty
l 2.d6!N in line A222 I reckon that readers
-

of Dembo's book will have to go back to the


drawing board on this one.
By contrast, B) 3 . . d6 is a much more solid
.

approach, but I hope that our quick look has


given you some ideas on how to play for the
attack against it.
Chapter 5

2 ... e4 3.if4 c5 4.d5

1 .d4 f6 2.i.g5 e4 3.i.4 c5 4.d5

A) 4 ... e6 5.f3 95
Al) 5 ... f6 95
A2) 5 ... i.d6 96
B) 4 ... 11Mb6 98
Bl) 5.d2!? 98
B l l) 5 ... xd2 98
B l 2) 5 ... 11Mxb2 1 00
B2) 5.i.cl 1 03
B2 1) 5 ... g6 1 03
B22) 5 ... e6 1 04
94 Richard Pert - Playing the Trompowsky

1 .d4 tll f6 2.i.g5 tll e4 3.i.f4 c5

a b c d e f g h
White now has an important choice to make:

So we move on to the main line. Black a) s.tll d2!? sacrifices the b2-pawn for an
first hits our bishop with his knight and then initiative. It is very much in the spirit of the
attacks our centre with . . . c5, at the same time Trompowsky and I will focus on this line.
creating a route for his queen to join the party.
I have covered several choices for White from b) 5.i.cl provides a more solid, though slightly
here, some sacrificial and some more solid, so bizarre-looking option, which seems to offer
you can choose whichever you feel best suits White good prospects of an advantage. Note
your playing style. that this line should be looked at together
with line B3 l in the next chapter, which arises
4.d5 after 4.f3 '1Wa5 t 5 . c3 tli f6 6.d5 '1Wb6 7.ic l ;
If you choose to meet 2 . . . c5 with 3.d5 then often the only difference between the lines is
you should make sure you have this line in your whether the white pawn is on c2 or c3 .
repertoire, as you can then get this position by
a direct transposition after 3 . . . tli e4 4.if4. If
you are looking to cut down on the number
of lines you have to learn, then opting for the
current line along with 2 . . . c5 3 . d5 should save
you some studying time.

4.f3 will be covered in the next chapter. It can


also lead to a choice between sacrificial and
solid lines.

4 ...b6
4 . . . e6 is a key alternative which we
will examine. I have a couple of major
improvements for White in this line.
1 .d4 tll f6 2.J.gS tll e4 1 2 . lD bc3 lD d7 1 3 .0-0-0 llJ f6 1 4 .h4 Wh8 1 5 .h5
I would remind you chat 2 . . . c5 3.d5 llJ e4 lD fxh5 1 6.g4 llJ f6 1 7 . lD g3t White built up the
4.if4 transposes co our main line. pressure co boiling point and won a good game
in Summerscale - B. Lalic, Coulsdon 1 999.
3.J.4 c5 4.d5
We shall examine A) 4 e6 and B) 4 'Wb6,
.. . A) 4 ...e6 5.f'3
after first looking at a few minor alcernatives.

4 . . . Wa5t 5 . c3 ( 5 . lD d2 is also possible: 5 . . . d6


6.c3 lDxd2 7.Wxd2 llJ d7 8 . e4 g6 9 . llJ f3 ig7
1 0 .ih6 0-0 l l .id3 llJ f6 1 2 .ixg7 c;!<xg7
1 3 . 0-0 ig4 1 4. llJ e l id? 1 5 . lD c2 Salgado
Lopez - Giri, Internet 2008) 5 . . . Wb6 (5 . . . d6
6.f3 llJ f6 7.e4 transposes co line B2 of the next
chapter) 6 . llJ d2 llJ xd2 7.Wxd2 d6 8 . e4 White
has a clear edge.

4 . . . g6 5 . f3 llJ f6 6.e4 ig7 7 . lD c3 0-0 8 .Wd2


Michael Adams cakes a direct route similar co
the 1 5 0 Attack against the Pirc. This fantastic
game indicates how quickly White can get on
cop if Black cakes a casual approach.

8.i llY..tN!z - 5 ... Wa5t 6 . c3 lD f6 7.e4 transposes to line B l

67 .
Wi-- ., _ ....
.iv.lf i in the next chapter (see page 1 1 3) .

n ' .
.
,, . . . . % %

5 . . . Wf6 is rather messy, but i t should end up

!
in White's favour: 6.ixb8 Wxb2 7 . fxe4 Wxa l
.,!
- -
8 .ig3 Wxa2 9 . e3 b5 1 0 . llJ f3 ib7 l l .ie2
3
...
%
Wa5t 1 2 . llJ bd2 exd5 1 3 . 0-0 f6 1 4. exd5 and

_ . z.,_ , .z.:1
2 !n-, .! White's advantage was clear in Nikolaev -
l
Kopasov, Sc Petersburg 2002.

a b c d e f g h AI) 5 tll f6 6.e4 exd5 7.exd5 d6


..

8 . . . d6 9 .ih6 ixh6 1 0 .Wxh6 e6 l l . O-O-O exd5


1 2. exd5 a6 1 3 . llJ ge2 b5 1 4. llJ g3 :i'!e8 1 5 . llJ ce4
lDxe4 1 6 . llJxe4 f5 1 7.llJg5 We? 1 8 .ixb 5 !
We3t 1 9 .Wb l :i'!e7 20.ie8 1 -0 Adams - Ki .
Georgiev, Burgas 1 993.

4 ... d6 5 . f3 llJ f6 6.e4 e5 (6 ... g6 7.lDc3 ig7


8.Wd2 0-0 9 .ih6 transposes co the above
Adams game) 7.ie3 ie7 8 . lD e2 0-0 9.c4 The
game has taken on the contours of a Czech
Benoni. 9 . . . llJ e8 1 0 .Wd2 g6 1 1 .ih6 lDg7

a b c d e f g h
96 Richard Pert - Playing the Trompowsky

s.ib5t!? Black, but chat was a lacer stage of the game


8 . tLl c3 is of course possible coo: 8 . . . ie7 and it was his opponent who missed the first
9 . lli ge2 0-0 1 0. tLl g3 ge8 l l .ie2 a6 1 2 .a4 chance.
lli bd7 1 3 . 0-0 if8 1 4.Wi'd2;!; Stefanova -
Areshchenko, Gibralcar 2006.

8 ... lli bd7 9.Ye2t Wi'e7 1 0.tlic3 a6 1 1 .!xd?t


@xd7
l l . . .ixd7 1 2 . 0-0-0 Wi'xe2 1 3 . tLl gxe2 0-0-0
1 4.g4 White has a small bur clear advantage
in the endgame and she steadily builds up her
position.


67 lt -., ,
8

. c,J. . . J
4
s

. . .
.r. . z.
8w2t


z


3 w ..... : W"{i
.
.. .
2 8 8 ttJ
i

. r.F . 0 ..

. r. - 1 8 .gS ie7 1 9 .gxh6 gxh6 20.ge2 f5 2 1 . tLl g3
a b c d e f g h lli g7 22.gg2 was unclear in Rodriguez Vila -
So, Khancy-Mansiysk (ol) 20 1 0 .
1 4 . . . h6 1 5 . h4 b5 1 6 . lli g3 b4 1 7. lli b l ie7
1 8 . c4 lli h7 1 9 .gde l if8 20.llid2 g6 2 1 . tLl de4
1 8 ... tli c7 1 9.b4 c4 20.h4 !e7 2 1 .ge2 ghe8
ie8 22.ge2 White's advantage was already
22.@b2;!;
of decisive proportions in Scefanova -
White has control of the board and a
T. Kosintseva, Krasnocurinsk 2006.
potential a3-a4 break on the cards.

12.0-0-0 Wi'xe2 13.tligxe2 b5 14.g4 A2) 5 ... !d6


The immediate 1 4. lli g3 ! ? also looks strong.

14 ... !b7 1 5.tlig3 h6 1 6.tlige4 tli eS 17Jhel


gds
We have been following a game by Wesley
So, and I remember chatting with him on
the internee about chis game. He had been
watching me play blitz - it seemed odd co
me chat he spent his morning preparation
watching ochers play blitz, but I remember
he went out and thrashed Ray Robson in the
afternoon, so it seemed co work.
In chis game he felc he was doing well with
This move has been seen as quite a tricky this opening to great effect on the club scene
move for White to face, and in their books Joe when I was growing up as a kid. 8 . . . 0-0 9 .Wi'd2
Gallagher, Richard Palliser and Pete Wells all Wa5 1 0. lli h3 White comes up with the clever
highlighted it as a potential problem for White. idea of developing his knight to f2, so that
Hopefully my new analysis presented here will his bishop can keep an eye on the c4-square
offer White prospects of an advantage. to stop the d6-knight getting into the game.
10 .. . f6 l l . l'll f2 a6 1 2.i.e2 lll f7 1 3 . 0-0 d6
6.i.xd6 lll xd6 7.e4 1 4.a3 l'll d7 1 5 .i'l:fb l b5 1 6. b4 cxb4? ( 1 6 . . . Wc?
White's choice of move order is important, as l 7.a4) l 7.axb4 We? l 8 . lli xb 5 +- Munson -
can be appreciated by looking at the inaccurate Jo. Hodgson, England 20 1 0 .
alternative:
7 . lli c3 ? ! 8.b3 f5 9.lll c3 fxe4

A w
; ...e...,
,
!aa
9 . . . 0-0 1 0 .Wd2 e5 ( 1 0 . . . fxe4 l 1 .fxe4 Wb4
8
.a. ; .JL
- --.%- /..,.
! --%
1 2 .a3 Wd4 1 3 . tll f3 Wi'xd2t 1 4. @xd2) l l .i.d3

6
%
f4 ( l l . . . fxe4 1 2. fxe4 lll f7 1 3 .l'll f3 d6 1 4. a4)

,, Q, -t '-

% 1 2 .lll ge2

5 @.
%
: m !

2 !8 ' ! !
1 ef . . % 1!i
a b c d e f g h
7 . . . W/h4t!N
I found this seriously strong new move a
long time ago, but it has yet to appear in a
serious game.
8 . g3 Wi'b4
I remember beating Nakamura as Black in
a blitz game in this variation in Gibraltar
2005 - something which doesn't happen
very often!
9 .i'l:b l
9 . dxe6 dxe6 l l .Wfxd6 Wi'xb2 favours Black.
9 . . . lli b 5
1 0 ... exf3?!
9 . . . lli c4 1 0 .e4 lli a3 ! also looks interesting.
This natural-looking move runs into trouble
1 0 .dxe6 dxe6 l l .Wi'd2 lli xc3 1 2 .Wi'xc3 Wxc3 t
as Black falls behind White in the race to
1 3 . bxc3 b6 1 4. e4 <tt> e7+
develop.

7 Wb6

1 0 . . . Wi'b4 l l .a3 Wd4 1 2 . fxe4 is better for
7 . . . e 5?! 8 . tll c3 transposes into a game played
White as . . . lli xe4 is not possible here.
by Shaun Munson, a former clubmate of
mine in Ipswich. I remember Shaun using
1 1 .lll xf3 0-0 1 2.0-0-0 lll f5 1 3.i.c4 lll a6
98 Richard Pert - Playing the Tro m powsky

1 4Jhfl exchange knights with BU) 5 ... lLlxd2 or


take the proffered pawn immediately by
Bl2) 5 ... VNxb2.

B U ) 5 ... tLlxd2

This is most common but I am not sure if it's


best.

6.i.xd2

B) 4 ...VNb6

6 ...VNxb2
Black really has to take the pawn here;
otherwise he will find himself worse off as
White has more space.

6 . . . e5 7.e4
Plaskett simply develops, ignoring the
b2-pawn, confident chat White will gain
compensation should Black cake the pawn
at any point. Jim Plaskett was present at the
The critical move, giving White a decision Pere - Hunt game given below, and at the
to make about the b2-pawn; he may sacrifice it post-match evening meal he assured me chat
by Bl) 5.tLld2!? or defend it with B2) 5.i.cl . chis is right way to play.
7 .i.c3 was played in a recent game and is a
Bl) 5.llid2!? solid alternative: 7 . . . d6 8 . e4 i.e7 9 . lLi f3 0-0
I O .i.d3 Gareev - Mikhalevski, Las Vegas

I like chis move with which White takes the 20 1 2; if anyone is better it must be White,
fight to his opponent. Black can now first but it's not a lot.
7 e6
.

White also has good chances if Black opts to


fianchetto :
7 . . . g6 8 .gb l W/f6
8 . . . Wi'xa2 ? ? 9 .i.c3 +-
8 . . . W/e5 9 .id3 c4 1 0. tt:\ f3 Wi'c7 l l .i.e2 ig7
1 2 . 0-0 d6 1 3 .gb4 ig4 1 4 .gxc4 S. Ernst -
Scholz, Germany 2007
9 . tt:\ f3 d6

b d f g h s ,i .t. &
.
-"'-.-,Y. ,
a c e

7
" " .... 7.B '
7 . . . d6
6

5 -
7 . . . Wi'xb2? 8 . tt:\ f3 d6 9.gb l +- and the black

% -'>.....
queen is in trouble.
8 .i.d3 tt:\ d7 9 . tt:\ e2 g6 1 0 . c4 i.g7 1 l .Wi'c2 a6

43
''
o o ir'Af
1 2 .gb l 0-0 1 3 . 0-0 h8 1 4.a3
White had a clear advantage and went on 7.

1 imlmt_,
to win a good game, Plaskett - Hjartarson, 2 o
Reykj avik 1 992.
a b c d e f g h
6 ... d6 7.e4 e5 8 . dxe6 (8 .i.d3 is Plaskett's
approach and probably right, nevertheless l O .gb3
my method proved sufficient for an edge) When I played this line it became apparent
8 . . . ixe6 9 .ic3 tt:\ c6 1 0 . tt:\ e2 0-0-0 l 1 . tt:\ f4 to me how much pressure White can apply
tt:\e5 1 2.ie2 g5 1 3 . tt:\ xe6 fxe6 1 4 .ig4 ge8 with simple development.
1 5 .ixe5 dxe5 1 6. 0-0 R. Pert - A. Hunt, 1 0 . . .ig7 l l .i.b5t tt:\ d7 1 2. 0-0 h6 1 3 .i.c3
West Bromwich 200 5 . Wxc3 1 4.gxc3 i.xc3 1 5 .e5
R. Pert - Jaunooby, Hastings 20 1 1 . White
7.e4 has netted the black queen and continues
White has fantastic compensation for the to build pressure on the undeveloped black
pawn and stands better in my view. position.

8.lif3 exd5 9.exd5 i.e7


9 . . . d6? 1 0 .gb 1 Wf6 l Li.b 5 t tt:\d7 1 2 . 0-0
i.e7 1 3 .ge l h6 1 4.We2 and the king is in a
mess: 1 4 . . . @d8 1 5 .ixd7 @xd7 1 6.ic3 Wxc3
1 7.Wi'xe7#

10.gbl
Once again we see Jim Plaskett play this line
with real aggression.

1 0 .6
l l .ic3
..

1 0 . . . Wxa2 Threatening ga l .
l 1 . . .Wa4 1 2 .id3 0-0 1 3 . 0-0 d6 1 4 .ge l
1 00 Richard Pert - Playing the Trompowsky

White's compensation is massive. 1 4 . . . id8 This option is slightly less common, but may
1 5 .Wi'd2 Wl'g4 1 6 .h3 Wi'h5 1 7.Wi'f4 Wi'h6 be Black's best.
1 8 .Wi'xh6 gxh6 1 9 .id2 l!.ig7 20 .if4 ic7
2 1 .E'!:e7 lll d7 22.ll\ h4;!; and White is cranking 6.t!Jxe4 Wl'b4t 7.c3
up the pressure. This rare line is a speciality of Teimour
Radjabov. I prefer it to the main alternative of
7.Wl'd2 because it allows White to keep an eye
on both the b4- and a4-squares. No matter how
unlikely it seems at the moment, having control
of those additional squares may mean that
White can trap the black queen in the middle
of the board at a future point in the game.

7 ... Wl'xe4 8.e3 g5


This is widely regarded as strongest, though
Black has tried various other moves:

8 . . . b 5 ? ! was the choice of Areshchenko, a


strong grandmaster, but it seems too slow:
9 . lll f3 c4

s ,ij_ . , Y..,
.. . , . , % .... %. ..... %.
, .

14 ...Ag4 1 5.Ac3 J.xf3 16.Axf6 J.xd1 ,. . . %..


67 .
5 ,
17.J.xe7 ge8 1 8.gxb7 Ag4 19.AbS t!Ja6
20.J.xa6 Ac8 2 1 .@fl
4 r 1

1-0
Plaskett - Hebden, London 1 987.
3 . 't%''"% 't%J7:,. ,':f. %
'"--
2 87: . .

-J- -- %L .. ':
Vlt
Bl2) 5 ...Wi'xb2 >" " '

1
a b c d e f g h
I O .ie2 ( I O .Wi'd4!?N looks interesting as
after 1 0 . . . Wi'xd4 1 1 .lll xd4 a6 1 2 .a4 Black's
queenside falls: 1 2 . . . ib7 1 3 .e4 e6 1 4.axb 5;!;)
1 0 . . . d6 1 1 . 0-0 ib7 1 2. lll d2 Wi'f5 1 3 .E'!:b l
Wi'd7 1 4 .ig4 Wl'c7 1 5 .E'!:xb5 a6 1 6 .E'!:b4 ixd5
1 7.if3;!; Radj abov - Areshchenko, Moscow
200 5 .

8 . . . d 6 9 . lll f3 Wi'f5 1 0 .a4 ( I O .id3 Wi'f6 l 1 .Wi'b3


h6 1 2 . 0-0 g5 1 3 .ig3 ig7 1 4 .E'!:ac l ) 1 0 . . . g6
1 I .id3 Wi'f6 1 2 .Wi'b3 lll d7 1 3 .lll d2 ig7
1 4. ll\ e4;!; M. Popovic - Bojovic, Senta 2009.
8 . . . e6 9 .ig3
This move is reasonably common, but it The untested 9 . f3 ! ? may also lead to an
doesn't look good to me. interesting game: 9 . . . Wf5 I O.id3 Wf6
9 . c4 exd5 l l .ig3 d6 ( l I . . . e4 1 2 .ixe4 Wfxc3 t
1 3 . @f2;j;) l 2 .lll e2 ie7 1 3 . 0-0 0-0 l 4.f4 t
and White has active play for the pawn.
9 . dxe6 was my choice against Hebden,
and whilst it offers some compensation for
the pawn, White cannot really claim any
advantage: 9 . . . Wxe6 I O . lll f3 ie7 l I .id3
tll c6 1 2 . 0-0 d6 1 3 .ic2 id7 1 4.b l 00 R.
Pere - Hebden, Hastings 2006.
9 ... d6 1 0 .tll f3 tll d7
I also analysed:

b d f g h
a) 1 0 . . .Wg6 l l .id3 f5 1 2.Wfa4t id7
a c e
( 1 2 . . . tll d7? 1 3 .tll h4 Wf6 1 4. lll xf5;!;) and
1 O . tll f3! now:
I came up with this very strong idea; White a l ) 1 3 .Wib3 b6 1 4 .tll d2 ie7 1 5 . 0-0
ignores pawns and goes for development. intending 1 5 . . . e4 1 6.ib5;!; or 1 5 . . . 0-0
1 0 . . . dxc4 1 6.ixe5 dxe5 1 7.d6tt.
1 O . . . d4 is also met by simple development: a2) 1 3 .ib5 ie7 1 4.b l
l I .id3 Wfe6 1 2 . 0-0 dxe3 1 3 .e l Wb6 b ) I O . . . ie7 l I .id3 Wg4 1 2 .h3 Wf d7
1 4 .xe3t+- and even at this early stage in 1 3 .Wib l ! ? Threatening ib5 and keeping
the game, White's lead in development is an eye on the h7-pawn and the f5-square.
decisive. 1 3 . . . Wd8 1 4. 0-0
l I . tll g5 Wff5 1 2.ixc4 d5 1 3 .ixd5 f6 1 4.if7t
@e7 l 5 .Wd6#
' -
1 (V i 'll i W
8
i
6 , ..% - ". , , %
%,
Antidrome - Nazari, Internet 2009.

8 . . . e5 0. 0.
5 8 .
ef"3-0
This is a critical alternative and was the
4
-- - - "-W0 W$B
-
choice of GM Mark Hebden against me.
3 . t et)
0
8 - - - " "Oiwt!
1 g .1k it
2 -----

a b c d e f g h
l I . tll g5N
After l l .c4 Wg6 1 2.id3 Wh6 1 3 . tll d2 ie7
1 4 . 0-0 0-0 1 5 . f4 f5 White did not have
enough for the pawn in Kiik - Sepp, Tallinn
1 997.

b d f g h
l 1 . . .Wg6 1 2. h4 ie7 1 3 .id3 Wh6 1 4. f4 g6
a c e
1 4 . . . 0-0 ?! l 5 .ixh7tt
1 02 Richard Pert - Playing the Trompowsky

1 4 . . . lll f6? 1 S . fxeS dxeS 1 6.d6


l S .l:!b l
White has good compensation for the pawn .

a b c d e f g h
9.ig3
9 .ixgS ?! WeS favours Black.

9 ... ig7 lOJkl d6


1 0 . . . e6 l l . c4! exdS 1 2 .tll f3 d4 1 3 .id3
We7 1 4. 0-0 looked very strong for White in
Antidrome - pisher, Internet 2009.

10 ... bS 1 I . lll f3 g4 1 2. lll d2 WxdS 1 3 .Wxg4


0-0

s E.i. -- y,m
1 4 .ibSt
7 6"""
6 7.
z.... -
-
i "
1 4.c4N looks interesting, aiming to keep

-- % ii'-
,
the black queen stuck in the middle of the

5 t
board: 1 4 . . . WeS (normal developing moves

4 l" "
@. such as 14 . . . id??! run into trouble: 1 S .id3

3 t w


0 - "Mies 1 6.lll e6) 1 S .lll e6 Wb2 1 6.lll xg?t

,f-
"J:
F,{ "fA't*'
( 1 6.lll c?t ?! d8 1 7.lll xa8 ic3t 1 8 .l:!xc3
2 0
' =:r iCiz 0 iQ
Wxc3t 1 9 .Wd2 "Mla l t isn't what we want)
1 1 6 . . . Wxg? 1 7.Wc2 id? 1 8 .id3 White has

b d f g h
good compensation for the pawn.
a c e
1 4 . . . id? 1 S .ixd?t lll xd7 1 6 ."Mfxg4 l:!g8
1 4.ixbS ! N ( 1 4.e4 Wxa2 l S .ixbS was less l 7.We2 ieS 1 8 . f300
clear in Fontaine - Gladyszev, Val Thorens Radj abov - Vachier-Lagrave, Moscow 20 1 0 .
2006) 1 4 . . . Wxg2 1 S .e2 dS 1 6.WhS lll d7
1 7 .l:!hg l lll f6 1 8 .WgS Wh3 1 9 .ieS Black is 1 1 . . .Wg6
facing problems on the g-file. l l . . .g4 1 2 .id3 ixc3 t 1 3 .l:!xc3 "Mlb4
Chapter 5 - 2 . . . ltJ e4 3 .if4 c5 4 . dS 1 03

1 4.Wc2 gxf3 1 5 .gxf3 offers White sufficient if White plays his pawn c4 at a later stage there
compensation. can be a direct transposition between the two
lines.
12.h4
White can also consider: 1 2 .id3 fS Black now chooses between B2 1) 5 g6 and ..

( 1 2 . . . ifS ? 1 3 .e4 ixe4? 1 4.Wa4t+-) 1 3 . h4 h6 B22) 5 ... e6.


1 4 .Wc2t
B2 1 ) 5 ... g6 6.f3
1 2 ... gxh4
l 2 . . . h6 will transpose to the previous note:
1 3 .id3 fS 1 4.Wc2t

13.id3 f5

6 . . . ltJ f6 7.e4 d6 8 . c4 transposes to line B3 1 1 of


the next chapter on page 1 22.

7.e4 ig7 s.ltJc3


8 . ltJ d2 looks a little strange, but it was clearly
prepared by Bauer against an opponent who
had previously played this exact line: 8 . . . 0-0
9 . f4 e6 1 0.eS ltJ fS 1 1 . ltJ c4 Wd8 l 2.dxe6 dxe6
1 4 ...f7 1 5.a4t id7 1 6.b3 b6 17.if4 1 3 .Wxd8 :gxd8 1 4. c3 b6 1 5 . lLi f3 ib7 1 6.ie2
I prefer White here as it looks awkward for
ltJ d7 1 7. 0-0 f6 1 8 .g4;t; Bauer - Vachier
Black to develop any of his pieces.
Lagrave, Pau 20 1 2.

B2) 5.icl 8 ... 0-0


Black may also attack the centre immediately:
White decides to hold on to the b2-pawn. As 8 . . . fS 9 .exfS
I mentioned at the start of this chapter, this 9 .We2 has also been tried: 9 . . . fXe4 1 0 . fXe4
line should be studied in conj unction with line Wb4 1 1 .eS ltJ fS 1 2.id2 ltJ d4 1 3 .We4 Wxb2
B3 1 in the next chapter, which arises after 4.f3 1 4.:gb 100 J. Gomez - Sadorra, Manila 2008.
Wa5 t 5 .c3 lLi f6 6.dS Wb6 7.ic l . In particular, 9 . . . ltJxfS
1 04 Richard Pert - Playing the Trompowsky

l l ... a6
1 l . . .ixb2 1 2 .Elb l WaS t 1 3 .id2 Wxa2
1 4.c3;l; leaves the black bishop in trouble.

1 2.c3 t[) c7 13.a4 t[) es 1 4.i.e2 t[)f6 1 5.0-0


d6 1 6.i.c4 i.d7 17.'ife2 fae8 18.t[)eg5
White has taken a very sensible approach
and stands better, Stefanova - Stellwagen,
Wij k aan Zee 2004.

a b c d e f g h B22) 5 ... e6 6.f3


1 0 .g4! ?
1 0 .lll e4 0-0 1 I .lll h3 makes some sense,
transposing to the main line.
1 0 .id3 0-0 1 1 .ixfS lhf5 1 2.lll ge2 c4
1 3 .lll g3 and now:
a) 1 3 . . . ixc3t 1 4.bxc3 i'!eSt I S .lll e4 WaS
Mensch - Beck, Germany 2008; here
1 6.d6N;l; gives White an edge.
b) 1 3 . . . i'!f8 is safer, and 1 4.We2 was level in
Adams - Gelfand, Cap D' Agde (rapid) 2003.
I O . . . lll h6
1 0 . . . lll d6!? 1 I .h4 c4 1 2.lll ge2 lll a6 1 3 .hS
a b c d e f g h
Elf8 1 4 .ig2 looks messy!
1 I .d6 e6 1 2.lll bS lll a6 1 3 .h4! ?--+
1 3 .if4 Wc6 1 4.ixh6 ixh6 1 S .c4 0-0 1 6. h4 6 ...Wa5t!?
if4 1 7.hS ig3t00 McShane - Kotronias, This was the choice of Kasparov himself, so
Gibraltar 2003. it needs to be taken seriously.
1 3 . . . Wc6?! 1 4.hS
Karhanek - D . Schwarz, Frydek Mistek 6 . . . lll f6 7.e4 exdS 8.exdS
2004.

9.t[)h3 f5 1 0.exfS t[)xfS n . t[) e4

a b c d e f g h
8 . . . d6
8 . . . id6 9 .lll a3 ! ? leads to an interesting pawn
sacrifice: 9 . . . Wb4t 1 0 .Wd2 Wxd2t l I .ixd2

a b c d e f g h
tlJxd5 1 2. lll b5 ie7 1 3 . ttJ e2 lll a6 1 4 .lll ec3 10.dxe6
lll xc3 1 5 .fi.xc3 0-0 1 6.fi.c4 d5 1 7 .ixd5 This is White's latest attempt, and in this
lll b4 1 8 .ixb4 cxb4 1 9 . 0-0-0t Yemelin - recent game White eventually managed to get
Chytilek, Czech Republic 20 1 2 . an advantage.
9 . lll c3
This is an additional option open to White 10 ... i.xe6 1 1 .tlia3 tli c6 12.tlic4 Yffc7
with this move order. 1 2 . . .ixc4 1 3 .ixc4 lll e5 1 4 .ie2 0-0
9 . c4 offers a direct transposition to line l 5 .lll h3t
B3 1 24 of the next chapter on page 1 27.
9 ... g6 1 0 .ib 5 t id7 1 1 .We2t d8 1 2 .a4 ig7 13.hffi gxf6 14.tlie3 0-0-0 15.tlid5 Yff d7
1 3 .Wi'f2 1 6.i.b5 ghg8 17.fl f5 1 8.exf5 i.xf5
The immediate 1 3 .a5!?N is worth 19.tfie2 gde8 20.tC!g3 i.ds 21 .tC!xf5 xf5
considering. 22.g3 h5 23.d3 Yffg5 24.4 g4 25.tll e3
1 3 . . . lll a6 1 4 .a5t Yff e6 26Jhel;!;
Stefanova - Makropoulou, Chalkida 2009. Yemelin - Hartikainen, Finland 20 1 2 .

7.c3 tli f6 8.e4 d6 9.i.g5!? Conclusion: After 4 . . . e 6 5 . f3 the tricky A2)


9 . ttJ a3 ? ! exd5 1 0 . exd5 ie7 1 l .ttJ c4 Wd8 5 . . . id6 has previously been regarded as a
1 2. ttJ e3 0-0 1 3 . ttJ e2 e8 1 4 .g4 lll fd7 1 5 .lll g3 problem for White, but I believe that my
ig5 1 6.ltif2 lll e5 1 7.ib5 id7 1 8 .ixd7 analysis, and in particular the improvement
lll bxd7 1 9 .lll ef5 c4+ left White in trouble in 1 0.Wi'd2!N, should allow White to face this
Van der Wiel - Kasparov, Moscow 1 9 82. line with confidence.

9 .fi.d2!? seems playable: 9 . . .ie7 (9 ... Wi'b6 1 0 . c4 Against 4 . . . Wi'b6 my personal preference is for
Wxb2 1 l . ttJ c3 Wb6 1 2 .b l Wc7 1 3 . f4 offers sacrificing a pawn with B l ) 5 . ttJ d2 ! ?; a lot of
good compensation, similar to the Vaganian the resulting lines are untested, but they seem
Gambit but with a pawn on c4. ) 1 0 . c4 Wc7 to offer White interesting play. For those less
1 l . ttJ c3 0-0 1 2 .id3 exd5 1 3 . exd5 lll bd7 inclined to give away material, B2) 5 .ic l is
1 4 .lll ge2t Mehmeti - Sutovsky, Istanbul (ol) also playable and may secure White an edge.
20 1 2 .

9 ... i.e7
Chapter 6

2 ... e4 3.if4 c5 4.f3

I .d4 tll f6 2.g5 tll e4 3.f4 c5 4.f3

A) 4 ... tll f6 5.dxc5!? 1 09


Al) 5 ... tll a6?! 1 09
A2) 5 ... 'i'a5t 1 10
A3) 5 ... b6! 6.e4 bxc5 7.tll c3 tll c6 8.c4 111
A3 1 ) 8 ... d6 111
A32) 8 ... g6 1 12
B) 4 ... 'i'a5t 5.c3 tll f6 6.d5 1 13
Bl) 6 ... e6!? 7.e4 exd5 8.exd5 d6 9.'i'd2 e7 10.c4 'i'xd2t 1 1 .@xd2 1 13
B l l) l 1 . .. b5 1 15
B l 2) 1 1 . .. tll h5 12.e3 f5 13.tll c3 1 16
B l 2 1) 1 3 ... tll d7 1 17
B l 22) 1 3 ... 0-0 1 18
B2) 6 ... d6 1 19
B3) 6 ... 'i'b6 121
B3 1) 7.cl 121
B3 1 1) 7 ... g6 121
B3 12) 7 ... e6 8.e4! exd5 9.exd5 1 22
B3 1 2 1 ) 9 d6
. 1 23
B3 1 22) 9 ... 'i'c7!? 1 24
B3 1 23) 9 ... c4 1 26
B3 124) 9 ... d6 1 27
B32) 7.e4!? 'i'xb2 8.tll d2 'i'xc3 9.c7! 1 28
B32 1) 9 ... b6?! 1 30
B322) 9 ... e6 1 32
B323) 9 ... d6 1 35
1 08 Richard Pert - Playing the Trompowsky

1 .d4 f6 2 .ig5 e4 3 .if4 c5 4.f3


As in the previous chapter, I shall offer you
Having looked at 4.d5 in the previous an alternative approach with 7.ic l . Moving
chapter, we shall now examine attacking the the bishop for the third time in seven moves is
knight straight away. the solid option, believe it or not! White takes

.i -.i.-
time out to defend the b2-pawn and goes in
search of a small advantage. This line should
8
7
'i"m''l--.v.
be studied together with line B2 with 5 .ic l in

,
--

' the previous chapter on page 1 03 .

6
, - 7 ...'Wxb2 8.d2 'Wxc3 9 ..ic7!?
s w m
7.!&
r
: --

4
.

%

....
"'" 7.
,,,. . /:

!n!.!j
r. -0 ,,.!n
r. - - - - z - -,,,/,/' - - -
1ttJ7.v.t.m : ..

a b c d e f g h
4 'WaSt
.

Simply retreating with 4 . . . f6 is of course


a possibility. I then recommend the direct
5 . dxc5 ! ? looking to develop quickly with e2-

a b c d e f g h
e4, tll c3 and 1Mfd2 while Black spends time
rounding up the c5-pawn.
White has given up two pawns but trapped
5.c3 f6 6.d5 'Wb6 the opposing queen in his own territory! A
6 . . . e6! ? is a less popular choice for Black, but personal favourite of mine, this is the first
interesting nevertheless - we'll check it out. time this line has been investigated in depth.
I have spent a lot of time coming up with new
6 . . . d6 is the other main alternative, with which analysis, and I believe this line should be taken
Black aims to complete his development before seriously as an attempt to obtain an advantage.
challenging White in the centre.

7.e4!?
Hold on to your hat! Those looking to make
their opponent j ump out of their chair should
take a look at this highly aggressive double
pawn sacrifice.
I .d4 tlif6 2.i.g5 tli e4 3.i.f4 c5 4.f3 6 . . . e5 7.i.e3 i.e7 8 .Wi'd2 (8.c4 ! ? 0-0 9 . tli c3t)
This very much forces the pace. Black now 8 ... 0-0 9 . tli c3 tli bd7 1 0 .g4!?--+
chooses between A) 4 f6 and B) 4 ...%Ya5t.
. 7.tlic3 i.g7 8 .Wi'd2t
White intends standard play with i.h6 etc.
A) 4 ... tlif6
Black may aim to regain the pawn with Al)

- - ,, %_ .,Y,_' .,v.
5 ... tli a6?!, A2) 5 ...%Ya5t or A3) 5 ... b6!.
s .i -.i.B -
7
- ';&(
5 . . . g6 6 . tli c3 i.g7 7.Wi'd2 0-0 8 .i.h6 d5 9 . cxd6

5 -- ,,,,,,;
6 '' i.xh6 1 0.Wxh6 Wxd6 l l .e4 did not give Black
enough for the pawn in Hall - Hardarson,

- '-if[!f p -- 0 -
- - - - % , ; , ,%
Hafnarfjordur 1 997, which concluded:
4 fi l 1 . . . tli c6 1 2 .i.d3 i.e6 1 3 . tli ge2 tlie5 1 4.Wi'e3

3 .1,4% , 0fj
i.c4 1 5 .d l Wi'b4?? 1 6 .Wi'd4 1 -0

2 ' f)jll. 8 r' %Jl:%


Al) 5 ... tli a6?!

I lLluvm : Although quite common, this move is probably

a b c d e f g h
inaccurate. When faced with it myself, I made
short work of scoring a full point.
Black usually inserts the intermediate check
. . . Wa5 t in order to force White to block the 6.e4 tlixc5 7.tlic3
c3-square with a pawn . When Black chooses 7.e5 ? is too early; after 7 . . . tli e6 8.i.e3 the e5-
not to do that, the c3-square can prove very pawn drops to 8 ... Wi'a5 t .
useful for the b I -knight.

5.dxc5!?
I think this is a good enough choice, so I
don't plan to cover the alternative of advancing
the d-pawn. I will j ust mention how play
may develop in case you wish to investigate it
further:
5 . d 5 ! ? d6
a) 5 . . . Wb6 6 . tli c3 Wi'xb2 7.i.d2 Wi'b6 8 . e4
d6 9.f4 takes us into a Vaganian Gambit,
covered as line A l of Chapter 4 on page 8 1 .

b d f g h
b) 5 . . . tli h 5 ! ? 6.i.e3 (6.i.c l and 6.i.g5 are
a c e
also possible) 6 . . . e5 (6 . . . d6 7.g4 tli f6 8 . c4 e6
9 . tli c3 exd5 1 O . cxd5t Stefanova - Raj lich, 7 ... g6?!
Ekaterinburg 2006) 7 . tli h3 ! ?N This looks an This is inadvisable, though White is doing
interesting novelty to me, intending g2-g4 quite well in any case:
without letting the black knight settle on the 7 . . . d6 8.e5
f4-square. 7 . . . Wb6 (7 . . . d6 8.g4 tli f6 9 . tli c3t) This looks very much to the point.
8 . tli c3 Wxb2 9 .i.d2t 8 .Wi'd2 is also possible and looks slightly
6.e4 g6 preferable for White:
1 10 Richard Pert - Playing the Trompowsky

a) 8 . . . !Wa5 9 . 0-0-0 id? 1 0 .@b l d8? 7.e4 g6 8 . lLi c3 may be slightly more accurate
l I .iLi d5 +- as it cuts out Black's option of playing . . . e6 and
b) 8 . . . ie6 9 . lLi ge2 a6 1 0. lLi d4 id? l I .lLi b3 . . . tLi d 5 , but I do not think that White needs to
tLi a4 1 2. tLi xa4 ixa4 1 3 .ie2t Hauchard - be worried by that.
Bacrot, France 1 99 8 .
c ) 8 . . . e5 9 .ib5t tLi cd7 1 0.ig5 a 6 l I .ixf6 6 Wfxc5
.

'1Wxf6 1 2. lLi d S 1Wd8 1 3 .1Wc3 b8 1 4. lLi c?tt 6 . . . e6 7 .id6 lLi d 5 is unclear according to
Hodgson - Reinderman, Leeuwarden 1 993. Wells, but to me it still looks preferable for
8 ... tLi e6 9 .exf6 tLi xf4 1 0 .1Wd2 tLi e6 l I .ib5t White: 8 .1Wd2 tLi xc3 9 . e3 !Nt White takes
id? 1 2.ixd?t Wxd7 1 3 . fxe? ixe7 1 4 . tLi ge2 measures against . . . tLi a6 before recapturing the
0-0 1 5 .lLidS lLi c7 1 6 .tLixe?t '1Wxe7 1 7. 0-0-0 knight.
d5 1 8 .E:de l ad8 1 9 . lLi d4t
It is clear that White holds some advantage, 7.e4 g6
although in Ki. Georgiev - Relange, 7 . . . d6 8 .1Wd2 a6 9 .0-0-0 e5 (9 . . . g6) 1 0.ie3
Montpellier 2006, he failed to convert it. We? l I .g4

8.1Wd2 ig7? 9.e5! tLlh5 8.Wfd2 d6


9 . . . tLig8 1 0 .0-0-0 8 . . . ig7 9 .e3 Wc6 1 0 .e5 lLig8 l l . f4 b6
1 2 .b5 Wb7 1 3 . iLi f3 tLi h6 1 4.d3t Wang Yue
10.i.e3! - Dao Thien Hai, Calcutta 200 1 .
Winning a piece.
9.0-0-0 i.g7 IO.i.h6
10 ... e6 l l .g4 i.xe5 1 2.gxh5 b6 1 3.0-0-0 Mickey Adams takes a Route One approach
i.b7 14.i.b5! i.c8?! 1 5.Wfd5 1-0 against Leko and wipes him out!
R. Pen - O'Shaughnessy, London 20 1 0.
10 0-0 1 1 .h4 i.e6 1 2.h5 tLlxh5 13.i.xg7
..

A2) 5 ...Wfa5t @xg7 14.g4 tlJf6 15.Wfh6t @gs 16.tLlge2


Wlfl

a b c d e f g h
6.c3
In Winning with the Tromp owsky, Wells
suggested that the move order 6.Wd2 Wxc5
1 8.exf6 exf6 19.tlid5 i.xd5 20.V:Vxh7t i>f8 9 . . . a6!
2 1 .V:Vhst i>e7 22.VHxcS V:Vxf3 23Jh8 V:Ve3t Black's most recent idea.
24.i>b l 9 . . . c!Li xe5 1 0.ixe5 dxe5 1 1 .xdSt ltixd8
1-0 1 2. 0-0-0t c!Li d7 1 3 . c!Li h3 g6 1 4.ic4 offered
Adams - Leko, Cap d'Agde (rapid) 1 996. White good positional compensation for the
pawn in I . Schneider - Stocek, Pardubice
A3) 5 ... b6! 2008.

- ..i.. , .,w.
9 ... dxe5 1 0.VHxdSt ltixd8 1 1 . 0-0-0t id?
s ,a
,mi, w .a

'&/.m,&m''i
1 2 .ig3 e6 1 3 . lLi h3 h6 1 4. c!Li a3 and again

" '
E"""
White has good compensation, Akopian -
1

:. .. 'Wf "
B . Socko, Cappelle la Grande 1 999.
6

m !% m m
1 O.exf6 axb5
W'd,,,,/.
r ,,,,,,,,
,, 8.
White seems to be struggling to gain any
s
4
advantage.
,
,,,,, /.
l l .d2 b6 1 2 . lLi e2 ie6
1 2 . . . gxf6 1 3 . lLi c3 c!Li d4+

"!n!
.'tJ nm!.!n
. 0 "VJ,, . . "'"""'?
1 3 .c!Li c3 b4 1 4 . fxe? ixe700
Rensch - Molner, Internet 2009.
1 mn
..

a b c d e f g h
Black's only real test of the white set-up; as we
have seen above, the other options leave White
with a clear positional advantage. Despite this
being Black's best, it has surprisingly not been
very popular.

6.e4
6 . cxb6 V:Vxb6 gives Black decent
compensation for the pawn.

6 ... bxc5 7.tli c3 tli c6 8.i.c4


Pete Wells advocated a different plan m
Winning with the Trompowsky back in 2003 :
8 . lLi b 5 ! ? d6 9 . e5
A31) 8 ...d6 9.e5 dxe5
1 0.VHxdSt i>xd8 1 1 .0-0-0t i.d7

Other moves do not solve all Black's problems


either:

1 1 . . . c!Li d? 1 2 .ig3 ( 1 2.id5 c7) 1 2 .. .f6


( 1 2 . . . e6 1 3 . c!Li h3 ie7 1 4. c!Li b 5 ) 1 3 . c!Li ge2 c7
1 4 .if2 lLi b6 1 5 .id3 e6 1 6. c!Li e4 c4 1 7.ixb6t
axb6 1 8 .ixc4;!;

a b c d e f g h
1 12 Richard Pert - Playin g the Trompowsky

1 1 . . . <;tic? 1 5.h3 es 1 6.xf4 g6 17.<i>bl .ig7


1 8.e41;
Kasparov - Reinderman, Wijk aan Zee 1 999.

A32) 8 ... g6 9.tiJb5 d6 1 0.e5 dxe5


1 1 .'!WxdSt xd8 1 2 ..ig5!

This is the most accurate move order. Black's


f7-pawn remains weak, and it should be noted
that White threatens lli d6 with devastating
impact in various lines.

a b c d e f g h
An important game continued: 1 2. 0-0-0t
1 2.ig3N lli d7 1 3 .ie3 (with this move order 1 3 .ig5 can
l 2.ie3 looks wrong to me - the bishop be met by 1 3 .. . f6 1 4.ie300) 1 3 . . . a6 1 4 . lli c3 e6
should remain on the h2-b8 diagonal, 1 5 .lli e4 <;tic? 1 6.llig5?! h6 1 7. lli e4 f5 1 8 . lli d2
hitting the e5-pawn and potentially also the lLi b6+ Hodgson - Shirov, Groningen 1 996.
king. 1 2 . . . e6 1 3 . lli b 5 t <;t>b6 1 4. lli c300 lotov
- Babula, Kallithea 2008. 12 ... h6
1 2 . . . e6 1 3 .lli h3 1 2 . . . ib??? 1 3 .gd l t (better than 1 3 .0-0-0t
Threatening llig 5 . which could allow a later . . . ih6t! to rescue the
1 3 ... h6 1 4.ghe l lli d7 1 5 . lli b 5 t h8-rook) 1 3 . . . rJ;; c s 1 4. lli d6t! exd6 1 5 .ixf6+-
White's advantage seems clear in all
variations, for example: 1 2 . . . lli d4 can be met by 1 3 .gd };!; and again
1 5 . . . @b6 1 6. lli f2 lli d4 1 7. lli a3 gbs 1 8 . lli d3 White's threats include lli d6.
lli c6 l 9 .ib5;!;

a b c d e f g h

12 . .ib5 Also possible is:


Kasparov shows the way! 1 3 .ixf6 exf6 1 4 .0-0-0t
1 4.ixf7 gbs 1 5 . 0-0-0t lli d4 1 6.ic4 id?
12 ... exf4 1 3.hc6 gc8 14 ..ixd7 xd7 l 7 . lli a3 h5 l 8 . c3 lli f5 l 9 .ie6 gh7 was fine
for Black in Thomsen - Kristjansson, corr.
1 999.
14 ... tt:l d4!? 1 5 . c3 id7 1 6.cxd4 cxd4 1 7.cJ;lb l;!;
White will likely give back the piece with
lll xd4 to get rid of the black central pawns,
keeping a small plus.

1 3 ... i.d7
The other ways of blocking the check also
concede an edge:

1 3 . . . lll d4 1 4 .ih4t
a b c d e f g h
1 3 . . . tll d7 1 4.id5 hxg5 ( 1 4 . . . ib7 1 5 . tll d6
c7 1 6. tt:l xb7 hxg5 1 7. tll a5t) 1 5 .ixc6 Elb8 7 ... exd5
1 6. tt:l xa7 Elb6 1 7.tll h3 ih6 1 8 .b l t White can try to take advantage if Black
delays this exchange:
14.i.xf6 exf6 1 5 .hf'lt 7 . . . d6 8 . dxe6!
The black king still looks awkward, and 8 .Wi'd2 looks likely to transpose to the main
White's chances seem preferable. line, but I prefer to challenge Black's last
move.
B) 4 ... V9a5t 5.c3 tll f6 6.d5 8 . . . ixe6 9 . tLl a3

9 . . . tt:l c6
9 . . . d5 1 0 .ixb8 Elxb8 l l .ib 5t cJ;le7 1 2 .e5
tll d7 1 3 .f4 g6 1 4 .tll e2 ig7 l 5 .ixd7 xd7
1 6. 0-0 :gbd8 l 7.lll c2 cJ;lc8 l 8.b4t White
secures the d4-square for his knight, with
B l ) 6 ... e6!? a small but clear advantage, Fressinet -
Dominguez, Wijk aan Zee 2004.
I find it surprising that this interesting move is 1 0 .lll c4 Wi'd8
not played more often. I O ixc4 l l .ixc4 ie7 1 2 . lZl e2 0-0 1 3 .0-0
. . .

:gad8 14.lZlg3 b5 1 5 .id5 ll\xd5 1 6.V9xd5 '1Wb6


7.e4 1 7. ll\ f5t Ancidrome - Skat, Internet 20 1 2.
1 14 Richard Pert - Playing the Trompowsky

1 1 .lll xd6t ixd6 1 2 .ixd6 to recommend chis line - no doubt I will try
1 2.11Mxd6!? Wb6 1 3 .b3 Wa5 1 4 . lll e 2 ixb3 again in the future, bur for now it's back co the
1 5 .1/Mc7 Wxc7 1 6 .ixc7 ie6 1 7. lll f4;!; looks simple recapture.
slightly better for White with the bishop pair.
1 2 . . . Wb6 8 ... d6

8 .1. U.
. 7' g{""
76.m..JLm:
i!' 'if.
5 ,., ,,7,.
".. , ?. !
,, , , . , ,

: !

2 ..Yllv-0 _t
-d ?.
%1:
r

I
a b c d e f g h
1 3 .Wc2!?N
1 3 .Wc l 0-0-0 1 4.ig3 l'!d7 1 5 .ie2
l'!hd8 1 6.if4 lll h5 1 7.ig5 f6 1 8 .ie300
9.d2
Miladinovic - Pavlovic, Subotica 2008.
Hodgson's move, which is considered to be
13 ... 0-0-0 1 4 .if4 l'!d7 1 5 .ie2 l'!hd8 1 6.ie3
the main line nowadays.
Wa5 1 7.f2 c4 1 8 . h4;!;
9 .We2t
At first sight this check looks awkward
for Black to deal with. Rather annoyingly
though, Black has a good answer up his
sleeve.
9 . . . ie7 1 0 .ixd6

a b c d e f g h
8.exd5
I spent a long time trying to make 8 . e 5 ! ?

h
work, and I d i d come u p with some promising
b d f g
new ideas for White. However, looking
.
a c e

at this line again recently I discovered an 1 O . . lll xd5 ! 1 1 .Wb 5 t


improvement for Black at an early stage in one The point i s that I 1 .ixb8 ? doesn't work
of the variations. This makes it difficult for me out too well after 1 l . . .l'!xb8 1 2.We5 , as
Black can sacrifice: 1 2 . . . Wb6 ! ? 1 3 .Wxb8 0-0 l l . . .b5 1 2. lLi e2 (or 1 2 .mf2!? threatening
Threatening . . . id6 to pick up the white ge l t) 1 2 . . . lLi b6 1 3 .lLi c3 bxc4 1 4.lLixc4;!;
queen. 1 4.We5 ge8 1 5 .g3 ( 1 5 .Wxd5 ih4t 1 2 .g4 0-0 1 3 . 0-0-0 b5 1 4. lLi e2;!;
1 6. m d l Wxb2 1 7. lLi e2 gd8-+) 1 5 . . . Wxb2 White has an edge.
1 6.Wxd5 if6t 1 7. lLi e2 Wxa l 1 8 .Wd l
Wxa2+ White cannot easily untangle. 1 0.c4 %Yxd2t 1 1 . i>xd2
1 1 . .. Wxb 5 1 2 .ixb 5t id7 1 3 .ixe7 rtdxe7
1 4. lLi a3 ixb5 1 5 .lLixb5 a6
This endgame promises White absolutely
nothing.

9 ...e7
White should be aware what to do against
the rare:
9 . . . lLi bd7
This hasn't been mentioned by previous
authors, but is potentially critical as the
standard response for White doesn't work in
this case.
1 0. c4 Wxd2t

8 -*-
1 .t. B'AI U .t. .t.
' % -
ref . . ''l. . ,
6 B l l) 1 1 . .. b5 12.tll c3 bxc4

: f1 ' " 1 2 . . . lLi h S was the choice in a blitz game of

3 '
i\ill '
a strong grandmaster who has experience

2 8 f[j 8 t
in this line: 1 3 .ie3 b4 1 4 . lLi e4 ( 1 4 . lLi b S !N
tm
ttS-
. - - "=.lmi
rtdd7 1 5 .g4 lLi f6 l 6 . a3 b3;!; also looks good
l for White) 14 . . . f5 1 5 .lLi g3 lLi xg3 1 6. hxg3 if6
b d f g h
' " "' ' ,,, , . , /. " " "

a c e
1 7.ge l @d8 1 8 .@c2;!; Antidrome - }-Becerra,
Internet 20 1 0 .
1 l . lLi xd2!N
This looks like the right approach.
The standard l 1 . mxd2 looks a bit suspect
here: l 1 . . .b5 1 2 . lLi c3 bxc4 1 3 .ge l t
rtdd8 1 4. lLi h3 h 6 1 5 . lLi b 5 gb8!N ( a big
improvement over 1 5 . . . ia6 1 6 . lLi xd6;!;
Gasanov - Sutovsky, Zurich 2009) 1 6. lLi xd6
( 1 6.ixc4 ia6 1 7.lLixd6 ixd6 1 8 .ixd6
ixc4+) 1 6 . . . ixd6 1 7 .ixd6 gxb2t 1 8 .@c3
gxa2+ White has some compensation, but it
doesn't look enough to me.
l l . . . ie7
1 16 Richard Pert - Playing the Trompowsky

I 3.Lc4
s J.1-- m m s
7 . ...%
J..
a :-
.w K......-%
-&
- w
----Y-
White has a reasonable alternative in:
-

.-w -
1 3 .E:e l 'it>d8 1 4.ixc4 %
1 4. lli e4 hitting the d6-pawn has also been
6
sm 8 U. .t. U,'fl)
tried, and offers reasonable prospects:
1 4 . . . lli xe4t 1 5 .fxe4 ia6 1 6. lli f3 lli d7
l 7.e5t Pixton - Browne, Seattle 2002.
1 4 . . . lli bd7
ll Kll ll a
: llll' )ii
8 r .. 8q
n-JL- w
1 4 . . . ia6 has been played against me: 1 5 . b3!
2
lfesn-- "m
ixc4 1 6 . bxc4 lli bd7 1 7. lli h3;!; with lli b 5

1
and lli g5 on the cards, Antidrome - marcol,
Internee 20 1 0 .
l 5 . b3 lli b6 a b c d e f g h

..ti!.
m1. ...%.
%. Jr1A Wi1.. .;. %.1:
13.tLJc3

7s ...... .
This is the obvious choice for White, but I
-
6 , - % A have come up with an interesting novelty here:

..
%

.
1 3 .id3 ! ?N
5 . ., .
,,,,, . .
" . .;% ; 8% The point behind this move is linked to two

4
%
Hodgson games. In the first game Pete Wells

3 . 8m
. . .. ; 8

playing Black cascled before playing . . . lli d7,

.
%

2 J'""" . . ... " .. .. . .


and Hodgson got a big advantage and won.

,z The second time around Lars Schandorff
1 m
z
played a quick . . . lli d7-e5 before cascling,
a b c d e f g h and managed to neutralize White's play for
a quick draw.
1 6 . lli h3 ! ?N
By switching our move order we are cutting
After 1 6 . lli e4? lli xc4t 1 7.bxc4 'ktid7 1 8 . lli h3
out Black's option of going for the immediate
ia6+ Black's developing queenside play
. . . lli d7 as we can meet that with ixf5 winning
gave him the better chances in Salimaki - a pawn. That said, I have now found a major
Schandorff, Saint Vincent 200 5 .
improvement in the Schandorff game (see
1 6 . . . ixh3 1 7 .gxh3t
line B l 2 1 below) , so it is not clear chat we
White obtains play on the g-file.
would want to avoid that variation anymore.
l 3 . . .f4!?
1 3 ... tLJbd7 13 ... id7?! prepares an early ... b 5 , but chat
1 3 . . . 0-0 1 4.E:e 1 lli h 5 l 5 .E:xe7 lli xf4
seems the wrong plan: 1 4 . lli c3 lli a6 l 5 . lli ge2
1 6 . lli ge2! seems more pleasant for White, E:b8 1 6.E:hg l b5 l 7.cxb5 lli c7 l 8.a4 lli f6
Antidrome - weicp, Internet 20 1 0 .
l 9 . lli f4 g5 20.llie6 ixe6 2 l .dxe6 f4 22 .if2
lli xe6 23.E:ge l lli d4 24.ixd4 cxd4 2 5 . lli e4+
14.i>c2 tLJ b6 15.ib5t i>d8 1 6Jdl ib7 Antidrome - Aclus, Internet 2009.
17.tLJh3 tLJ bxd5 1 8,ghe l tLJxf4 1 9.tLJxf4 g5 13 ... 0-0 lli d7 1 4 . lli c3 transposes into
20.tLJ d3 gcs 2 I .tLJe5 gfg 22.ic4t Hodgson - Wells; see the note to White's
Viciugov - Pap, Budva 2009.
1 4th in line B l 22 below.
1 4.if2 lli d7
B 1 2) 1 I . .. tLJ h5 1 2.ie3 f5 With . . . llie5 co follow, the position is unclear.
As mentioned above, Black chooses between 1 5 ... lli hf6
B 1 2 1 ) 13 .. tll d7 and Bl22) 13 ... 0-0.
. 1 5 . . . fxg4? 1 6. fxg4 and the black king is in
for it in my opinion.
B I 2 1 ) 1 3 ... tll d7
1 5 .. . f4
SchandorfFs choice.
Inviting complications, but White can easily
I 4Jel <it>f7 avoid them and claim an edge.
1 6.if2 'Ll hf6

1 7.h4!?
Making the f4-pawn a target for a future
'Llh3 or 'Ll e2.
1 7.c l ! ?;!; also looks interesting. One of
Black's plans is ro play . . . 'Lle5, and after ixc5
there may be the possibility of the knight
1 5 .'Llh3
raking the f3- or c4-pawn with check before
This was the direction taken by all the old
Black captures the bishop. By stepping out
analysis by Wells, Davies and Palliser, but it
of the way of any future knight check, White
doesn't look very convincing.
cuts out that option.
1 5 . . . 'Ll e S 1 6.ie2
1 7 . . . a6
Wells gives this as an improvement over
This may be Black's best, preventing 'Ll b5
1 6.'LlgSt ixg5 1 7.ixgS h6 1 8 .ie3 id7
1 9 .ie2 g5 20.g3 f4 Y2-Y2 Hodgson -
and preparing . . . Ei:e8.
1 7 . . . Ei:e8 1 8 . 'Ll b S
Schandorff, Germany 200 1 .
1 7 . . . 'Ll e S 1 8 .ixc5;!;
1 6 . . . h6
1 8 .@c l
Palliser suggests that this is Black's best try,
1 8 . 'Ll ce2 b5 creates complications although
and he may well be right.
White's chances look preferable. But we
1 6 . . . Ei:f8 ? ! 1 7. f4 'Ll g4 1 8 .'LlgSt ixg5
might as well get the king safe first.
1 9 . fxg5;!;
1 8 . . . Ei:e8 1 9 . 'Ll ce2!?;!;
1 7. f4 'Ll g4 1 8 . 'Ll f2 'Llhf6 1 9 . 'Ll xg4 'Ll xg4
White wins the f4-pawn while Black lacks
20 .ig l
sufficient compensation.
Palliser prefers White, but I would evaluate
this position as equal (and so would my
16.gxfS
computer) .
118 Richard Pert - Playin g the Trompowsky

It will not be a simple task for Black to regain and then a player with the handle "DarcyLima"
his material. played the same line against me on the internet
in 20 1 2. If I were a betting man then I would
say that it was the same person! His play
seems to be a lot more accurate than previous
attempts with Black.

14,gel!?
This move is slightly awkward to face.
believe that if White follows up as I suggest
then he should have good prospects.

1 4.id3
This was Hodgson's choice.
1 4 . . . lll d7 1 5 . f4
a b c d e f g h Denying . . . tll e5 possibilities.
1 6 J.H8
..
1 5 . . . lll df6 1 6.tll ge2
This may be Black's best. None of 1 6 . . . tll e5
1 7.ixc5 or 16 ... lll b6 1 7.id3 or 1 6 ... lll h5
1 7 . f4 lll df6 1 8 .ih3 offer him much
encouragement.

17.tiJh3;!;
It is going to take Black a while to recover
that pawn - if he manages to at all .

B l 22) 13 0-0
...

1 6 . . . lll g4!
Lima's idea and he showed his hand in an
internet game with me.
1 6 . . . g5 ? looks a terrible move and Hodgson
quickly built a winning position: 1 7.h3 (or
1 7. fxg5 !?) 1 7 . . . gxf4 1 8 .tll xf4 id7 1 9 . tll e6
ixe6 20.dxe6 ids 2 1 .ih6 !!e8 22.g4+
Hodgson - Wells, York 2000.
1 7.ig l id7 1 8 .h3 tll h6 1 9 .!!e l !!ae8 20 .if2
ids 2 Lg3
Antidrome - DarcyLima, Internet 20 1 2;
White may have a tiny pull, but it's not a lot.

14 . i.ds
..

1 4 . . . tll d7 isn't possible: 1 5 .ixc5


1 4 . . . if6 1 5 .lll b 5 ! is also problematic for Black.

1 4 . . . f7 1 5 .lll h3 lll d7 1 6. lll f4;!;

a b c d e f g h
This is a common choice, with which
Black neither contests the centre immediately

a b c d e f g h
nor challenges the vulnerable b2-pawn, but
instead focuses on development. Note chat chis
1 5 .tll ge2!N position can also be reached via the move order
I'm not sure about I 5 .id3 in chis position, as from the previous chapter of 2 . . . lll e4 3 .if4 c5
the bishop will become a target for . . . lll e5 and 4.d5 Was t 5 . c3 d6 6 . f3 lll f6 .
meanwhile the f5-pawn is securely defended:
1 5 . . . lll d7 1 6 . lll ge2 f4 1 7.if2 lll e5 and Black 7.e4 g6
gets his knight lodged on e5 and equalizes, Black quite often prefaces the fianchecco
Rodi - Lima, Guarapari 2006. with:
7 . . . lll bd7?!
I 5 .lll h3!N;!; also looks good, with the same
z
tlm &.,.. ",
plan of playing lll f4.
8 i. .t. -
... . . %.r
6 . . ..
7
1 5 ... tll d7
&.. -" '"""
... . .

1 5 . . . f4 1 6.if2 a6 ( 1 6 . . . lll d7? is not possible 5


here: I 7. lll b5 +-) 1 7. lll e4;!;
4 . .
L
! :
r
3 w -J

w -
j
1 6.tlif4! tlixf4
I 6 . . . lll hf6? 1 7.lll e6+-
2 J -0 "J
, Vtt
h
1 6 . . . lll df6 1 7.id3 looks much better for
a b c d e f g
White, with the black knights awkwardly
placed and lll e6 on the cards. This is slighcly inaccurate in my view as
it blocks the c8-bishop, giving White the
17.Lf4 additional option of using the h3-square for
Black is struggling co hold his d6-pawn. his knight. White can drop his knight from
h3 back co f2 at an appropriate moment, or
B2) 6 ... d6 occasionally it may j ump forward with lll f4
or lll g5.
1 20 Richard Pert - Playing the Trompowsky

8 . lD h3 ! ?
8 . lD d2 ! ? g 6 9 . lD h 3 White can play about
with the move order, but putting the knight
here still looks like the right plan to me.
9 . . . ltJ h S 1 0 . .ie3 lDe5 1 l .g4 lD f6 1 2 . lD f2 h6
1 3 .h4 .ig7 14 . .ie2 Wc7 1 5 . f4 and it was
starting to look very promising for White in
Moskalenko - Mateos Rozas, Sieges 2007.
8 . lD a3 g6 9 . lD c4 Wc7 1 0 .a4 .ig7 1 1 .lD e2
White of course does not have to put his
g l -knight on h3, but can aim fo r lD e2-
g3 . That said, it seems a shame not to take
advantage of Black's move order. l 1 . . . lD b6
1 2 . lD g3 Similar positions can arise in the
main line; White had an edge in Rahman -
Shen, Kuala Lumpur 2007.
8 . . . g6 9 ..ie2 .ig7 1 0 . 0-0
1 0 .a4 Wc7 l l . c4 lD h S 1 2 . .ic l Wa5 t
1 1 .Wi'd2
This is the main choice, keeping the door
1 3 . .id2 Wb6 1 4 .!!a2 0-0 1 5 .g4 ltJ hf6 open for a future 4Jh3.
1 6. ltJ f4;!; Agdestein - Scubberud, Calvi
2005. 1 1 . lD e2!?
1 0 . . . 0-0 1 1 .Wc2 b5 1 2 . a4 b4 1 3 .lD d2 bxc3 Nakamura's choice - in fact he has played it
1 4. ltJ c4 Wc7 1 5 . bxc3 lD h S 1 6 . .ig5;!; three times according to my database. His
M. Gurevich - Niemela, Helsinki 1 99 2 . plan is to combine pushing his kingside
pawns with the knight coming to g3 to
8.tll d2 i.g7 9.tll c4 support them.
9 . .id3 is also a sensible way to develop,
allowing the knight to settle on the el-square:
9 . . . 0-0 1 0 . lD e2 Wd8 1 1 .Wc2 e6 1 2 .c4 lD a6
1 3 . a3 lD h S 1 4 . .ie3t Movsesian - Dyachkov,
Moscow 2007.

9 ... Wi'ds
9 . . . Wc7 1 0 .a4 0-0 1 I .Wd2 lD bd7 1 2 . g4!?
( 1 2 . lD h 3 lD b6 1 3 . lD f2 is of course also
possible) 1 2 . . . lD e S 1 3 . lD xeS dxe5 1 4 . .ie3t
Hall - Van den Doel, Germany 1 99 6 .

1 0.a4 0-0 1 l . . . b6
It looks right to meet 1 0 . . . 4J bd7 with 1 1 . . . lD h S ? ! 12 ..ie3 b6 1 3 .g4;!; Nakamura -
l 1 .lD h 3 , with similar ideas to those we saw Laxman, Internet 2006.
after 7 . . . 4J bd7 above. 1 1 . . . lD a6 1 2 .g4 lDc7 1 3 . lD g3 b6 1 4 .Wd2
.ia6?! 1 5 . h4 lD d7 1 6.hS .ixc4 17 . .ixc4
looks very promising for White who can
muster up an attack, Nakamura - Daskevics, 1 9.tl)xe6 fxe6 20.0-0 a6
Oslo 20 1 0 . 20 . . . dxe4 2 l .Wifxd8 xd8 22.fxe4 llixe4
1 2. lli g3 ia6 1 3 . h4 h5 1 4 .Wifd2 lli bd7 1 5 .ih6 23 .ic4
I 5 .id3N;!; may be better, when White holds
a small edge. 2 1 .ad l
1 5 . . . ixc4 1 6.ixc4 llie5 1 7.ie2 e6 1 8 .c4 Miladinovic - Milanovic, Bar 2008.
Nakamura - Lie, Oslo 2009; White holds
the initiative, alchough it is not clear if he has B3) 6 Wifb6
.

any real advantage if Black plays accurately.


Attacking the b2-pawn is by far Black's most
1 1 Jfos
popular option. White now has a choice
Teeing up . . . e6 whilst keeping an eye on the between defending the pawn with B3 1) 7 ..icl
h3-square. or offering a double pawn sacrifice with B32)
7.e4!?.
I 1 . . . lli bd7 1 2. lli h3 lli b6 1 3 . lli f2;!;
B3 1 ) 7 . .icl
1 2 ..ie2
White intends co play llih3 even if he has co This odd-looking move is actually a very
prepare it by playing g2-g4 first. sensible way co protect the b2-pawn; the
bishop steps out of the way so chat White can
12 tl) bd? 1 3.g4 tl)b6 14.llie3 .id? 15.aS
focus on playing e2-e4 and developing his
tlJ cS 16.tl)h3 e6 1 7.dxe6 J.xe6 ocher pieces. Now Black can simply develop
with B3 1 1) 7 .. g6 or go for the more critical
.

B3 12) 7 ... e6.

B3 1 1) 7 ... g6

1 8 dS
.

Practically forced, as otherwise Black will


find himself squeezed out of space.
1 22 Richard Pert - Playing the Trompowsky

8.e4 d6 9.c4 i.g7 10.ltie2! i b 7 20.fxg6 hxg6 2 1 .Wd3 tll f8 22.if4;!;


This is an interesting idea to remember. Rowson - Ziegler, Porto Mannu 2007.
Rather than developing the b l -knight to c3
and getting his knights tangled up aiming for 1 2.cxd5 0-0 13.i.e2 a6
the same squares, White sends the g l -knight 1 3 . . . tll bd7 1 4. 0-0 a6 1 5 .a4 White aims
to c3 ; later the b l -knight may head to c4 after straight for the standard plan of playing a2-
a likely cxd 5 . a4, tll a3 , ie3 , b l , and later b2-b4. l 5 . . . b8
1 6.'tt> h l Wd8 1 7.ie3 e8 1 8 .tll a3 h6 1 9 .Wd2
1 0 ... e6 'tt> h 7 20.ab 1 tll h5 2 l .g4 tll hf6 22.h3;!;
Black can also go for an idea involving . . . e5 McShane - Woj taszek, Goa 2002.
and .. .f5 , bur once he has got these moves in it
is not clear what he can do, and his g7-bishop
will be blocked in. As White I'd be tempted
to hold off castling until it becomes obvious
which way you should go. An example of how
play may develop is: 1 0 . . . 0-0 l 1 . tll ec3 e5
l 2 .ie2 tll h5

s ,i.; Y.l?u
j_ i'
76 "it)! -t"' B--r r
.....
. ..
.
.

er l.
5 %.8% %
.


.87. .87.
.

4
. . .

<?m ' w-
3 w
2 .1.p; !, j!j
j) ..
From here we once again see White execute
.

the standard plan mentioned in the previous


1 ltJV li
.

note.
b d f g h
. .
.

a c e
14.a4 tll bd7 15.tll a3 Wds 16.0-0 gbs
1 3 .g3 ( 1 3 .tll a3 ! ? also looks sensible: 1 3 . . . tll f4
17.i.e3 tll e8 18.Wd2 lti c7 1 9.gab l We7
[ 1 3 . . .f5 1 4.exf5;!;] 1 4.g3 tll xe2 1 5 .Wxe2 f5
20.b4
l 6.ie3 tll a6 1 7. tll ab5;!;) 1 3 . . . f5 1 4. exf5 gxf5
White has executed his plan and stands
1 5 .f4 tll f6 1 6. fxe5 dxe5 1 7. 0-0 tll a6 1 8 . tll d2;!;
better.
Richter - Elsness, Norway 2008.
20 .. ,ges 2 1 .i.fl b6 22.lti c4 b5 23.axb5 axb5
1 1 .tLlec3 exd5 24.lti a5 Wf6 25,gfcl gas 26.tll xb5 tll xb5
Black may try to do without this exchange:
27.i.xb5 cxb4 28.Wxb4 gds 29.tll c6 gf8
1 1 . . . 0-0 1 2.ie2 tll bd7 ( 1 2 . . . a6 1 3 . 0-0 Wc7
30.i.d4 Wg5 3 I .i.xg7 @xg7 32.Wxd6+-
1 4.a4 tll bd7 1 5 .ie3 b8 1 6 .tll a3 exd5 1 7. cxd5
White has won a second pawn and Black
is similar to our main line: 1 7 . . . e8 1 8 .Wd2
soon called it a day in Nakamura - Lie, Gj ovik
tll f8 1 9 .ab l id7 20.b4 cxb4 2 1 .xb4 Wa5 ?
(rapid) 2009.
22.fb 1 +- Laznicka - Solodovnichenko,
Internet 2006) 1 3 . 0-0 e8 1 4.'tt> h l a6 1 5 . tll d2
B3 12) 7 ... e6
Wd8 1 6 .dxe6 fxe6 l 7.f4 b6 l 8 . tll f3 Wc7 l 9 . f5
White's main plan here is to develop along
the lines of c3-c4 , llJ c3 , id3 , llJ ge2 and 0-0 ,
and then to aim for kingside play. In Laznicka
- Zubarev (line B 3 1 24) , we shall see a great
example of how effective this plan can be.
Black can try to disrupt this idea at an early
stage, and we'll have a look at the options
B3 1 2 1 ) 9 ... J.d6, B3 1 22) 9 ... c7!?, B3 1 23)
9 c4 and B3 1 24) 9 d6.
.

B3 1 2 1 ) 9 ...J.d6

a b c d e f g h
8.e4!
Surprisingly this move is a relatively new
idea. Previously 8 . c4 was often played here,
though that move looks a little awkward to
me, and the modern consensus is for White to
aim for quick development with the text move.

8 ... exd5
8 . . . d6 looks a little wet in combination
with . . . e6, and Kasparov soon took over the

a b c d e f g h
initiative in one of his exhibition games: 9 . c4
ie7 1 0 . llJ c3 e5 l l .id3 0-0 1 2 . llJ ge2 llJ bd7
1 3 .Wc2 a6 1 4 .ie3 We? 1 5 .g4 b5 1 6 .b3 bxc4 10.a3
l 7.bxc4 l:!b8 l 8 . llJ g3;!; Kasparov - Grup Equs, This move looks t o take advantage of Black's
Madrid (simul) 1 997. awkwardly-placed bishop and queen .

9.exd5 The standard move 1 O . c4 ? ! is a bit clumsy


here: 1 0 . . . 0-0 l l .id3 ie5 1 2 .Wc2 llJ a6
1 3 .a3 Wa5t and Black will play . . . llJ b4 next.
We really do not need to be getting involved
in all this.

1 0 ... 0-0 1 1 .J.d3!


White has scored well with this move,
setting up llJ e2 to block a check on the e-file.

l l .ie2 also looks playable: l l . . . a6 1 2 . llJ c4


We? 1 3 . a4 b6 1 4 .i.g5;!; Tu Hoang Thong -
Sadorra, Singapore 2002.

1 1 ..J::i e St
1 24 Richard Pert - Playing the Trompowsky

It's important to note that l 1 . . . tll xd5 ? Again Smirnov plays this move with good
isn't playable: 1 2 .tll c4 Wfc6 1 3 . tll x d6 Wfxd6 effect.
1 4.i.e4+-
1 6.a4 looks good too: 1 6 . . . i.h6 1 7.tll c4 i.xc l
1 1 . . .a6 1 2. tll c4 Wf c7 1 3 .a4 b6 1 4.i.g5 1 8 .xc l b6 1 9 .tll g3;!; Ivanisevic - Kotronias,
tll h5 1 5 .tll e2 h6 1 6.i.e3 e8 1 7.@f2 i.b7 Kavala 2007.
( 1 7 . . . i.xh2 ? is well met by 1 8 .d6! +-) 1 8 . tll xd6
Wfxd6 1 9 .c4 Wff6 20.g4 Wfh4t 2 1 . tll g3 tll f6 1 6 ... hS 1 7.a4 h4 1 8.tll e4 tll h7 1 9.f4
22.Wf d2;!; Ivanisevic - Solak, Vrnj acka Banja A. Smirnov - Gajewski, Plovdiv 2008.
200 5 .
B3 122) 9 ...W/c7!?
I l . . .h6 1 2 .tll e2 a6 1 3 . tll c4 Wfc7 and White has
a pleasant choice between 1 4.a4;!; A. Smirnov
- Dinev, Plovdiv 2008, and 1 4. tll xd6N Wfxd6
1 5 . c4;!;.

12.tll e2 i.f'8 13.tll c4


White switches the knight to the centre.

13 ... W/ds 1 4.tll e3 d6 1 5.0-0

a b c d e f g h
This is Black's latest move-order refinement.
He wants to play a plan involving . . . i.d6 but
he is electing to wait for White to play c3-c4
so that he won't get hit with tll a3-c4. Okay,
chis plan is very sophisticated, but it is far from
clear that Black really wants his queen on c7.
Personally I think here we can j ust get on with

b d f g h
our standard plan and have good chances of an
a c e
advantage.
1 5 ... g6
1 5 . . . tll bd7 1 6. tll g3 ! ? ( 1 6.a4 tll e5 1 7.i.c2 10.c4 i.d6 1 1 .i.d3 0-0
b6 1 8 .c4 a6 1 9 .h3 a7 2 0 . f4 tll g6 2 1 . tll g3;!; 1 1 . . . b5 tries to mix it up, but again Black finds
Damljanovic - Vuckovic, Subotica 2008) that his queen and bishop are targets: 1 2 .tll c3
I 6 ... tll e5 I 7.i.c2 b5 1 8 .a4 i.d7 1 9 .h3 c4 20.f4 bxc4 1 3 .i.xc4 0-0 I 4. tll b5 Wfb6 1 5 .tll e2 i.a6
tll g6 2 l . axb5 Wfb6 22 .Wff3 i.xb5 23. tll gf5 l 6.a4 i.xb5 1 7.axb5;!; White's bishop pair and
tll e7 24. tll d4 a6 2 5 . g4t A. Smirnov - Givon, greater space ensure an advantage, Moskalenko
Plovdiv 20 1 2 . - Llaneza Vega, Barcelona 2008 .

1 6.tll g3 Despite Black placing his bishop and queen


on the b8-h2 diagonal it is dangerous for him 1 7 . . . Wxf4 1 8 .Wd2
to grab the pawn with l l . . .ixh2, as he falls This looks highly prom1smg for White.
way behind in space and development. No Black will surely be in for a miserable time if
Black player has risked this, so let me j ust give he exchanges queens as it will be very difficult
you an example of how play could develop: for him to develop his queenside.
1 2 . lll e2 ig3t 1 3 . lll xg3 Wxg3 t 1 4.c;t>fl d6
1 5 . lll c3 lll a6 1 6 .id2--+ lll b4 1 7.We l t Wxe l t
1 8 .xe l t c;t>f8 1 9 .ib 1 id? 20.a3 lll a6 2 1 .if4
lll e8 22. lll e4+-

12.c!Lic3 a6 13.c!Lige2 ges


Black has also tried:
1 3 . . . b5 1 4.ig5 !
Taking the b5-pawn is possible, but would
give Black some queenside play. It all seems
a bit unnecessary when simple development
favours White.
l 4 . . . lll h5 l 5 .lll e4 lll f4?
This move is too ambitious. a b c d e f g h
Black should play a normal move like 14.%Vc2
l 5 . . . ie5 and settle for a slightly worse 1 4.a4 aims to stop Black expanding with
position: 1 6.Wd2 f5 l 7. lll 4g3 lll xg3 . . . b 5 , and has also been played with success:
1 8 .hxg3;!; White has a lead in development, 14 . . . ie5 (Black might consider 14 . . .ixh2 so
more space and good prospects of a future as to at least have something for his cramped
kingside attack. position, though 1 5 .c;t>f2t looks promising for

--- - -- -.v,
s .i A
White) 1 5 .Wc2 b6 1 6.id2 ib7 1 7.'it>f2 d6

6 ,%. ..... z " "


1 8 .h3 lll bd7 1 9.ie3 lll f8 20.f4 ixc3 2 1 . lll xc3
7 ic8 22 .id2t White's additional space

-%'"' "
provides an advantage, Martinovic - Vorobiov,
5
4
i ,,ef.lil?i"
--;, - ,,<
, ,, ;
Rijeka 20 1 0 .


3 z p-tl)-
14 ... bS!?N

C"{" 0 .
effj.. .
-0 This must be critical, hoping to show that

1 ; --- -
2
0
White should have taken the time to play

1 4.a4.
a b c d e f g h
l 6 . lll xf4!N
14 ... ie5 1 5 .ig5 h6 1 6.ixf6 ixf6 1 7. lll e4
ie7 1 8 . 0-0 d6 1 9 . lll 2g3 lll d7 20.ae l b5
l 6 . lll x d6 lll xd3 t l 7.Wxd3 was only slightly
2 1 . b3;!; led to a small but safe edge for White
better for White in Rahman - Konguvel,
in Moskalenko - Alsina Leal, Barcelona 20 1 1 .
Kolkata 2008.
1 6 . . . ixf4 1 7 .ixf4
1 5.i.gS bxc4 16.i.xc4 i.eS 17.0-0!;t
l 7 . d6 doesn't win a piece as Black has
This clever move secures an edge for White,
1 7 . . . Wa5 t .
based on the variation: 1 7 . . . ixh2t ? ! 1 8 .c;t>h l
1 26 Richard Pert - Playing the Trompowsky

ie5 1 9 . f4 id4 20.ae l ! With lll xd4 on the l 1 . . . lll x d5


cards, this is very strong for White. Black could consider 1 1 . . . 0-0 1 2 . lll xc4
e8t 1 3 .ie2 Wa6 1 4. lll d2 and now:
B3 1 23) 9 c4 .. a) 14 . . . W/b6 1 5 .b4;!;
b) 1 4 . . . d6 1 5 .b4!? Probably strongest,
though a bit murky. ( 1 5 . lll g5 followed by
lll ge4 is a safe route to an edge for White.}
1 5 . . .ixh3 1 6.gxh3 ib6 1 7.@fl ( 1 7. lll e4
lll xe4 1 8 . fxe4 xe4 1 9 .@fl xe2 20.Wfxe2
Wla4 2 l .if4;!;) 1 7 . . . xe2 l 8 .Wfxe2 W/a4;!;
c) l 4 . . . lll xd5 l 5 .lll e4;!;
1 2 .lll xc4 Wfe6t 1 3 .ie2 h6 1 4.lll f4
White has achieved a comfortable lead in
development.
14 . . . lll x f4 1 5 .ixf4 d5 1 6. b4! ixb4 1 7.cxb4
dxc4 1 8 .id6
This stops Black from castling, and it begins
a b c d e f g h to look really promising for White.
An important move to take into l 8 . . . lll c6 1 9 . 0-0 id? 20.c l 0-0-0
consideration. Black is willing to sacrifice a 2 1 .ixc4+-
pawn for immediate activity. Efimov - Kotronias, Heraklio 2007; Black's
position has suddenly collapsed, his weak king
I O.ixc4 giving White a decisive advantage.
Taking the pawn is most common, and
White's chances look preferable. 1 0 ...ic5

1 o .lll h3!?
I like this rarely played idea too. This move
pre-empts . . . ic5 and has the idea of taking
the c4-pawn with the queen's knight.
1 0 . . . ic5 l 1 . lll d2
l l .Wfe2t @d8 1 2 .Wfxc4 e8t 1 3 .ie2
d6 1 4.lll g5 ie3 offers Black decent
compensation.

a b c d e f g h
I I .lll e2
Developing in this way seems most sensible.

l l .Wfe2t @d8 1 2 .@fl looks rather risky:


1 2 . . . e8 1 3 .Wfc2 ( 1 3 .Wfd3 ?! was played in
Rojas Keim - Gomez Jurado, Sabadell 2009, 15.\Wb3!N
and now 13 . . . d6N intending . . . tll bd7-e5 would 1 5 .1%xh2 Wc7 1 6.d6 Wxc4 1 7.ig500 Gomez
have offered Black ample compensation.) Ledo - Pena Gomez, Sanxenxo 2009.
13 ... d6 1 4 .tll e2 tll bd7 Here too, Black intends
. . . tll e5 with decent compensation. 15 ...\Wd6
1 5 . . . Wc7? 1 6.d6 Wxd6 1 7.ixf7t+-
1 1 ... 0-0
1 1 . . .d6 1 2 . tll d4 0-0 1 3 . 0-0 (or 1 3 .b4!? 1 5 . . .ic7 1 6.'1Wxb6 (or 1 6 . d6!?) 1 6 . . . ixb6
Ele8t 1 4 .f2 ixd4t 1 5 .Wxd4;!;) 13 ... tll bd7 1 7.ig5 and White has a huge lead in
1 4 .ib3 1%e8 1 5 .lifh l h6 1 6 . tll d2 a6 1 7 . tll e4;!; development.
Gruenenwald - Georges, Switzerland 2007.

l 1 . . .a5?! 1 2 .Wb3 Wa7 1 3 .ig5 d6 1 4.ixf6


16.tlib5 \Wc5 17.@fl a6
White is also doing well after 1 7 . . . ie5
if2t 1 5 . d l gxf6 1 6. tll d2 f5 l 7.ib5t liff8
1 8 .d6+- or 1 7 . . . id6 1 8 .tll xd6 Wxd6 1 9 .if4.
1 8 .Wa4 Stamenkovic - Sega, Santos 2006.

12.t[)d2 1 8.d6!?
White can also aim for an edge with: 1 2 .Wb3 The simpler l 8.1%xh2;!; is promising too.
Wd8 1 3 .ig5 h6 1 4 .ih4;!; Duijker - Dij khuis,
Hoogeveen 20 1 1 . 18 .. ,gxe2 1 9.Lflt @f8 20.lll d4! lll c6
21 .tlixe2
12 ... ges
1 2 . . . d6 1 3 .tll b3 tll bd7 1 4. tll xc5 Wxc5 B3 1 24) 9 ... d6 1 0.c4!
1 5 .ib3;!;

13.lll b3 .igl
1 3 . . . if2t 1 4 . fl Wc7 1 5 . xf2 Wxc4
1 6 .1%e l tll xd5 1 7.Wd4;!; Peelen - Trygstad,
Copenhagen 1 999.

14.lll bd4 .ixh2!?


Black has regained the pawn, but now his
lagging development will come into play.

10 ... .ie7
1 O . . . g6! ? aims for optimal bishop
development on the long diagonal, but to
achieve this Black must allow his king to be
a b c d e f g h
1 28 Richard Pert - Playing the Trompowsky

displaced: l l .'1We2t! @d8 1 2 .'1Wc2 ig7 l 3 .id3 1 8.4 a6 1 9.a4


lll a6 1 4. a3 !!e8t 1 5 . lll e2 @e7 1 6. lll bc3 lt>f8 White has positioned all of his minor pieces
1 7.0-0 lll b4 1 8 .axb4 cxb4t 1 9 .@h l bxc3 optimally and now needs to focus on the major
20.lll x c3 Movsesian - Kotronias, Moscow pieces.
2007.
19 ... f8 20.ga b6 2 1 .V;Yc2 h6 22.gafi ga7
1 O . . . if5 is met by White's standard plan: 23.g4 gae7 24.g3
l I .lll c3 lll bd7 1 2. lll ge2 h6 1 3 . lll g3 ig6 White has the advantage with more space
1 4.id3 and prospects of play on the kingside.

1 1 .c3 0-0
1 1 . . . tll bd? 1 2 . f4 lll f8 1 3 .id3 lll g6 1 4 .tll f3
ig4 1 5 . 0-0 lll h4 1 6 .'\Wa4t id? ( 1 6 . . . lll d??
1 7. lll x h4 ixh4 1 8 .h3+- Stamenkovic -
Bortoloso, Vitoria 2007) l 7.'1Wc2

1 2.id3 ges
1 2 . . . lll e8 1 3 .lll ge2 lll d7 1 4. b3 Barsov -
Grigore, Sitges 2007.

1 3.ge2 bd7

25.hxg4 .L:g4 26.fS!


A direct and effective move.

26 ... .id4t 27.@g2 hat 28.gxf3 @h7


29. ce4 .ie5 30.'IWcl
1-0
Laznicka - Zubarev, Polanica Zdroj 2006.

14.b3 B32) 7.e4!?


Preparing to meet . . . lll e5 with the retreat
ic2 to keep the bishop. As I mentioned at the start of the chapter,
this is a personal favourite of mine - White
1 4. f4 is of course also possible: 14 . . . '1Wd8 sacrifices two pawns to draw the black queen
1 5 . 0-0 a6 1 6. a4 b6 1 7.h3 tll f8 1 8 . g4 into his territory.
Madakov - Yumakhuzhin, Rybinsk 2008.
7 ...V;Yxb2
1 4 ...if8 1 s.o-o g6 1 6.h3 .ig7 1? ..id2 V;Yds It is awkward for Black to decline the gambit
as White has played very directly: 1 3 .@g3 ie7 1 4. tll d6t ixd6 1 5 .ixd6 tll c6
7 . . . e6 ?! 8 . tll a3 exd5 9 . exd5 1 6. tll h3 b l 1 7. tll g5 lll d8 1 8 .ib5 xb5
After this relatively forced sequence, White
now missed a forced mate and went on to
draw the game. This is surprising for such a
highly-rated grandmaster, but it happens to
everyone!

9 . . . xb2
9 . . . d6 looks too passive, and this is
highlighted by a blitz game of mine. Whilst
these moves are not forced, it is totally clear
White has a huge advantage; compared to
some of the variations with ic 1 in line B3 1
he is effectively two tempos ahead. 1 0.ib 5 t
id7 1 1 .e2t @d8 1 2 .ixd7 lll bxd7 1 3 .tll h3
lll xd5 1 4 . 0-0-0 c6 1 5 .ig3 ie7 1 6.1::1 h e l
1::1 e 8 1 7.l!.ib l lll 7f6 1 8 .c4 lll c7 1 9 . tll g5 @d7 s.c!Lid2 Wxc3 9.J.c7!
20.tll xf7 1 -0 Antidrome - spark, Internet
20 1 1 .
1 0 .tll b5 tll xd5 1 1 .xd5 xa l t 1 2 .@f2

a b c d e f g h
If your opponent hasn't seen this before he
might get a shock at this point! This is the
starting position of this double pawn sacrifice
variation. I have done some serious analysis in
this line, greatly exceeding any previous work
on this variation. Whilst the bizarre nature
1 30 Richard Pert - Playin g the Trompowsky

of the resulting positions makes them quite


hard to accurately evaluate, on the whole the
positions do seem to favour White. Certainly
from a practical viewpoint I would consider
White favourite, especially if he is familiar
with the following extensive analysis.

Black's main choices are now B32 1) 9 b6?!, ...

B322) 9 e6 and B323) 9 d6.


... ...

9 . . . g6?! was played in the first game in this


line, bur it doesn't seem to work and it has l l . . . b5
rarely been tried since: I O.l:'lcl We3t l l .ctJ e2 l l . . .d6 1 2 .ic3 Wa3 1 3 . ctJ c4 Wa6 1 4 . ctJ g300
ctJ a6 1 2. ctJ c4 Wh6 1 3 .if4 Wg7 1 4 .Wa4 g5 1 2 .a4 b4 1 3 . ctJ c4 Wd8 1 4 .d6 e6
1 5 .ie5 g4 1 6. f4 Wg6 1 7. ctJ g3 Chernyshov I 4 . . . ct:J c6 l 5 . dxe7 ixe7 l 6 . ct:J d6t00
- Grischuk, Dagomys 200 5 ; Black is totally 1 5 . ct:J f4 ct:J c6 1 6.ib2
passive and White's advantage is significant. With e4-e5 on the cards.
1 6 . . . g5 1 7. ctJ d3 ig7 1 8 . ctJ xc5 0-0 1 9 .Wd2
B32 1) 9 b6?!
... ctJ h 5 20.e5

Black seems to be struggling in this line.

l OJ'k l !
This move i s White's best; the reason is
that if Black retreats with . . . Wa5 , he cannot
subsequently play . . . b5 as the c5-pawn would
drop to Elxc5.

I 0 . ctJ e2
I played this move in a London League
game against Bob Eames, who kindly told
me after the game that 1 0 .l:'lc l is White's 20 . . . ct:J f4?
best. The reason I say "kindly told me" is This allows White to break open the h-file.
because the next year he advised his good 20 .. . f6! 2 l .id3t
friend Dave Ledger to try this line against 2 1 .h4 f6 22.hxg5 fxg5
me in Hastings, and I got a chance to try out 22 . . . fxe5 23 .id3t
the improvement - I am not quite sure what 23 .id3 ctJ xd3t 24.Wxd3 h6 2 5 .Wg6 Elf4?
Bob's logic was there, but thanks anyway! 25 . . . '1We8 26.Elxh6 Wxg6 27.Elxg6 Elf4
Despite the substandard knight move the (27 . . . Elf5 2 8 . ctJ e3) 28 .l:'lc l iif7 29.Elxg5
position remains interesting, so I have 26 .Elxh6 ct:J d4 ?
included the game. 2 6 . . . Elh4 27.Wh7t +-
1 0 . . . '1Wa5 27.ixd4 Elxd4 28 .Wh7t iif8 29 .Elg6!
10 . . . '1Wa3 l l .l:'lb l ia6! 1 2 .l:'lb3 Wa5 1 3 .Wc 1 00 1 -0 R. Pert - Eames, London 2009 .
l l .ie5
.i -.t-
.--- - -%-. 8% . ', , , ;
I S . . . Wb2 is no improvement for Black:
8 - - - 0 %j'ef""' Y.%j'ef'
. %-_,,%_ .t. r. .t. r. .. %_
. . %.. .t.
" " Y. 1 6. ll:J e2 Wes 1 7.ibSt d8 1 8 .0-0 g6
1
%1'-
1 9 .if4 WhS 20.ll:Jg3 Wh4 2 1 .Wd2 h6
6

%,,
22.eS !+- Pavlovic - Aleksandrov, Vrnjacka

5 L' -
Banj a 200 S .

1 6.:gc3

4 B,
White plays a great game and never lets his
opponent get round to solving his problems

'" %.
, , J,%,
with the queen. I 've included the rest of the

)!. . . . . : J
game as it is well worth playing through.

m ii= :s
0
1 6 . . . Wb2 1 7. lLi e2 bS 1 8 .ib3 Wa3 1 9 . ll:J d4 g6
20.eS dxeS 2 I .d6 Wb4 22.l'k4 Wxc4 23 .ixc4
a b c d e f g h exd4 24.Wb3 e6 2 S .ixe6 E!:a7 26 .ixf7t
I O f;Ye3t
..
:gxf7 27.We6t ie7 2 8 . 0-0 0-0 29.dxe7 :ge8
If the black queen stays on the queenside it 30 .Wd6 ll:J bd7 3 1 .:ge l c4 32.ib4 d3 33.Wxa6
will soon be in danger again: l':lb8 34 .Wd6 E!:c8 3 S .ic3
1 0 . . . Wi'aS I Lies ia6 1 -0 Trent - Hebden, Southend 2006.
I Ld6? 1 2 . .ic3 Wi'xa2 ( 1 2 . . . Wi'a3 1 3 .ll:J c4
Wi'xa2 1 4.:ga l +-) 1 3 .ic4 Wa3 1 4 . ll:J b l +- 1 1 .ll:i e2 d6 12.ll:ic4 f;Yh6 13.f;Ya4t!
1 2 . .ic3 Wa3 And the b6-pawn will drop.
1 2 . . .ixfl doesn't really work: 1 3 .ixaS ixg2
I 4.ic3+- and Black will not be able to 13 ... id7
keep enough material for the queen, Bhat - I 3 . . . ll:J bd7? I 4.ll:J xb6+-
Panchanathan, Internet 2006.
1 3 . ll:J c4 ixc4 1 4 .ixc4 14.f;Ya3 a6 15.tlixb6 ga7 16 ..ixb8 gb7

-
;:: " " %
-:'0.
White's chances are clearly preferable.


-
8
% "/ .i.e 1 -
81 . 1
Y. Y.
1

..' . /,. ;.lj',.8%. .;/ \',,.,,.,;J, ;;::;(S


. "'. . .,
...
6 & ? ,: ?
; .J - ,r . /.::::

5 - L'
/ ;

: ii ,,
2 ':ii;"
b d f g h
. . ! . ,
ai .
=,.,, L
!o
b d f g h
a c e

a c e
1 4 . . . d6
1 4 . . . e6 I S . ll:J e2! exdS 1 6.ixf6 dxc4 1 7.Wd S ! 17.tlia8!!
also looks much better for White: l 7 . . . ll:J c6 This is one of the favourite moves I have ever
1 8 .:gd l played. The idea is to follow up with lLi c7t
1 4 . . . e S I S .Wd2 d6 1 6.:gb a driving out the black king for White to attack.
I S .id2 a6 I remember when I spotted it at the board
1 32 Richard Pert - Playin g the Trompowsky

- I couldn't believe my eyes that playing my


8 -j_ . . '
. -
.-,
knight into the corner could be such a strong
7 . . . . % . . . - ,. .. . .%.
6 if
. - ',. , . , ;
move. 7.

17 ... e6
5 1u.
: a %""-i!-
l 7 . . . Ei:xb8 1 8 . tll c7t @d8 1 9 .Wi'aS +-

,,. , . , P,

.. . . ...... .
1 8.c!ic7t @ds 19.c!ixa6 exd5 20.e5 dxe5
2 t!J

ttJ t!J rl!1..
:%'0
1 ,B BiiW:J.B
2 1 .Wi'aSt @cs 22.he5 ga7 23.f4 Wi'g5 .. %

24.Wi'c3 c6 25.b4 d4 26.xd4 Wi'xf4


27.c!ixc6 gxa2 28.e5 'i!Ya4 29.c!i b4 ga3 a b c d e f g h
30.a6t @d7 3 1 .'i!Yd2t @e6 32.cSt @xe5 1 1 .l"i:b l !N
33.f4t @e4 34.gc4# This move is far stronger than 1 1 .El:c 1 ?
R. Pert - D . Ledger, Hastings 20 1 0. because the rook is going to the 3 rd rank
and on the c3-square it can be attacked by
B322) 9 e6 .
. . . tll xd5 , whereas that is not the case on the
b3-square: 1 1 . . . exdS 1 2 .Ei:c3 Wa6 1 3 .Ei:e3
( 1 3 .exdS lll xd5-+) 1 3 . . . ie7+ Walton -
G . Buckley, Coventry 2007.
1 1 . . . exd S ? !
Black should probably prefer l 1 . . . c 4 1 2 .dxe6
and:
a) 1 2 . . . fxe6 1 3 . tll xc4 Wc5 1 4. tll d6t;!;
b) 1 2 . . . WfcS 1 3 . exf7t @xf7 1 4.if4 c3 ?
1 5 . tll xc3 Wfxc3 1 6 .Ei:cl Wf d4 l 7.El:xc8+-
c) 12 . . . dxe6 1 3 . c!i xc4 ib4t 1 4.@f2 ic5t
l 5 . tll d4 Wf c3 1 6. tll d6t @e7 1 7 . tll 6b5
ixd4t 1 8 .Wi'xd4 Wfxd4t 1 9 .tll xd4 tll bd7

b d f g h
20 .ie2;!;
a c e
1 2 .Ei:b3 Wa6
I consider this as an important option for
Black and one we should be ready for. There
are very few games in this line so much of the
analysis below has not been tested in practice,
but I have spent a lot of time on this variation
to ensure that the analysis can be trusted.

I O.c!ie2 'i!Yd3

.
Swinging the queen over to the kingside with
1 O . . We3 ?! seems wrong when the white bishop
can come back to the f4-square: l 1 .tll c4 Wi'h6
1 2 .if4 g5 1 3 .tll d6t ixd6 1 4.ixd6;!;

1 0 . . . Wi'a3
this is not just possible but very strong - 1 2 .ie5 ! ?
perhaps even winning. This was the first idea I looked at, preparing
1 3 . . . l'll xd5 l'll c3 .
Virtually forced as l'll c3 threatens to win the 1 2 . . . exd5
queen. 1 2 . . . ic5 1 3 .l'll xc4 Wxd l t ( 1 3 . . . Wxc4
1 4 . l'll f4 l!Mc6 1 5 .ib5 Wxc7 1 6. t'li xd5 l!Md6 1 4 .l'll c3) 1 4.E:xd l and White has
1 7.l'll c4+- compensation for the pawn.
White will quickly develop his rooks to the 1 3 .l'll c3 We3t 1 4.We2 Wxe2t 1 5 .ixe2 dxe4
e-file and mate looks likely. At chis exact moment White may be four
pawns down, but the compensation is
I Ub l ! obvious.
As against 1 0 . . . Wa3 , White threatens E:b3
which would be close to winning.

1 1 . .. c4!
It may not be obvious to the unprepared
player, but this move is close to being forced.

1 1 . . .exd5 1 2.E:b3 l!Ma6 1 3 .exd 5 ! transposes to


the note to Black's 1 0th move above.

% '""-0 , z ..-::
8 i. J.. -
%

7
6
.:1-
% -m
%.... fm' - - %-1
IY-m
r.- Y,
1 6 . t'li b 5 ! ?

11$11$ !1(
,,,,,

1 6.ixf6 ! ? exf3 ( 1 6 . . . gxf6 1 7. l'll dxe4 f5

11$
1 8 .l'll f6t @d8 1 9 .ixc4) 1 7.ixf3 gxf6

: 11$11$ f11$ !11$ 11$11$
1 8 . t'li b 5 ( 1 8 .l'll xc4 t'li c6 1 9 .l'll b5 @d8

11$'!1$'w.-
20.t'li bd6) 1 8 . . . t'li a6 1 9 .l'll xc4


3 11$
1 6 . . . l'll a6
% '"//,
- - - -- - j
l 6 . . . exf3 1 7.l'll c7t @d8 1 8 .l'll xf3 t'li c6
2 8 m mtt:Jm 8 eftJ

1 9 . l'll xa8 ic5 20 .ic7t rJle7 2 I .ixc4 d5

m a rilfm . a
22.ie2;:l;
1 6 . . . t'li c6 1 7.ixf6 gxf6 1 8 . l'll c7t @d8
a b c d e f g h l 9 .l'll xa8;:l;
I 7. l'll xc4 d5 1 8 . t'li cd6t ixd6 I 9 . l'll xd6t @e7
12.i.f4!
20.t'lixb700
This move looks totally bizarre and I had
Although White has compensation in
been aware of this position for some months
all these lines, it is not clear chat he has any
before I realized it may well be the way to go.
advantage.
The idea is to follow up with E:c l and either
E:c3 or l'll c3 , while l'll g3 is also on the cards.
White's plan seems slow, but it is effective and
12 ... exdS
I have looked at various ocher possibilities:
it puts the onus on Black to come up with
something.
12 . . . c3 ? 1 3 .l'll xc3 Wxc3 1 4 .E:c l +-
1 34 Richard Pert - Playing the Trom p owsky

1 2 . . . icS ? ! 1 3 .E:c l ;!; and White threatens E:c3 . position remains somewhat murky: l S . E:xc3
ixc3 1 6.Wc l ixd2t 1 7.Wxd2 0-0 1 8 .ieS
1 2 . . . ia3 ?! 1 3 .lll g3 Wc3 1 4.ixc4;!; d6 1 9 .ixf6 gxf6 20.Wf4
l S .lll bS Wes
1 2 . . . lll h S ? ! 1 3 . lll g3 lll xf4 1 4.ixd3 cxd3 l S . . . Wb6 1 6.lll c7t @f8 l 7.lll xa8+- picks up
1 S . lll c4 lll xg2t 1 6.@fl ;!; the a8-rook with tempo.
1 6 . lll d6t lt> f8
1 2 . . . lll a6 1 3 .E:c l lll h S ( 1 3 . . . ib4 1 4.lll c3 1 6 . . . @e7 1 7.ixc4;!;
Wd4 l S . lll b S Wb6 1 6.E:xc4 0-0 1 7.E:xb4
lll xb4 l 8 . lll c7 lll h S ? l 9 .lll c4+-) 1 4.lll c3 (or
1 4 . lll g3 !?) 1 4 . . . Wd4 ( 1 4 . . . lll x f4 1 S .ixd3;!;)
l S .lll bS Wes ( 1 S . . . Wb6 1 6.lll xc4) 1 6.E:xc4
Wb6 1 7.ieS

1 3.kl

1 7.a3
White can also consider I 7.ixc4 ! ? with the
idea: I 7 . . . dxc4? I 8 .E:xc4+-
1 7 . . . ixd2t
I 7 . . . ixa3 I 8 .lll 6xc4;!;
1 8 .Wxd2 lll c6 1 9 .lll fS lll e8 20.WxdS WxdS
2 1 .exdS;!;

14.lll c3

13 . . . dxe4? 1 4.E:xc4 lll c6 l S .lll c3 lll eS 1 6.ixd3


lll xd3 t 1 7.lt>fl +-

1 3 . . . lll h S 1 4. lll c3 lll xf4 1 S .ixd3 lll xd3t


1 6.@fl lll a6 17 .E:b l;!;

1 3 . . . ib4
Black looks for quick development.
1 4. lll c3 Wd4
Black can give up his queen with 1 4 . . . Wxc3
but White should be better, although the
White keeps an edge against all the 1 8 . . . c3 1 9 . 0-0 ic5 t 20.Wh l cxd2 2 1 .ixd2
alternatives: Wa3 22.gxc5 Wxc5 23 .if4 d5 24.ixb8 id?
2 5 . ll'l c7 d4 26.Wd2
1 4 . . . ll'l a6 1 5 . exd5 ib4 1 6. ll'l b 5 Wa5 1 7.ixc4;!;
19J'hc4 d5 20,gc2 dxe4 2 1 .0-0 exf3
14 . . . lll h5 l 5 .ie3;!; 22.lLixB
With two pawns for the exchange, material
14 . . . Wa5 1 5 . exd5 ib4 1 6 .We2t Wd8 is roughly level, but the misplaced black king
1 7.Wxc4;!; offers some encouragement to White.

15.lLibS Wa5 16.lLic7t @8 B323) 9 ... d6


16 . . . e7 1 7. exd5 c3 1 8 .We2t Wd8 1 9 . ll'l b3
c2t 20.Wf2 Wb6t 2 1 .We3 Wxe3 t 22.Wxe3 d6
23.gxc2;!;

a b c d e f g h
1 0.gb l !
I believe this i s strongest.

1 o . ll'l e2!?
This move works well against ... We3 , but the
problem is that it gives Black an additional
It was only after carrying out the above analysis option:
that I discovered that there had been an email 1 0 . . . Wd3 !
game which followed this route: Black should take this option although the
1 7.ll'l xa8 ! ? c3 1 8 .f2 position remains murky.
1 8 .gc200 1 0 . . . We3 1 1 .gb l transposes into a very
1 8 . . . ic5 t 1 9 . e2 favourable line for White - see 1 0 . . . We3 t in
1 9 .W e l ib4! is a repetition of moves. the following note.
1 9 . . . cxd2 20 .Wxd2 Wxd2t 2 1 .Wxd2 ib4t 1 1 .gb l
22.d3 dxe4t 23.fxe4 ll'l c6 24. ll'l c? ia3 1 1 .g c l ll'l bd7 1 2 .gc3 Wa6 1 3 . ll'l d4!? cxd4
25 .gc3 ib4 26.gc l ia3 27.gc3 1 4.ixa6 dxc3 gives Black enough material
Yi-Yi Klausen - Serradimigni, email 2007. for the queen.
l 1 .ll'l g3 We3t l 2.ie2 ll'l a6+
17 ... dxc4 18.lLixa8 lL! c6 l l . . .b6
1 36 Richard Pert - Playin g the Trompowsky

White's compensation was eventually


enough for a draw in Stavrianakis - Tukhaev,
Chalkida 2009.

10 l'ilfd7
...

This is now considered the main move, as


Black frees the f6-square for his queen to drop
back to.

1 0 . . . lli bd? 1 1 .lli e2 We3 1 2. lli c4 Wh6 1 3 .Wa4


g6 1 4. h4! (Black is able to allow 1 4 . lli b6 as
1 2 .gb3 the time spent pocketing the rook gives him
1 2 . lli g3 We3t 1 3 .ie2 id? ( 1 3 . . . lli a6 enough time to complete his development:
1 4.Wa4t lli d7 1 5 . lli f5) 1 4. lli c4! ( 1 4.Wc2? 1 4 . . .ig? l 5 . lli xa8 0-0 1 6.Wc2 lli e5 l 7 . lli c3
g6 1 5 .lli c4 Wf4 1 6.id3 ig7 1 7. lli e2 Wh4t id? 1 8 .Wd2 Wh4t 1 9 .Wf2 Wh6 20 .Wd2 with
1 8 .g3 Wh6-+ and White was running out of a repetition of moves) 14 . . . ig? l 5 .ia5 g5
ideas in A. Smirnov - Maslak, St Petersburg 1 6.id2 Wg6 1 7.hxg5t
2007.) 1 4 . . . Wc3t ( 1 4 . . . Wh6 1 5 . 0-0t)
1 5 .'it?f2 b5 1 6.gc l Wd4t 1 7.Wxd4 cxd4 1 0 . . . We3t l 1 . lli e2 lli a6 1 2 . lli c4 Wh6 1 3 .ia5
l 8 . lli a3 a6 l 9 . lli c2 White is regaining one g5 1 4. lli g3 g4 ( 1 4 . . . Wg6 1 5 .eS!t; 1 4 . . . ig?
pawn and will have decent compensation for l 5 . lli e3t)
the remaining pawn deficit.
1 2 . . . Wa6 1 3 .ixb8 gxb8 1 4. lli c3
1 4. lli d4!? Wb7 1 5 .ib 5 t ( 1 5 . lli c6 gas
1 6. lli c4 We?) 1 5 . . . id? 1 6.ic6 ixc6
1 7.llixc6 offers White some compensation,
but maybe not enough.
1 4 . . . Wb? 1 5 . lli c4
1 5 .ga3 is well met by 1 5 . . . a5+.
1 5 . . .id? 1 6.eS dxe5 1 7. lli xe5 g6
l 7 . . . a6! ? is also interesting.
a b c d e f g h
1 5 .gxb?! ixb7 ? 1 6. lli f5 1 -0 Miladinovic
- Gozzoli, Nancy 2008; a very impressive
victory. The reason for Black's resignation
is lines such as 1 6 . . . Wg5 1 7. lli cxd6t exd6
l 8.ib5t lli d7 1 9 .ixd?t 'it?xd7 20 .Wa4t
'it?c8 2 1 .We8t with mate next move.

1 0 . . . b6?! l I .i b 5 t id? 1 2 .Wa4 Wa5 ?


1 3 .Wxa5 bxa5 1 4.ic4+- and White picks up
the b 8-knight, Trent - Kotronias, Liverpool
1 8 . lli e4! 2008.
I O . . . tt.J a6 I l .ixa6 ( I l .ib5 t ! ? id? 1 2 . tD e2 1 2 . . . Wf6
'1fe3 1 3 . tt.J c4 Wg5 1 4 .ixa6 bxa6 1 5 . 0-0 is 1 2 . . . We3 1 3 . f4!? is an enterprising idea
another way to obtain good compensation aiming to trap the queen: 1 3 . . . axb5
for the pawns) 1 l . . . bxa6 1 2 . tD e2 ! ? ( 1 2 .Wa4t ( 1 3 ... Wa3 1 4.ic4 b6 [ 1 4 ... b5 1 5 .gb3
may lead to a draw, but White should not Wxa2 1 6. tD c3 nets the queen] 1 5 .gb3 Wa5
be satisfied with that: 1 2 . . . id? 1 3 .Wxa6 g6 1 6.e5;!;) 1 4.gb3 Wxb3 1 5 .axb3 tD a6 1 6.ia5
1 4. tt.J e2 Wc2! 1 5 .Wb7 gc8 1 6.gb2 Wa4 1 7. tD c3 b4 I 7 . tt.Jc4t
Wd4 I 8 . tt.J e2 Wa4 I 9 . tD c3 with a repetition of 1 3 .Wa4 g6
moves) 1 2 . . . Wa3 1 3 .Wc2 id? 1 4.gb3! ia4 1 3 . . . e6 1 4. 0-0 ie7 1 5 .f4 0-0 1 6.ic4 and
( 1 4 . . . Wa4 1 5 . tt.J c3 Wd4 1 6.Wb l ) 1 5 .gxa3 White threatens e4-e5 .
ixc2 1 6. f2 The misplaced bishop on c2 1 4. 0-0
gives White the advantage. 1 4. tt.J c4?! axb5 1 5 .Wxa8 bxc4 1 6.ixb8 ih6
1 7 .ixd6 0-0+
1 1 .J.hs 1 4 . . . ih6
This keeps the d3-square covered and intends 1 4 . . . ig? 1 5 .f4 0-0 1 6.id3 ga7 ( 1 6 . . . e5
tD e2 hitting the queen. 1 7. f5t) 1 7. tD f3 b5 1 8 .Wa5 ih6 1 9 .e5 dxe5
20.fxe5 Wg7 2 1 .@h l
1 5 .f4 0-0 1 6.id3
1 6 .e5 ? is too early: 1 6 . . . dxe5 l 7 . tt.J e4 Wh4+
1 6 . . . ga?
This move looks a bit clumsy, but it may
be Black's best choice as he has to try to get
organized somehow. The immediate e-pawn
breaks don't seem to work out too well for
him:
a) 16 . . . e5 1 7 . fxe5 Wg5 ( 1 7 . . . Wxe5 1 8 .tt.J c4
Wg5 1 9 .Wc2 b5 20.tDxd6 c4 2 1 .ixc4 bxc4
22.tDxc4 a5 23.gb3 ig7 24.gg3) 1 8 .ixd6
'1fe3t 1 9 .h l Wxd3 20.ixf8 ixd2 2 1 . e6
b) 1 6 . . . e6? l 7.ixd6+-
l 7.e5 dxe5 1 8 .tt.J e4 Wh4

1 l . . .a6! ?N 1 2 . tD e2

1 9 .g3 !
1 38 Richard Pert - Playin g the Trom p owsky

l 9.fxe 5 ? b5 20 .Wa5 c4 2 l .ic2 xc7 1 3.0-0!N


22.Wxc7 ie3t 23.@h l ib6-+ This time it Amazingly this obvious move is a novelty.
is White's queen which gets caught out! I'm
starting to lose count of how many times l 3 . f4 has been tried, but it looks premature:
someone loses their queen in this variation! 1 3 . . . ig7 ( 1 3 . . . Wh4t! ? N 1 5 .g3 Wh5 may be
1 9 . . . WhS slightly more accurate) 1 4 . e S ? ! White really
l 9 . . . Wh3 20 .Wc2 (not 20.fxe5 ? ie3t needs to play a couple of developing moves
2 1 .@h l b5-+ nor 20.ixb8 ?! lli xb8 2 1 .fxe5 before this expansion . ( 1 4. 0-0! returns to our
ie3t 22.@h l lli d7 23 . lli f4 ixf4+) 20 . . . exf4 main line.) 14 . . . Wi'h4t 1 5 .g3 Wh5 1 6. lli e4
2 1 .lli xf4 ixf4 22.ixf4 0-0 1 7. exd6 exd6 1 8 . lli xd6 lli f6+ and it
20 .ixb8 lli xb8 was clear that White had overextended in
20 ... b S 2 1 .Wc2 lli xb8 22 .Wxc5 Miladinovic - Volokitin , Murska S obota
2 1 .d6 b 5 ? ! 22.xb 5 2008.

.
.. . ... . -
.- r l
8
7 . . - r
1 3 . lli c4 ! ?

6 -.,Y.. n--.
Th i s has been a popular choice in the few

5 . ... %.
, . games which have reached this position.
Despite White winning a couple of nice

4 ,.... 3.lhD
games, I am slightly wary of this idea.

3 .i. wr
Although White still has excellent practical
.

2 8 tt:J. . 3
%
chances, the knight on c4 provides a

1 .
target for Black's queenside pawns and the

1.m ,
position can become murky.

b d f g h
% %

a c e

This wacky position is typical of this


variation. Obviously a lot of this is not forced
but it does give a flavour of what might happen
and some of the ideas which White should try
to implement.

12.llie2 Y:Vf6

a b c d e f g h
1 3 . . . ig7
l 3 . . . a6!N looks like a good move to me,
calling White's bluff and saying that if you
want to win some material you are going to
have to misplace all your minor pieces to do
so. 1 4. lli b6 axb5 1 5 .llixa8 and:
a) 1 5 . . . lli a6 ! ? 1 6.xb5 Wh4t ( 1 6 . . . ih6
1 7.0-0 0-0 1 8 .ia5t followed by ic3)
1 7.g3 Wh5 1 8 . lli f4t
b) 1 5 . . . b4? 1 6 . .ixb8 llixb8 1 7.Wa4t
c) 1 5 . . . .ih6 1 6 . .ixb8 lli xb8 1 7 . lli c7t;!;
d) 1 5 . . . Wg5 1 6 . 0-0 We3 t 1 7.@h l Wa3
1 8 .ixd6 exd6 1 9 . lli c7t @d8 20.llixb500
1 4 .e5
14 . .ia5 ? 0-0 1 5 ..ic3 Wh4t 1 6.g3 .ixc3t+
1 4 . 0-0!? Now ia5-c3 really will be an
option with no annoying . . . Wh4t to worry
about. 1 4 . . . 0-0 1 5 .ia5 a6 1 6 . .ic3 Wg5
1 7.id2 Wh5 1 8 . .ixd7-+
1 4 . . . dxe 5! ?
1 4 ... Wg5 1 5 . 0-0 dxe5 1 6.f4 W h 5 1 7.b3-+
Bosiocic - Fercec, Sibenik 2008.
1 5 . .ixe5 Wh4t 1 6 . .ig3!
1 6.g3 Wh6 1 7.d6 e6 1 8 ..ixg7 Wxg7 1 9 . 0-0
0-0+
1 6 . . . Wh5
After 16 . . . Wg5 1 7.h4 Wf5 1 8 . lli e3 Wf6
l 9 . lli g4 Wf5 20 . .ia4! the black queen is in 1 5 . . . e 5 1 6.dxe6 Wxe6 1 7 . .ixd6;!;
trouble.
1 7.h4 a6N 1 6.e5 W/f5 17.id3 W/h5 1 8.c!lig3 Wlg4
1 7 . . . 0-0 1 8 . .if4 Wf5 l 9 . g4 ic3 t 20.@f2 1 9.exd6 e6 20.dxe6 Wfxe6 2Uel Wfxa2
.id4t 2 1 .Wg2 Wxd5 22.llic3 We6 23.e l
was excellent for White in Alf - Gorokhov,
email 2007.
1 8 .ixb8 axb5 1 9 .g4 Wh6 20.g5 Wh5 2 1 . lli g3
bxc4 22 . .if4;!;
And the black queen is trapped; but despite
this there is still plenty of play left in the
position as Black has a whole host of minor
pieces and pawns to pay for his queen .

13 ... ig7
1 3 . . . a6 1 4.Wa4 transposes to the note to
Black's 1 1 th move above.

14.4
1 4 . .ia5 is perhaps premature: 1 4 . . . 0-0
1 5 .ic3 Wh4+

1 4 ... 0-0 15.c!lif3


Now all of White's pieces are well positioned
22 ... c!li c6 23.ic4 Wla4 24.ib3 Wlb5
and he is ready to bring his bishop from c7 to
25.ixf7t
c3, or to play e4-e5 .
1 40 Richard Pert - Playing the Trom powsky

White has the option of a repetition of Conclusion: This chapter featured various
moves with 2 5 .c4. contrasting lines. In line A) 4 . . . lt:l f6 5 . dxc5 ! ?
White obtains comfortable development and
25 ... gxfl 26.gxb5 axb5 27.f5 gal 28.e3 good control of the centre, and is slightly
gxel t 29.xel ti de5 30.lig5;!; better.
Turning to the more critical 4 . . . 1Wa5 t 5 . c3
lt:l f6 6.d5 1Wb6, I offered you a choice. After
defending the b2-pawn with the solid B3 1 )
7.c l , White has a simple plan o f development
and good chances for a small advantage.
But if you fancy ruffling your opponent's
feathers then sacrificing two pawns with B32)
7.e4! ? looks interesting. A lot of the analysis
of this line is my own work, due to the lack of
games in this variation. This analysis has been
built up over several months and years and so
hopefully will add significantly to the theory
of this line. Whilst it is impossible to analyse
everything, this provides a good start and in
my opinion should be more than enough to
tempt you to give this line a whirl.
Chapter ?
a b c d e f g h

2 ... d5 3.ixf6

1 .d4 f6 2.J.g5 d5 3.J.xf6

A) 3 ... gxf6!? 143


B) 3 ... exf6 4.e3 J.d6 5.g3 c6 6.J.g2 147
Bl) 6 ... 0-0 7. e2 148
B 1 1) 7 ...b6 149
B 1 2) 7 ...J,f5 149
B13) 7 ... d7 1 50
B2) 6 ... f5! 7. e2 151
B2 1) 7 ... J.e6 151
B22) 7 ... d7 1 52
1 42 Richard Pert - Playin g the Trompowsky

I .d4 c!ll f6 2 ..ig5 d5 3 . .ixf6!?


This move is a solid option for Black, who The more positional system involving 3 . e3
is just looking to get himself into the game will be covered in the next chapter.
without anything going wrong. It can be a
frustrating move for a Trompowsky player Exchanging the f6-knight is White's most
to face, as it is more difficult to create a free popular choice in this position and there is
flowing initiative against this move than it is a case for saying it is White's strongest move
against many of Black's other options. In fact, although personally I feel like that the decision
I would estimate that in recent years I have comes down to taste. It is important that we
devoted more time to the analysis of 2 . . . d5 have a look at this line and so I have attempted
than to any of Black's other options on the to build on previous authors' analysis in this
second move. It was the choice of Michael variation.
Adams, David Howell, and Pavel Tregubov
against me, just to name a few, so it is clear a) 3 .. gxf6!? is an ambitious approach. I
.

that it is highly respected. I am going to look have some exciting new ideas here, having
at two key ways of tackling this move, the first prepared against this move for a league game
based on taking the f6-knight. early in 20 1 3 .

b) 3 . exf6 is the more popular recapture, and


..

we will have a look at plans involving g2-g3 .


This system was championed by both Pete
Wells and Richard Palliser in their respective
books, but we will have a look to see what's
new since then.

a b c d e f g h
Chapter 7 - 2 . . d5 3 .ixf6
. 1 43

I.d4 tll f6 2.J.gS d5 3.Lf6 so it is always worth keeping an eye out for
Black has A) 3 ... gxf6!? and B) 3 ... exf6 . her games.

A) 3 .. gxf6!?
.

a b c d e f g h
7 . tt:l ge2! ?
White aims t o use her knight on g3 .
7 . . . b6 8 .d2 dxc4 9 .lll g3 id3 1 0 .ixd3
cxd3 l 1 . lll h5 lll d7 1 2 .g4 0-0-0 1 3 . 0-0-0
a5 1 4.c.tib l g8 1 5 . h3 f5 1 6. f3 e5 1 7.xd3;1;
White's chances are preferable, Stefanova -
Kovalevskaya, Sochi 2006.
4.c4
4. . .c5!?
I think this is the logical follow-up to the
Th i s alternative looks a b i t more like i t
exchange on f6 .
to me.

-,-- ,,
% "r
, '
?I
. %
4.e3 is also playable and is likely to transpose
s .l J..
to line B of the next chapter after 4 . . . c5. 7

6
(
...

z ...

4 ... dxc4
". % "-
5 "
This has to be considered the main line,
.

"fi Wfj. . %
though Black has tried various other moves. 4

3 - -
4 . . . c6
2 zJ& (/J&/;J/J-%
1 g ti\ : m .a:
This is quite commonly played, but it is a
bit wet and White should have no problems
securing a small advantage.
a b c d
..

e f g h
5 .e3 if5 5 . cxd5 xd5 6 . tt:l f3 cxd4 7.lll c3 a5 8 . tt:l xd4
5 . . . e6?! looks too passive: 6 . tt:l c3 f5 7. lll f3 id?
ig7 8 .c2 tt:l d7 9.h3 dxc4 1 0 .ixc4 c7 8 . . . ig7 9 . e3 0-0 l O .id3 ( 1 0 .ic4!?_.
1 1 . 0-0-0 b5 1 2 .ib3 ia6 1 3 .g4;1; Hodgson looks to me like a better square, though it
- A. Martin, Plymouth 1 992. is probably j ust a matter of taste) 1 0 . . . d8
6. lll c3 e6 1 1 . 0-0 f5 1 2.h5 e6 1 3 .ad l e5 1 4 .lll f3
We are following one of Stefanova's games; f6 1 5 . e4 tt:l c6 1 6 .fel ( 1 6.ic2! keeps
she is a leading expert on the Trompowsky some advantage: 1 6 . . . g6 l 7.xd8 t tt:l xd8
1 44 Richard Pert - Playing the Trompowsky

1 8 .Wfh4;!; and in contrast to the game . . . Wfg4 1 1 . . .lD aS 1 2 . lD b S;t .


is not possible as the knight is hanging on 6.cxdS WfxdS 7.Wi'a4t lD c6 8.Wi'xb4 lD xb4
d8.) 1 6 . . . Wfg6 1 7.Wi'h4 Wi'g4 1 8 .exfS Wfxh4 9 . liJ xdS lD xdS
1 9 . llJ xh4 if6 20.g3 1h-1h Wells - Sulskis,
Isle of Man 2003; even in the final position
I still prefer White.
9.g3 ! ?
I like this way of developing, although 9.e3!?
is also possible, as is 9 .Wfb3 .
9 . . . llJ c6 1 0 . liJ b3 WfeS
1 0 . . . WfhS 1 1 .Wi'dS WfxdS 1 2 .llJ xdS 0-0-0
1 3 .ig2 @b8 1 4. 0-0 ig7 1 5 .l:!ac l e6
1 6. llJ f4 fS 1 7.lD cS;!; Martinovic - B. Lalic,

h
Zadar 2008.
a b c d e f g
1 l .ig2 l:!d8 1 2 .Wfc l e6 1 3 . 0-0 h S 1 4. f4 Wfc7
1 5 . llJ e4 Wi'b6t 1 6.@h l ie7 I 7.Wfc3 l:!h6 I O .e4!N
1 8 .llJ ecS ic8 White should take the opportunity to get
This was Cebalo - Cvitan, Stari Mikanovci this move in while he has the chance!
2009. Here White should play: 1 0 . 0-0-0 is well met by: I O . . .ifS ( I O . . . e4
1 l . e3 l:!g8 1 2.g3 ig4 1 3 .l:!d2 @d7 1 4.ic4
c6 1 5 .h3 ie6 1 6.ixdS ixdS 1 7. b3 fS
1 8 . lD e2;!; Nikolov - Vuj ovic, Budva 2009)
l l . e3 0-0-0 1 2 .ic4 ie400 Polaczek - Van
den Doel, Germany 2006.
1 0 . . . llJ b4
White also keeps an edge after 1 0 . . . llJ e7
1 1 . 0-0-0;!; or 1 0 . . . llJ f4 1 1 .dS;!;.
1 1 .l:!c I;!;
White's better pawn structure ensures an
advantage.

5.e3
5 . e4 is also possible, but after looking at it
some depth I have concluded that it is too
4 . . . eS loose.
This is also playable, though very rare.
5 . llJ c3 ib4 5 ... c5
5 . . . dxc4 6 . llJ f3 exd4 7.llJxd4 cS 8 . lD c2 5 . . . ie6 6 . llJ e2 cS 7 . lD bc3 (7. llJ f4 WfaSt
( 8 . lD db S a6 9 .Wfxd8t 'itixd8 1 0 . 0-0-0t 8 . lD c3 is j ust a transposition) 7 . . . Wf aS 8 . lD f4
lD d7 l 1 . liJ d6 ixd6 1 2.l:!xd6) 8 . . . Wfxd l t cxd4 9 .exd4 id7 1 0 .ixc4 White has a lead in
(8 . . . Wf aS 9 . e4 ie6 1 0 . lD e3;!; gives White development and stands better, Hoang Thanh
plenty of activity) 9 . l:!xd l ie6 1 0 . e4 llJ c6 Trang - Szeberenyi, Budapest 2004,
1 1 .lD e3 and White wins back the pawn in
view of 1 1 . . . lD e S ? ! 1 2. f4 ih6 1 3 . llJ ed S or 6 ..ixc4 cxd4
Chapter 7 - 2 . . . d5 3 .ixf6 14 5

7
8 .1

?""/
..t.
:/" L;
-- ,,..,%--,
,
, , , , 9 . . . Wf a5
It looks natural for Black to try to exchange
L' L' ,
,

queens to neutralize White's pressure, but it


6 proves difficult for him to do this effectively.
" ' 9 . . . Wc7 1 0 .exd4;!;

: - I O .Wxa5

m

-j,,
J
J I O .ib5 also looks interesting: 1 0 . . . id?

rt '
3 ll? """'>rt
m""'
(not 1 0 . . . dxc3? I I .ixc6t bxc6 1 2 .Wxa5)

2 J)J y -r1/d:/J.fj
l l .xd4oo

m

1 0 . . . lt:lxa5 I I .ib5t lll c6

1 tIJ-il
1 1 . . . .id? 1 2.ixd?t \t>xd7 1 3 .xd4t @c7
1 4. lt:l ge2 lll c6 1 5 .c4;!; with lt:l d4 to come.
a b c d e f g h 1 2. exd4 id? 1 3 .d5 ih6t 1 4.@b l lll e5
7.exd4 1 5 .ixd?t lll xd7 l 6. lll f3 lll c5 l 7.dxe6 fxe6
I have discovered a particularly interesting 1 8 .b4!
unplayed idea here: White plays he l next and Black will
7. lll c3 !?N struggle to hold his central pawns together.
White can get away with delaying the capture
of the d4-pawn on tactical grounds, with 7 ...ig7 8.c3 0-0
the idea of taking it under more preferable 8 . . . f5 9 .lll ge2 lt:l c6 1 0.d5 lll e5 1 I .ib3 id?
circumstances at a later stage. This was my ( 1 1 . . . 0-0 would transpose to the main line
intended novelty when I recently prepared after 1 2. 0-0 and is perhaps the option Black
this line for a game, but the position never should have taken) 1 2. 0-0 Wb6 1 3 .c l Wh6
came about. 1 4.ia4!;!; Povah - D. Ledger, Birmingham
7 . . . lt:l c6 200 1 .
7 . . . dxc3 ? is certainly not advisable: 8 .ixf7t
\t>xf7 9 .Wfxd8+- 9.ge2 ti c6 1 0.0-0
8 .Wh5 I O .Wfd2 has been played on a few occasions
8 . exd4 ig? transposes into the main line. and mentioned by previous authors, White
8 . . . e6 9 . 0-0-0 wants to play d l to support the pawn on d4,
but it all looks a bit slow and clumsy to me.

1 0 ... fS
146 Richard Pert - Playin g the Trom powsky

1 1 .d5 l 9 . E:xf7!! and Black loses after all of


White nearly always goes for this plan. He 19 . . . E:xf7 20.xb8t or 19 . . .xf7 20 .ixe6
gains space, but yields the e5-square to the or 1 9 . . . @xf7 20.E:xe6.
black knight. 1 9 .E:d6 ib7
1 9 . . . E:ac8 ? 20 .ia6 E:c7 2 1 .c l +-
1 1 .E:e l ! ? 20 .E:d? ic6 2 1 .E:c7
I'm not sure why this move hasn't been White decides he can do better than force
repeated since Georgiev played it in 2007. a draw.
White keeps his pawn on d4 to cover the e5- 2 1 . . . id5 22 .ixd5 exd5 23 .E:ce?;!;
square. Ki. Georgiev - Ruck, Sibenik 2007.
1 1 . . . tt:\xd4
Black has to really take this pawn if he hopes 1 1 . .. tll e5 12.ib3 %Vd6
to prove that 1 1 .E:e 1 is incorrect. 1 2 . . . a6 1 3 .d2 d6 1 4 .f4 h8 1 5 .E:fe l
1 2 .tt:\xd4 ixd4 1 3 .d2 f6 Black doesn't seem to come up with a
plan and shuffles his pieces around. 1 6.E:ad l
E:g8 l 7 . tt:\ d4;!; White has developed wisely and
can claim an advantage, Palliser - McPhillips,
Millfield 2004.

a b c d e f g h
1 3 . . . if6
1 3 . . . ig? 1 4.xd8 E:xd8 1 5 .E:xe?;!; looks
better for White.
1 4 .tt:\ d5 e6 1 5 . tt:\ xf6t xf6 1 6.E:ad l b6
This is almost an only move as Black must
try to catch up in development.
1 7.f4 ib7 1 8 .E:d? ic6
1 8 . . . E:ab8? cannot be recommended.
13.h3
1 3 . tt:\ d4 ! ? id? ( 1 3 . . . tt:\ g4?! 1 4. tt:\ f3 @h8
1 5 .h3 tt:\e5 1 6.E:e l was a fraction better for
White in Bui Vinh - Wittmann, Budapest
2007) 1 4.E:e l E:fe8 1 5 .h3 b600 Muukkonen
- Borisovs, corr. 20 1 0 .

13 ... id7 I 4.J.a4


A common plan for White, which we also
saw in Povah - Ledger above.

14 ... tlic4 15.i.xd7 %Vxd7 16.b3 tll b6 17.%Vd3


Chapter 7 - 2 . . . d5 3 .ixf6 1 47

l:fac8 1 8Jadl gc5 19.Yllif3 ffc8 20.gd3 @hS our c2-c4 pawn thrust.
1/2-1/i 7 . . . a5 8 . tli e2 a4 9 . tli d2 if5
The position is balanced and the players
agreed a draw in Miladinovic - Ki. Georgiev,
Bar 2008.

B) 3 ... exf6

1 0 .e4
Stefanova switches plans and gains an edge,
but it seems more natural to me to continue
with queenside play.
However, the immediate 1 O.c4 is a bit
awkward for White after: I O . . . axb3 I I .axb3
!!xa l 1 2.Wi'xa l i.b4 1 3 .cxd5 0-000
1 O .bxa4!?N may be a better solution:
10 ... !!xa4 1 1 . 0-0;!; White tucks the king
4.e3 id6 away safely before continuing with c2-c4.
Black has numerous moves here but a lot of 10 ... dxe4 1 1 . 0-0 ie7 1 2 . tli c4 Wi'd8 1 3 . tli c3
them will transpose. Often he goes for plans 0-0 1 4.tlixe4t
involving . . . f5 and transferring the b8-knight Stefanova - Romanishin, Solin 2006.
to f6 in order to have a bit more influence on
the kingside. 4 . . . c6! ?
This can be played with an interesting idea
4 . . . ie6
for countering White's anticipated fianchetto.
This will often transpose but I will j ust
5 . tli e2
mention a couple of ways Black can deviate
This rare move order may avoid Black's idea.
at an early stage.
5 . g3 h 5 ! ?
5 . g3 c6
5 . . . c5?! doesn't look right to me as Black
saddles himself with a weak isolated d5-
pawn: 6 . tli e2 tli c6 7.i.g2 Wi'b6 8.tli bc3
cxd4 9.exd4 Wi'xb2 1 0 .!!b U Ki . Georgiev -
Moreno Ruiz, Leon 20 1 0 .
6.ig2 Wi'b6
6 . . . id6 7 . tli e2 f5 transposes to line B2 I .
7.b3
Black has spent time forcing this move, but
we often want to play it anyway to support
1 48 Richard Pert - Playing the Trompowsky

Only played once, but it looks interesting to Bl) 6 ... 0-0


me. Black aims to force White to clarify his
kingside straight away. 6 . h4 .ig4N 7.V*'d200 Black's most common move, but not his best.
It all looks a bit awkward for White. White can transpose into line B2, but there is
5 .. . f5 6.g3 lll d7 7 . .ig2 lll f6 8 .V*'d3 g6 9 . b3 a more promising option involving the idea of
.ig7 1 0 .c4 0-0 l 1 . lll bc3 .ie6 1 2 . 0-0 lll e4 an early b2-b3 and c2-c4, when the b I -knight
1 3 . cxd5 cxd5 1 4.fc l;!; may then j ump to c3 . White does not want
Stefanova - N. Kosintseva, Moscow 20 1 0 . to play this plan with his king uncastled, as
b2-b3 and c2-c4 weakens the a5-e 1 diagonal
5.g3 to his king, but an important point is that
since Black has castled, White can in turn
% '''/0. './'" '" % ' ' ' ' '/.
8 i. al..iJ
-,- - -%
-
castle without worrying about the possibility
7
of . . . h 5 .
.,- Y.
6 ,,

5
{@j
, , %
.- -
- - - , .

, ,

7.lll e2

4 - w
r m
-
,
3 -- , , % wr
2 8 8-""% , , , %
1 -vm!
,,, , . , %
,, , , , Y,

a b c d e f g
'./,-, , , , , ;

h
This is the line which Wells recommended,
and he has backed up his belief in this line
by playing it on several occasions. Palliser
too followed in his footsteps. The only thing
which slightly disappointed me about their
books was they did not try to find White's
most precise move order - instead they focused
on model games, although to be fair to them
transpositions are likely via many different
routes. I am going to further explain the
ideas of these two players, and in addition I 7 . . . .ig4 was played recently against Georgiev,
shall aim to give you an exact move order for who has considerable experience in these lines:
White to cause Black the most problems. We 8 .V*'d3 .ixe2 9.V*'xe2 V*'b6 1 0 .b3 Again the
shall also have a look at some important recent standard move when the b-pawn is attacked.
games. 1 0 . . . V*'a6 l l .c4 .ib4t 1 2.'kt>fl dxc4 1 3 .V*'xc4
V*'a5 1 4.a3 .ie7 1 5 .b4 V*'h5 1 6 . lll c3 lll d7
s ... c6 6.J.g2 l 7.V*'e2 V*'xe2t 1 8 .'kt>xe2;!; White's better pawn
Black now chooses between Bl) 6 ... 0-0 and structure and more active bishop give him a
B2) 6 ... fS!. clear advantage in the endgame, Ki . Georgiev
- Codenotti, Arvier 20 1 2 .
Chapter 7 - 2 . . . d5 3 .ixf6 1 49

7 . . . ie6 8 . 0-0 ll\ d7 9 .iWd3 f5 1 0 . ll\ d2 ( 1 0.b3!


seems more consistent with White's plans, and
after 1 o . . . ll\ f6 l l .c4 play has transposed into
line 8 1 3 below) 1 0 . . . ll\ f6 l l . c4 ffe7 1 2 .E:fc l
g6 1 3 .a3 E:fd8 1 4 .b4 ll\ e4 1 5 . c5 ic7 1 6 .a4t
Andreikin - Tomashevsky, Khanty-Mansiysk
20 1 1 .

B l l ) 7 ...Wb6

l 3 ... tl)d7
Black backtracks, vacating the b6-square for
his queen.

14.c4 dxc4 1 5.xc4 if8 1 6.V:'fc2 b5 17,tl)d2


Wb6 1 8.ig2 gac8 19.b4
White's advantage is totally clear, with the
backward c6-pawn firmly in my sights, R. Pert
8.b3 - Povah, Hinckley Island 20 1 1 .
As previously mentioned, this is the logical
response to . . . Wfb6, looking to set up a future B 1 2) 7 ... if5
c2-c4 .

8 ... ges 9.0-0 ig4!?


Craftily threatening to take on e2 and then
play . . . 'Wxd4, when my e3-pawn would be
pinned.

IO.gel!
Avoiding the trap; now the black pieces are
asking to be hit by c4-c5 .

I O ... tl) d7 1 1 .a3 'Wa6 12.d2 tl) b6


1 50 Richard Pert - Playing the Trompowsky

This was tried against me in a London 29 .id3;!; White may still be better, but Black's
League match, but Black soon finds his bishop counterplay is quite scary.
misplaced and has to take time to move it
again. 23.YMxa7 YMxd4?? 24.exd4 gel t 25.!J.fl !J.h3
26.e3
8.d2 d7 9.0-0 ges 10.c4 dxc4 1 1 .xc4 1 -0 R. Pert - Coles, London 20 1 1 .
!J.c7 12. lil c3 /J.e6 1 3.d5 cxd5 14.xd5 e5
15.gcl xc4 16.gxc4 /J.d6 17.'iMd2 gcs B 1 3) 7 ... d7 8.0-0 f5
18Jhc8 !J.xc8

9.b3!
Having castled, White can execute his plan
of b2-b3 and c2-c4 without worrying about
possibilities such as . . . ib4t.

9 ... f6 1 0.c4 !J.e6


1 9 ... /J.fS 1 O dxc4?! does not work out well for Black:
. .

1 9 . . . ig4 is perhaps an improvement: 20.f3 l l . bxc4 '1We7 1 2 . lli bc3 :ge8 1 3 .:gb l lli e4 1 4 .c5
ie6 2 1 . xf6t '1Wxf6 22.'1Wxd6 ixa2 23.'1Wxf6
gxf6 24. @f2;j;

20.'iMc3
20 .'1Wc2 ! ? Wa5 2 1 .:gd4 '\We i t (2 1 . . .'1Wxa2 ?
22 .ie4+-) 22 .ifl h5 23.'1Wa4 a6 24.llib6 ig4
(24 . . . ih3 2 5 . :g d l +-) 2 5 .:gxg4;!;

20 ...YMd6 2 1 .gd4 YMe5 22.'iMa5 b6?


22 . . . ie6! is the move that I was worried
about: 23.'1Wxa7 :gc8 24.if3 :ge l t 2 5 .'tt> g2
'1Wf5 26. lli f4 'IWb l 27.ie4 (27.llixe6? :ggl t
2 8 . 'it>h3 Wfl t 29.'tt> g4 fxe6 30 .'1Wxb7 h5t
3 1 .'tt> f4 '1Wh3-+) 27 ... :gg l t 2 8 .'tt> f3 We l
Chapter 7 - 2 . . . d5 3 .ixf6 151

l 5 . lli xe4 fxe4 1 6. tli c3 f5 l 7 .Wa4 gd8 l 8 .gb2 1 3.cS ic7 I4.b4 hS 1 5 .h4 gfeg 1 6.tll f4
h5 1 9 .gfb l h4 20.gxb7 ixb7 2 1 .gxb7 Wd7 ixf4 17.exf4 tll e4 18.tll e2 bS 1 9.a4 a6 20.f3
22.ih3 hxg3 2 3 .hxg3 gdb8 24.ixf5 Wxf5 tll f6 2 1 .ga3 b7 22.d2 gas 23.gfal geb8
2 5 . gxc7 gf8 26.Wc2 Wells - Howell, Halifax 24.ifl tll e8 25.tll cl tll c7 26.lLJd3;!;
(rapid) 2004. Ki. Georgiev - A. Horvath, Fuegen 2006.

1 1 .d3 B2) 6 .. fS!


.

l I . . .Wa5 1 2 .c5 ie7 1 3 .a3 b5 1 4 . b4 Wc7 7.tll e2


1 5 .a4 bxa4 1 6. tli bc3 a5 1 7. b 5 cxb 5 1 8 . tLl xb5;!; Black now decides which of his queenside
Sedlak - Vukic, Subotica 2008. minor pieces to develop first: B2 1) 7 ... ie6
and B22) 7 ... tll d7.
l l . . . a6 1 2.c5 ic7 1 3 . b4 b5 1 4.cxb6 id6
1 5 . b7 ga7 1 6.a3 Wb6 1 7. tli bc3 gxb7 1 8 .gfc l B2 1) 7 ...ie6
gc8 l 9 . tli a4 Wa7 20.tlic5 ixc5 2 1 .gxc5 tli d7
22 .gc3;!; Stefanova - Peptan, Dresden 2004. Flicking in this move before developing the
b8-knight to f6 has the bonus of making c2-c4
l I . . .g6 1 2 . tli bc3 ic7 1 3 .gfc l ge8 1 4 .cxd5 a more difficult task for White.
lli xd5 l 5.llixd5 ixd5 l 6.ixd5 Wxd5 l 7.tlic3
Wf3 1 8 .We2 Wxe2 1 9 . lli xe2 id6 20.gab l 8.tll d2 tll d7 9.b3
'it>g7 2 1 . b4 gac8 22.tlic3;!; Mensch - Boursier, It is still important not to castle too early,
France 2009. as an incoming . . . h5 can be a big problem.
The ideal situation is if Black castles, when
12.tll bc3 gac8 the option of castling then becomes available
1 2 . . . gad8 1 3 . gfc l gfe8 1 4. lli f4;!; Gonzalez to us.
Rodriguez - Pujol Clua, Barcelona 2003 .
9 ... lLJf6 10.c4 ib4
1 52 Richard Pert - Playing the Trompowsky

1 0 . . . h5 l 1 .h4 occurred in a game by Pete 1 1 .0-0 .txd2 1 2.YHxd2 dxc4


Wells which he discussed in derail in his book.
Again you should note chat White delays
castling until Black commits his king, first
carrying out an advance on the queenside.

--
' ' " Z
8
7
!"- -; . '

6 r..-0 zJ...
.. . .

@. . . . - '" ""
5
. . . ... .
AA
4

3 -- .... w-% w -l- ....
8 if .. t%
z , ,J@-P.
"

2 8 t

1 ,_9. r------
ii -i( -- %
:@ h
. ... ..

a b c d e f g

l I . . . ltJ e4 1 2 .c5 ic7 1 3 . b4 g6 1 4.a4 'itif8


1 5 .Wc2 'tt> g7 1 6 .Wb2 id7 1 7. ltJ f4 gb8 1 8 .E:a3
Wells - Parker, West Bromwich 2003. We
have a strategical manoeuvring game where
1 3 ... cxb3 14.tll xe6 fxe6 1 5 .l:Ub l 0-0
White's chances are slightly preferable due to
1 6.gxb3 Wd7 17.Wb4 Ub8 1 8.gab l ii;
an eventual b4-b5 break being on the cards.
White had good compensation for the pawn

1 O . . . ltJ e4 l l . c 5 ! ? This move was recommended


in Hodgson - Tiviakov, Groningen 1 994.

by Wells. 1 1 . . . ic? 1 2 . b4 g6 1 3 .Wb3 'tt> f8 1 4 .a4


B22) 7 ... tll d7
Walton - Schaefer, Bad Woerishofen 2003; the
position is similar to Wells - Parker above.

1 0 . . . 0-0 1 1 . 0-0 g6 1 2 .cxd5 ixd5


Chapter 7 - 2 . . . d5 3 .ixf6 1 53

still in the middle: 8 . . . lll f6 9 . c4 (9.lll d2?! lll e4! 9 . . . ll\ e4 1 0 . 0-0 lll xd2 I 1 .Wxd2 dxc4

J.% . . .s JI
looks uncomfortable for White) 9 . . . ib4t!



8
The point - Black can cause problems with

1 f.....
r. . . . . .,

6
this check. 1 0 .'>tifl 0-0 I l .c5 ia5 1 2.a3 ic7
iB % B i i . %

- -- -,--
1 3 . lll bc3 b600 Laznicka - Howell, Liverpool

: ,
2008.

8 ... tlJf6
.... r.WKWM
After
3 riJ-Pz
2 iffj @11r. 1 .i. ..

w--
wnL.m %
8 . . . 0-0
it is a bit frustrating that White cannot play
the standard plan that we saw in line B 1 3 , as ,
1 - -.f- -
'

a
"'

b c d e f g
.

h
.

his knight is already on the d2-square:


9 . 0-0 ll\ f6 1 2.gfd l ! ?N
1 2 .d5 c5 1 3 .Wc3 0-0 1 4.Wxc4 b5
1 5 .Wxb5N ( 1 5 .Wc200 Rewitz - J . Nielsen,
Copenhagen 1 987) 1 5 . . . gbs 1 6.Wc4 gxb2
1 7.gab l;!; White's passed d-pawn should
secure a small advantage.
1 2 . . . 0-0
1 2 . . . ie6?! 1 3 .d5 cxd5 1 4.ixd5 ie5
( 1 4 . . . ic7? 1 5 .Wc3 ixd5 1 6 .Wxg7 ms
1 7. lll c3 +-) 1 5 .Wb4 ixd5 1 6.Wb 5 t Wd7
1 7.gxd5 and White regains the pawn with
advantage.
1 3 .gac l ie6 1 4.d5;!;
I O . c4
The correct approach here is to leave out b2- 9 ... h5N can be met by 1 0 .h4 and the white
b3 altogether. king is still not under threat, or by 1 0 .Wb3 ! ?
1 0 . . . ie6 with active play for White.
1 0 . . . dxc4 1 1 .lll xc4 ic7 1 2 .Wb3 transposes
to our main line. 10.tlJxc4 !J..c7
I 1 .c5 ie7 1 2 . b4 a5 1 3 . a3 axb4 1 4. axb4 b5 If Black instead gives a check, then White
1 5 .Wb3 Wc7 1 6.ga3 ga7 1 7.gfa l;!; has to play accurately to gain an advantage:
Ward - Akesson, Isle of Man 2000. The 1 0 . . . ib4t 1 1 . lll c3 ie6
position is slightly better for White, who will I 1 . . . lll d5 can be met by an interesting pawn
gain control of the a-file and still has knights sacrifice: 1 2. 0-0! ?N ( 1 2 .Wc2 is also quite
which can j ump in. possible: 1 2 . . . ie6 1 3 .0-0 lll xc3 1 4. bxc3
ixc4 1 5 .cxb4 ixfl 1 6.gxfl 0-0 1 7.Wxf5
9.c4 Ponomarev - Gabrielian , St Petersburg
9 . 0-0 ?! h5 is still a problem. 2009) 1 2 . . . ixc3 1 3 .bxc3 lll xc3 1 4 .Wd3 lll d5
1 5 .gab l ( 1 5 .Wa3 We700) 1 5 . . . 0-0 1 6 .Wa3t
9 ... dxc4 1 2.Wd3 lll e4
9 . . . ie6 1 0 .b3 transposes to line B2 1 . 1 2 . . . id5 1 3 .ixd5 Wxd5 ( 1 3 . . . lll xd5
1 54 Richard Pert - Playing the Trompowsky

1 4.Wxf5 ! lll xc3 1 5 .a3 Wd5 1 6.Wxd5 tll xd5t and d3 . The other option is to expand on the
1 7.axb4t) 1 4. 0-0;!; queenside with b2-b4.

12 Y;ie?!
..

Probably Black's most accurate - preventing


both b2-b4 and lll e5 and waiting to see what
else White has in mind.

12 . . . h5 1 3 . b4 White goes for the second plan


I mentioned. 1 3 . . . a6 1 4.a4 h4 1 5 .fd l hxg3
1 6.hxg3 ie6 1 7.lll e5 We7 1 8 .lll f4;!; Schneider
- Dautov, Halle 20 1 0 .

1 2 . . . ie6 1 3 .lll e5 lll d5 ( 1 3 . . . g6 1 4 .lll d3 id5


1 3 . 0-0!N l 5 .ixd5 cxd5 1 6.ac l c8 1 7 .Wb3;!; Galyas
1 3 .tll d2 lll xd2 1 4 .Wxd2 ic4 did not give - Dencsi, Budapest 2004) 1 4. lll d3 g6 1 5 . lll c5
White any advantage in Gustafsson - ic8 1 6.lll c3 lll f6 1 7.b4 a6 1 8 .a4 id6

.... . v.
Burnett, New York 1 999.
13 ... ixc3 1 4. bxc3 ixc4 s .i B..t
--- .. z
1 4 . . . 0-0 1 5 .lll d2;!;
1 -0 %lB
0""' "
l 5 .Wxc4 lll d2
6 .\ i - '
,,.;
4 .::.n!..
5
Winning an exchange, but the black b-pawn
drops, leaving White with a very powerful
g2-bishop.
3 'lt::
,: iQ fl'%,
'effl'%. 'i,
%'0%
-:i-
.
...
.. .
l 6.Wb4 lll xfl l 7.Wxb7 0-0 1 8 .xfl Wa5

2 ,/, if.

%
1 9 . c4;!;
1 ,f"
.
. .:;..if% . . ..
h
l l .Y;ic2 0-0 1 2.0-0
b d f g
, z

a c e

1 %,,'i.f'. %iW
s

-."n 1-.f
.1. m ..t.. B - 1 9 . b 5 axb5 20.axb5 xa l 2 1 .xa l Wc7
22.bxc6;!; White has the advantage with a

6
.
, - - - "
-- weak queenside pawn to attack, McDonald -
Lukacs, Budapest 1 99 5 . Incidentally, a great
!fil
:
game from Neil McDonald that is still of
theoretical relevance eighteen years on.

-- ,
32 -l-lt 13.d2
This looks best to me, seeking out an

---- - -!"""
alternative route to the c5-square.

1
1 3 . lll f4?! ixf4 1 4 . exf400
a b c d e f g h
White has two main plans here. One is to 1 3 .a3 ! ? is interesting, with the point that if
transfer the c4-knight to c5 - if possible via e5 Black prevents b2-b4 with l 3 . . . a5 then l 4. lll f4
Chapter 7 - 2 . . . d5 3 .ixf6 1 55

is more effective: 1 4 . . . .ixf4 1 5 .exf4;!; and this Conclusion: In line A) 3 . . . gxf6!?, the main
time the b6-square is vulnerable. line with 1 l .d5 has been quite well worked out
and it is hard for White to gain an advantage.
13 ... hS I 4Jacl id6 However, I have highlighted a couple of
14 . . . .ie6 1 5 . ttJ b3 g6 1 6. ttJ c5 .id6 1 7.lll f4 interesting moves for White, my new idea of
ixf4 1 8 .exf4 id5 1 9 .l'!fe l Vfic7 20 .ixd5 7. ttJc3 ! ?N and the rare 1 1 .l'!e l ! ? - these ideas
lll x d5 2 1 .Vfib3 1'!ab8 22.h4 1'!fd8 23 .1'!e2;!; look promising to me and I would be happy
to test out one or both of them in tournament
play.
Turning to B) 3 . . . exf6, it has to be said that
meeting this with 4.e3 and 5 . g3 is a very solid
positional approach, but nevertheless a serious
one in which White looks for queenside
pressure and more often than not obtains
a small but lasting advantage. I would again
remind you of the importance of both players'
choice of move orders in this line.

a b c d e f g h
15.ttJb3N
Heading to the c5-square.

1 5 . lll c4 can lead to a repetition of moves:


1 5 . . . .ic? l 6 . ttJ d2 .id6 l 7.lll c4 ic7 l 8 . ttJ d2
Y2-Y2 lotov - Kolev Sunny Beach 2009.

1 5 ...1'!e8 16.cS e4 17.b4 h4 1 8.a4


This position is quite finely balanced, but
I slightly prefer White who has simpler play
with a queenside minority attack on the cards.
Chapter 8

2 ... d5 3.e3

I .d4 tli f6 2.i.g5 d5 3.e3

A) 3 ... tli bd7 159


B) 3 ... c5 4.i.xf6 gxf6 5.tlic3 tli c6 162
Bl) 6.dxc5!? 1 64
B2) 6.YNh5 1 65
B2 1) 6 ... e6 1 66
B22) 6 ... cxd4 167
C) 3 ... c6 1 69
1 58 Richard Pert - Playing the Trom powsky

I .d4 f6 2.J.g5 d5 3.e3 Trompowsky Attack. The resulting posmon


This Torre-like move has been included is also endorsed from Black's side by Boris
in the repertoires of virtually all the serious Avrukh in Grandmaster Repertoire 11, where
Trompowsky players of the last decade; for it is reached via a Veresov move order. This is
example it was the choice of Hodgson when of course a worry from White's point of view
playing White against me. as Boris tends to be very much on the money
Although this move is becoming increasingly with his evaluations. I agree with these authors
popular, it hasn't been written about by any that this move is hard to answer. Nevertheless
authors in recent years. All the Trompowsky we will have a look at some ideas which can at
books in the last decade have prioritized least get White into some interesting positions
3 .J.xf6 as their main line, and so this will be where we can fight for an advantage.
the first book for a while to have an in-depth
look at this option. c) 3 tli e4 4.J.f4 transposes directly into the

variation 2 . . . ltJ e4 3 .J.f4 d5 4.e3 c5, which


- A \ntJ:W
,,Y,_,,v.
;
s
,, , -,_,
.a.
, , %_
is covered as line D in the next chapter on
: .JL mm-m
.
7
page 1 79 .

6
;
/, , , , , % ,,,,,% , , , , , /, ,,,,%

d ) 3 e6 i s the most common choice for Black,

s % - , , , ,Y,

' ;-, , , ;m

but White has a good chance of obtaining a


m

small advantage with 4 . ltJ d2, which transposes
4


into line B of Chapter 2 - see page 5 2 .
L 'W'J,
3 -n: frn e ) 3 c6 i s a solid choice and was the move
2 8 rtl 8 - rtl 8 rtl

vra-r{:fti
David Howell picked against me in 20 1 0 .
Although Black's position is very solid, White
- , , L , , , , , ; should be able to get a small edge. We look at
a b c d e f g h this line at the end of this chapter.
Black has many options here and there
are several transpositional possibilities, so f) 3 g6 4.J.xf6 transposes to a favourable

the following summary should let you know version of line B of the previous chapter, where
where to look. Black has mixed his systems - he wants his f8-
bishop to be placed on d6 but has invested
a) 3 bd7 was the choice of Michael Adams

time playing . . . g6 already.
against me in 20 1 0 . However, I have some new
ideas in this line included in this chapter. g) 3 J.f5 4.J.xf6 exf6 also gives White a

favourable version of line B of the previous


b) 3 c5 is a very direct answer and is the

chapter, where the bishop on f5 is blocking
move which seems to have scared Richard Black's natural plan of playing .. . f5 to free the
Palliser the most in his Starting Out: !he f6-square for his queen's knight.
Chapter 8 - 2 . . . d 5 3 . e3 1 59

1 .d4 f6 2 ..igS dS 3.e3 4... h6


The choice of Adams - he said to me after
the game that if he can have chis move for free
then he'll cake it. There are not many stronger
players than him in the world, so who am I to
disagree?

4 . . . e6 5 . bd2 will transpose to Chapter 2 .


For example 5 . . . c5 is line B on page 52, while
5 . . . h6 6.ih4 is the note to Black's 5 th move of
line C l on page 54.
Of course S . c4 is also possible if you have
knowledge of the Queen's Gambit Declined.

4 . . . cS S . dxcS

A) 3 .. bd7
.

This important variation was the choice of


England's top player Michael Adams against
me in the top board clash at the British
Championships in 20 1 0 . Mickey is a former
Trompowsky player himself, so the fact chat he
chose chis line is significant.

S . . . lll xcS
4.f3
With this move order Black cannot use the
I chink White really has to play this move
plan which Adams used against me, as S . . . h6
otherwise Black will play . . . e 5 .
is met by: 6.ixf6! (6.ih4 gS transposes to
the Pert - Adams game given in the note to
White's 6th move) 6 . . . ll:\xf6 7.c4;l;
S . . . 'WaS t 6. lll bd2 'WxcS (6 . . . e6 7.a3 'WxcS
8 . c4 ie7 9 , gc l 'WaS 1 0 .cxd5 'WxdS I l .ic4
'Was 1 2. 0-0 0-0 1 3 .h3 bS 1 4.id3;!;
Antidrome - maradona, Internet 20 I O)
7.c4 e6 8.gcl 'IWaS 9 . cxdS lll xd5 1 0 .a3 ie7
I l .ixe7 lll xe7 1 2 .ie2 ll:\ c6 1 3 . 0-0 0-0
1 4 . ll:\ c4;l; Antidrome - notsogood, Internee
2009.
6.ixf6 gxf6 7.ib S t
7.c4 dxc4 8 .'Wxd8t cj{xd8 9 .ixc4 ie6
I O .ixe6 fxe6 1 1 .lll c3 gc8 1 2 . iie2 ig7
1 60 Richard Pert - Playing the Trompowsky

1 3 .E1hd l t @e8 1 4 .E1ac U Antidrome - Adams suggested that exchanging the bishop
maradona, Internet 20 1 0 . could be considered, and I tried this in a later
7 . . . .id7 8 .Wxd5;t; game in the same tournament:
5 .ixf6!? lll xf6
4 . . . g6
This doesn't look critical .
5 . c4 .ig7 6.lll c3

6.c4
6. lll e5 ! ? followed by going for a Stonewall
set-up was Adams' suggestion.
6 . . . c6 6 . . . e6 7.lll c3 ie7 8 . cxd5 exd5
I faced this in a London League match in 8 . . . lll xd5 9 .ie2 0-0 1 0 . 0-0 b6 ( 1 0 . . . lll xc3
April this year and it is my computer's l l . bxc3 b6 1 2.lll e5 ib7 1 3 . f4) l 1 . lll xd5
preference, but it's hardly convincing. Wxd5 1 2 .lll e5 promises White a small edge.
6 . . . h6 7 . .ih4 c6 8 . cxd5 lll x d5 9 . .id3 lll b4 9 .id3 0-0
1 0 . .ie2 c5 1 1 .0-0 0-0 1 2.d5 lll b6 1 3 .e4 g5 9 . . . ig4 1 0 .Wa4t!? ( 1 0.Wb3 ! ? ixf3 l l .gxf3
14 . .ig3 e6 1 5 .a3;!; Antidrome - Yardbird, 0-0 1 2 . 0-0-0--+) 1 0 . . . c6 1 1 . lll e5;!;
Internet 20 1 1 . My opponent in this blitz 1 0 .lll e5 id6
game was GM Lobron, and this game 1 0 . . . c5 1 1 . 0-0 '1Wb6 1 2 .E1b l id6 1 3 .lll a4
allowed me to notch up my second of three Wc7 1 4. f4;t;
wins against him in quick succession in this l L f4 c5 1 2 .Wf3
line as he struggled to find a suitable way to 1 2 .0-0 cxd4 I 3.exd4 Wb6=
combat these ideas. 1 2 . . . \Wb6 1 3 . 0-0-0 cxd4 1 4.exd400
7.cxd5 cxd5 8 .'1Wb3 '1Wa5 R. Pert - Ynojosa, Canterbury 20 1 0 .
White has a pleasant choice here. Black has responded accurately to my plan,
9 . .ib5 and White's advantage is minimal if at all.
9 . .ixf6 ! ? lll xf6 1 0 . .ib5t and Black has no On reflection I came to the conclusion that
suitable way to meet this check: 1 0 . . . @f8 5 .ih4 is the right approach but that I needed
1 1 . 0-0 to follow up in a different way to my game
9 . . . e6 1 0 .lll e5 0-0 I l ..ixd7 lll xd7 1 2.lll xd7 against Adams.
ixd7 1 3 .Wxb7 h6?! 1 4.ie7+-
Already a pawn up, White now wins more 5 .. cS
.

material, R. Pert - Bowmer, London 20 1 3 . Black's plan is to combine . . . Wb6 with


the idea of . . . g5-g4 pressuring both b2 and
s.i.h4 d4 .
Chapter 8 - 2 . . d5 3 . e3
. 161

board, though arguably it's Black's best:


8 .Wd2! (8.tlJxe5 ? Wa5 t! 9 . tlJ c3 ic5 1 0 .Wf4
id6-+ and the white knight is trapped)
8 . . . Wb6 (8 . . . Wc7 9.cxd5 ttJ e4 1 0 .Wd l Wa5 t
l 1 . tlJ fd2 ib4 1 2.a3 ttJ df6 1 3 .id3) 9 . cxd5
ttJ e4 1 0 .Wc2

8.ig3 J.g7 9.cxd5


White can also consider: 9 . tlJ c3!? dxc4
1 0 .0-0-0 0-0 l l .h4 g4 1 2 .tlJe5t

9 ... tlih5
9 . . . 0-0 1 0. tlJ c3 ttJ b6 was tried against me in
6.c4!? a blitz game, but Black quickly got into a mess:
This rare move looks interesting with . . . h6 I l . d6 ttJ fd5?! 1 2 .dxe7 Wxe7 1 3 .ttJxd5 ttJxd 5 ?
thrown in, as Black now doesn't have the ( 1 3 . . . We6 1 4.ie5) 1 4.Wxd5 ixb2 1 5 .El:d l
option of . . . tlJ e4 hitting a bishop on g5 . ie6 1 6.Wd2 Wa3 1 7.id6 Wxa2 1 8 .ixfB 1 -0
Antidrome - Yardbird, Internet 20 1 1 .
6 . dxc5 was my choice against Michael Adams,
and whilst there is nothing wrong with it, the 10.'1Vd2 0-0 1 1 .tli c3 tlixg3 12.hxg3 tlic5
resulting positions look balanced: 6 . . . g5 7.ig3
ig7 8 . ttJ bd2 ttJ h 5 9.c4 tlJ xg3 I O .hxg3 tlJ xc5
I I . b4 ttJ e6 1 2 . cxd5 Wxd5 1 3 .ic4 Wd6 1 4.El:b l
Here 1 4 . . . 0-0 was played in R. Pert - Adams,
Canterbury 20 1 0 , and now Adams suggested
that 1 5 .Wc2 with the threat of tlJ e4xg5
would have given White some initiative. So
he reckoned that delaying castling for the
moment with 14 . . . id7!?N00 would be more
accurate.

6 ... cxd4
White seems to be able to claim an edge
against the alternatives:

6 . . . g5 7.ig3 ttJ e4 8 . tlJ c3 Wa5 9 .Wc2

6 . . . llJ e4 7 . tlJ c3 1 3 .ic4? if5 1 4 . ttJ d4 ig6 was unclear in


Shuvatkin - Kuznetsov, Kazan 2009.
6 . . . Wb6 7.tlJc3 Wxb2 (7 . . . cxd4 8.Wxd4)
8 . tlJ b 5 cxd4 9.El:b l Wxa2 1 0 . ttJ c?H 13 ...'1Vb6!
If Black is careless he can lose very quickly:
7.'1Vxd4 g5 1 3 . . . ig4 1 4. ttJ xg5 +- or 1 3 . . . ixc3t 1 4.Wxc3
7 . . . e5N might be hard to spot over the ttJ e4 1 5 .Wd4 Wa5 t 1 6.b4+-.
1 62 Richard Pert - Playin g the Trompowsky

1 4.ie2 So we move on to what is arguably Black's


The clever point of Black's previous move most critical response. If you are going to
is that 1 4 .lll xg5 :B:d8! gives him strong choose 3 . e3 against 2 . . . d5 then you certainly
counterplay. need to be ready for this. I admit that it is hard

.
to force an advantage against this move, but
14 . JMS 1 5Jdl ig4 1 6.d4 ixe2 the positions remain interesting and White has
1 7.Wfxe2 e6 a lot of choice - there are several ideas in this
chapter so hopefully you can find a route that
appeals to you.

4.Lf6 gxf6
4 . . . exf6?! looks wrong as Black leaves his
d-pawn vulnerable to attack: 5 . lll c3 ie6
6. dxc5 ixc5 7.Wlh5 ib4 8 .ib5 t lll c6 9 .lll ge2
0-0 1 0. 0-0-0 lll e5 l 1 . h3 Wb6 1 2 .ia4 :B:fd8
1 3 .ib3 The pressure is mounting on the d5-
pawn and Black feels obliged to give up the
bishop pair in order to save it.

,i U . -
61 .rr . .. . % r
r
s

. V,.
.. . .% .
r-/, .
.
...

./,.
z

5 .., /. .
.
fl
- ''l. .. . :
.. . . ..

4 -l . .,/, ./, '0 .


3 ... 8
1 9.0-0;!;
..tm
.

2 t, . 8 al2JD
,- 8 a
If Black wishes to recapture his pawn then .. ..: .....%

1
he is going to end up with weaknesses round
his king, in particular the f5-square. ..
:
a b c d e f g h
B) 3 ... c5
1 3 . . . ixc3 1 4.lll xc3 d4 1 5 .exd4 :B:xd4 1 6.:B:xd4
Wxd4 1 7.We2 ixb3 1 8 .axb3t R. Pert -
Giffard, Montpellier 2002. White's advantage
is clear, because all king and pawn endgames
will be winning. Furthermore, White's
queenside majority means that knight and
pawn endgames are likely to be winning
too, and that is in fact what happened in the
game!

5.c3
This brings us into a line of the Veresov.
Note that this position can also arise after
2 . . . c5 3 . lll c3 d5 4.ixf6 gxf6 5 . e3 , although in
Chapter 8 - 2 . . . d5 3 . e3 1 63

Chapter 3 my recommendation was the more repetition: 8 . lt:l f3 Wff6 9 . 0-0-0 ltl c6 I O. ltl b 5
aggressive 5 .e4! ? in that move order. 0-0 I I .1'!g l Wfg 6 1 2 .Wfh3 Wfg 4 1 3 .Wfh6
Wfg6 1 4.Wfh3 Wfg4 Yi-Yi R. Perr - Crouch,
If you fancy quieter waters then you can Birmingham 2002.
choose: 5 . c4 cxd4 (5 . . . dxc4 6.ixc4 transposes 8 .ib5 id? 9 . ltl ge2 a6 I O.ia4 Wf a5
into line A of the previous chapter) 6.Wfxd4 1 0 . . . Wfe? 1 1 .0-0-0 b5 1 2.ib3 b4 1 3 .1'!xd5 !;!;
dxc4 7.Wfxd8t @xd8 8 .ixc4 e6 9 . ltl c3 a6 1 1 . 0-0-0 b5 1 2.ib3 b4? 1 3 . ltl xd 5
1 0 . ltl f3 Although my computer prefers White, Th i s i s a typical example of Hodgson's plan,
the position looks drawish with the queens off. with the switch of the bishop to b3 being
followed by a knight sacrifice on d 5 . There is
5 . dxc5 more analysis on these types of position in line
This was the regular choice of Hodgson, who BI below.
once played it against me in a rapid game.
5 . . . e6 5 c6
...

5 . . . Wfa5t leads to positions which slightly After 5 . . . Wf a5 White can play 6.dxc5 ,
favour White who usually picks up a pawn, transposing to the previous note (after 5 . dxc5
though Black obtains some compensation: Wfa5 t 6 . ltl c3 ) , though 6.ib 5 t ! ? id? 7.ixd7t
6 . ltl c3 e6 7.Wfd4 lt:l c6 8 .ib5 (8.Wfxf6 1'!g8 lt:l xd7 8 .Wfh5;!; looks interesting too.
9 . ltl ge2 ixc5 1 0 .0-0-0;!;) 8 . . . 1'!g8 9 . ltl ge2
id? 1 0 .Wfxf6;!; 5 . . . cxd4 6. exd4 h5
6 . ltl c3 This is quite a common plan; this strange
6.c4 leads to a drawish endgame: 6 . . . dxc4 looking move has the idea of stopping White
7.Wfxd8t @xd8 8 .ixc4 ixc5 9 . ltl c3 @e7 from landing his queen on its optimal h5-
1 0.a3 a6 I I .ltl f3 lt:l c6 Y2-Yi Miladinovic - square.
Popovic, Vrnjacka Banja 20 1 2.
6 . . . ixc5 7.Wfh5

a b c d e f g h
7.Wff3
This makes a lot of sense to me - this square
7 . . . lt:l c6 is also decent for the white queen, as it eyes
7 . . . f5 ! ? is slightly annoying, intending to up h 5 , d5 and f5, as well as providing cover
use the f6-square either for the knight or along the third rank.
the queen . In the following game Black 7 . . . e6 8 .0-0-0 lt:l c6 9 . ltl ge2 f5 1 0 .'itib l ig7
used this square to transfer his queen to g6, l I .h4
and I could find no good way to avoid a I l .Wfg3 ih6 1 2. h4 a6 1 3 . ltl f4;!;
1 64 Richard Pert - Playing the Trompowsky

l l . . .'Wb6 1 3 . ll'i c3 t ie7 1 4. tt'i xd5-+ Hall - Salmensuu,


Preventing lt'i b 5 . Panormo 200 1 .
l l . . .id7 looks a b i t sloppy: 1 2.'Wg3 if6 8 .ig2 b6 9 . 0-0 ia6 1 0 .l:'!e l ie7 l 1 . ll'i f4 l:'!c8
1 3 .ll'ib5;!; 1 2.Wh5 'Wd7
1 2 .We3 ii f8 1 2 . . . 0-0 1 3 . ll'i cxd5 exd5 1 4.Wxf5;!;
1 3 .dxc5 ixc5 1 4.l:'!ad U
Dromedar - Antidrome, Internet 2007.

a b c d e f g h
Here I have decided to cover two approaches
l 7 . . . dxc4? l 8.d5+-
for White, B l ) 6.dxc5!? and B2) 6.'@h5.
1 8 .c5

Bl) 6.dxc5!?

a b c d e f g h
This is an interesting idea, aiming for
Hodgson's set-up mentioned above after
7 . . .f5 5 . dxc5 , but not allowing Black as many
7 . . . cxd4 8 . exd4 Wb6 9 .ig2 Wxb2 options as capturing on the 5 th move.
1 0. 0-0 Wb6 1 1 .l:'!e l ib4 1 2.ll'ixd5 exd5
Chapter 8 - 2 . . . d5 3 . e3 1 65

6 e6 7.'!Wh5 i.xc5 8.0-0-0 '!We7 9.i.b5 i.d7


.

10.ti:)ge2 0-0-0
1 O . . . a6 1 l .i.a4 b5 l 2.i.b3 b4 1 3 .xd 5 !;!; was
mentioned in the note to White's 5th move on
page 1 63 .

1 6.a3 ci>a7
1 6 . . . b6 1 7. a2 ie7 1 8 . f3 ib5 1 9 .'ll xb5
xb5 20.d2 c4t (20 . . . c6? 2 1 . 'll d4+-)
2 1 .b l b5 22. 'll d4 b6 23.d3;!;

17.tli d4 i.d7 1 8Jd3


1 l .e4 is perhaps too ambitious: 1 1 . . .d4 1 2 .'ll a4 White gradually prepares e3-e4.
id6N This novelty is given by Avrukh . ( 1 2 . . . e5
1 3 .'ll g3 ib4 1 4.b l was unclear in Breder - 18 i.e7 1 9.f3 '!Wb6 20.ti:)b3 '!Wc7 2 1 .edl
..

Ciron, Internet 200 5 , though White's position ci>a8


is simpler to play.) 1 3 .b l ( 1 3 . c3 ! ? could be It is difficult to suggest any ideas for Black.
worth a try, when 1 3 . . . dxc3 1 4. 'll axc3 leads
to a balanced position, but 1 3 . . . e 5 ! ? might 22.ti:) d4 '!Wb6 23.ci>al ci>a7 24.e4;!;
keep an edge for Black) 1 3 . . . eS 1 4 .'ll g3
ic?+ B2) 6.'!Wh5

1 1 . .. ci>bs 12.ci>bl a6 1 3.i.xc6


1 3 .ia4 ! ? is of course playable too.

1 3 ...i.xc6 14J'.!:hel :!ks 1 5 .'!Wh6


Objectively the position may be equal, but
it is not so easy for Black to come up with a
plan, whereas White can gradually improve
his position and may look to prepare an e3-e4
break further down the line. The following is a
plausible continuation:

a b c d e f g h
1 66 Richard Pert - Playing the Trompowsky

Black now chooses between B2 1) 6 ... e6 and 8 . . . cxd4 9 . exd4 a6


B22) 6 ... cxd4. 9 . . . '\M!b6 1 0. 0-0 a6 looks less accurate:
1 1 .ixc6 bxc6 l 2 . lLi a4 'lM!bS 1 3 .b3 ie7
B2 1) 6 ... e6 1 4 .l'!fe l t
1 0.ixc6! ? ixc6 1 1 . 0-0 ie7 1 2 .l'!ae l '\M!d7
White has three reasonable ways to meet this 1 3 .l'!e3t
move, all of similar worth.
7 ... id7 8.lDge2
7.0-0-0!? 8 . f4 cxd4 9 . exd4 ib4 1 0. lLi ge2 f500 leads to
This is covered in Avrukh's Grandmaster a solid position for Black.
Repertoire 1 1 , and I have decided to take it as
the main line. 8 ... f5

7.dxc5 ! ? transposes to line B 1 above.

7 . lLi f3 ! ?
This was Hector's choice; White keeps open
the option of kingside castling.
7 . . . id7
7 . . . cxd4 8.exd4 transposes to line B22.

s B -

1 St :iB'i 'B 'i
6 :
, , , /. 1- L.. 7.

-
: r,J. . 7.-r


1

3 >' t ltJ-

2 08". ""' 7,
1 . , /.. =:r 9 . g4 was played in Van der Werf - Jakovenko,
h
.

b d f g
a c e
Saint Vincent 200 5 , and here Avrukh gives:
9 . . . fxg4N 1 0 .'\M!xg4 '\M!f600
8 .ib S ! ?N
With 8 . dxc5 ixc5 9 .id3 White is aiming to
9 ... cxd4
go kingside. Black may respond: 9 . . . ig7?! is met by 1 0 .g4 with the initiative.
a) 9 . . . '\M!b6 holds an empty threat. 1 0. 0-0
'lM!xb2? 1 1 . lLi b S ! leaves the black queen
1 0.exd4 '?Nf6 1 1 .ih5
vulnerable.
This looks most sensible to me.
b) 9 . . . '\M!e7 1 0 . 0-0 f5 1 1 .ixfS ! exf5
1 2. lLi xd S --+ looks promising for White.
1 1 .'lMle2 was Avrukh's main focus: 1 1 . . . 0-0-0
c) 9 . . . lLi b4 1 0 . 0-0 lLi xd3 1 1 .cxd3 and White 1 2.'lM!e3 id6 1 3 .g3 a6 1 4 .ie200 and it looks
has the initiative.
pretty balanced.
d) 9 . . . f500 is perhaps Black's best, intending
'\Mf f6.
.
1 1 ... id6
Chapter 8 - 2 . . . d5 3 . e3 1 67

8 - --
7 .:r- % r- :-- , -
6
% .... - ; r- -
5 r .,Y. 'l" l
4

m-- -

m
ill
3
r- - ---; - -%
,

2_ .. . %(b'.8'0 rf!j
- -
1
8 rf!j
m . nm mn % 8 r .
- -
....

a b c d e f g h a b c d e f g h
12.c!Licxd5!? 7 e6
..

This idea ofmine looks seriously tempting and 7 . . . gg8 has the idea 8.Wxh7 gg600 Shrentzel
White seems to obtain decent compensation. - Hodgson, Tel Aviv 1 98 8 , bur instead
Certainly in a blitz game I would struggle to 8 .Wxd5!N give White an edge.
stop myself playing this move immediately!
7 . . . lll xd4 ? 8 . 0-0-0 e5 9 .lll f3 ic5 (9 . . . lll xf3
1 2 .g3 (Avrukh) and 1 2 . lll ce2 are both unclear. 1 0 .ib 5 t id7 1 1 .gxd5 +-) 1 0 . lll xe5 +-

1 2 ... exd5 13.c!Lixd5 g6 7 . . . Wb6 8 . lll x d5 Wxb2 9.gd l gb8 (9 . . . e6


1 3 . . .'g7 1 4 .ghe l t ! ? ( 1 4.Wh4 is similar 1 0 .lll xf6t md8 1 1 .id3 ib4t 1 2.mfl ie7
to our main line) 14 . . . s!if8 (not 14 . . . ie6? ? 1 3 .Wf3 id7 1 4 .lll e2) 1 0 . lll f.3
1 5 .gxe6t+-) 1 5 .Wh4 and again White has
play similar to the main line. s.tlia
White has a major alternative in:
14.h4 8 . 0-0-0! ? ib4
Threatening lll f6t . 8 . . . id7 9 .lll ge2 f5 1 0 .mb 1 f6 l 1 .Wf3
Threatening g3-g4. l 1 . . .ie7 1 2.Wf4 Wh4
14 .. fS
. 1 3 .We3 0-0-0 1 4.g3
Black cannot stop the threat with 1 4 . . . ie7?? 9 . lll ge2
in view of: 1 5 .ghe l ie6 1 6.Wxe7# 9 . lll ce2! ? is also possible: 9 . . . id7 1 0 .c3
id6 l 1 .lll f3 We7 ( l I . . .Wa5 1 2. s!i b l lll e7
15.c!Lif6 1 3 .ll\ c l ;!; Scho - ltter, email 2000) 1 2. lll g3
White can also try l 5 .lll f4! ? ixf4t 1 6.Wxf4t 0-0-0 1 3 .id3 With ghe l to come, chis
with d4-d5 on the cards. looks reasonable for White.
9 . . .id7 1 0.h4 ! ?
1 5 .ie6 1 6.d5
. A n interesting way t o develop the h l -rook.
White has the initiative. 1 0 . . . We7 l 1 .gh3 0-0-0 1 2 .ge3 Wf8 1 3 .g3
'.!?b8 1 4.Wf3!
B22) 6 cxd4 7.exd4
. Improving on an earlier game. Although
1 4 .lll f4?! lll e7?! turned our fine for White
in G . Mohr - Farago, Bled 200 1 , instead
1 68 Richard Pert - Playing the Trompowsky

14 . . . e5 !+ would have been problematic. 1 9 .lll a4 !!g8 20.'it>h l 00) 1 6.Wi'fl Suddenly
14 .. . f5 1 5 .a3 ie7 1 6.'it>b l lll a5 1 7.lll f4 Black has to worry about an attack on his
king. 1 6 . . . 'it>b? 1 7.lll a4 f4 1 8 .E:ad l Bosch
8 -

:
w: - F tacnik, Hamburg 2009; White intends to
7 ,% :f-'i" 'i
6 ,,,
continue with E:d3-b3.
.

. . 3 ,,
5.

T T 8 . . . f5 9 .ib5 ig7 1 0 . 0-0 id? I l .ixc6 ixc6 ?

;
4 . . .. :" W'0 ""''/, w- Arutinian - Kashlinskaya, Olomouc 2009, and
.J8l\WI
.

WA'0 %'"' ,.,. . ,



White now missed a great chance: 1 2.lll g5!N
3 !1Jr
"" 8 n I
-- ' . . . . . Y. "
Wi'd7 1 3 . lll xe6 Wi'xe6 1 4.E:ae l +-
2 w-
,d': " '
1 - -..t
; .. 8 . . . Wi'b6!?

b d f g h
Making White decide on his king position.
a c e
9 . 0-0-0! ?
1 7 . . . !!c8 ?! 9.ib 5 ! ? a6 1 0 .ixc6t bxc6 1 1 .!!b l c5
After 17 ... id6!N the resulting position 1 2 .dxc5 ixc5 1 3 . 0-0 id? 1 4 .Wi'h600
looks fairly balanced, though I slightly prefer 9 . . . id7
White. 9 . . . ib4 1 0 .Wh6
1 8 . lll cxd5 exd5 1 9 .Wi'xd 5
Black had two minor pieces hanging in
Jugelt - Farago, Deizisau 2008.

I O .ib 5N
1 0.id3 E:c8 1 1 .E:he I ie7 I 2.E:e3 lll b4
gave Black good play in Atanasiu - Zozulia,
Antwerp 20 1 1 .
a b c d e f g h 1 0 .a3 E:c8 1 l .ib5 a6 1 2.ixc6 bxc6 1 3 .Wi'h4
8 ...ih4 ie7 1 4.lll a4 Wb5 1 5 . lll c3 Wi'b7 1 6. lll a4
Black has various other moves: could lead to a draw by repetition.
10 ... ib4 I l .ixc6 bxc6 1 2 .Wi'h6 ixc3
8 . . . id7 ! ? 9 .id3 f5 1 0 . 0-0 Wi'f6 1 1 .!!fe l 0-0-0 1 3 .bxc3t
1 2 .ib5 Wg6 1 3 .Wi'h3 f6 1 4.ixc6 bxc6 1 5 .g3
Wg4 ( 1 5 .. . f4 is mentioned by Lakdawala with 9.id3 id7
the following analysis: 1 6.Wi'fl 'it>b7 1 7.E:ad l 9 . . . f5 1 0 . 0-0 Wf6 1 1 .E:fe l 0-0 1 2 .E:e3 Wi'g6
h5 [ 1 7 . . . Wxc2? 1 8 .E:d3 'it>a8 1 9 .E:b l ! !!b8 1 3 .Wi'h3 Wg4 1 4 .Wh6 Wg6 1 5 .Wf4 Hector -
20.lll e l ! +- traps the queen] 1 8 . lll h4 Wg4 Heinemann, Nuremberg 2008.
Chapter 8 - 2 d5 3 . e3
. . . 1 69

1 0.0-0 i.xc3 1 1 .bxc3 lll aS?! out how White should handle this position in
1 1 . . .Wi'e? 1 2 .ab l 0-0-0 1 3 .fe l;!; order to gain an advantage.

1 2.fel Vffe7 4.Ad3 Ag4 s.f3


5 . lll e2 lll bd7 6.c4?? Amazingly a player of
Aronian's standard allows the most basic trick
in the Trompowsky. 6 . . . dxc4 7.ixc4 W/a5 t-+
Aronian - Radj abov, Monte Carlo (rapid)
2007.

s ... Ahs 6.lll e2


Here too, 6.c4? falls for the same trick.

6 ... lll bd7

C) 3 ... c6

... --
- ,
8
7 /,- , , - v,
, !.
, , ,
'(4f "
5 T ,
6 ,,
7.0-0

4 - -9
. ,. .3.W1i Removing any possibility of the . . . Wi'a5t trick.

.
If White can now get c2-c4 in unchallenged
3

. "ir;r"m-
and develop with lll bc3 , he will certainly hold
w'm.%
an advantage with better queenside and central

iliR
prospects than Black, as well as more space.

/, , , , , v,

a b c d
;.',, , , , /,

e f g
0, , , , , ;

h
7 ... es
This has to be critical.
This move was played against me by
David Howell in 20 1 0 . He is an occasional 7 . . . ig6
Trompowsky player himself, so it is worth This has been the usual move here, perhaps
checking out this rare line. That game was not indicating that the Black players don't trust
particularly interesting, ending in a stale draw, the advance of the e-pawn. However, the
but it inspired me to have a look in more detail compliant bishop move hands White a small
at this variation. I think I have now worked but risk-free advantage.
1 70 Richard Pert - Playing the Trompowsky

s .i B - 8 ...i.e7 9.i.xf6 Lf6 1 0.c:x:d5 c:x:d5 1 1 .tll bc3


76 . z 4)
' 1 '
. . z- tlJ b6 12.i.b5t @m 1 3.dxe5 i.xe5 14.VNb3

f ''l ;
z. White's advantage is dear, with the black

5 . . j
king misplaced in the centre of the board.

4 . . 8 - %/
.....
;
Conclusion: Both A) 3 . . . lll bd7 and C) 3 . . . c6

.1 . 8ttS- 8
3 . -
..
are quite sensible though slightly passive

2 c ii rJ. . . %
moves. I believe that White can expect to

ltJii'
z .... achieve an edge against both of them.
Line B) 3 . . . c5 is a more serious challenge,
h
. .

a b c d e f g highly regarded by many authors . In some of


8 . c4 i.xd3 the variations it is difficult for White to prove
8 . . . e6 9 . lll bc3 i.e7 1 0 . cxd5 cxd5 1 Uk l an advantage. That said, I have given a few
0-0 1 2.lll f4 c8 1 3 .lll xg6 hxg6 1 4.Wb3;!; ideas of how White can try and cause Black
White stands better with the bishop pair and problems, and I hope there are enough ideas
queenside pressure, Iotov - Gopal, Enschede and options here to give you at least one line
2009. which you would be happy to play.
9 .Wxd3 dxc4
9 . . . e6 I O . lll bc3 i.e7 1 1 .ad l 0-0 1 2.e4
c8 1 3 . b3 b6 1 4.@h l;!; White's additional
space ensures an advantage, Stefanova - N.
Kosintseva, Dresden 2008.
1 0.Wxc4 e6 l 1 .lll bc3 i.e7 1 2.e4 0-0 1 3 .i.e3
c8 1 4 .fd l;!;
Again White's space advantage ensures an
edge, Lputian - Vescovi , Moscow (ol) 1 994.
Chapter 9

2 ... e4 3.if4 d5 4.e3

1 .d4 f6 2.i.g5 e4 3.i.f4 d5 4.e3

A) 4 ... e6 5.i.d3 i.d6 6. e2 173


Al) 6 ... f6 173
A2) 6 ... 0-0 174
B) 4 ... i.f5 5.f3 175
Bl) 5 ... d6 175
B2) 5 ... f6 176
C) 4 ... c6 177
D) 4 ... c5 5.i.d3 179
D l ) 5 ... b6 179
D2) 5 ... cxd4 181
D3) 5 ... c6?! 1 83
D4) 5 ... f6 1 85
D41) 6.f3!? 1 86
D42) 6.c3 1 87
1 72 Richard Pert - Playing the Trompowsky

1 .d4 tlJf6 2.J.g5 tll e4 3.i.f4 d5 This is Black's best, although we will check
This solid move is not as popular as 3 . . . c5, out his other moves.
but nevertheless it is an important option as
it has been backed by many experts in this 4 . . . e6 and 4 . . . c6 both get the standard
variation. Boris Avrukh recommends this line treatment of 5 .id3 intending ixe4 .
in his recent book Grandmaster Repertoire 11.
It was also the choice of Trompowsky expert 4 . . . if5 is met by 5 . f3 , after which White is
Pete Wells when playing me in 20 1 2, and I then able to grab space with either c2-c4 or
noticed that it has slipped into the repertoire of g2-g4.
Mark Hebden, who is known for his excellent
opening preparation. Despite the backing of s.i.d3!
these players I still feel happy with White's As mentioned already, White intends ixe4.
chances of an advantage here.

4.e3
Unlike with 3 . . . c5 where I gave several
options for White, against 3 . . . d5 I am only
offering this single recommendation, for the
simple reason that I believe it is clearly the best 5 . . . tlJ c6 6.ixe4 dxe4 7.d5 looks promising for
choice for White. White.
For those who intend to meet 2 . . . d5 with
3 . e3, you need to be aware of this line as Black 5 . . . Wi'b6 6.ixe4 dxe4 7 . tlJ c3 and I prefer
can transpose into it with 3 . . . tlJ e4 4.J.f4. White here.
White's plan is to play id3 and ixe4.
Although Black may know what White's plan 5 . . . cxd4 6.exd4 and once again I like White.
is, it is nevertheless difficult for him to find an
effective way to deal with it. The latest try is to 6.c3
spend time dropping the e4-knight back to f6 This seems to give White a small but
when it is attacked. comfortable edge according to my detailed
analysis.
4 ... c5
I .d4 f6 2.i.g5 e4 3.i.f4 d5 4.e3 6.ixe4 ixf4 7. exf4 dxe4 8 . lll c3 is the
alternative, with a small edge for White.

Black usually chooses between Al) 6 ... f6


and A2) 6 ... 0-0.

6 . . . f5 ? looks like a mistake, as Black leaves


himself with a weak square on e5, whereas
White is able to control the e4-square: 7 . f3 !
lll f6 8 . c4 0-0 9 .lll bc3;!; Yemelin - Sgnaolin,
Rijeka 20 1 0 .

6 . . . lll d7 7.ixe4 dxe4 8 .lll d2 f5 9 . lll c4 \We?


1 0 .1Wd2 ixf4 l 1 . lll x f4 0-0 1 2.0-0-0 lll f6
a b c d e f g h 1 3 .h4 b5 1 4.lll e5;!; Akopian - Mohandesi,
Elista (ol) 1 99 8 ; White has a comfortable
We shall take a look at A) 4 ... e6, B) 4 ... i.f5 advantage with the better pawn structure
and C) 4 ... c6, before examining the main line and strong knights dominating Black's light
of D) 4 ... c5 . squared bishop.

4 . . . g6 receives the standard treatment: 5 .id3 Al) 6 ... tli f6


ig7 6.ixe4 dxe4 7. lll c3 f5 8 . f3 exf3 9 . lll xf3
lll a6 1 0 . 0-0 c6 l l .1We2 ie6 1 2 .l:!ad l lll c7
1 3 . lll g5 ig8 1 4 . e4;!; Bui Vinh - Bubalovic,
Harkany 2009.

A) 4 ... e6 5.i.d3 i.d6

7.0-0
7.ig5 was tried recently: 7 . . . e5 (7 . . . c5!?N
may be the way to go for Black) 8 . dxe5 ixe5
9 . lll bc3 c6 1 0.1Wd2 h6 l l .ih4 lll bd7 1 2 . f4
ixc3 1 3 .lll xc3 1Wa5 1 4 . 0-0-0;!; Bosiocic -
Rogulj , Sibenik 2009.
1 74 Richard Pert - Playing the Trom p owsky

7.c4!? dxc4 8.ixc4 7 liJ c6 s.J.xd6 Vflxd6


.

8 . . . ixf4
8 . . . ltJ c6 9 .ib5 id? 1 0 . lD bc3 a6 1 l .ia4
b5 1 2 .ic2 ixf4 1 3 . lD xf4 e5 1 4.dxe5 lDxe5
1 5 .Wd4;!; Gallagher - Vogt, Lenk 200 5 .
9 . liJ xf4 e5 1 0 .dxe5 'Wxd l t 1 1 .@xd l lD g4
1 2 .liJd3
9 . f4 liJ b4 1 0 .liJ bc3 0-0 1 1 . lD g3 c5 1 2 . lD b 5
1 2 .@e2N lDxe5 1 3 . lD d5 @dB slightly
Vfle7 1 3 . dxc5 Wxc5 1 4 . liJ d4 Fridman - Arnold,
favours White.
Helsingor 20 1 1 ; perhaps White has a tiny edge
1 2 . . . if5 1 3 .@e2
but it's not a lot.

8 .1 U. D fl

,'----"
- --.i(Wf' fm0.....1-
--&
9 ... dxc4 1 0.J.xc4 0-0 1 1 .tlibc3
7 %
.....

: .
A2) 6 ... 0-0
: ,. ,.
.
4
....
.
3 @, .., ltj-- - - "r0 r
8 @ 8
g(- -- - - "]1
2

1
a b c d e f g h
1 3 . . . liJ d?!N
13 ... ixd3t 1 4 .ixd3 lD xe5 1 5 .ie4;!; White's
good bishop versus knight gave him the
advantage in Wang Yue - Macak, Istanbul
200 5 .
1 4 .d l
1 4. f4 liJ b6 1 5 .cl 0-0-0 1 6. liJ fL.
lDxc4 l 7 .xc4 lD xf2 gives Black good
7. c4
This looks a logical follow-up.
compensation for the pawn.
1 4 . . . lD gxe5 1 5 .lDxe5 lD xe5 1 6.ib3 0-000
7 . ..hf4
7 . . . b6 doesn't get Black anywhere: 8 .Wc2 The knight may now retreat with
ixf4 (8 . . . ib7 9 . cxd5 exd5 1 0. tll bc3 f5 B l ) 5 lll d6 or B2) 5 ltlf6.
. .

1 1 . 0-0 We7 1 2 .:gae l tll d7 1 3 . f3 tll xc3


1 4 . bxc3;!;) 9.ixe4 ih6 1 0 .ixh7t;!; Hodgson - B l ) 5 lll d6
.

Thiruchelvam, Bradford 200 1 .

8.tll xf4 lll f6 9.lll c3 dxc4 1 0.ixc4 lll c6


1 1 .lll d3!
Targeting Black's only real idea, that of
playing . . . e 5 .

l l . .. e5

8 jj . --
7<
6
% t-
%....
'fa)- --- - ,Y.m----%
t
s jJjJ jj!Jjj!J jj!Jm" R jJjJ
4
3
jj!Jjj!J

m ttJef m
!o"
%""/- - - - W-'1'j"jj!J
0jj!J

2 c'i}
8d- '- ----%- - -
-JDfj ----%_z ----%
..

6 e6 7.c4 dxc4
1
.

a if n 7 . . . tll xc4 8 .tll xc4 dxc4 9 . e4 ib4t 1 0 .id2

b d f g h
ixd2t 1 1 .Wxd2 ig6 1 2 .ixc4 0-0 1 3 .tll e2
a c e
We7 1 4. 0-0;!; Lputian - Ilincic, Yerevan 2000.
1 2.dxe5
This is enough for an edge, but 1 2 . tll xe5!N 8.lll xc4 lll xc4
looks even stronger: 12 ... tll xe5 1 3 .dxe5 8 . . . tll d7 leaves White with slight but lasting
tll g4 1 4.Wxd8 ( 1 4 .Wd4;!; is also quite good) pressure: 9.:gcl tll xc4 1 0 .ixc4 id6 1 l . tll e2
14 . . . :gxd8 1 5 . tll b5 tll x e5 ( 1 5 . . . c6 1 6. tll c7 :gb8 0-0 1 2 .e4 ig6 1 3 . 0-0 e5 1 4.dxe5 ixe5
1 7. e6) 1 6. tll xc7 :gb8 1 7.ie2;!; 1 5 .Wb3 ixf4 1 6. tll xf4 lll b6 l 7.We3 tll xc4
l 8 .:gxc4 c6 l 9 .:gd4 Wb6 20.Wf2 f6 2 1 .:gd7;!;
12 lll g4 13.id5 lll cxe5 14.lll xe5 lll xe5
.. Hodgson - Hertneck, Germany 2000.
1 5.0-0;!;
Shimanov - Jerez Perez, Leon 20 1 2. 9.ixc4 ih4t 1 0.@fl id6 1 1 .lll e2 0-0
l 1 . . .h6 1 2 .Wb3 ( 1 2 . e4! ?;!;) 1 2 . . . ixf4
B) 4 ifS
.. 1 3 . tll x f4 tll d7 Winants - Van Haastert,
Netherlands 200 1 , and now 1 4. e4!N ih7
This move provides a target for White's pawns, 1 5 .:gad l , with d4-d5 on the cards, gives White
with f2-f3 and later g2-g4 gaining space on the a clear advantage.
kingside.
12.g4 i:xf4 13.lll xf4 '?Nh4t
5.B
1 76 Richard Pert - Playing the Trompowsky

6.g4 also looks promising: 6 . . . ig6 7.h4 h5


8 . g5 tll fd7 9 . c4 e6 1 0 . cxd5 exd5 1 1 . tll c3 c6
1 2.id3 ixd3 1 3 .Wfxd3 ie7 1 4 . 0-0-0 tll f8
1 5 .tll ge2 White has a rather pleasant position
with more space and a lead in development,
Yemelin - Laurusas, Warsaw 2009.

6 ... c6
6 . . . c5 ?! lets White grab material: 7.cxd5
tll x d5 8 .ixb8 tll xe3 (8 . . . xb8 9. e4) 9.ib5t
id7 1 0 .ixd7t Wfxd7 l l .Wfe2 tll xg2t 1 2.Wfxg2
xb8 1 3 .dxc5;!; Black did not have quite
enough compensation in Adams - Van Wely,
Tilburg 1 996.

6 ... ixb l hands White a small but safe


advantage: 7.xb l c6 8 .id3 e6 9 . tll e2 and
White has more space, Adams - Emms, Hove
1 997.
I4 ...Ag6 1 5,gc1
6 . . . e6
If Black plays passively then White has a
comfortable advantage, but active play from
Black may make matters worse, for instance:

15 ... tll c6 1 6.AbS e5 17.tll xg6 fxg6 1 8.bc6


White has a serious advantage.

B2) 5 ... tll f6

a b c d e f g h
7.tll c3
I prefer 7.Wb3! to cut out Black's option of
playing . . . ib4. Then after 7 . . . b6 8 . tll c3 c6
play transposes into the main line.
7 . . . ib4 8 .Wb3 tll c6 9 .a3
9 . g4 ig6 1 0 . h4 h5 1 l .g5 dxc4 1 2 .ixc4 tll d5
1 3 .ixd5 Wfxd5 1 4.Wxd5 exd500
9 . . . ixc3t 1 0 .Wfxc3 0-0 1 1 . tll e2 ig6 1 2 .h4
a b c d e f g h
e8 1 3 .g4 dxc4 1 4. e4 tll xe400
This led to unclear complications in Carlsen
6.c4 - J. Polgar, Rishon Le Zion 2006.
7. c3 e6 8.b3 b6 I 've faced 5 . . . if5 ? ? on several occasions in
8 . . . Wi'b6 9 .c5 Wi'xb3 1 0 . axb3:t internet games.

9.g4 .ig6 1 0.h4 h6

5 . . . tll d7 6 .tll e2 g6 7.ixe4 dxe4 8 . tll bc3 f5


9 . d 5 ! ? (9.h4t secures a safe edge) 9 . . . ig7
1 0. dxc6 bxc6 l I .tll d4 tll c 5 ? ( l I . . .Wi'b6! 1 2 . tll e6
l I . tll h3 ie7 1 2. 0-0-0 a5 1 3 . cxd5 and now
Wi'xb2 offers Black counterplay) 1 2.tll xc6 Wi'b6
instead of 1 3 . . . exd5 1 4.id3:t Winants -
1 3 .ie5! ixe5 1 4. tll xe5 Wi'xb2 1 5 . 0-0! 0-0?
Wiedenkeller, Neum 2000, Black should
( 1 5 . . . Wi'xc3 1 6.Wi'd5) 1 6 .Wi'd5t ie6 1 7.Wi'xc5
play 1 3 . . . tll xd5 !N00 which hits h4 and has the
gac8 1 8 . tll c6 1 -0 Fier - Zwahr, Zurich 20 1 2 .
point that 1 4 . tll xd5 cxd5 leaves the white king
looking vulnerable.
6.Le4 xb2 7. d2 dxe4
1 1 ... xd5
l l . . . exd5 1 2. tll h3 ie7 1 3 . 0-0-0:t

1 2.xd5 exd5
1 2 . . . cxd5?! 1 3 .Wi'a4t! tll d7 1 4. h 5 ih7
l 5 .ia6 and the a8-rook is in trouble.

1 3.0-0-0;!;
White has a pleasant position.

C) 4 ... c6 5 . .id3

a b c d e f g h
The standard response, looking to take on e4.

5 ...b6 s.lll e2
1 78 Richard Pert - Playing the Trompowsky

White should prioritize development here 1 2.ic7


and look to keep the momentum on his side. White aims to make his opponent's queen a
little uncomfortable.
8 . tt:l xe4 Wb4t 9.c3 WaS 1 0 . tt:l f3 tt:l d7 1 1 .0-0 1 2 . . . b6 1 3 .B:ab l Was 1 4. tt:l d6t?
g6oo Too aggressive.
1 4.c4;!; is simple and keeps an edge.
8 ... tli d7 1 4 . . . exd6 l S .We4t tt:l e S ! 1 6 .ixd6 ifS 1 7.Wh4
After 8 . . . fS 9 . 0-0 tt:l d7 1 0 .a4 Wb6 1 1 . f3 exf3 gS 1 8 .WxgS tt:l g6+
1 2.tt:lxf3 White has excellent compensation for White found himself a piece down for
the pawn . insufficient compensation in Popovic -
Solomunovic, Valjevo 20 1 1 .
8 . . . ig4 9 . 0-0 White continues to develop,
even at the cost of a second pawn. 9 . . . ixe2 1 2.a4 0-0 1 3.a5 Yds
1 0.Wxe2 Wxc2 1 1 .B:fc l Wd3 1 2.Wg4 tt:l d7
1 3 .tt:l c4 g6 1 4.B:ab l ig7 1 S .B:xb7 tt:l f6
1 6.WgS 0-0 1 7.B:b2 tt:l d S 1 8 .B:d2 Picking
up the queen. 1 8 . . . h6 1 9 .Wg4 1 -0 Yemelin -
Trofimov, St Petersburg 20 1 0.

9.tlixe4
White can further delay the recapture of
the pawn: 9 . 0-0 tt:l f6 1 0 . c4 Wa3 1 1 . tt:l g3 g6
1 2 .ieS ig7 1 3 . tt:l gxe4 tt:l xe4 1 4.ixg7 tt:lxd2
1 S .Wxd2;!; Black is unable to castle kingside
and short of space, Hodgson - Hjartarson,
Copenhagen 1 996.

9 g6
..

9 . . . tt:l f6 1 0 . tt:l xf6t exf6 1 1 . 0-0 ie7 1 2.Wd3


0-0 1 3 . c4 Wb6 1 4. e4 and White's strong
central pawns gave him the advantage m
Gorovykh - Trofimov, St Petersburg 20 1 0 .
14 ... a6
1 4 . . . B:e8 l S .B:fd l cS 1 6 . tt:l xcS tt:lxcS
1 0.0-0 J.g7 1 1 .Wd3 Wb6
1 7.WxcS ig4 1 8 . f3 ifS 1 9 .c3 b6 20.axb6
1 1 . . .Wb4
axb6 2 l .Wc7 B:c8 22.Wxd8+- left White a
pawn up for absolutely nothing in D. Pavlovic
- Solomunovic, Kraljevo 20 1 1 .

1 5Jfdl h6 1 6.B:ab l tli f6 17.tlixf6t exf6


18.a3
White's advantage is totally clear. He has
the superior pawn structure and his ongoing
pressure against the b7-pawn keeps Black's
queenside bishop and rook out of the game.
Black has a variety of options here: D l )
5 . . .Wb6, D2) 5 . . .cxd4, D3) 5 . . . c!Li c6?! o r D4)
5 ... c!Lif6.

5 . . . ifS ? ? i s a version of a blunder w e have


already seen: 6 . f3 ! ll'i d6 ? (6 . . . WaS t! is the only
way to save the piece, but White has various
routes to a clear plus, for example: 7.c3 ll'i d6
8 .ixd6 ixd3 9.Wxd3 exd6 1 0 . ll'i e2) 7.ixd6
ixd3 8 .ixb8! 1 -0 White wins a piece,
Antidrome - Jaskier, Internet 20 1 0 .

D l ) 5 ...Wb6

28 .. J:!:b8 29.c!Lixc8 gxc8 30.Wb2t .if6


3 1 .gxc8 Wxc8 32.Wxb7
Another masterclass from Hodgson.

32 ...We6 33.Wxa6 Wa2 34.Wd3


1-0
Hodgson - Smejkal, Germany 1 996.

D) 4 ... c5 5 ..id3 This was previously seen as the main line,


but now that role has very much been taken
over by 5 . . . lll f6. I think the main game which
I have chosen here, Mickey Adams against
Xie Jun, is a major reason for the switch away
from this move. I was playing in the Hastings
Challengers at the time and I remember the
news spreading around the playing hall that
Adams had crushed his opponent in the
Premier tournament in ultra-quick time.

6 ..ixe4 dxe4
6 . . . Wxb2?! 7.ixd5 gives White huge
amounts of play for the exchange: 7 . . . Wxa l
8 . ll'i f3 e6 9 .ib3 cxd4 1 0 .0-0 lll c6 l l . exd4 ie7
1 2 .id2 ib4 1 3 .c3 ie7 1 4. c4 ib4 1 5 .ixb4
ll'i xb4 1 6.Wd2 Black needs to sacrifice material
1 80 Richard Pert - Play ing the Trom p owsky

to save her queen. 1 6 . . . lll d3 1 7.1Wxd3+ 1 0 .d6 f5 l l .g4 id? 1 2 .gxf5 exf5 1 3 .a3
Stefanova - Grobelsek, Rabac 2003. tli c6 1 4. tli d5 +- Antidrome - StepByStep,
Internet 20 1 2 .
7.c!lic3 9 . 0-0 tli d7 1 0 . a4!
I like this move, grabbing some space on the
queenside.
1 0 . . . a6 1 l . a5 l&d8 1 2 .ig3
1 2 .dxc5 !?N ixc5 1 3 .id6;!;
l 2 . . . tli f6

7 : , . . ,7. ,Y.
s i. U ..t B
. . .
6 , !
. . -.)% r-%
54
Jt. . .
:
..
. . . l< 0

,J
% .
3 R m r
7 ...'Wxb2
a b c d e f g h
2

1
- 8 % ''=
'- ft'8. . . %

7 . . . cxd4 8 .Wxd4 Wxd4 9 . exd4 f5 1 0 . f3 a b c d e f g h


tli c6 1 1 . 0-0-0 exf3 1 2 .tlixf3 id? 1 3 .d5 tli d8
1 3 .dxc5 !?N
1 4.he l with a big lead in development,
Again this move looks interesting.
Hodgson - Jackson, London 1 99 8 .
1 3 .l&b l ?! seems the wrong plan: 1 3 . . . id?
1 4.d l cxd4 1 5 . tli xd4 We? 1 6.tlia4 e5 !00
7 . . . if5 ? loses material : 8 . tli d5 Wa5 t 9 . b4 cxb4
Moskalenko - Cabrera, Salou 20 1 2 .
1 O.lll c?t +- Woj taszek - Gajdzica, Koszalin
1 3 . . . ixc5 1 4 .'l&xd8t 'kt>xd8 1 5 .fd l t @e?
200 5 .
1 6 . tli a4 ia7 1 7.id6t;!;
7 . . . e6 8 . tli ge2
8.c!lige2 i.g4?!
8 . . . tli a6?! hardly looks a problem: 9 . 0-0 g6
1 0 .b l l&a3 l l .d5 ig7 1 2 .d6 ie6 1 3 . lll b5
'l&xa2 1 4 .dxe? Wd5 1 5 .tli d6t 'kt>xe7 1 6.xb?t
'kt>f8 1 7.Wb I +- Winants - Harovelo, France
2004.

Perhaps Black should try 8 . . . cxd4, though


after 9.b l Wa3 1 0 . exd4;!; White is obviously
doing well.

9.c!lixe4! i.xe2 10.'kt>xe2!


8 .. . f5 White does not fear moving his king as his
8 . . . tli c6?! is provocative and I showed how clear lead in development means it is the black
to handle it in a blitz game: 9 . d 5 ! tli b4 monarch which is more vulnerable.
Chapter 9 - 2 . . ttJ e4 3 .if4 d5 4.e3
. 181

1 0 ... cxd4 6 ... tli c6


6 . . . if5 ? ? is a third version of this blunder, in
j ust slightly different circumstances: 7.f3 ttJ d6
(Black also loses a piece after 7 . . ."l&a5 t 7 . tli d2
ttJxd2 8 .ixd2+-) 8.ixd6 ixd3 9 .ixb8+-

6 . . . Wb6 7 .tli c3!


This rarely played move looks really
interesting to me.
7.ixe4 is the alternative, but I do not think
that White should rush to give up his bishop
now that Black has clarified the centre.
7 . . . ttJxc3 8 . bxc3 lli c6

.i .i..
zl3.
.
8
7 -
.%. -f%'"%"""
.. '?j. %

:4 L--a,.
, -
:f-"'""
- -
14 ...Wc3 1 5.Wxc3 dxc3 1 6Jhb7 @f7 3
2
l2r-. - l
1 , lm Zmjf
17.tlid4 'it>f6 18.ic7 tlixd4t 1 9.exd4 a6
20.ga7 e6 2 1 .gbl ie7 22.ieSt
b d f g h
... v. %- . % 0 . .

1-0 a c e

White wins the bishop to wrap up a great 9 . tli f3 ! ?N


game, Adams - Xie Jun, Hastings 1 996.
9 . lli e2 g6 1 0 .Wd2 ig7 1 1 .ih6 0-0 1 2.h4
tli a5 1 3 .h5 Neiman - Trassaerc, France
D2) 5 ... cxd4 6.exd4! 200 1
9 . . . g6
I prefer this to the commonly played 6.ixe4 .
9 . . . ig4 1 0 . 0-0;!; and the upcoming l:l:b l
My view is that we can always take the knight looks a major problem for Black to deal with.
later, so why cut down our options? 1 0 . 0-0 ig7 1 1 . h3 0-0 1 2 .Wd2 Wa5 1 3 .l:l:ab l
a6 1 4.a4;!;
Black has serious problems completing his
development, whereas White's play is relatively
simple with l:l:fe l to come.

7.ixe4
Transposing back into the main line which
arises from 6 .ixe4, having cut out some of
Black's options along the way.

If you would prefer to delay the exchange even


longer, you could consider 7 . tli e2 ! ? .
1 82 Richard Pert - Playin g the Trompowsky

7.. dxe4 s.tll e2


. 9 ... e6
I had hoped to make 8. d5 work, but found The main alternative is:
a massive improvement for Black which makes 9 . . . Wa5 1 0 .h3 ih5 1 1 . 0-0 0-0-0
this line inadvisable for White: 8 . . . e5 9 .ig3
Wa5 t!N 1 0 . lli c3

a b c d e f g h

h
1 2 .We l N
b d f g
a c e
I think this solid approach should secure
1 0 . . . ia3! ! 1 1 .Wc l ib4 1 2 .dxc6 ixc3t White a small plus.
1 3 .bxc3 Wxc3t 1 4.@fl bxc6 1 5 .We l ia6t l 2.d5 was played by Joe Gallagher and
1 6. lli e2 ixe2t 1 7.@xe2 Wc4t+ endorsed by Pete Wells, but it looks a little
risky to me: 1 2 . . . e6 1 3 . dxc6 gxd l 1 4. cxb7t
8 ...i.g4 @xb7 1 5 .gfxd l ixe2!N Wells points out
8 . . . e5?! loses a pawn for insufficient that this move may be an improvement,
compensation. A game by Pete Wells shows the and I would agree. ( 1 5 . . . ib4? 1 6.g4 ig6
way here: 9.dxe5 Wxd l t 1 0 .xd l ig4 l l .lli bc3 1 7.gd7t @a8 1 8 .ie3 ic5 1 9 . lli d4t
0-0-0t ( l 1 . . .llid4 1 2.h3 llixe2 1 3 .llixe2 0-0-0t Gallagher - Rytshagov, Elista [ol] 1 998)
1 4.e l t) 1 2.cl h6 1 3 .gel g5 1 4.id2 ig7 1 6. lli xe2 ic5 ! This is my improvement on
1 5 .llixe4 llixe5 1 6.ic3 ghe8 1 7. lli 2g3 h5 1 8 .h3 previous analysis; by covering the a7-pawn
h4 1 9 .hxg4 hxg3 20 .f3 c7 2 1 .a4 f5 22.gxf5+ (against gd7 followed by ie3) Black ensures
Wells - Visser, London/Crowthorne 2006. that his king will be safe. 1 7 .gd7t @a8+ The
situation remains murky, but the material
9.tll bc3 advantage of queen for rook and knight
should give Black an edge.
1 2 . . . llixd4
1 2 . . . e6 1 3 .a3 ( 1 3 .lli xe4 Wxe l 1 4.gfxe l
ixe2 1 5 .gxe2 gxd400) 1 3 . . . lli xd4 1 4.llixd4
gxd4 l 5 . b4 Wa6 l 6.We3 l'!c4 l 7 . lli xe4t
1 3 .llixd4 l'!xd4 1 4.ie3 l'!d8 1 5 . lli xe4
l 5 . a4!? is another idea, aiming for queenside
play.
1 5 . . . Wxe l 1 6.l'!fxe l t
I slightly favour White, who has some
prospects on the queenside.
Chapter 9 - 2 tt:J e4 3 .if4 d5 4.e3
. . . 1 83

1 0.h3 ih5 2 1 .b4! ixb4 22.ih4t rtle8 23.gc?;!;


1 0 . . . i.xe2 I l .'Wxe2! lll xd4 1 2.'Wxe4;!:; White has a dominant position .

1 1 .tlixe4 ixe2 1 2.'Wxe2 tlixd4 13.'Wd3 tli c6 D3) 5 ... c6?!


1 4.o-o-o Wxd3 I 5J'hd3 tli b4 I 6Jb3 ds
17.ig3 b6

Although this move is reasonably common,


after studying this position I have come to the
conclusion that the whole line is really j ust
dubious.

6.ixe4 dxe4 7.d5 b4


1 8.c3!N This may be the consistent follow-up to
This looks to be a strong novelty. Black's 5 th move, but in practice White has a
huge score against it.
1 8 .d l c8 1 9 .@b l 00 Hodgson - Wells,
Oxford 1 99 8 . 7 . . . e5
Black should probably resort to this, but
1 8 ... xc3 19Jxc3 ic5 20,gdl rtle7 White's chances are still preferable.
8 .i.g3 lll e7 9 . tLl c3

a b c d e f g h
1 84 Richard Pert - Playing the Trom p owsky

9 . . . f6 players. Again you can see that White has a


9 . . . tli g6 1 0 .h4 h5 1 1 . 8 ( 1 1 . tli xe4 is playable: clear initiative.
1 1 . . . f5 1 2. tli g5 f4 1 3 .'<Mfd3 '<Mff6 1 4.exf4 exf4 l 1 . . . f6 1 2.ig3 '<Mfb6 1 3 .0-0 gd8 1 4 .h3
1 5 .i.h2;!;) 1 1 . . .i.e? 1 2.tlixe4 ( 1 2 .'<Mfd2!?N e6 1 5 .ih2 ig7 1 6.g4 ixg4 1 7.hxg4 exd5
i.xh4 1 3 .ixh4 lll xh4 1 4.tlixe4;!;) 1 2 ... f5 1 8 .tlixd5+-
1 3 . tli c3 ixh4 1 4.ixh4 lll xh4 1 5 .'<Mfd2;!; Nakamura - Mamedyarov, Moscow (blitz)
Radjabov - ]. Polgar, Benidorm 2003 . 20 1 0 .
1 0 .Wh 5 t tli g6
1 0 . . . g6 l l .'<Mfe2 i.f5 1 2. f3 exf3 1 3 .tlixf3 9.d6 c\i) c6
Wb6 1 4. e4;l; Note that 1 4 . . . 1Mfxb2 would lose 9 . . . Wa5 1 0. tli ge2
material to 1 5 .Wb5 t . 1 0 .'<Mfd2 also seems prom1smg: 1 0 . . . id?
1 1 . 0-0-0 '<Mid? 1 2 . tli xe4 Wf5 1 3 .'<Mfxf5 i.xf5 1 1 .gd l f5 1 2. f3 h6?! [ 1 2 . . . exf3 1 3 . tli xf3;!;]
1 4. tli d2 b5 1 5 .e4;l; 1 3 . fxe4 fxe4 1 4 .a3 tli c6 1 5 .tlixe4 and it
Laznicka - Huzman, Eilat 20 1 2 . looks great for White, Iotov - Spiridonov,
Albena 2009.
8.c\i) c3 10 ... id? 1 1 . 0-0 f5 1 2 .a3 tli c6 1 3 . b4 cxb4
1 4 .axb4 Wb6
1 4 . . . 1Mfxb4 1 5 .!b l
1 5 .b5
Hodgson - Tseitlin, Ischia 1 996; White
has a very comfortable position with a lead in
development and more space.

9 . . . a6 1 0 .a3 ! ?N Forcing the knight to retreat


without giving it the option of going to the d5-
square. (1 o . tli xe4 tli d 5 1 l .'<Mf d2 Wb6 1 2 . tli e2
f5 1 3 .tli g5 h6 1 4 . tli f3;!; Yemelin - Gheng,
Deizisau 20 1 1 ) 10 . . . tli c6 1 1 .tlixe4 f5 1 2 .tlixc5
e5 1 3 .d?t ixd7 1 4.ig5 !;!;
a b c d e f g h
8 ... e6
The alternative allows Black's knight to be
driven back to the a6-square:
8 . . . i.f5 9 .a3 tli a6 1 0. tli ge2 g6
1 0 . . . 1Mfb6 was one of my blitz games in
which you can see how easily White's play
flows: I Ub l 0-0-0 1 2. tli g3 e6 1 3 . tli xf5
exf5 1 4. 0-0 id6 1 5 . tli a4 Wa5 1 6.ixd6
gxd6 1 7.c4 gg6 1 8 . b4 cxb4 1 9 .axb4 lll x b4
20.'<Mfb3 b5 2 1 . tli c5 tli d3 22.c\i)xd3+
Anridrome - gaito, Internet 20 1 0 .
l l .ie5
We are following another blitz game, though
this one is between two of the world's top
Ivanchuk won a famous game in this line
with an alternative approach:
1 0 .lll ge2 f5 ? !
1 0 . . . e 5 ! ? 1 1 . lll b5 exf4 1 2.lll c7t d7
1 3 .Wd5 Wf6 1 4. 0-0-0 ( 1 4. lll xa8 ixd6;!;)
1 4 . . . :gb8 1 5 .Wxe4;!;
1 1 . lll b5 @f7 1 2. lll c7 :gb8 1 3 .g4!
Ivanchuk opens up lines against his
opponent's king.
1 3 . . . fxg4 1 4 . lll g3 lll b4?!
Jobava plays this move for the second time
in the game, and neither time is it inspiring.
14 . . . g5 was the critical move, though
Ivanchuk was ready with an impressive piece
sacrifice:

s
7 :- Y,m, "
. . .AX
6 % i'f/ :
54 .. . % -
% -
l
. .. 13 ... gxf6 14.Wfh5t @g7 1 5.dxcSW gxc8

% 16.J.h6t @gs 1 7.0-0-0


The black king is a target for White's ongoing
ft rJj
2 ,. % , . . . %% '
attack.
3 %
1 rs{ 1 vf -111
D4) 5 ... tll f6

h
.. .

a b c d e f g

1 5 . lll xe4 gxf4 1 6.Wxg4 ixd6 1 7.Wh 5 t e7


1 8 . 0-0-0 Wxc7 1 9 .Wg5 t f8 20.Wf6t and
White wins.
1 5 .a3 lll d5 1 6. lll xe4 lll x f4 1 7.exf4 g8
1 8 .Wxg4+-
Ivanchuk - Jobava, Havana 200 5 .

1 0 ... 6
1 0 . . . e 5 ? 1 1 .ig5 Wa5t 1 2.c3 ie6 1 3 . lll f3
f6 1 4.ixf6! gxf6 1 5 .lll x f6t @f7 1 6. lt:\ e4 (or
1 6. lll xh7+-) 1 6 . . . h6 1 7.lll h4 ig7 1 8 .Wh5t+
Stohl - Kreisl, Austria 2008.
So we move on to the main move, which has
1 1 .J.g5 Wb6?! been the recent choice of GMs Boris Avrukh,
Black should have considered 1 1 . . .Wa5t Mark Hebden and Pete Wells. Trompowsky
1 2 . lt:\ c3 Wb6! with some counterplay, though expert Wells played this line against me in
White's chances are still preferable. 20 1 2; as you shall see below I got an advantage
1 86 Richard Pert - Playin g the Trompowsky

against him, but let him off with too easy a 6 . . . ig4 is best met by 7 .c3 when Black can
draw when I should have made him work a bit transpose to the main line by 7 . . . tlJ c6 . If Black
more for it. Boris Avrukh improved on Wells' instead tries to be creative and take advantage
play in his excellent Grandmaster Repertoire of White's unusual move order with 7 . . . 'Wb6
11, and whilst his analysis is hard to break, then he can find himself in trouble: 8 . dxc5 !
I disagree with the final evaluation he has 'Wxb2 9 .Wb3!;!; 'Wxa l ? ? 1 0 .'Wxb7 e5 l l . tlJxe5
given in the main line - I believe that White's ie7 1 2 . tlJ xg4 tlJxg4 1 3 .ib 5 t 'it>f8 1 4 .'Wc8t
chances look slightly preferable. with mate to follow.

We shall take a quick look at the rare D4 1 ) 6 . . . tlJ c6 7.h3 e6


6.f3!? before concentrating on m y main This passive approach is not uncommon and
recommendation of D42) 6.c3. so having a look how this game proceeds
could be beneficial .
6.dxc5?! has been reasonably popular, bur it 7 . . . 'Wb6 8.b3 transposes to our main line.
looks dubious to me as White gives up his 8 . 0-0 id6
centre and makes his d3-bishop look awkward.
Ir may be an interesting option against an
unprepared opponent, but I think I will save
this one for another time!

D41 ) 6.f3!?

9 . dxc5 !
A n important idea t o remember.
9 . . . ixc5 1 0 . tlJ bd2 tlJ b4 l 1 .ie2 0-0 1 2.a3
tlJ c6 1 3 .c4 a5 1 4.c l 'We7 1 5 .cxd5 exd5
1 6. tlJ b3
It's amazing how quickly Black can come
under pressure in this line.
1 6 . . . ib6 1 7. tlJ bd4 id7 1 8 . tlJ b 5
Ir is clear that White holds the advantage
here and can have a risk-free attempt at
exploiting Black's weaknesses.
1 8 . . . fc8 1 9 . tlJ d6 cb8 20.tlJb5 c8 2 1 .id6
'We8 22 .ic5 ixc5 23.xc5 'We7 24.c l
6 . . . cxd4 7.exd4 ig4 8 . c3 ixf3 9 .Wxf3 c6
ie6 2 5 .'Wa4 tlJ e4 26.tlJ bd4 id7 27.fd l
1 0 .g4 e6 l l .g5 tlJ d7 1 2.h4 ie7 1 3 . tlJ d2 tlJ b6
h 6 28 .Wb3 ie6 29 .Wb6 ab8 30 .id3 tlJ f6
1 4.0-0-0 id6 1 5 .'it>b l ixf4 1 6.'Wxf4 and
3 l .c3 tlJ xd4 32 .'Wxd4 xc3 33.'Wxc3 b6
White was clearly better in Zhang Pengxiang
34.'Wc6 'Wd8 3 5 . tlJ d4 id7 36.'Wd6 'Wf8
- Li Haoyu, Hefei 20 1 0 .
43 . i.xg6!
1 -0 R. per t - Britton, Sheffield 20 1 1 .
.

IO.t/:)c3! N
This is more am bitious than 1 0 . c300 Torre -
Duini, 01 0 ngapo C1ty 20 1 0 .
.

1 0 ... c:xd4 1 1 .exd4 i.g7 12."Lla e1


4 VNa5 1 3 .!::!.

0-0 14.c3 gac8 1 . g c 1


-: h lt::i c5 and b3-b4.


White may con tmue wit

D42) 6.c3

'*
" z

.
8 ... g6
8 . . . g 5 .1 . 1s a c I ever idea: 9 . i. xg 5 lt::i e4 1 0 .i.f4
( I O . liJ bd2 "l..J C 3 ) 1 0 . . . .::.
J":\
i:oi g 8 1 1 .g3 cxd4

;;
1 2 fil 2!;!; ' 1 1 . . . i.g7 1 2 . C3 i.f5

iii :'.'.i id;


(I I
1 3. 14 . ll.xe4 ) I o 4 %\' b4t 1 3 . c3
lt::i xc3 1 4 . xc3 %\' xc3t ; fl t Wo h
m
. :
reac h ed an interes ting posmon who Whire
1 88 Richard Pert - Playin g the Trompowsky

6 ... tli c6 1 3. . .e5!?


Black has also tried: Returning the pawn seems t o be the way to
6 . . . Wlb6 go.
This is quite rare, but it looks interesting to 1 3 . . . ig4 ? ! 1 4 . f3 id? 1 5 .a6 b6 1 6 . it:) xc6
hit the b2-pawn when b 1 is not an option. ixc6 1 7 . it:) d4 id? 1 8 . it:) b 5 gives White an
overwhelming amount of play!
1 4 . it:) xc6 bxc6 1 5 .ixe5 .id6 1 6 .ixd6 Wxd6
1 7 .h3 0-0 1 8 . 0-0 c5 1 9 . c4
White keeps a slight initiative .

7.tlid2

a b c d e f g h
? . it:) d2!?N
An interesting sacrifice.
7.Wi'c l and 7.b3 are both possible, with
normal development to follow.
7.Wi'b3 c4 8 . Wi'xb6 axb6 9 . .ic2 is very similar
to a position from the London system with
White having a tiny advantage, but it's
nothing to shout about. a b c d e f g h
7 . . . Wxb2
7 . ig4
..

7 . . . c4 8 . .ic2 Wi'xb2 9 . it:) e2 Wb6 1 0 . 0-0-t


7 . . . e6 seems too passive and White has a
and e3-e4 will give White excellent play.
good chance to get an advantage: 8 . it:) gf3 ie7
8 . it:) e2 it:) c6 9 . a4 Wi'b6
(8 . . . id6 9 . dxc5 is similar to Pert - Britton
Black evacuates his queen before White
given in the note to Black's 6th move in line
starts targeting it.
04 1 ) 9.h3 Wb6 1 0 .Wc2 id? 1 1 . 0-0 c8
I O . dxc5 Wxc5 I l . it:) b3 Wb6 1 2 .a5 Wd8
I 2.a3 0-0 I 3 . dxc5 Wi'xc5 I 4.b4 Wi'b6 I 5 . c4
1 3 . it:) ed4
a6 1 6 .ac l Wi'a7 1 7.Wb a White had a
White's lead in development offers good
pleasant edge in Laznicka - Werle, Germany
compensation.
2008.

7 . . . g6 8 . it:) gf3 ig7 9 . h 3 0-0 1 0 . 0-0 it:) d?


1 l .ib5 a6 1 2 .ixc6 bxc6 1 3 . b4 c4 1 4. e4
Anastasian - Ghaem Maghami, Stepanakert
2004.

7 . . . Wlb6
With this move order White can defend the
b-pawn naturally.
8 . l:'!: b l 9.0-0
Sacrificing the pawn with 8 . lLi e2!?N is
interesting and now:
a) 8 . . . Wxb2 transposes into the previous
note on 6 . . . Wb6.
b) 8 . . . ig4 9 . dxc5 Wxc5 1 0 . b4 ixe2 l l .Wb3!
Wb6 l 2.ixe2;!;
c) 8 . . . g6 9 . 0-0 ig7 1 0 . dxc5 Wxc5 l l . b4
Wb6 1 2 . b 5 lLi d 8 1 3 .ie5 lLi e6 1 4 . lLi b3;!;
d) 8 . . . c4 9 .ic2 Wxb2 1 0 . a4 e6 1 1 . 0-0 Wb6
1 2 . e4 ie7 1 3 .l:'!:b 1 Wd8 l 4 . lLi g3 0-0 l 5 . e5
lLi d7 1 6 .Wf3t and White's compensation is
obvious.
8 . . . ig4 9 . lLi gf3 e6 1 0 .h3 ih5 1 1 . 0-0 cxd4
1 1 . . .ie? 1 2 . dxc5 ! Wxc5 1 3 . b4 Wb6 1 4 . c4;!;
1 2 .cxd4 ie7 1 3 . b4 0-0 1 4 . a3;!;
White holds an edge with more space on the
queenside, Cao Sang - Gupta, Kuala Lumpur
20 1 0 . 9 . . . ie7
This looks natural and was the choice of Pete
8.gf3 e6 Wells against me in 20 1 2 .
It seems a bit premature for Black to 1 0 .h3
exchange pawns: It is a tricky debate as to whether White
8 . . . cxd4 9 . exd4 e6 1 0 .Wb3 should insert this move or not, but it
1 0 .Wa4 lLi d7 1 1 . 0-0 ie7 1 2 .h3;!; probably leads co much the same thing.
1 0 .Wb3 Wc8 l l . dxc5 lLi d7 1 2 .id6 lLi xc5
1 3 .ixc5 ixc5

8 :::.,
'!--r).
. . ; ... . .7.
16 .7. r &
5 - r
4 - ,

r r
2 f:j f. f:j f
3 JJ8l!Jw
a b c d e f g h
1 D
. . 7.
'

L.
1 0 . . . Wb6
1 0 . . . Wc8 l 1 . lLi e5;!; a
.

b

c d e f g h
10 ... lLiaS? l l .Wb5t lLi d7 1 2 . b4 and White 1 4 . c4!N Black has problems handling
wins the b7-pawn. this move and White already has a plus.
1 0 . . . id6 l 1 .Wxb7 0-0 1 2 .ig3;!; ( 1 4.l:'!:ac l ?00 Le Quang - Pruijssers,
l 1 . h3 ih5 1 2 .Wxb6 axb6 1 3 .ib5 lLi d7 Gaziantep 2008, missed this opportunity)
1 4 . lLi e5;!; 1 4 . . . dxc4 ?! 1 5 .Wxc4 ixf3 1 6 .Wxc5 'Wd7
1 90 Richard Pert - Playing the Trom p owsky

( 1 6 . . . id5 1 7 . e4+-) 1 7 . tll xf3 Wxd3 1 8 .gfd l cannot afford to let White take the b7-pawn :
and Black i s i n serious trouble.
1 0 . . . ihS 1 1 .Wb3 Wc8 1 2 . dxcS ! lll d7 a) I O . . . dxe3 ?! I 1 .Wxb7 and now:
1 2 . . . ixcS is again met by the simple 1 3 . c4 a l ) I 1 . . . exf2t 1 2 .gxf2 Wc8 1 3 .ia6+-
dxc4 1 4 .Wxc4;!; a2) I l . . .gc8 1 2 . fxe3 with ia6 to come.
a3) 1 1 . . . eS 1 2 .ixeS exf2t 1 3 .gxf2 id7
8
,.i'-
ii'

. J 1 4 .ixf6+-

7 : t .t.
; r
a4) I 1 . . .Wc8 1 2 .Wxc8 t gxc8 1 3 . fxe3 ie7
6 '- '
w-



'
1 4 .ia6 gd8 1 5 .ib5 gc8 1 6 . tll e5 g5 1 7 .ig3+-

5

0
-
4 .z . . . .. z W.;'..t.
b) I O . . . dxc3 I 1 .Wxb7 Wc8 1 2 .Wxc8t gxc8

l "
1 3 . bxc3 ia3 ( 1 3 . . . tll aS 1 4 .ib S t) 1 4 .ia6

. .
3a n'. zWB 8
ff
f.'%
2 0 /..J:. O'l. 0 c) I O . . . Wc8 I l . cxd4;!; White will continue
t '
..
'

1
.



-. .:
'.
0 . with gac l , building up serious pressure on

h
,

Black's queenside.
b d f g
.....

a c e

1 3 .id6 ixd6 1 4 . cxd6 tll c5 1 5 .WbS tll xd3 1 0.'?;Va4 tll d7N 1 1 .tll e5 tl:Jdxe5 1 2.ixe5
1 6 .Wxd3 Wd7 1 7. c4 Wxd6 1 8 . cxdS Wxd 5 '?;Vd7 1 3.ig3 ih5
1 9 .WxdS exd5 20.gac l ;!; 1 3 . . . c4 1 4 .ic2 ie7 1 5 . b3 cxb3 1 6 .axb3
Yi-Yi R . Pert - Wells, Daventry 20 1 1 . Really gives White good pressure down the a-file:
I should be playing on this position. 16 . . . 0-0 I 7 . b4 b6 So that b4-b5 can be met
by . . . tll a5 . ( I 7 . . . a6 1 8 . b S axb 5 1 9 .WxbS looks
9 . . .id6 I O .%Vb3!N;!; looks difficult for Black promising for White, with ongoing queenside
to meet: I O . . . ixf4 ( 1 O . . . gb8 1 1 . dxcS leaves pressure) I 8 . h 3 ih5 I 9 .id3 id6 20 .ixd6
White a pawn up) I 1 .Wxb7 and White wins Wxd6 2 1 .gfc l gc7 22.ibS gfc8 23.ixc6;!;
a pawn .

9 . . . cxd4

s .i B
-
t
%... ; . . .
7 - - ,
-
6
.
5 . r
',.... . :
4 0 .%
..t.
3 efn
,.,,,;,(- r0
2 A ii"
O r.0% ':-?

:
'ii" A !"0
r.Oz O

1 m
J
v1
-.

'
.j
..

b d f g h
. ,

a c e

Avrukh gives this position as unclear, but I


I O .Wb3 !!N This powerful novelty is given in
marginally prefer White.
Avrukh's book, though I was already aware of
the idea. The following lines show that Black
14.gfern
Chap ter 9 - 2 . . . ttJ e4 3 .i.f4 d5 4.e3 191

This multipurpose move seems like a good 1 4 i.e7


...

starting point. Either Black is going to open 1 4 . . . cxd4 looks a solid option: 1 5 . exd4 id6
up the e-file for our rook by taking on d4 1 6.ixd6 ( 1 6 . tll b3 is also possible, for example:
when we shall recapture with the e-pawn , or 1 6 . . . ixg3 l 7 . hxg3 b6 1 8 .Wa3i) 1 6 . . . Wxd6
alternatively we shall aim to play an e3-e4 1 7 .l:!e3 0-0 1 8 .l:!ae l ;!; I slightly prefer White,
break at some point in the future to unleash who has the more active pieces and perhaps
this rook. some prospects of an attack on his opponent's
king.
1 4 . dxc5 ! ?
Clarifying the centre immediately and 14 . . . c4 1 5 .ic2 ie7 1 6. e4 ! ?
thereby cutting down Black's options. Th i s opens u p the e-file for o u r rook, though
1 4 . . . ixc5 in this position it has the downside of giving
Black the option of .. . f5 at a later stage to
harass our g3-bishop.
The otherwise desirable 1 6.b3 runs into a
tactic: 1 6 . . . cxb3 l 7.axb3 tll b4! and Black is
doing well .
1 6 . . . 0-0 1 7. exd5
l 7.b3 cxb3 l 8 . axb3 f5 leads to the same
thing.
1 7 . . . exdS 1 8 . b3 cxb3 1 9 . axb3 f5 20 . f3
It is also possible to play: 20.f4 a6! (20 . . . l:!fe8
2 1 . tll fl ;!; favours White, who can attack the
weak pawns on a7, d5 and f5)

u.U. .i ,_ . Y..,
1 5 .Wh4
1 5 . tll b3 ! ?
1 5 . . . ib6
also looks
( 1 5 . . . ie7
quite
1 6 . f3 0-0
interesting:
1 7 .l:!ad l
8
7
6 ' " .;. , . '..7:
. ...

Intending e3-e4. 1 7 . . . fS 1 8 . c4;!;) 1 6 .Wa3 ....

White's idea is to stop Black from castling.


1 6 .. . f6 1 7 .l:!ae l t 5 ..,.r

r
1 5 . . . g6 4 !.J%
.8 "
3 8 lf
W@=
This makes the bishop on h5 look a bit funny,
.

m .
2 -J: . . .
but the alternative is hardly appealing.
1 5 . . .ig6 1 6 .ixg6 fXg6 1 7 . tll f3 0-0 1 8 . e4;!;
definitely looks better for White, who will

continue with l:!ad l and Wg4 to pressure a b c d e f g h
Black's weak central pawns . Black is aiming for a quick . . . b 5 -b4. We have
1 6 . tll b3 ie7 the possibilities:
1 6 . . . ib6 1 7 .if4;!; a) 2 1 . tll fl ? b5 22.Wa2 b4+
l 7.Wa4 0-0 l 8 . f3 b) 2 1 .id l leads to an in teresting position
With the black bishop shut out on h 5 , I with chances for both sides: 2 l . . . b5 22 .Wxa6
slightly prefer White. ixd l 23.l:!axd l b4 24 . c4 tll xd4 2 5 .if2 if6
1 8 . . . a6 1 9 .l:!ad l l:!fd8 2 0 . e4 d4 2 1 .ib l e5 26. tll f3 l:!a8 27.Wb6 l:!fb8 28 .Wc5 tll xb3
22 .if2;!; 29 .We3 ic3 3 0 . l:!xd500
1 92 Richard Pert - Playin g the Trompowsky

c) 2 I .!d3 b5 22 .Wxa6 b4 2 3 . c4 lll xd4 1 6 . . . !e7 l 7 . e4 ( I 7.f3 also looks interesting:


results in a complex position with balanced 1 7 . . . 0-0 1 8 .ad l;!;) 1 7 . . . 0-0 1 8 . exdS Wxd5
chances . 1 9 .ie4;!;
20 . . . a6
Again I like this idea for Black, keeping a 1 6 . . . !d6 is similarly met by: 1 7 . e4;!;
quick . . . b5 -b4 on the cards.
2 1 .id3 f4 17.h4!?
2 1 . . . b S 22.Wxa6 b4 2 3 . c4 lll xd4 24.cxdS;!; White swings his queen over to take
seems slightly better for White, who benefits advantage of the tempo on the h5 -bishop.
from having his pawn on f3 rather than f4 .
22 .!2 f6 2 3 . b4 !g6 24 .!fa 17 ... !g6
White has a tiny pull and may be able to In this particular variation I 7 . . . g6 looks a
break with b4-b5 at some point. bit awkward after I 8 .!f4 . White threatens
g2-g4 and so 1 8 .. . fS may be necessary, but

-m.1 wm then White clearly holds the advantage.


s
7 /_,
6

-"if
% -
,-
%

ef" "'Y.
1 8.J.xg6 fxg6 1 9.lll d4

% ....%

,-.!,
. -----%

My preference is to bring the knight across


to the kingside, though the immediate I 9 . e4 is
5 0 also possible: 1 9 . . . 0-0 20 . ad l t
'! %

43 1%/..JwPw0 w
%!J8l/. .J%
1 9 ... 0-0 20.g4 ke8 2 1 .lll f3

2 :ef--. . ... :ef . % . .


White's knight is very well placed on this
A W /
m J:
Wf\' A W
-
square, providing additional cover to the f2-

;-;
0 iO iU 0 z-O


% ------ -- . .. %
pawn and hitting the important e5 -square.
1
b d f g h
,, , . . Y. . . . .%

a c e
/, , , , ,

2 1 . ..J.c7 22.e4!
1 5.dxc5! I prefer White, who has good central pressure
Releasing the tension in the middle now that with ad l to come.
Black has spent a move with his bishop. This
makes way for a future e3-e4 from White. Conclusion: 2 . . . ll:\ e4 3 .!f4 d5 is a solid
option for Black, but I have endeavoured to
1 5 ...i.xc5 1 6.lll b3 show that 4.e3, intending to follow up with
The immediate 1 6 .Wh4 ! ? also looks strong: id3 and at the right time !xe4, offers Wh ite
1 6 . . . g6 ( 1 6 . . . !g6 again leads to a clear an edge against various Black options.
advantage for White: 1 7 .ixg6 fxg6 1 8 . lll f3;!; The critical battleground occurs in line
with ad l , e3-e4 and Wg4 to come, pressuring 04 after 4 . . . c5 5 .id3 ll:\ f6, which was
the centre) 1 7. lll b3 !e7 1 8 .Wa4 0-0 1 9 .f3 recommended for Black by Avrukh in
This slightly favours White with the bishop Grandmaster Repertoire 11. While I agree with
stuck out on h 5 . the majority of what Avrukh says, my maj or
point of divergence is in the evaluation of
1 6 ... !b6 the position after 1 3 . . . ihS on page 1 9 0 - I
This looks Black's most ambitious, keeping hope that I have demonstrated that White's
his bishop actively placed in anticipation of a chances should be considered preferable in this
future e3-e4 push . position.
Chapter 10

Rare 3rd Moves

I .d4 f6 2.i.g5 e4 3.i.f4

A) 3 ... g5?! 1 95
B) 3 d6
1 96
C) 3 g6?!
. 1 96
D) 3 e6!? 1 97
E) 3 e5?!

.. 1 97
1 94 Richard Pert - Playin g the Trompowsky

1 .d4 Cll f6 2.i.g5 lti e4 3.i.4 a) 3 ... g5?! This provocative move looks

8
misplaced to me and we'll have a look at the
correct antidote. It seems to be a common

76 choice of aggressive blitz players, but it doesn't


cut it in long play.

5
b) 3 d6
. was the choice of Luke McShane
against me. I managed to take an advantage

4 out of the opening in that game, as we shall

32 see.

c) 3 ... g6?! seems a little strange inviting

1
f2-f3 and e2-e4 with easy play for White;
nevertheless it is surprisingly common so we
had better take a look.

To make sure chat we have the Trompowsky d) 3 e6!? is an interesting idea recommended
..

totally covered we must deal with various by Andrew Martin in an article some years
odds and ends, and in chis chapter we are ago. Black aims for an early . . . id6 to offer an
going to cover Black's rare 3 rd move options. exchange of bishops.
These variations include an assortment of
lines ranging from the out-of-date to the e) 3 e5?! Unbelievable - it is amazing that
.

ridiculously new! chess has got to a point where we need to look


at moves like chis! This pawn sacrifice was
recently suggested in an article in New in Chess
Yearbook 1 03 .
1 .d4 tll f6 2.i.g5 tll e4 3.i.f4 7 . c3 ? !
Perhaps White could try 7 . dxc5 ! ?N ,
'=' A
:\\it/: W though t o be honest I don't really feel that
8 .a. .JL EW Bf
.
7 J.11 '%, .&. x-%,
%. & !', %' & r &
!"%. comfortable playing these positions as
rlf"""r .
ix A ix A i% A ix A
.

""' - , , ,% "" ' -


6 ""' -
----- . ..

?,ii
White.
7 . . . cxd4 8 . cxd4 Wlb6
Although this gives Black good play,
5
. . . -m
m -, , 0,% 41) 8 . . . tli c6!N may be even stronger.

4 -
.

9 . tli c3 ixd4 1 0 .e3 ixc3 t l l . bxc3 f6 1 2 .if4


32 8 -wfj0 8 8 -wfj0 8 wt!J e5 1 3 .ig3 Wxe3 t 1 4 . tli e2 Wc500

m
Talbot - Gormally, Leeds (rapid) 20 1 2 .

1 ltS "if=JZm
a
/, . ,
. v.

b
..
c d
/,

e
.
%

f g
%-. . . . . .

h
4 ... 6 5.e3 h5

So what else can Black do here other than


the standard moves 3 . . . c5 and 3 . . . d5 that
we have already exam ined? We shall look at
A) 3 ... g5?!, B) 3 ... d6, C) 3 ... g6?!, D) 3 ... e6!?
and E) 3 ... e5?!.

A) 3 ... g5?!

Aggressive but too loose.

4.i.e5
The main alternative is the retreat:
4.ic l
Palliser gives this move an exclamation 6.i.d3
mark, and although White may be better, I think that this relatively rare move is the
it seems to me that it is far from clear. In best way to exploit Black's weakness on the
this game Danny Gormally, who knows e8-h5 diagonal. I 've included a couple of blitz
the Trompowsky well , comes up with some games of mine due to the lack of "real" games
interesting counterattacking ideas for Black. in this line.
4 . . . ig7! 5 . f3 lll d6 6 .ixg5 c 5 !
6 ... d5 7.f3 fxe5 8.fxe4 exd4 9.exd4 i.g7
9 . . . dxe4 1 0 .ixe4 Wd6 l I . tli c3 a6 1 2 . tli f3
lll c6 1 3 .Wd3 tli b4 1 4 .ig6t+- Antidrome -
Abul l 1 48 , Internet 20 1 1 .

1 0.eS!?N!
The threat of ig6t gives White a small plus.
The more fluid 1 0 . tli c3;l; also sufficed
for an edge in Antidrome - baza, Internet
20 1 1 .

a b c d e f g h
1 96 Richard Per t - Playing the Trompowsky

B) 3 ... d6 5.e3 xd.2 6.YMxd.2 tD d7 7.6 e6 8.id3


ixd3 9.'iMxd3 ie7 10.0-0
White's additional space gives him an
advantage. I 've included the rest of the game
to show how White's position is easier to play
than Black's.

Luke McShane's choice against me in an


important last-round game in the Politiken
Cup.

4. d2 if5
4 . . . f6 5 . e4 g6 6 . gf3 ig7 7 .ic4!? bd7?!
(7 . . . 0-0 8 . 0-0 bd7 9 .We2 c6 1 0 . h3;!; White
has more space)

J -Ji'
JJ;J: . 'tt
8
7
6 " ""lifi"
.t. 'Jl) i i .


54 @ -r
jJ
-'0
"0
8
3
2
-0 " % '"'/,
'0 ,
8 r 8 m r 8 rt!f 36.YMest @h7 37.YMg6t @gs 38.YMest
11z_11z
l -?. iim
t "r %v,{' "W
:.... . R. Pert - McShane, Copenhagen 2002.
a b c d e f g h
8 .ixf7t!? ( 8 . 0-0 0-0 9 . c3;!;) 8 . . . 'iti xf7 9 . g5t C) 3 ... g6?!
'iti g8 1 0 . e6 We8 1 1 . xc? Wd8 1 2 . xa8
f8 1 3 .e5 d5 1 4 .ig3;!; Richter - Albinus, This doesn't look like a good move to me. White
Berlin 2007. is invited to play f2-f3 and e2-e4, and has the
future idea of Wd2 and ih6. I 've included a
4 . . . xd2 5 .Wxd2 d7 6 . 0-0-0 c5 7.e3 a6 typical game to show what can happen .
8 . f3 h6 9 .ig3 We? 1 0 . e4;!; Miladinovic -
Damljanovic, Vrsac 2007. 4.6 f6 5.e4 d6 6. c3 ig7 7.Wd.2 o-o
8.0-0-0 bd7 9.ih6 c5 10.d5 a6 1 1 .h4 b5
Chapter 1 0 - Rare 3 rd Moves 1 97

12.i.xg7 xg7 13.h5 tlig8 14.g4 a5 1 5.bl 8 . . . 0-0


tlib6 16.e5 tlic4 17.i.xc4 bxc4 18.hxg6 fxg6 8 . . . d5 9 . tt'l f3 0-0 1 0 .id3 b6 1 l . c3 ia6
19.exd6 exd6 20.h2 h6 21 .xd6 b4 1 2 .ic2 g5 1 3 . g4 fxg4 1 4 . tt'l xgS tt'l xg5
22.e5t h7 23.tlie4 tlif6 24.tlixf6t 1 5 .Wi'xg4 h8 1 6. fxgS We7 1 7 . tt'l d2 c5
1-0 1 8 . 0-0-0;l; Vitiugov - Deszczynski, Warsaw
Lin Weiguo - Mai Dongqi, Jinan 200 5 . 2008.
9 . tt'l c3 d 6
D) 3 ... e6!? I remember the article saying that Black
should look to play . . . b6 at some point, so
let's take a look it here: 9 . . . b6 1 0 .Wd2 ib7
1 1 . 0-0-0 tt'l c6 1 2 . tt'l f3 tt'l e7 1 3 .ie2 a5
1 4 JhgU with g2-g4 on the cards .
1 0 . tt'l f3 c5 1 1 .dxcS dxe5 1 2 .Wi'xd8 xd8
1 3 . tt'l xeS tt'l xe5 1 4 .fxeS tt'l c6 l 5.ic4 tli xe5
1 6 .ib3 Wh8 1 7. 0-0 g6 1 8 . tt'l b S t
Kamunen - Nevanlinna, Finland 2007.

4 ... tlixd2 5.xd2 d5 6.e3 i.d6 7.tlif3 0-0


8.i.d3
White's slight lead in development gives him
an edge.

I remember Andrew Martin recommending E) 3 ... e5?!


this move in an article some years ago. It looks
an interesting idea, although I slightly prefer
White.

4.tli d2!?
I find it difficult to pick between this and the
more complex:
4 . f3 ! ? id6
Black's idea.
5 .ixd6 tli xd6 6 . e4 f5 7.e5 tlif7 8 . f4

GM Rusev wrote an article about this move


in New in Chess Yearbook 1 03 , claiming that
it could become one of the future main lines
against the Trompowsky. But the truth is that
it is rather dubious as Black struggles to prove
that he has compensation for the pawn .
1 98 Richard Pert - Playing the Trompowsky

4.dxe5 7 . . . if5 8 . lll d4 lll xd4 9 . cxd4 (9. lll xe4!?


4 .ixe 5 ? ! looks all wrong: 4 . . . lll c6 5 . lll f3 d5 lll e6 1 0 .Wa4t Wd7 1 1 .Wxd?t 'kt>xd7
6.h3 lll xe5 7 . dxe5 c6 8 . e3 Wb600 Nuding - I. I 2 . lll g3 lll xf4 I 3 . lll xf5 'kt>e6 I 4 . tli g3 'kt>xe5
Schneider, Frankfurt 2 0 1 1 . 1 5 . 0-0-0t) 9 . . . Wb4 1 0 . f3 lll c5 l 1 . e3 lll e6
1 2 . g4 ig6 1 3 .Wb3 h5 1 4 .g5t
4 ... d5 8 . lll xe4
This is Black's idea, trying to grab some space The more complicated 8 . h3!? should also
i n the centre. secure a plus: 8 . . . ixf3 (8 . . . ih5 9 . lll xe4
dxe4 1 0 . lll g5t) 9 . exf3 (9. gxf3 lll c5 1 0 . lll b3
5.tll d2 0-0-0 l I . lll xc5t) 9 . . . lll xd2 (9 . . . lll c5
5 . exd6 ? Wf6! plays into Black's hands . 1 0 .ib5t) 1 0 .Wxd2 lll xe5 1 1 . 0-0-0 0-0-0
1 2 .We3 lll c6 1 3 .id3t
5 ... We7 8 . . . dxe4 9 . lll g5 f6 1 0 . lll xe4 lll xe5 l l . f3 if5

.1at.tm-
1 2 .Wa4t id? 1 3 .Wb3 0-0-0 1 4 . 0-0-0t

White is a pawn up for not a lot.


s
%ef , , , , , ;r '%" " ' '/.
. . ,,." . . . & .. .. ,,&
, :<,N 'V.(' ""Y,
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& iai,, ff-- g :%'./, 6 ... dxe4
i/,
6

. . . , ,, , , , , , ,, .

5 "'01 0 .i -..tUm
. % ..
s .

43 - -
-

.. .. ,Y.
7
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.. . %
6 *
%. .. . . .. .

w-0 %'"//, % ,, % '0


2 %8 r. %vm 5 t .0
-

8 ID 8 8
, 1 .... ,Y.
4
..

1
3 " " "
.

b d f g
%-. . . . . .

h
2 "!l *P,/2,P:
,.,, , , %

a c e

6.tll xe4
6 . lll gf3 ? ! resulted in an advantage for White
1 iiJ.. m :
b d f g
after: 6 . . . lll c6 ? ! 7 . e3 ig4 8 .ie2 0-0-0 9 . lll d4
id? 1 0 . lll xc6 ixc6 1 1 . c3 g5 1 2 .ig3t I .
a h c e

Schneider - Dausch, Deizisau 20 1 1 . But as 7.c3!N


Rusev points out, replying 6 . . . Wb4!00 would Again this important move holds the key
instead lead to a murky position. - White prevents . . . Wb4, at the same time
preparing to develop his own queen.
6 . c3 ! ?N
This stops Black's queen from swooping to 7 .Wd4 ?! if5 8 . e3 g5 was unclear in Duckworth
the b4-square, where it would hit the b2- - Casella, Los Angeles 20 1 2 .
pawn , pin the d2-knight and also attack
sideways. 7 ... tll c6 8.a4 g5
6 . . . lll c6 7. lll gf3 8 . . .if5 9 . 0-0-0 Wc5 1 0 . e3 ie7 l l .ib5
Now Black is struggling to claim full 0-0 1 2 . lll e2 !!ad8 1 3 . lll g3 ig6 1 4 .ie2 lll xe5
compensation. 1 5 . lll xe4+-
7 . . . ig4
Chap ter I 0 - Rare 3rd Moves 1 99

9.i.e3 i.5 1 0.0-0-0 Conclusion: It has to be said that some of the


Again White finds himself a pawn up for lines in this chapter are quite tricky and it is
minimal compensation. important to be ready for them . But if he is
ready, then White's chances are preferable.
10 ... i.g7 l 1 .g4 i.g6 12.i.g2

1 3.h4 h6
This attempt to shore up the g5-pawn does
not really work, so Black would do better to
try 1 3 . . . gxh4, although 1 4 . xh4 followed by
tll h3-f4 gives White a comfortable plus.

14.hxg5 hxg5 1 5Jlxh8t i.xhS 16.tLJh3 i.f6


17.i.d4
Black can't hold everything together.

1 7 ...YMe7 1 8.Lf<i YMxf6 1 9.i.xe4+-


Chapter 1 1
a b c d e f g h

Rare 2nd Moves

1 .d4 lLi f6 2 . .ig5

A) 2 b6
. 203
B) 2 ... g6 3 ..ixf6 exf6 4.e3 .ig7 5. g3 d6 6 . .ig2 f5 7.lLi e2 0-0 205
Bl) 8.c4 206
B2) 8.0-0 206
C) 2 ... lLi c6 208
D) 2 ... c6 209
202 Richard Pert - Playin g the Trompowsky

1 .d4 lll f6 2.J.g5 b) 2 ... g6 has totally fallen our of fashion as


players are no longer keen to hand White more
space and easy development. Black's most
dangerous idea involves trying to play an early
. . . c 5 , but I have a new idea against that.

c) 2 ... ti c6 goes for a Two Knights Tango


approach co the Trompowsky. This move is a
speciality of Ipswich player Steve Gregory, but
he has had a bit of a hard time in this line,
so we'll have a look at some of the ideas his
opponents came up with .

d) 2 . c6
.. has been played against me on a few
occasions - hoping for 3 . e 3 ? ? Wa5 t picking up
the g5-bishop. However, it looks a bit slow to
me.

e) 2 .. d6
. is reasonably common, but does not
a) 2 .. b6
. This quirky move is the suggestion have much independent significance as Black
of GM Nigel Davies, who wrote an article on usually follows up with a quick . . . g6.
this line. He backed his belief in this line by
playing it against me in 2009, but I think that
White stands better here with accurate play.
I .d4 f6 2.ig5 3 . . . gxf6 does not look right: 4 . e3 e5 5 . lll c3;!;
and it's not clear what Black's plan for
completing his development should be.
4 . e3 g6 5 .g3 ig7
Play has transposed into line B below.

A) 2 b6 ...

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7 1;.:.1& 1.
6
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.....
7.
% , , , , ;.: :%1 , , , , /,

5 8
4 ,, '
1
.,;.c '-,. .
Ztt:J '- ,,,,m
w!n! !n!n ,;z. '-

2 . . . d6
This has the idea of playing . . . lll bd7 to
a
b c d e f g h
support the f6-knight, and so encourages When Nigel Davies played this line against
White to make a decision about taking on me in 2009, having previously endorsed it in
f6 straight away. an article, I did not choose the critical line
and the game fizzled out to a relatively quick