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White: Yudasin, L USSR Championship, Moscow

Black: Kasparov, G
1988
Result: 0-1

1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 e6 3 d4 cXd4 4 NXd4 Nf6 5


Nc3 d6 6 f4 Not the most popular move, but a
logical one. White can potentially push on with
8
rZ0lka0s
f5 or e5 if Black isnt careful. 7
ZbZnZpop
6. . . a6 7 Be3 b5 8 Qf3 Bb7 9 Bd3 QUESTION:
Black must make a decision about his knight on
6
pZ0opm0Z
b8. Should he place it on d7 or c6 in this posi-
5
ZpZ0Z0Z0
tion? ANSWER: Here d7 is the best square, as 4
0Z0MPO0Z
on c6 it can become something of a tactical lia-
bility.
3
O0MBAQZ0
9. . . Nbd7
2
0OPZ0ZPO
1
S0Z0J0ZR
a b c d e f g h

8
rZ0lka0s 10 g4
7
ZbZnZpop 10. . . Rc8 11 O-O QUESTION: How should Black
6
pZ0opm0Z develop the bishop on f8? ANSWER: It is possi-
ble for Black to play it to e7 (the normal move),
5
ZpZ0Z0Z0 but also to fianchetto it on g7. Although this
4
0Z0MPO0Z takes slightly longer to carry out, the pawn on
3
Z0MBAQZ0 g6 does nullify Whites light-squared bishop on
the b1-h7 diagonal.
2
POPZ0ZPO 11. . . Be7
1
S0Z0J0ZR
a b c d e f g h

9. . . Nc6 10 e5! dXe5 11 NXc6 Qc7 12 NXb5!


8
0ZrlkZ0s
aXb5 13 BXb5 7
ZbZnapop
10 a3 With 10 a3 White tries to stop the threat 6
pZ0opm0Z
of ...b4, but it does allow Black an extra move to
develop.
5
ZpZ0Z0Z0
4
0Z0MPO0Z
3
O0MBAQZ0
2
0OPZ0ZPO
1
S0Z0ZRJ0
a b c d e f g h

11. . . g6 12 Qh3 Nc5 13 e5 Nd5 14 Ne4 NXe4


15 BXe4 NXe3 16 QXe3 BXe4 17 QXe4 dXe5
18 QXe5 QXd4+ 19 QXd4 Bc5 20 QXc5 RXc5

1
21 Rf2 Ke7
12 Rae1 O-O 13 Qh3 With this move White gets
his queen o the h1-a8 diagonal and hopes to
8
0Zrl0skZ
threaten mate on h7 after a subsequent e5 push.
7
ZbZnapop
Another idea is to play g4-g5 and kick the f6-
knight away.
6
pZ0opZ0Z
13. . . Nc5! As expected Kasparov shows impec-
5
Zpm0Z0Z0
cable understanding of the position. Rather than
4
0Z0MPO0Z
being afraid of the e5 push, he counterattacks 3
O0MBZ0ZQ
against e4 and at a stroke is able to exchange o
the potentially dangerous piece on d3 that bears
2
0OPZ0APO
down towards his king on h7. The text also al-
1
Z0Z0SRZK
a b c d e f g h
lows Black a square on d7 for his other knight,
should he so need it.
14 Bf2 QUESTION: Is it good for Black to play 15 f5 e5 16 Nde2 Nf6 17 Ng3 d5!
...h6 in this position to prevent Whites potential 15. . . Bf6 EXERCISE: Can White now go for 16
attack down towards h7? e5, attacking the f6-bishop and unleashing an at-
14. . . Nfd7 tack on the pawn on h7?
16 Rd1

8
0Zrl0skZ
7
ZbZnapop
8
0Zrl0skZ
6
pZ0opZ0Z
7
ZbZnZpop
5
Zpm0Z0Z0
6
pZ0opa0Z
4
0Z0MPO0Z
5
Zpm0Z0Z0
3
O0MBZ0ZQ
4
0Z0MPO0Z
2
0OPZ0APO
3
O0MBZ0ZQ
1
Z0Z0SRJ0
2
0OPZ0APO
a b c d e f g h 1
Z0ZRZRZK
a b c d e f g h
14. . . h6
14. . . g6 15 f5 e5 16 Nf3 Nh5 16 e5 NXd3! 17 eXf6 NXf4 18 Qg4 BXg2+ 19
Kg1 QXf6 20 Be3 BXf1 21 RXf1 e5 22 BXf4
15 Kh1 QUESTION: Why did White play Kh1? Qg6 23 QXg6 f Xg6
ANSWER: Such moves are generally classified as
waiting moves. White tucks his king away in 16. . . Re8 17 Bg1
the corner and awaits developments. He wants
to avoid any potential tricks on the g1-a7 diag-
onal, although now it walks into the line of the
b7-bishop which could be potentially hazardous
for White.

2
bishops, Black can play 20...Nf6, which attacks
e4 and retains the flexibility to play e5 at some
8
0ZrlrZkZ point, or 20...Ne5, which places the knight on a
7
ZbZnZpop secure square and also nullifies the scope of the
bishop on d4.
6
pZ0opa0Z 20. . . Nf6
5
Zpm0Z0Z0
4
0Z0MPO0Z
3
O0MBZ0ZQ 8
0ZrZrZkZ
2
0OPZ0ZPO 7
ZbZ0lpap
1
Z0ZRZRAK 6
pZ0opmpZ
a b c d e f g h 5
Zpm0ZPZ0
17 e5 NXd3
4
0Z0APZ0Z
17. . . g6
3
O0MBZ0ZQ
2
0OPZNZPO
1
Z0ZRZRZK
8
0ZrlrZkZ a b c d e f g h
7
ZbZnZpZp 20. . . Ne5 21 Ng3 NcXd3 22 cXd3 Bc6 23 Nge2
6
pZ0opapZ a5 24 Nf4 b4 25 aXb4 aXb4 26 Nce2 eXf5 27
5
Zpm0Z0Z0 eXf5 Qb7
4
0Z0MPO0Z 20. . . BXd4 21 NXd4 Ne5 22 f6 Qf8 23 Nf3!
3
O0MBZ0ZQ 21 Qg3 EXERCISE: Should Black capture on
e4?
2
0OPZ0ZPO 21. . . e5! Perfectly timed by Kasparov. As e4 is
1
Z0ZRZRAK under threat, White must capture on c5 and ac-
a b c d e f g h
cept a bad position, or sacrifice the e4-pawn and
hope he obtains some compensation. Of course,
17. . . h6 against Kasparov this is hardly likely to work!
18 Nde2 Bg7 19 f5 This is a typical move that
White plays to try to launch an attack. Here,
though, it seems rather loose, as now Black has
a lovely square on e5 for his knight to hop into.
A knight on e5 would be a wonderful piece, as it
8
0ZrZrZkZ
cannot be attacked (it is on an outpost), and de-
fends the g6-square, as well as counterattacking
7
ZbZ0lpap
against the c4- and d3-squares.
6
pZ0o0mpZ
19. . . Qe7 20 Bd4 QUESTION: Should Black ex-
5
Zpm0oPZ0
change the dark-squared bishops? If not, what 4
0Z0APZ0Z
should he do? ANSWER: Although it wouldnt
be immediately disastrous for Black to do this,
3
O0MBZ0L0
it would allow White to push on with f6 more
2
0OPZNZPO
easily. Black should generally not allow White 1
Z0ZRZRZK
to get a pawn to f6 as this can become a ma- a b c d e f g h
jor thorn in his side. To prevent the exchange of

3
21. . . Nf Xe4? 22 BXe4 NXe4 23 NXe4 BXe4 24
BXg7 KXg7 25 f6+
22 f Xg6
8
0ZrZrZkZ
7
ZbZ0lpa0
6
pZ0o0mpZ
8
0ZrZrZkZ
5
Zpm0o0Z0
7
ZbZ0lpap
4
0Z0ZPZ0Z
6
pZ0o0mPZ
3
O0MBA0L0
5
Zpm0o0Z0
2
0OPZNZPO
4
0Z0APZ0Z
1
Z0ZRZRZK
a b c d e f g h
3
O0MBZ0L0
2
0OPZNZPO 23 BXc5 dXc5
1
Z0ZRZRZK 23. . . Nf Xe4 24 BXe4 NXe4 25 NXe4 BXe4 26
a b c d e f g h Nc3 EXERCISE: Should Black capture on c2?
26. . . Bb7! The safest course of action is to play
22 BXc5 dXc5 23 Ng1 c4 24 Be2 NXe4 25 NXe4 the position safely. The bishop on b7 covers the
BXe4 d5-square and prevents the knight from jumping
22. . . hXg6 into this nice square.

8
0ZrZrZkZ
7
ZbZ0lpa0
8
0ZrZrZkZ
6
pZ0o0mpZ
7
ZbZ0lpa0
5
Zpm0o0Z0
6
pZ0o0ZpZ
4
0Z0APZ0Z
5
ZpZ0o0Z0
3
O0MBZ0L0
4
0Z0Z0Z0Z
2
0OPZNZPO
3
O0M0A0L0
1
Z0ZRZRZK
2
0OPZ0ZPO
a b c d e f g h 1
Z0ZRZRZK
a b c d e f g h
22. . . eXd4 23 gXh7+ Kh8 24 NXd4 Nf Xe4 25
BXe4 NXe4 26 NXe4 QXe4 26. . . BXc2 27 Rd2 Bf5 28 Nd5 Qe6
22. . . f Xg6 27 h4 White wants to play h5 to try and prise
23 Be3 open the g-file towards Blacks king.
27. . . Rc4! Now the counterattack comes.
28 Bg5

4
30. . . f6 31 Be3 RXg2! 32 RXg2 Qh3+
8
0Z0ZrZkZ 0-1
7
ZbZ0lpa0
6
pZ0o0ZpZ
5
ZpZ0o0A0
4
0ZrZ0Z0O
3
O0M0Z0L0
2
0OPZ0ZPZ
1
Z0ZRZRZK
a b c d e f g h

28 h5 Rh4+ 29 Kg1 RXh5


28. . . Qe6 29 Rd2

8
0Z0ZrZkZ
7
ZbZ0Zpa0
6
pZ0oqZpZ
5
ZpZ0o0A0
4
0ZrZ0Z0O
3
O0M0Z0L0
2
0OPS0ZPZ
1
Z0Z0ZRZK
a b c d e f g h

29 h5 Rg4 30 Qe3 RXg2


29. . . Rg4 30 Qd3 f6

8
0Z0ZrZkZ
7
ZbZ0Z0a0
6
pZ0oqopZ
5
ZpZ0o0A0
4
0Z0Z0ZrO
3
O0MQZ0Z0
2
0OPS0ZPZ
1
Z0Z0ZRZK
a b c d e f g h

5
White: Movsesian, S Sarajevo
Black: Kasparov, G
2000
Result: 0-1

1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 d6 3 d4 cXd4 4 NXd4 Nf6 5 14 bXc3 Qc7


Nc3 a6 6 Be3 This is the English Attack, which
will be analysed in Chapter Four.
6. . . e6 7 f3 b5 8 Qd2 Nbd7 9 O-O-O Bb7 10
g4 Nb6 11 Qf2 As will be discussed later in
8
0Z0Zka0s
Korneev-Sasikiran, this Qf2 idea is quite popu-
7
ZblnZpop
lar. Hopefully Black will have had his morning
cup of coee and will realize there is a threat of
6
pm0opZ0Z
Nxe6 followed by Bxb6, but in reality Whites
5
ZpZ0Z0Z0
main idea is to move the queen out of the way of 4
0Z0MPZPZ
a ...Nc4 fork. However, as we shall see, moving
the queen away from the defence of the king has
3
Z0OBAPZ0
its drawbacks...
2
PZPZ0L0O
11. . . Nfd7 12 Kb1?!
1
ZKZRZ0ZR
a b c d e f g h

14. . . Na4!? 15 Ne2 Be7


8
rZ0lka0s 14. . . Be7 15 h4 Qc7 16 Ne2 Na4 17 g5 d5 18
7
ZbZnZpop Rhf1 O-O 19 Bd4 e5 20 Be3 b4 21 cXb4 BXb4
6
pm0opZ0Z 22 eXd5 BXd5 23 c4 BXc4 24 BXc4 QXc4 25
RXd7 Qb5 26 Ka1 Ba3
5
ZpZ0Z0Z0 15 Ne2 White probably has to defend the c3-
4
0Z0MPZPZ pawn at some point anyway.
3
Z0M0APZ0 15. . . Be7 16 g5 O-O! 17 h4 EXERCISE: What
2
POPZ0L0O are the candidate moves for Black here? I recom-
1
ZKZRZBZR mend finding three possible moves before decid-
ing which one you would go for.
a b c d e f g h
17. . . Na4 ANSWER: Again we see this thematic
12 Bd3 Rc8 13 Nce2 leap. The alternatives were 17...d5 and 17...Rc8:

12. . . Rc8 13 Bd3 RXc3! This sacrifice changes


the balance of the game. QUESTION: Why can
Black get away with such a move? ANSWER:
Blacks compensation is the fractured pawn shield
in front of the white king and the fact that he
can normally pick up the c3-pawn, meaning he is
only one point down in the material stakes. Also,
Black can attack quite fluently after the sacrifice
...Rc8 and ...Na4 are coming fast and White is
forced on to the defensive. If you still need con-
vincing, just play through this game!

6
8
0Z0Z0skZ 8
0Z0Z0skZ
7
Zblnapop 7
Zbl0apop
6
pZ0opZ0Z 6
pZ0opZ0Z
5
ZpZ0Z0O0 5
ZpZ0m0OP
4
nZ0ZPZ0O 4
nZ0ZPZ0Z
3
Z0OBAPZ0 3
Z0OBZPZ0
2
PZPZNL0Z 2
PZPZNL0Z
1
ZKZRZ0ZR 1
ZKARZ0ZR
a b c d e f g h a b c d e f g h

17. . . d5 18 h5 dXe4 19 BXe4 BXe4 20 f Xe4 Nc4 19 f4? NXd3 20 cXd3 d5! 21 e5 d4
21 Bc1 b4 22 cXb4 BXb4 23 Rh3 19. . . d5! 20 Qh2
17. . . Rc8!? 18 h5 Na4
18 Bc1?! Too slow.
8
0Z0Z0skZ
7
Zbl0apop
6
pZ0ZpZ0Z
8
0Z0Z0skZ 5
ZpZpm0OP
7
Zblnapop 4
nZ0ZPZ0Z
6
pZ0opZ0Z 3
Z0OBZPZ0
5
ZpZ0Z0O0 2
PZPZNZ0L
4
nZ0ZPZ0O 1
ZKARZ0ZR
3
Z0OBZPZ0 a b c d e f g h
2
PZPZNL0Z 20 h6 g6! 21 Qg3 Bd6 22 Qg2 Rc8
1
ZKARZ0ZR 20. . . Bd6!
a b c d e f g h

18 h5!? Ne5 19 g6 f Xg6 20 hXg6 h6! 21 BXh6


gXh6 22 RXh6 NXf3 8
0Z0Z0skZ
18. . . Ne5 19 h5 7
Zbl0Zpop
6
pZ0apZ0Z
5
ZpZpm0OP
4
nZ0ZPZ0Z
3
Z0OBZPZ0
2
PZPZNZ0L
1
ZKARZ0ZR
a b c d e f g h

7
20. . . b4? 21 eXd5 BXd5 22 BXh7+ KXh7 23
g6+ Kg8 24 h6! Qc4 25 RXd5 QXe2! 26 RXe5!
NXc3+ 27 Ka1 QXh2 28 RXh2 Bd6 29 hXg7
8
0Z0Z0skZ
KXg7 30 Bh6+ Kg8 31 gXf7+ KXf7 32 BXf8 7
Zbl0Zpop
BXe5 33 f4!
21 Qh3?! Again this is too slow.
6
pZ0apZ0Z
5
Z0ZpZ0OP
4
no0ZPZ0Z
3
Z0OPZPZQ
8
0Z0Z0skZ
2
PZ0ZNZ0Z
7
Zbl0Zpop
1
ZKARZ0ZR
a b c d e f g h
6
pZ0apZ0Z
5
ZpZpm0OP 22. . . NXc3+ 23 NXc3 QXc3 24 Bb2 Qb4 25 g6
4
nZ0ZPZ0Z Be5 26 d4 Bf4 27 gXf7+ KXf7 28 Qg4 Bh6
3
Z0OBZPZQ 23 cXb4? White cracks under the pressure. Its
not surprising, though, as his kings pawn cover is
2
PZPZNZ0Z being stripped and to make things worse, Garry
1
ZKARZ0ZR Kasparov is sitting on the other side of the board!
a b c d e f g h

21 Bf4! b4! 22 cXb4 Rc8 23 Rc1 d4! 24 g6


21. . . NXd3! 22 cXd3 EXERCISE: How should
Black proceed? White is angling to play g6 and
8
0Z0Z0skZ
he is an exchange up after all. Black must cer-
7
Zbl0Zpop
tainly act quickly here. 6
pZ0apZ0Z
5
Z0ZpZ0OP
4
nO0ZPZ0Z
3
Z0ZPZPZQ
8
0Z0Z0skZ 2
PZ0ZNZ0Z
7
Zbl0Zpop 1
ZKARZ0ZR
6
pZ0apZ0Z a b c d e f g h
5
ZpZpZ0OP
4
nZ0ZPZ0Z 23 h6 g6
3
Z0OPZPZQ 23 c4! dXc4 24 g6 cXd3 25 RXd3 Rc8 26 Rd2
Be5 27 Rhd1 Bc6!
2
PZ0ZNZ0Z 23 cXb4? BXb4
1
ZKARZ0ZR 23. . . Rc8 ANSWER: Quick development is key!
a b c d e f g h
Taking on b4 would be a little bit slow in this
position, whereas the text threatens ...Qc2+.
22 RXd3? dXe4 23 RXd6 QXd6 24 h6 g6
24 Ka1 White tries desperately to hold the fort.
22. . . b4! ANSWER: Do as Garry does!

8
8
0ZrZ0ZkZ 8
0ZrZ0ZkZ
7
Zbl0Zpop 7
Zbl0Zpop
6
pZ0apZ0Z 6
pZ0apZ0Z
5
Z0ZpZ0OP 5
Z0Z0Z0OP
4
nO0ZPZ0Z 4
nO0ZPZ0Z
3
Z0ZPZPZQ 3
Z0ZPZ0ZQ
2
PZ0ZNZ0Z 2
PZ0ZNZ0Z
1
J0ARZ0ZR 1
J0ARZ0ZR
a b c d e f g h a b c d e f g h

24 Qf1 dXe4 25 f Xe4 Qc2+ 26 Ka1 Be5+ 27 25 dXe4? Be5+ 26 Nd4 BXd4+ 27 RXd4 QXc1+!
d4 BXe4 28 Ba3 Bd5 25. . . BXe4! ANSWER: Yes! With Whites king
24. . . dXe4?! so open, such a move looked on the cards. I will
quote Grandmaster Lubomir Ftacnik here: Even
to an untrained eye it becomes clear that Black is
achieving success in the attack with much higher
0ZrZ0ZkZ
8
speed than his opponent.
7
Zbl0Zpop 26 g6! White doesnt give up and makes one last
6
pZ0apZ0Z throw to complicate things. That is to be ex-
pected when playing someone as strong as Movs-
5
Z0Z0Z0OP esian.
4
nO0ZpZ0Z
3
Z0ZPZPZQ
2
PZ0ZNZ0Z
1
J0ARZ0ZR 8
0ZrZ0ZkZ
a b c d e f g h 7
Z0l0Zpop
24. . . Qc2 25 Rd2 Be5+ 26 d4 BXd4+ 27 RXd4
6
pZ0apZPZ
QXe2 28 Bd2
5
Z0Z0Z0ZP
24. . . BXb4! 25 Qh2 Qc2
4
nO0ZbZ0Z
25 f Xe4 QUESTION: Does Black have a killer 3
Z0ZPZ0ZQ
blow here? 2
PZ0ZNZ0Z
1
J0ARZ0ZR
a b c d e f g h

26 dXe4 Be5+ 27 Nd4 BXd4+ 28 RXd4 QXc1+!


26 Rhg1 Qc2 27 Nd4 Be5 28 Qe3 Bd5
26. . . BXh1 27 QXh1 BXb4 28 gXf7+ ANSWER:

9
8
0ZrZ0ZkZ 8
0ZrZ0j0Z
7
Z0l0ZPop 7
Z0l0ZPop
6
pZ0ZpZ0Z 6
pZ0ZpZ0Z
5
Z0Z0Z0ZP 5
Z0Z0Z0ZP
4
na0Z0Z0Z 4
na0Z0Z0Z
3
Z0ZPZ0Z0 3
Z0ZPZ0Z0
2
PZ0ZNZ0Z 2
PZ0ZNZQZ
1
J0ARZ0ZQ 1
J0ARZ0Z0
a b c d e f g h a b c d e f g h

28 gXh7+ Kh8! 29 Bb2 Qc2 30 Rb1 QXe2 31 h6! Bc3! 32


28. . . Kf8! The position is complicated so we hXg7+ KXf7! 33 Qb7+ Kf6 34 BXc3+ NXc3
should be worrying about what tactical possi- 29. . . Rb8! Now its the b-file Black is interested
bilities lie in it. Using the opponents pawn as in.
a shield is a good start. This is another typi- 30 Bb2
cal way to block the opponents attack which is
worth banking in the defensive memory bank.

8
0s0Z0j0Z
7
Z0l0ZPop
8
0ZrZ0j0Z
6
pZ0ZpZ0Z
7
Z0l0ZPop
5
Z0Z0Z0ZP
6
pZ0ZpZ0Z
4
na0Z0Z0Z
5
Z0Z0Z0ZP
3
Z0ZPZ0Z0
4
na0Z0Z0Z
2
PA0ZNZQZ
3
Z0ZPZ0Z0
1
J0ZRZ0Z0
a b c d e f g h
2
PZ0ZNZ0Z
1
J0ARZ0ZQ 30 Bd2 Ba3 31 Bc1 BXc1 32 RXc1 Qb6 33 Nc3
a b c d e f g h
NXc3
30. . . NXb2 31 Nd4 ANSWER: Yes!
28. . . KXf7 29 Bb2! NXb2 30 Rc1 Qe5? 31
Qb7+ Kf6 32 Rf1+ Kg5 33 d4
28. . . QXf7
29 Qg2

10
8
0s0Z0j0Z 8
0s0Z0Z0Z
7
Z0l0ZPop 7
Z0l0ZkLp
6
pZ0ZpZ0Z 6
pZ0ZNZ0Z
5
Z0Z0Z0ZP 5
Z0Z0Z0ZP
4
0a0M0Z0Z 4
0a0Z0Z0Z
3
Z0ZPZ0Z0 3
Z0ZPZ0Z0
2
Pm0Z0ZQZ 2
PZ0Z0Z0Z
1
J0ZRZ0Z0 1
J0ZnZ0Z0
a b c d e f g h a b c d e f g h

31 Rc1 Qe5 32 d4 Qd5 33 QXd5 eXd5 34 KXb2 33 NXc7 Bc3+


Bd2+ 33. . . KXe6 34 QXc7
31 KXb2 Bd2+ 32 Ka1 Bc3+
31 Nd4
31. . . NXd1! Cool as you like! Not only does 8
0s0Z0Z0Z
this win a rook, but White cannot now win the
queen with his intended trick (can you see why?).
7
Z0L0Z0Zp
6
pZ0ZkZ0Z
5
Z0Z0Z0ZP
4
0a0Z0Z0Z
8
0s0Z0j0Z 3
Z0ZPZ0Z0
7
Z0l0ZPop 2
PZ0Z0Z0Z
6
pZ0ZpZ0Z 1
J0ZnZ0Z0
Z0Z0Z0ZP
5 a b c d e f g h

4
0a0M0Z0Z 34 Qh6+ Kf5
3
Z0ZPZ0Z0 34. . . Bc3+ Notice how calm Kasparov was when
2
PZ0Z0ZQZ being counterattacked. A level head gets one far
1
J0ZnZ0Z0 in any Sicilian variation and the Scheveningen is
no exception.
a b c d e f g h

31. . . Bc3! 32 NXe6+ KXf7 33 QXg7+ KXe6 34 0-1


QXc7 Nc4#
32 NXe6+ It looks like Black is in trouble, but
Kasparov has everything worked out.
32. . . KXf7 33 QXg7+

11
White: Karpov, A World Championship (Game 24), Moscow
Black: Kasparov, G
1985
Result: 0-1

1 e4 Here Kasparov writes: When with exag-


gerated confidence he advanced his kings pawn,
I felt glad: now the battle would take place on
8
rZbZrZkZ
my territory my opponent was aiming not for 7
Zpl0apop
protracted manoeuvring, but for a hand-to-hand
fight. With this Kasparov perfectly describes the
6
pZnopm0Z
type of position that commonly arises from the 5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
Scheveningen and in which you must be ready to
fight!
4
PZ0MPO0Z
1. . . c5 And here Kasparov comments: Black also
3
Z0M0A0Z0
sticks to his principles: he does not avoid the Si-
2
0OPZBZPO
cilian Defence, which nearly always leads to com- 1
S0ZQZRZK
plicated, double-edged play. Again, I have to a b c d e f g h
agree with his sentiments of this opening!
2 Nf3 d6 3 d4 cXd4 4 NXd4 Nf6 5 Nc3 e6 11. . . Bd7
12 Bf3 Rb8 13 Qd2 Bd7 14 Nb3 b6 15 g4 The
typical way to try and push Black o the board.
8
rmblka0s White decides he will have more play on the king-
side than on the queenside.
7
opZ0Zpop 15. . . Bc8 QUESTION: Why retreat like this?
6
0Z0opm0Z The bishop only went to d7 a few moves ago.
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0 ANSWER: The idea is to allow the f6-knight to
come to d7 as White is threatening g5 to trap
4
0Z0MPZ0Z it. As we will see further in Aagaard-Gordon in
3
Z0M0Z0Z0 Chapter Two, d7 is the best square for the knight
2
POPZ0OPO as it can re-emerge on c5 or e5 as the game de-
velops.
1
S0AQJBZR 16 g5 Nd7 17 Qf2!? ANSWER:
a b c d e f g h
17. . . Bf8! An excellent move and one that the
5. . . a6 6 Be2 e6 Scheveningen player needs to be aware of. This
move defends the king and helps to open the e-
6 Be2 a6 7 O-O Be7 8 f4 O-O 9 Kh1 Qc7 10
file for the rook on e8 (should White ever go f5,
a4 Nc6 11 Be3 Re8
Black can consider capturing with ...exf5 to clear
the file for the rook to exert influence in the cen-
tre). Black will now play ...Bb7 and ...Nb4 to
control d5, a square the white knight on c3 is
eyeing up. With these moves Black simply com-
pletes his development, relying on the flexibility
and solidity of his position.
18 Bg2

12
20 h4!? Nc5 21 h5 Ba8 22 f5 Ne5 23 Bd4 Ncd7
24 hXg6 f Xg6 25 f Xe6 RXe6 26 Nd5 BXd5 27
8
0sbZrakZ eXd5 Re7 28 BXe5 NXe5 29 Nd4
7
Z0lnZpop 20. . . Rbc8?!
6
ponopZ0Z
5
Z0Z0Z0O0
4
PZ0ZPO0Z
8
0ZrZrakZ
3
ZNM0A0Z0
7
ZblnZpZp
2
0OPZ0LBO
6
ponopZpZ
1
S0Z0ZRZK
5
Z0Z0Z0O0
a b c d e f g h 4
PZ0ZPO0Z
18 h4 Bb7 19 h5
3
ZNM0Z0Z0
18. . . Bb7 19 Rad1 A sensible move. White com-
2
0OPZ0LBO
pletes his development and takes aim at the d6-
1
Z0ARZRZK
a b c d e f g h
pawn.
19. . . g6 QUESTION: Why would Black want to
apparently weaken his king position like this? 20. . . Nc5! 21 NXc5 bXc5! 22 Rd3 Nd4 23 Rh3
ANSWER: The bishop on f8 can now fianchetto Qe7!? 24 Qh4 h5! 25 gXh6 QXh4 26 RXh4
by coming to g7, where it will be on an active Kh7!
square. By analysing this game (and other games 21 Rd3 Nb4
in this book), you will realize that such a move
isnt in fact all that weakening for Black.
20 Bc1!? EXERCISE: What other moves could
White have played here? ANSWER: All of 20 f5,
8
0ZrZrakZ
20 Qh4 and 20 h4 came into consideration. Lets
7
ZblnZpZp
take a look: 6
po0opZpZ
5
Z0Z0Z0O0
4
Pm0ZPO0Z
3
ZNMRZ0Z0
8
0s0ZrakZ 2
0OPZ0LBO
7
ZblnZpZp 1
Z0A0ZRZK
6
ponopZpZ a b c d e f g h
5
Z0Z0Z0O0
4
PZ0ZPO0Z 21. . . Bg7!? 22 Rfd1 d5!? 23 eXd5 Nb4! 24 Re3
NXd5 25 NXd5 BXd5 26 BXd5 eXd5 27 RXe8+
3
ZNM0Z0Z0 RXe8 28 RXd5 Qc6
2
0OPZ0LBO 22 Rh3 Bg7 23 Be3?! ANSWER:
1
Z0ARZRZK
a b c d e f g h

20 f5?! Nce5! 21 f Xe6 f Xe6


20 Qh4 Bg7 21 Rf3 Nb4 22 Rh3 Nf8

13
8
0ZrZrZkZ 8
0ZrZ0ZkZ
7
ZblnZpap 7
Zblnspap
6
po0opZpZ 6
po0opZpZ
5
Z0Z0Z0O0 5
Z0Z0Z0O0
4
Pm0ZPO0Z 4
Pm0ZPO0Z
3
ZNM0A0ZR 3
ZNM0A0ZR
2
0OPZ0LBO 2
0OPZ0LBO
1
Z0Z0ZRZK 1
Z0Z0ZRJ0
a b c d e f g h a b c d e f g h

23 f5! eXf5 24 eXf5 BXg2+ 25 KXg2 Qb7+ 26 24 Bd4 e5 25 f Xe5 BXe5 26 BXe5 dXe5
Kg1 24 f5 eXf5 25 eXf5 BXg2+ 26 QXg2 Rce8 27 Bg1
23 Be3 Be5 28 f6 Re6
23. . . Re7! Congratulations if you chose this strange-24 Nd4 e5 25 Nde2 eXf4 26 NXf4 Rce8! 27 Qh4
looking move! Nf8
24. . . Rce8?! So this was the idea! To double
rooks on the e-file. This is a prophylactic idea
to try and put the brakes on the f5 advance (it
would be met with ...exf5 when the e-file is open
8
0ZrZ0ZkZ for the rooks), but if White doesnt play f5, how
7
Zblnspap else is he going to attack?
6
po0opZpZ
5
Z0Z0Z0O0
4
Pm0ZPO0Z
3
ZNM0A0ZR
8
0Z0ZrZkZ
2
0OPZ0LBO
7
Zblnspap
1
Z0Z0ZRZK
6
po0opZpZ
a b c d e f g h
5
Z0Z0Z0O0
4
Pm0ZPO0Z
23. . . BXc3 24 bXc3 QXc3 25 Bd4 QXc2 26 RXh7!!
KXh7 27 Qh4+ Kg8 28 Qh8#
3
ZNM0A0ZR
23. . . d5!? 24 f5! eXf5 25 eXf5 Qd6 26 Bd4
2
0OPZ0LBO
23. . . f5 24 gXf6 BXf6 25 f5 eXf5 26 eXf5 Rf8
1
Z0Z0ZRJ0
a b c d e f g h
24 Kg1
24. . . f5! 25 gXf6 BXf6
25 Rd1! Looking at that d6-pawn again.
25. . . f5 26 gXf6! EXERCISE: Which way should
Black now recapture on f6?

14
27 BXb6! Ng4! 28 BXc7 NXf2 29 BXd6! NXd1
30 BXe7 NXc3! 31 bXc3 NXc2
8
0Z0ZrZkZ 27. . . Rf7! Black succeeds in successfully regroup-
7
Zblns0ap ing his rooks and now takes over the initiative.
6
po0opOpZ 28 BXb6 Qb8 So White has won a pawn, but
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0 Black has some handy compensation in the form
of a newly opened b-file and pressure against f4.
4
Pm0ZPO0Z 29 Be3 Nh5 30 Rg4
3
ZNM0A0ZR
2
0OPZ0LBO
1
Z0ZRZ0J0 8
0l0ZrZkZ
a b c d e f g h
7
ZbZ0Zrap
26 eXf5?! eXf5! 6
pZ0opZpZ
26. . . NXf6!? 5
Z0Z0Z0Zn
4
Pm0ZPORZ
8
0Z0ZrZkZ
3
ZNM0A0Z0
7
Zbl0s0ap
2
0OPZ0LBO
6
po0opmpZ
1
Z0ZRZ0J0
a b c d e f g h
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
4
Pm0ZPO0Z 30 Rf3 Nf6
3
ZNM0A0ZR 30. . . Nf6 31 Rh4!? ANSWER: Surprise White!
2
0OPZ0LBO
1
Z0ZRZ0J0
a b c d e f g h

26. . . BXf6 27 Qd2 d5 28 e5 Bg7 29 Nd4 Nc6


8
0l0ZrZkZ
30 Nce2
7
ZbZ0Zrap
27 Rg3?!
6
pZ0opmpZ
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
4
Pm0ZPO0S
8
0Z0ZrZkZ 3
ZNM0A0Z0
7
Zbl0s0ap 2
0OPZ0LBO
6
po0opmpZ 1
Z0ZRZ0J0
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0 a b c d e f g h

4
Pm0ZPO0Z 31 Rg3 Nh5
3
ZNM0A0S0 31 Rh4
2
0OPZ0LBO 31. . . g5! Risky stu, but White had it in his
1
Z0ZRZ0J0 mind to be the one attacking and suddenly the
a b c d e f g h tables are turned something which it is often

15
hard for a chess player to adapt to.
32 f Xg5 Ng4! 8
bl0ZrZkZ
7
Z0Z0Z0ap
6
QZ0SpZ0Z
8
0l0ZrZkZ 5
Z0Z0Z0O0
7
ZbZ0Zrap 4
PZ0ZPZ0S
6
pZ0opZ0Z 3
ZrM0Z0Z0
5
Z0Z0Z0O0 2
0OnZ0ZBO
4
Pm0ZPZnS 1
Z0Z0Z0J0
3
ZNM0A0Z0 a b c d e f g h
2
0OPZ0LBO
1
Z0ZRZ0J0 37. . . Nb4! 38 Qa5 QXd6 39 e5 Qd3 40 BXb7
a b c d e f g h Qe3+
38 RXe6 RXb2
32. . . NXe4 33 Qe2! NXc3 34 bXc3 Nd5 35
BXd5 BXd5 36 QXa6 BXc3 37 Qd3
33 Qd2 NXe3 34 QXe3 NXc2 35 Qb6! Ba8
Exchanging queens would suit Black, as he has
8
bl0ZrZkZ
play on the queenside.
7
Z0Z0Z0ap
36 RXd6? In time trouble White blunders, which
6
QZ0ZRZ0Z
is hardly unexpected in such a complicated posi- 5
Z0Z0Z0O0
tion. 4
PZ0ZPZ0S
3
Z0M0Z0Z0
2
0snZ0ZBO
8
bl0ZrZkZ
1
Z0Z0Z0J0
a b c d e f g h
7
Z0Z0Zrap
6
pL0SpZ0Z 38. . . Ne3! 39 RXe8+ QXe8 40 Bh3 RXb2 41
5
Z0Z0Z0O0 Qe6+ QXe6 42 BXe6+ Kf8
4
PZ0ZPZ0S 39 Qc4 Kh8 40 e5? With the last move of the
time control, White understandably blunders for
3
ZNM0Z0Z0 the second time.
2
0OnZ0ZBO
1
Z0Z0Z0J0
a b c d e f g h

36 QXb8 RXb8 37 Bh3!


36. . . Rb7! Skewering the queen against the knight
on b3.
37 QXa6 RXb3?!

16
8
bl0ZrZ0j
7
Z0Z0Z0ap
6
0Z0ZRZ0Z
5
Z0Z0O0O0
4
PZQZ0Z0S
3
Z0M0Z0Z0
2
0snZ0ZBO
1
Z0Z0Z0J0
a b c d e f g h

40 RXe8+ QXe8 41 Nd1 Na3 42 Qd3 Ra2


40. . . Qa7+ 41 Kh1 BXg2+ 42 KXg2 Nd4+ With
this game Kasparov became World Champion! A
complicated fight its safe to say, but one in which
Black always had his chances.

0-1

17
White: Tseshkovsky, V USSR Championship, Moscow
Black: Kasparov, G
1981
Result: 0-1

1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 e6 3 d4 cXd4 4 NXd4 Nf6 5


Nc3 d6 6 g3 The Fianchetto Variation will be
examined more closely in Chapter Six. This sys-
8
rZ0lkZ0s
tem can be played against almost all the Sicilian 7
opZbapop
variations and the Scheveningen is no exception.
6. . . Nc6
6
0Znopm0Z
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
4
PZ0MPZ0Z
8
rZblka0s
3
Z0M0Z0O0
7
opZ0Zpop
2
0OPZ0OBO
6
0Znopm0Z
1
S0AQZRJ0
a b c d e f g h
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
4
0Z0MPZ0Z 9 Ndb5 Qb8 10 Bg5 a6 11 BXf6 gXf6 12 Nd4
3
Z0M0Z0O0 Qa7!
2
POPZ0O0O 9. . . O-O 10 Nce2?! QUESTION: Why did White
play this seemingly strange-looking move? AN-
1
S0AQJBZR SWER: White would like to play for a Maroczy
a b c d e f g h
Bind position with c4. The pawns on e4 and c4
would hinder Blacks freeing ...d5 and ...b5 pawn
6. . . Be7 7 Bg2 O-O 8 O-O Nc6 breaks.
7 Bg2 Bd7 8 O-O Be7 9 a4 QUESTION: Why
would White be playing moves like this so early?
ANSWER: White is concerned about a future
...b7-b5 break, which is one of Blacks main pawn
break ideas in the Scheveningen (and the Sicilian
8
rZ0l0skZ
in general). 7
opZbapop
6
0Znopm0Z
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
4
PZ0MPZ0Z
3
Z0Z0Z0O0
2
0OPZNOBO
1
S0AQZRJ0
a b c d e f g h

10 Ndb5 Qb8 11 Be3 a6 12 Nd4


10. . . Rc8! 11 c3?! Alternatives:

18
8
0ZrZ0skZ
8
0Zrl0skZ
7
Zplbapop
7
opZbapop
6
pZnZpm0Z
6
0Znopm0Z
5
Z0ZpZ0Z0
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
4
PZ0MPZPZ
4
PZ0MPZ0Z
3
Z0O0Z0ZP
3
Z0O0Z0O0
2
0O0ZNOBZ
2
0O0ZNOBO
1
S0AQZRJ0
a b c d e f g h
1
S0AQZRJ0
a b c d e f g h
13. . . Be8 14 g5 Nd7
13. . . h6
11 Nb5 d5! 12 eXd5 NXd5
14 eXd5
11 b3 d5! 12 eXd5 eXd5
11 c4 a6 12 b3 Qa5
11. . . a6! Preventing Nb5 which would attack the
d6-pawn. A typical Sicilian move, the text also
8
0ZrZ0skZ
gives Black ideas of ...b5 at some point.
7
Zplbapop
12 h3 Qc7 13 g4 ANSWER:
6
pZnZpm0Z
5
Z0ZPZ0Z0
4
PZ0M0ZPZ
3
Z0O0Z0ZP
8
0ZrZ0skZ 2
0O0ZNOBZ
7
Zplbapop 1
S0AQZRJ0
6
pZnopm0Z a b c d e f g h

5
Z0Z0Z0Z0 14 NXc6 BXc6 15 e5! Ne4 16 f3 Nc5 17 f4 f6
4
PZ0MPZPZ 14. . . NXd5 Black has a fine position. Whites
3
Z0O0Z0ZP g4 move has only served to create weaknesses
2
0O0ZNOBZ around his own king, and Black is ready to put
his rooks in the centre to attack down the open
1
S0AQZRJ0 files.
a b c d e f g h
15 BXd5?! A risky decision. Though the d5-
pawn is now ripe for the taking, White will sorely
13 Be3 Na5! 14 b3 b5!
miss the bishop in the defence. That said, its
13. . . d5! Kasparov demonstrates his knowledge clear from such a decision that White was already
of the principles. As usual, a counter on the wing unhappy with his position and thus tried to shake
is best met by a counter in the centre! things up.
15. . . eXd5 16 Nf4 QUESTION: What to do about
the pawn on d5? ANSWER: Play actively and
sacrifice it! Without the bishop on g2 Whites

19
king is even more exposed, but how to get at it? 18 Be3 Bb8!
16. . . Bc5! Now this bishop comes into the game 18 NXd5 Qg3+!
with great eect. The potential power of the 18. . . Be6!
Scheveningen is about to be witnessed.
17 Nb3? Not great, but White had already gone
wrong:
8
0ZrZ0skZ
7
apl0Zpop
6
pZnZbZ0Z
8
0ZrZ0skZ 5
Z0ZQZ0Z0
7
ZplbZpop 4
PZ0Z0MPZ
6
pZnZ0Z0Z 3
ZNO0Z0ZP
5
Z0apZ0Z0 2
0O0Z0O0Z
4
PZ0Z0MPZ 1
S0A0ZRJ0
a b c d e f g h
3
ZNO0Z0ZP
2
0O0Z0O0Z 18. . . Rfe8
1
S0AQZRJ0 18. . . Rcd8
a b c d e f g h
19 NXe6 f Xe6 20 Qe4 ANSWER:
17 Be3 NXd4 18 cXd4 Bd6 19 NXd5 Bh2+ 20
Kg2 Bc6
17 NXd5 Qd6 18 Ne2 Rfd8 19 Bg5 f6 20 Be3
Ne5 8
0ZrZ0skZ
17. . . Ba7! 18 QXd5 QUESTION: Is White just 7
apl0Z0op
a pawn ahead for nothing? What can we do here
as Black? ANSWER: No! White is badly coor-
6
pZnZpZ0Z
dinated, but Black does need to attack quickly
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
before White can regroup. 4
PZ0ZQZPZ
3
ZNO0Z0ZP
2
0O0Z0O0Z
8
0ZrZ0skZ
1
S0A0ZRJ0
a b c d e f g h
7
aplbZpop
6
pZnZ0Z0Z 20 QXe6+ Kh8 21 Be3 Bb8! 22 f4 Rce8
5
Z0ZQZ0Z0 20 Qg2 Ne5 21 Be3 Nf3+ 22 Kh1 Nh4! 23
4
PZ0Z0MPZ Qe4 Nf3!
3
ZNO0Z0ZP 20. . . RXf2! The correct choice.
2
0O0Z0O0Z
1
S0A0ZRJ0
a b c d e f g h

20
8
0ZrZ0ZkZ 8
0ZrZ0ZkZ
7
apl0Z0op 7
ZpZ0Z0op
6
pZnZpZ0Z 6
pZnZpZ0Z
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0 5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
4
PZ0ZQZPZ 4
PZ0Z0ZPZ
3
ZNO0Z0ZP 3
ZNO0Z0lP
2
0O0Z0s0Z 2
0O0Z0aQZ
1
S0A0ZRJ0 1
S0A0ZKZ0
a b c d e f g h a b c d e f g h

20. . . Ne5 21 Bf4! Nf3+ 22 QXf3 RXf4 23 Qe2 23 Kh1 Qd3! 24 QXf2 Rf8! 25 Qe3 Qf1+ 26
21 RXf2 Qg3+ 22 Qg2 Kh2 Rf2+ 27 Kg3 Rg2+ 28 Kh4 Qf6+ 29 g5
Ne7!! 30 Nd4 QXd4+!
23. . . Qe5! 24 Bf4
8
0ZrZ0ZkZ
7
apZ0Z0op 8
0ZrZ0ZkZ
6
pZnZpZ0Z 7
ZpZ0Z0op
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0 6
pZnZpZ0Z
4
PZ0Z0ZPZ 5
Z0Z0l0Z0
3
ZNO0Z0lP 4
PZ0Z0APZ
2
0O0Z0SQZ 3
ZNO0Z0ZP
1
S0A0Z0J0 2
0O0Z0aQZ
a b c d e f g h
1
S0Z0ZKZ0
a b c d e f g h
22 Kh1? QXh3+ 23 Kg1 BXf2+ 24 KXf2 Rf8+
25 Ke2 Qf1+ 26 Ke3 Qe1+ 27 Kd3 Rd8+ 28
Nd4 Ne5+! 24 KXf2 Rf8+ 25 Kg1 Qe1+ 26 Kh2 Rf2
22. . . BXf2+ 23 Kf1? 24. . . QXf4 25 QXf2 ANSWER:
25. . . Qc4+ If only we could always play such
nice games as Black against 1 e4! The key theme
from this game was Blacks perfectly timed ...d5
break in the centre. This gave Kasparov a good
position and he went on to score a crushing vic-
tory from there.

0-1

21
White: Anisimov, P Krasnoyarsk
Black: Belov, V
2007
Result: 0-1

1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 d6 3 d4 cXd4 4 NXd4 Nf6 5


Nc3 e6 6 Be2 a6 My recommendation, playing
the position in Najdorf/Scheveningen style. The
8
rZblkZ0s
text gives rise to a potential ...b5 push which will 7
ZpZ0apop
harass the knight on c3.
7 Be3 Be7
6
pZnopm0Z
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
4
0Z0MPO0Z
8
rmblkZ0s
3
Z0M0A0Z0
7
ZpZ0apop
2
POPLBZPO
6
pZ0opm0Z
1
S0Z0J0ZR
a b c d e f g h
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
4
0Z0MPZ0Z 9 O-O O-O
3
Z0M0A0Z0 9. . . O-O 10 O-O-O Nd7 QUESTION: Why has
2
POPZBOPO Black retreated like this? What other sensible
moves could he have played? ANSWER: Black
1
S0ZQJ0ZR pre-empts Whites g4-g5 push to kick the knight
a b c d e f g h away and the knight is happy to search for pas-
tures new, mainly on the queenside. We saw this
7. . . Qc7 idea in Kasparovs games in the previous chapter.
8 f4

8
rmblkZ0s 8
rZbl0skZ
7
ZpZ0apop 7
ZpZnapop
6
pZ0opm0Z 6
pZnopZ0Z
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0 5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
4
0Z0MPO0Z 4
0Z0MPO0Z
3
Z0M0A0Z0 3
Z0M0A0Z0
2
POPZBZPO 2
POPLBZPO
1
S0ZQJ0ZR 1
Z0JRZ0ZR
a b c d e f g h a b c d e f g h

8 Qd2 O-O 9 O-O-O Nc6 10 f4 10. . . NXd4 11 QXd4 b5 12 e5!?


8. . . Nc6 9 Qd2 11 g4 ANSWER: Think of the typical moves we

22
have seen so far. Black wants to play ...b5, but 13. . . Bb7 14 h4 Re8 15 h5 e5
cannot yet due to the knight on c6 being en prise, 14 Rhg1 ANSWER:
so first he plays...
14. . . Qa5! Best.

8
rZbl0skZ 8
0sbZ0skZ
7
ZpZnapop 7
Z0Znapop
6
pZnopZ0Z 6
pZ0opZ0Z
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0 5
lpZ0Z0O0
4
0Z0MPOPZ 4
0Z0LPO0Z
3
Z0M0A0Z0 3
Z0M0A0Z0
2
POPLBZ0O 2
POPZBZ0O
1
Z0JRZ0ZR 1
Z0JRZ0S0
a b c d e f g h
a b c d e f g h

11 Bf3 Nb6 12 Qe2 Bd7 13 Kb1 Na5 14 b3


14. . . b4 15 Na4 Qa5 16 b3 Nc5 17 NXc5 dXc5
Qc7 15 Rd3 Nc6 16 a3 NXd4 17 BXd4 Bc6
18 Qb2
11 Kb1 NXd4 12 QXd4 b5 13 g4 Qa5 14 a3
14. . . Qc7 15 f5 Ne5 16 f6
Bb7 15 g5 Rfc8 16 h4 Rab8 17 h5 Ba8 18 h6
Bf8 19 Bd2 b4 20 Na2 Qc7 21 Bd3 bXa3 22 b3 15 b3!? White cant decide whether to play an
Nc5 23 Bc3 e5 24 f Xe5 dXe5 25 QXe5 NXd3 26 aggressive or defensive move. Welcome to the Si-
QXc7 RXc7 27 hXg7 BXg7 28 BXg7 BXe4 29 cilian labyrinth... EXERCISE: Did White have a
Bd4 RXb3+! 30 cXb3 Nc1+! better option than this nervous defensive move?
11 g4
11. . . NXd4 12 QXd4 ...and only then:
12. . . b5 Blacks counterattack has been launched!
13 g5 Rb8 QUESTION: Why did Black play this,
8
0sbZ0skZ
rather than develop with ...Bb7?
7
Z0Znapop
6
pZ0opZ0Z
5
lpZ0Z0O0
4
0Z0LPO0Z
8
0sbl0skZ 3
ZPM0A0Z0
7
Z0Znapop 2
PZPZBZ0O
6
pZ0opZ0Z 1
Z0JRZ0S0
5
ZpZ0Z0O0 a b c d e f g h
4
0Z0LPO0Z 15 f5! b4 16 f6 Bd8 17 f Xg7 Re8 18 Nb1 Bb6
3
Z0M0A0Z0 19 Qd2 QXa2 20 Rgf1 Ne5
2
POPZBZ0O 15. . . Nc5 This threatens ...b4 as the knight on
1
Z0JRZ0ZR c3 can no longer run to a4 as planned.
a b c d e f g h 16 e5

23
17 Kb2 b4 18 Nb1 Bd7
8
0sbZ0skZ 17. . . Qa3+ 18 Kd2
7
Z0Z0apop
6
pZ0opZ0Z 8
0sbZ0skZ
5
lpm0O0O0 7
Z0Z0apop
4
0Z0L0O0Z 6
pZ0ZpZ0Z
3
ZPM0A0Z0 5
ZpmpO0O0
2
PZPZBZ0O 4
0O0L0O0Z
1
Z0JRZ0S0 3
l0M0A0Z0
a b c d e f g h
2
PZPJBZ0O
16 f5 b4 17 f6 bXc3! 1
Z0ZRZ0S0
16. . . d5! a b c d e f g h

18 Kb1 Na4 19 NXa4 bXa4! 20 c3 BXb4!


8
0sbZ0skZ 18. . . Ne4+ 19 NXe4 dXe4 20 Ke1
7
Z0Z0apop
6
pZ0ZpZ0Z
5
lpmpO0O0
8
0sbZ0skZ
4
0Z0L0O0Z
7
Z0Z0apop
3
ZPM0A0Z0
6
pZ0ZpZ0Z
2
PZPZBZ0O
5
ZpZ0O0O0
1
Z0JRZ0S0
4
0O0LpO0Z
a b c d e f g h 3
l0Z0A0Z0
2
PZPZBZ0O
16. . . b4? 17 eXd6 bXc3 18 Kb1! 1
Z0ZRJ0S0
17 b4 a b c d e f g h

20 QXe4 BXb4+
8
0sbZ0skZ 20. . . Bb7 21 Kf2 BXb4 Whites king has been
7
Z0Z0apop forced on to the run and Black has won a clear
pawn. White can of course throw plenty of ob-
6
pZ0ZpZ0Z stacles in Blacks way, but the opening has been
5
lpmpO0O0 a great success for Belov.
4
0O0L0O0Z 22 Rg3 Qa5 23 c4 Rbd8 24 Qa1 RXd1 25 QXd1
3
Z0M0A0Z0 Rd8 26 Qb1 bXc4 27 BXc4 Bd5 28 a3 Bc5 29
Be2 QXa3 A second pawn bites the dust.
2
PZPZBZ0O 30 Qc2 BXe3+ 31 RXe3 Qa1 32 Qc7 Ra8 33
1
Z0JRZ0S0 Rc3 ANSWER:
a b c d e f g h
33. . . e3+! 34 KXe3

24
8
rZ0Z0ZkZ
7
Z0L0Zpop
6
pZ0ZpZ0Z
5
Z0ZbO0O0
4
0Z0Z0O0Z
3
Z0S0J0Z0
2
0Z0ZBZ0O
1
l0Z0Z0Z0
a b c d e f g h

34 RXe3 Qd4
34. . . Qg1+ 35 Kd3 g6 36 Qd7 Qb1+ 37 Kd2
Qb2+ 38 Rc2 Qb4+ Once f4 goes, White loses
almost all his other remaining pawns.

0-1

25
White: Filev, G Bulgarian Championship, Blagoevgrad
Black: Nikolov, M
2009
Result: 0-1

1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 e6 3 d4 cXd4 4 NXd4 Nf6 5


Nc3 d6 6 Be2 a6 7 O-O Be7 8 f4 O-O 9 Kh1
QUESTION: Why does White put the king in the
8
rmbZ0skZ
corner like this? ANSWER: As in many Sicilian 7
Zpl0apop
lines, safeguarding the king like this is a moot
point. Many believe it to be a waste of time, but
6
pZ0opm0Z
others think it is a useful safety move in case the 5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
king gets into trouble on the g1-a7 diagonal. The
following games will hopefully let the reader de-
4
0Z0MPO0Z
cide for themselves!
3
Z0M0Z0Z0
2
POPZBZPO
1
S0A0LRZK
a b c d e f g h

8
rmbl0skZ 10 Be3 b5!? 11 Bf3 Bb7 12 e5 dXe5 13 f Xe5
7
ZpZ0apop Nfd7 14 BXb7 QXb7 15 Qh5 b4 16 Nce2 Nc6
6
pZ0opm0Z 17 Bf4 NXd4 18 NXd4 Qe4!
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0 10. . . b5 And why not? If White doesnt play a4
to prevent it, you definitely have this move on
4
0Z0MPO0Z the agenda. Now a potential ...b4, kicking the
3
Z0M0Z0Z0 c3-knight and weakening the defence of e4, is in
the air.
2
POPZBZPO
11 Bf3 Bb7 12 e5 QUESTION: How should Black
1
S0AQZRZK deal with the attack on the knight on f6? AN-
a b c d e f g h
SWER: Normally the knight prefers to retreat to
d7, but here that would allow a tactic:
9 e5 dXe5 10 f Xe5 Bc5 11 Be3 Nd5 12 NXd5
12. . . Ne8
QXd5
9. . . Qc7 The queen typically comes here, keep-
ing an eye on the e5-square.
10 Qe1 QUESTION: Why does White play this
8
rm0ZnskZ
move? What is the idea behind it? ANSWER:
7
Zbl0apop
The queen can swing to the kingside via g3 or 6
pZ0opZ0Z
help support the e5 push. 5
ZpZ0O0Z0
4
0Z0M0O0Z
3
Z0M0ZBZ0
2
POPZ0ZPO
1
S0A0LRZK
a b c d e f g h

26
12. . . Nfd7? 13 eXd6 BXd6 14 NXe6! f Xe6 15 14 Qg3 Nd7 15 Be3 Rc8 16 Rad1 b4 17 Nce2
BXb7 QXb7 16 QXe6+ Kh8 17 QXd6 Rc5!?
12. . . dXe5 13 BXb7 QXb7 14 f Xe5 Nfd7 15 Qg3 14 Ne4 Nd7! 15 eXd6 NXd6 16 NXd6 BXd6 17
Kh8! 16 Bf4 Nc6 17 Rad1 Rac8 Bd2 Rac8 18 Rd1 Nf6
13 BXb7 14 f5 dXe5 15 QXe5 Bf6 16 Qe3 Nc6! 17 NXc6
QXc6 18 f Xe6 f Xe6 19 Bd2 Nc7 20 Rae1 Rae8
14. . . Ra7
8
rm0ZnskZ
7
ZBl0apop
6
pZ0opZ0Z 8
0m0ZnskZ
5
ZpZ0O0Z0 7
sqZ0apop
4
0Z0M0O0Z 6
pZ0opZ0Z
3
Z0M0Z0Z0 5
ZpZ0O0Z0
2
POPZ0ZPO 4
0Z0MQO0Z
1
S0A0LRZK 3
Z0M0Z0Z0
a b c d e f g h 2
POPZ0ZPO
13 f5 dXe5 14 f Xe6!? BXf3 15 eXf7+ RXf7 16
1
S0A0ZRZK
a b c d e f g h
NXf3 Nd7 17 Bg5 Bf8 18 a3 Nd6 19 Nd2 RXf1+
20 QXf1 Qc6 21 Re1 Re8
14. . . d5
13. . . QXb7 EXERCISE: Pretend you are White
and that you want to start attacking as quickly 14. . . d5 15 Qd3 Nc6 16 NXc6 QXc6 17 f5
as possible (well, I am guessing you do, as youve 14. . . QXe4 15 NXe4 dXe5 16 f Xe5 Nd7 17 Nc6!
played attacking moves so far!). Think about
what moves you could play to set up an attack. 15 Be3 b4 Forcing White to capture on b7. Now
a queenless middlegame will be reached do you
14 Qe4 This doesnt look very aggressive, but think this will be acceptable for Black?
its probably here that White noticed the coiled
spring eect behind Blacks solid position. AN- 16 QXb7 RXb7 17 Ne4 dXe5 18 f Xe5 ANSWER:
SWER: 14 Qg3, 14 Ne4 and 14 f5 look like better 18. . . Nc7! The knight is coming to d5, where it
ways to attack. Lets see if they were any better: cannot be kicked away, as the c2-pawn is being
held back by the black pawn on b4.

8
rm0ZnskZ
7
ZqZ0apop
6
pZ0opZ0Z
5
ZpZ0O0Z0
4
0Z0MQO0Z
3
Z0M0Z0Z0
2
POPZ0ZPO
1
S0A0ZRZK
a b c d e f g h

27
20. . . Rc7
8
0m0Z0skZ 21 Nc6 Rb6 22 NXe7+ NXe7 23 c3 ANSWER:
7
Zrm0apop
6
pZ0ZpZ0Z
5
Z0Z0O0Z0 8
0Z0Z0skZ
4
0o0MNZ0Z 7
Z0Znmpop
3
Z0Z0A0Z0 6
ps0ZpZ0Z
2
POPZ0ZPO 5
Z0Z0O0Z0
1
S0Z0ZRZK 4
0o0ZNZ0Z
a b c d e f g h
3
Z0O0Z0Z0
18. . . g6 19 Rad1 Ng7 20 g4! 2
PO0A0SPO
19 Rf2 Nd5! 1
S0Z0Z0ZK
a b c d e f g h

8
0m0Z0skZ 23 Bf4 Ng6
7
ZrZ0apop 23. . . NXe5 24 cXb4 Nd3! A simple fork.
6
pZ0ZpZ0Z 25 Re2 NXb4 Black has won a pawn and now
sets about converting his advantage.
5
Z0ZnO0Z0 26 a3 Nbd5 27 b4 Rc8 28 Be3 NXe3 The knight
4
0o0MNZ0Z on d5 disappears...
3
Z0Z0A0Z0 29 RXe3 Nd5 ...only to be replaced by its com-
2
POPZ0SPO rade!
1
S0Z0Z0ZK 30 Rd3 Rc2 31 h3 h6 32 Rf1 Rbc6 33 Rdf3 f6
a b c d e f g h Adequately dealing with all of Whites threats.
34 Rd3 Kf7 35 Nc5 Rc3 36 Rd4 RXa3 37 NXe6
19. . . f5 20 eXf6 gXf6 21 Bh6 Rf7 22 Raf1 Nd7 KXe6 38 Re1+ Re3 39 RXe3+ NXe3 40 Re4+
23 Ng5! Kd5 41 RXe3 Rb6 Although White has managed
20 Bd2 Nd7 to reach a rook ending, which was probably his
best chance to draw, its always nice to be in a
position as Black is here where you can play for
a win and you cant really lose!
0Z0Z0skZ
8
42 Re7
7
ZrZnapop
6
pZ0ZpZ0Z
5
Z0ZnO0Z0
4
0o0MNZ0Z
3
Z0Z0Z0Z0
2
POPA0SPO
1
S0Z0Z0ZK
a b c d e f g h

28
8
0Z0Z0Z0Z
7
Z0Z0S0o0
6
ps0Z0o0o
5
Z0ZkZ0Z0
4
0O0Z0Z0Z
3
Z0Z0Z0ZP
2
0Z0Z0ZPZ
1
Z0Z0Z0ZK
a b c d e f g h

42 Rb3 a5 43 b5 Kc4
42. . . g6 43 Rh7 h5 44 Rg7 f5 45 Kg1 Kc4 Ex-
cellent technique from Nikolov. The b-pawn goes
and so do Whites hopes.
46 Kf2 KXb4 47 Ke2 a5 48 Kd2 Kb3 49 Kc1 a4
50 Kb1 Re6 51 Rb7+ Ka3 52 Rg7 Re1+ 53 Kc2
Re2+ Initially Black appeared to have a passive
position, but after ...Nc7 and ...Nd5! suddenly it
was Black who was better!

0-1

29
White: Adams, M London
Black: Van Wely, L
2009
Result: 1/2-1/2

1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 d6 3 d4 cXd4 4 NXd4 Nf6 5 Nc3


a6 6 Be2 e6 7 O-O Be7 8 f4 O-O 9 Bf3 Here we
see an advantage of developing the bishop to e2:
8
rZ0Z0skZ
it has the option of coming to f3 and pointing at 7
Zbl0apop
Blacks queenside.
9. . . Qc7 10 Be3
6
pZpopm0Z
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
4
NZ0ZPO0Z
8
rmbZ0skZ
3
Z0Z0ABZ0
7
Zpl0apop
2
POPZ0ZPO
6
pZ0opm0Z
1
S0ZQZRJ0
a b c d e f g h
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
4
0Z0MPO0Z 12. . . d5 13 e5 Nd7 14 c4
3
Z0M0ABZ0 13 c4 c5!
2
POPZ0ZPO
1
S0ZQZRJ0
a b c d e f g h 8
rZ0Z0skZ
7
Zbl0apop
10 Kh1 Nc6 11 NXc6 bXc6 12 Qe1 d5! 13 b3
a5
6
pZ0opm0Z
10. . . Nc6 11 NXc6 This isnt generally a good
5
Z0o0Z0Z0
trade for White to make, but Adams has a follow-
4
NZPZPO0Z
up which will clamp down on the newly-formed
black central pawn mass.
3
Z0Z0ABZ0
11. . . bXc6 12 Na4 QUESTION: Should Black
2
PO0Z0ZPO
play for ...d5 here? ANSWER: With the white
1
S0ZQZRJ0
a b c d e f g h
knight on a4 Black must be careful not to let
White get in c4 to attack any ...d5 push.
13. . . d5
12. . . Bb7
14 Qc2 ANSWER:
14. . . Nd7 Well done if you worked out that the
d4-square looks pretty ideal for it. (Though I did
mention it above!) Black can now play ...Nd7-
b8-c6, heading for d4.
15 b3 Rac8 16 Rad1 Nb8! Coming to c6 and
then d4 (if possible). White tries to arrange his
pieces to prevent this, but this just leaves the

30
position level as the white pieces become tied up on opposite sides, but whose is the more potent?
trying to prevent the knight jumping into d4. 26 h6
17 Qf2 QUESTION: Can Black play 17...Nc6 im-
mediately and head for d4?
17. . . Rfd8 8
0Zrs0ZkZ
7
Zbl0Zpap
8
0mrs0ZkZ
6
0ZnopZpO
7
Zbl0apop
5
Z0o0Z0O0
6
pZ0opZ0Z
4
pZPZPO0Z
5
Z0o0Z0Z0
3
ZPZ0ABZ0
4
NZPZPO0Z
2
PZ0SNL0Z
3
ZPZ0ABZ0
1
Z0Z0ZRJ0
a b c d e f g h
2
PZ0Z0LPO
1
Z0ZRZRJ0 26 f5 eXf5 27 eXf5 Ne5 28 BXb7 QXb7 29 hXg6
a b c d e f g h hXg6 30 f6 Bf8 31 Nc1 Re8 32 Qg3 Qd7 33
Rh2 Qg4
17. . . Nc6 18 e5! dXe5 19 BXc5 eXf4 20 Bb6 26. . . Bh8 27 Bg2 aXb3 28 aXb3 Rb8 Homing in
Qb8 21 Rd7 Bf6 22 Rfd1 on the now weakened b3-pawn.
18 g3 29 Rfd1 Ba8 30 Rd3 Nb4 31 R3d2 Nc6 32 Rd3
Nb4 Black agrees to a draw against his slightly
higher-rated opponent.
8
0mrs0ZkZ
7
Zbl0apop
6
pZ0opZ0Z
5
Z0o0Z0Z0
8
bs0s0Zka
4
NZPZPO0Z
7
Z0l0ZpZp
3
ZPZ0ABO0
6
0Z0opZpO
2
PZ0Z0L0O
5
Z0o0Z0O0
1
Z0ZRZRJ0
4
0mPZPO0Z
a b c d e f g h 3
ZPZRA0Z0
18 e5!? BXf3 19 QXf3 Nd7 20 eXd6 BXd6 21
2
0Z0ZNLBZ
Rd3
1
Z0ZRZ0J0
a b c d e f g h
18. . . Bc6 19 Nc3 Bf6 20 Ne2 Bb7 21 g4 AN-
SWER:
32. . . e5 33 f5 Nd4 34 f6 NXb3
21. . . g6! An idea we saw in Yudasin-Kasparov
in Chapter One. This lets the bishop stay on the
1/2-1/2
long diagonal and provide useful defensive cover.
22 g5 Bg7 23 Rd2 Nc6 24 h4 a5 25 h5 a4 Sud-
denly both sides get their respective attacks going

31
White: Kamsky, G Moscow
Black: Mamedyarov, S
2008
Result: 0-1

1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 e6 3 d4 cXd4 4 NXd4 Nf6 5 Nc3


d6 6 Be2 a6 7 O-O Be7 8 Be3 O-O 9 f4 Nc6
10 Qe1 We saw this idea in Filev-Nikolov. The
8
rZbl0skZ
idea is to swing the queen around to g3, where 7
Z0Z0apop
it looks down the g-file at the black king, as well
as supporting a possible e5 advance in the fu-
6
pZ0opm0Z
ture. In this line White wants to do without any 5
ZpZ0Z0Z0
Kh1 move. Although this may appear to save
a tempo, White will always need to watch out
4
0Z0APO0Z
for tricks down the g1-a7 diagonal. This can be
3
O0M0Z0Z0
quite annoying, so generally Black neednt worry 2
0OPZBZPO
too much. 1
S0Z0LRJ0
a b c d e f g h

12 Rd1 Bb7 13 Bf3 Qc7 14 e5 dXe5 15 f Xe5


8
rZbl0skZ Nd7 16 BXb7 QXb7 17 Ne4 Kh8! 18 Rf4 Qc7
19 Qg3 NXe5 20 BXe5 QXe5 21 RXf7 QXg3 22
7
ZpZ0apop RXf8+ BXf8 23 hXg3
6
pZnopm0Z 12. . . Bb7 13 Qg3 Defending the e4-pawn through
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0 tactical means, due to the threats against g7.
4
0Z0MPO0Z 13. . . g6! QUESTION: Why does Black play this
seemingly weakening move?
3
Z0M0A0Z0
2
POPZBZPO
1
S0Z0LRJ0
a b c d e f g h
8
rZ0l0skZ
10 a4 7
ZbZ0apZp
10. . . NXd4 QUESTION: Why does Black exchange 6
pZ0opmpZ
like this in the centre? ANSWER: Because White
hasnt played a4, Black can go for ...b5. Of course,
5
ZpZ0Z0Z0
though, he cant right away as he would lose his
4
0Z0APO0Z
knight on c6! 3
O0M0Z0L0
11 BXd4 b5 12 a3 Preventing Black from going 2
0OPZBZPO
...b4 and winning the e4-pawn. 1
S0Z0ZRJ0
a b c d e f g h

13. . . NXe4
13. . . Bc6 14 Kh1 Qd7 15 Rad1 Qb7 16 Bf3

32
Rac8 17 Rfe1 g6
14 Bf3 8
rZ0l0skZ
7
ZbZ0apZp
8
rZ0l0skZ
6
0Z0opmpZ
7
ZbZ0apZp
5
opZ0Z0Z0
6
pZ0opmpZ
4
0O0APO0Z
5
ZpZ0Z0Z0
3
O0M0ZBL0
4
0Z0APO0Z
2
0ZPZ0ZPO
3
O0M0ZBL0
1
S0Z0ZRJ0
a b c d e f g h
2
0OPZ0ZPO
1
S0Z0ZRJ0 15 Rae1?! b4 16 aXb4 aXb4 17 Nd1 d5! 18 e5
a b c d e f g h Ne4
15 NXb5!? NXe4 16 Qe1 ZZ
14 f5? e5 15 Be3 NXe4 16 NXe4 BXe4 17 Bh6 15. . . Rc8 16 Rad1
Re8
14 Bd3 Nh5! 15 ZZ
14. . . a5!? Black can no longer play the ...Nh5
and ...Nxf4 trick, but there are other ideas at his
8
0Zrl0skZ
disposal.
7
ZbZ0apZp
6
0Z0opmpZ
5
opZ0Z0Z0
4
0O0APO0Z
8
rZ0l0skZ 3
O0M0ZBL0
7
ZbZ0apZp 2
0ZPZ0ZPO
6
0Z0opmpZ 1
Z0ZRZRJ0
5
opZ0Z0Z0 a b c d e f g h
4
0Z0APO0Z 16 Qf2 Rc4 17 Rad1 aXb4 18 aXb4 Qc8 19 BXf6
3
O0M0ZBL0 BXf6 20 NXb5 RXc2 21 Qe3 Ba6 22 NXd6 Qb8
2
0OPZ0ZPO 23 b5 BXb5 24 NXb5 QXb5
1
S0Z0ZRJ0 16. . . aXb4 17 aXb4 The position hinges on whose
a b c d e f g h queenside is the weaker: b5 is a target, but then
so too are b4 and c2.
14. . . Rc8 15 Rae1 Nd7 17. . . Rc4! Black appears to have a very playable
15 b4!? Returning to the radical 15 b4: position here. Whites queenside pawns are tar-
gets and his minor pieces are a little loose.
18 Kh1?! Finally White feels he has to get the
king o the dangerous diagonal, but this is slow.

33
8
0Z0l0skZ 8
0Z0l0skZ
7
ZbZ0apZp 7
ZbZnapZp
6
0Z0opmpZ 6
0Z0opZpZ
5
ZpZ0Z0Z0 5
ZNZ0Z0Z0
4
0OrAPO0Z 4
0s0APO0Z
3
Z0M0ZBL0 3
Z0Z0Z0L0
2
0ZPZ0ZPO 2
0ZPZBZPO
1
Z0ZRZRZK 1
Z0ZRZRZK
a b c d e f g h a b c d e f g h

18 Qe1!? RXb4! 19 Nd5 Rc4 20 NXe7+ QXe7 20 BXb5 BXe4 21 BXd7 BXc2 22 Bb5 BXd1 23
21 BXf6 QXf6 22 e5 Qd8! 23 BXb7 Qb6+ 24 RXd1 Bf6 24 Be5 dXe5! 25 RXd8 RXd8
Qf2 QXb7 25 eXd6 Rd8 20. . . BXe4 ANSWER:
18. . . Nd7 21 Bg7?! I bet you didnt see that one coming!

8
0Z0l0skZ
7
ZbZnapZp 8
0Z0l0skZ
6
0Z0opZpZ 7
Z0ZnapAp
5
ZpZ0Z0Z0 6
0Z0opZpZ
4
0OrAPO0Z 5
ZNZ0Z0Z0
3
Z0M0ZBL0 4
0s0ZbO0Z
2
0ZPZ0ZPO 3
Z0Z0Z0L0
1
Z0ZRZRZK 2
0ZPZBZPO
a b c d e f g h
1
Z0ZRZRZK
a b c d e f g h
18. . . RXb4?! 19 e5 Nd5 20 NXd5 eXd5 21 e6
f Xe6 22 Qe1!
21 Bc3 Ra4 22 NXd6 BXd6 23 RXd6 Qc7! 24
19 Be2!? Sacrificing a pawn, but White will ob- Rd4 RXd4 25 BXd4 QXc2 26 Re1
tain some activity and pressure for it.
21. . . BXc2!
19. . . RXb4 20 NXb5

34
8
0Z0l0skZ 8
0Z0Z0lkZ
7
Z0ZnapAp 7
Z0ZnapZp
6
0Z0opZpZ 6
0Z0ZpZpZ
5
ZNZ0Z0Z0 5
ZNZpZ0Z0
4
0s0Z0O0Z 4
0S0Z0O0Z
3
Z0Z0Z0L0 3
Z0Z0Z0L0
2
0ZbZBZPO 2
0ZbZBZPO
1
Z0ZRZRZK 1
Z0Z0ZRZK
a b c d e f g h a b c d e f g h

21. . . KXg7 22 Qc3+ Nf6 23 QXb4 24 Qc3!? Be4 25 RXb4 BXb4 26 Qc7 Nf6 27
22 BXf8 QXf8 QUESTION: Black is the exchange Ra1 Qc5 28 Ra8+ Kg7 29 Ra7 QXc7 30 RXc7
down, but what does he have in return? AN- 24. . . BXb4 25 Rc1 Be4 26 Rc7 Qd8 27 Qe3
SWER: Black has two pawns as well the more Qh4! With an obvious threat of mate in one on
active pieces and a passed d-pawn. With Whites e1, which surprisingly White cant deal with so
dark-squared bishop gone, Black also can be less easily.
fearful of being checkmated on g7! 28 Qg3
23 Rd4 White is struggling to do anything mean-
ingful here, as those Scheveningen central pawns
prevent any central play.
23. . . d5
8
0Z0Z0ZkZ
7
Z0SnZpZp
6
0Z0ZpZpZ
8
0Z0Z0lkZ 5
ZNZpZ0Z0
7
Z0ZnapZp 4
0a0ZbO0l
6
0Z0ZpZpZ 3
Z0Z0Z0L0
5
ZNZpZ0Z0 2
0Z0ZBZPO
4
0s0S0O0Z 1
Z0Z0Z0ZK
3
Z0Z0Z0L0 a b c d e f g h

2
0ZbZBZPO 28 Bd1 Nf6
1
Z0Z0ZRZK 28. . . Qf6 29 Qe3 Qa1+ 30 Qc1
a b c d e f g h

23. . . Rb3 24 Qe1 d5 25 Qd2 Bf5


24 RXb4

35
8
0Z0Z0ZkZ 8
0ZRZ0Z0Z
7
Z0SnZpZp 7
Z0M0Zpjp
6
0Z0ZpZpZ 6
0Z0ZpmpZ
5
ZNZpZ0Z0 5
Z0ZpZ0Z0
4
0a0ZbO0Z 4
0Z0Zba0Z
3
Z0Z0Z0Z0 3
Z0Z0Z0ZP
2
0Z0ZBZPO 2
qZ0ZBZPZ
1
l0L0Z0ZK 1
Z0Z0ZQZK
a b c d e f g h a b c d e f g h

30 Qg1! Qb2 31 Rc8+ Kg7 32 Qd4+ QXd4 35 QXf4 QXe2


33 NXd4 Bd2 34 NXe6+! f Xe6 35 Rc7 Kf6 36 35. . . Qd2 36 Ne8+ NXe8 37 RXe8 Qe3 Threat-
RXd7 h5 37 Bf3 BXf3 38 gXf3 BXf4 39 Kg2 ening 38...Qxh3+.
30. . . Qa2! Continuing to probe. Mamedyarov 38 Bf3 BXf3 39 gXf3 Qd2 40 Qg1 Qe2!
wants more than a pleasant ending with the bishop-
pair and two pawns for the exchange.
31 Rc8+ Kg7 32 Qd1 Nf6 33 h3
8
0Z0ZRZ0Z
7
Z0Z0Zpjp
8
0ZRZ0Z0Z
6
0Z0ZpZpZ
7
Z0Z0Zpjp
5
Z0ZpZ0Z0
6
0Z0ZpmpZ
4
0Z0Z0a0Z
5
ZNZpZ0Z0
3
Z0Z0ZPZP
4
0a0ZbO0Z
2
0Z0ZqZ0Z
3
Z0Z0Z0ZP
1
Z0Z0Z0LK
a b c d e f g h
2
qZ0ZBZPZ
1
Z0ZQZ0ZK 40. . . Qe2 41 Qg2 Qd1+ 42 Qg1 QXf3+
a b c d e f g h

0-1
33 Nc3 BXc3! 34 RXc3 Ng4 35 Qe1 d4 36 Rg3
Ne3
33. . . Bd2 Now f4 falls and White is completely
lost.
34 Qf1?! ANSWER:
34. . . BXf4! 35 Nc7

36
White: Sibarevic, M Banja Luka
Black: Kasparov, G
1979
Result: 0-1

1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 e6 3 d4 cXd4 4 NXd4 Nf6 5 Nc3 d5! 20 e5 Ne4 21 Rg2 f6 22 Ne3 f Xe5 23 BXe5
d6 6 Be2 a6 7 O-O Be7 8 Be3 O-O 9 f4 Nc6 10 Bd6 24 BXd6 QXd6 25 f5 Ng5 26 Qh4 h6 27
Kh1 Bd7 Be2 d4
12. . . Qb8! ANSWER: The queen still looks at
the e5-square from b8, preventing White from
8
rZ0l0skZ playing e5 himself, but the queen serves a dual
purpose on b8: it also creates the possibility of
7
ZpZbapop pushing ...b4 and recapturing on b4 with the queen.
6
pZnopm0Z This would immediately attack b2 and put White
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0 on the back foot.
4
0Z0MPO0Z
3
Z0M0A0Z0
2
POPZBZPO 8
rl0Z0skZ
1
S0ZQZRZK 7
Z0Zbapop
a b c d e f g h
6
pZnopm0Z
10. . . Qc7 5
ZpZ0Z0Z0
11 Qe1 b5 If White doesnt play a4 to prevent
this, why cant Black push on?
4
0Z0MPO0Z
12 a3 Preventing ...b4 which would cost him the
3
O0M0A0Z0
e4-pawn.
2
0OPZBZPO
1
S0Z0LRZK
a b c d e f g h

12. . . Qc7
8
rZ0l0skZ 13 Qg3?! Not best, although Black is fine in any
7
Z0Zbapop case:
6
pZnopm0Z
5
ZpZ0Z0Z0
4
0Z0MPO0Z
3
O0M0A0Z0
2
0OPZBZPO
1
S0Z0LRZK
a b c d e f g h

12 Bf3 Rc8 13 a3 NXd4 14 BXd4 Bc6 15 Rd1


Qc7 16 Rd2 a5 17 g4 b4 18 aXb4 aXb4 19 Nd1

37
8
rl0Z0skZ 8
rZ0Z0skZ
7
Z0Zbapop 7
Z0Zbapop
6
pZnopm0Z 6
pZNopm0Z
5
ZpZ0Z0Z0 5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
4
0Z0MPO0Z 4
0Z0ZPO0Z
3
O0M0A0L0 3
Z0M0A0L0
2
0OPZBZPO 2
0lPZBZPO
1
S0Z0ZRZK 1
S0ZRZ0ZK
a b c d e f g h a b c d e f g h

13 Rd1 NXd4 14 BXd4 e5 15 Be3 Bc6 16 Bf3 16 Na4 Qb7 17 Nb6! NXd4 18 BXd4 Rad8 19
Re8 17 f Xe5 dXe5 18 Nd5 BXd5 19 eXd5 e4 20 BXa6 QXe4
Be2 Qc7 21 Rd2 Rad8 16. . . BXc6 17 Bd4 QUESTION: Can you see
13 Bf3 NXd4 14 BXd4 e5 15 Be3 Bc6 16 Qg3 Whites threat? ANSWER: White wants to play
Re8 17 f Xe5 dXe5 18 Bh6 Bf8 19 Bg5 Nd7 20 18 Nd5! with a discovered attack on b2 while also
Bh5 g6 21 Rad1 Nc5 22 Bf3 Ne6 threatening to take on f6.
13 Bd3 b4 14 Nd1 a5 15 Nf2 NXd4 16 BXd4 e5 17. . . Qb7! A nice square for the queen. Now e4
13. . . b4! 14 aXb4 QXb4 Now we see the main is attacked, which gives White no respite.
idea behind 12...Qb8. How can White defend b2? 18 Rab1 Qc7 So the queen has been chased back,
15 Rfd1 but she already has her loot in the form of the
b-pawn. It is now up to White to prove that he
has any compensation.
19 e5
8
rZ0Z0skZ
7
Z0Zbapop
6
pZnopm0Z 8
rZ0Z0skZ
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0 7
Z0l0apop
4
0l0MPO0Z 6
pZbopm0Z
3
Z0M0A0L0 5
Z0Z0O0Z0
2
0OPZBZPO 4
0Z0A0O0Z
1
S0ZRZ0ZK 3
Z0M0Z0L0
a b c d e f g h
2
0ZPZBZPO
15 e5? NXd4 16 eXf6 Nf5!
1
ZRZRZ0ZK
a b c d e f g h
15 NXc6 BXc6 16 e5 Ne4! 17 NXe4 BXe4 18
Bf3 BXf3 19 RXf3 QXb2 20 Raf1 dXe5 21 f Xe5
QXc2 22 Bg5 BXg5 23 QXg5 Rab8 24 Rg3 Qg6 19 Bd3 g6 20 f5 Nh5 21 Qg4 Bf6! 22 BXf6
NXf6 23 Qg5 Kg7
15 Rad1 QXb2 16 Rd3
19. . . dXe5 20 BXe5
15. . . QXb2 16 NXc6

38
8
rZ0Z0skZ 8
rZ0ZqskZ
7
Z0l0apop 7
Z0Z0apZp
6
pZbZpm0Z 6
pZbZpmpZ
5
Z0Z0A0Z0 5
Z0Z0APZ0
4
0Z0Z0O0Z 4
0ZRZ0Z0Z
3
Z0M0Z0L0 3
Z0M0Z0L0
2
0ZPZBZPO 2
0ZPZBZPO
1
ZRZRZ0ZK 1
ZRZ0Z0ZK
a b c d e f g h a b c d e f g h

20 f Xe5 Ne4 21 NXe4 BXe4 23 Rb6 Bb5 24 NXb5 aXb5 25 Rc7 Nd7 26
20. . . Qc8 21 Rd4 BXb5 NXe5!
23. . . eXf5 24 Rb6 QUESTION: Can Black play
24...Ne4 here?
8
rZqZ0skZ 24. . . Rc8!
7
Z0Z0apop
6
pZbZpm0Z 8
0ZrZqskZ
5
Z0Z0A0Z0 7
Z0Z0apZp
4
0Z0S0O0Z 6
pSbZ0mpZ
3
Z0M0Z0L0 5
Z0Z0ApZ0
2
0ZPZBZPO 4
0ZRZ0Z0Z
1
ZRZ0Z0ZK 3
Z0M0Z0L0
a b c d e f g h
2
0ZPZBZPO
21 Rb6 g6 22 f5 eXf5 23 BXf6 BXf6 24 Rd6 1
Z0Z0Z0ZK
BXg2+! a b c d e f g h

21. . . g6 This appears weakening, but ideas of f5


are prevented and also there are no more ideas 24. . . Ne4? 25 NXe4 BXe4 26 RXe4!! f Xe4 27
with Qxg7 mate on the cards. Bc4! ZZ 28 RXg6+ hXg6 29 QXg6#
22 Rc4 Threatening Bf3 so Black gets out of the 25 RXa6 Ne4 26 NXe4 BXe4 Kasparov has re-
way. turned one of the extra pawns, but hes still one
22. . . Qe8 This all looks rather passive for Black, ahead and has exchanged a pair of knights to
but if left alone the a6-pawn will run down the boot.
board, so White must try some tricks soon. 27 Bd4?
23 f5!?

39
8
0ZrZqskZ 8
0ZrZ0ZkZ
7
Z0Z0apZp 7
Z0Z0ZpZp
6
RZ0Z0ZpZ 6
0Z0Z0ZpZ
5
Z0Z0ZpZ0 5
Z0A0LpZ0
4
0ZRAbZ0Z 4
0Z0ZbZ0Z
3
Z0Z0Z0L0 3
Z0Z0Z0Z0
2
0ZPZBZPO 2
0ZqZBZPO
1
Z0Z0Z0ZK 1
S0Z0Z0ZK
a b c d e f g h a b c d e f g h

27 Bb2! Rb8! 28 Qe5 RXb2! 29 QXb2 BXg2+ 32 Bf1 BXg1 33 KXg1 Qc5+
30 KXg2 Ba3!! 32. . . QXe2!
27. . . Qb5! 28 RXc8 Qb1+ 29 Bg1 RXc8 Sud-
denly the initiative is with Black; he is still a
pawn up and he is attacking. Whites strategy
has clearly failed. 0ZrZ0ZkZ
8

30 Qe5 ANSWER:
7
Z0Z0ZpZp
30. . . Bc5 Pinning and winning.
6
0Z0Z0ZpZ
5
Z0A0LpZ0
4
0Z0ZbZ0Z
3
Z0Z0Z0Z0
8
0ZrZ0ZkZ 2
0Z0ZqZPO
7
Z0Z0ZpZp 1
S0Z0Z0ZK
6
RZ0Z0ZpZ a b c d e f g h
5
Z0a0LpZ0 32. . . QXe2 33 Rg1 BXg2+
4
0Z0ZbZ0Z
3
Z0Z0Z0Z0 0-1
2
0ZPZBZPO
1
ZqZ0Z0AK
a b c d e f g h

30. . . QXc2 31 Bf1 Qc7


31 Ra1 QXc2 32 BXc5?

40
White: Efimenko, Z Dresden Olympiad
Black: Nguyen Van Huy
2008
Result: 1-0

1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 e6 3 d4 cXd4 4 NXd4 Nf6 5 Nc3


d6 6 Be2 a6 7 O-O Be7 8 f4 Nc6 9 Be3 O-O 10
a4 QUESTION: This is very popular, but why is
8
rZbZ0skZ
it necessary? Cant White just get on with other 7
Zpl0apop
useful attacking moves? ANSWER: As we saw in
the last two games, Black obtains quite a lot of
6
pZ0o0m0Z
counterplay when allowed to advance with ...b5. 5
Z0Z0o0Z0
White reasons that its worth investing a tempo
to prevent this freeing move.
4
PZ0ZPO0Z
10. . . Qc7 11 Qe1 Here White plays the Qe1 line,
3
Z0M0A0Z0
but replaces the useful move Kh1 with a4. This
2
0OPZBZPO
rules out any ...b5 ideas, but the question is just 1
S0Z0LRJ0
how exposed will the king be on g1? a b c d e f g h
11. . . NXd4 Of course this is not the only move,
but as usual there is an idea connected with it. 13 f Xe5 dXe5 14 Qg3 Bc5! 15 BXc5 QXc5+ 16
Kh1 ZZ
13 Be3
13. . . eXf4
8
rZbZ0skZ
7
Zpl0apop
6
pZ0opm0Z
8
rZbZ0skZ
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
7
Zpl0apop
4
PZ0mPO0Z
6
pZ0o0m0Z
3
Z0M0A0Z0
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
2
0OPZBZPO
4
PZ0ZPo0Z
1
S0Z0LRJ0
3
Z0M0A0Z0
a b c d e f g h 2
0OPZBZPO
1
S0Z0LRJ0
11. . . Bd7 12 Qg3 Kh8 13 Rad1 a b c d e f g h
12 BXd4 e5 This is the point. The bishop on c8
can emerge on more active squares than d7 (i.e. 13. . . Be6 14 Qg3 eXf4 15 BXf4 Nd7
e6) thanks to this tempo-winning move. 14 BXf4
13 Be3 This retreat is almost always played, but
of course its not the only idea in the position.

41
8
rZbZ0skZ 8
rZ0Z0skZ
7
Zpl0apop 7
ZpZnapop
6
pZ0o0m0Z 6
pZ0obZ0A
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0 5
Z0l0Z0Z0
4
PZ0ZPA0Z 4
PZ0ZPZ0Z
3
Z0M0Z0Z0 3
Z0M0Z0L0
2
0OPZBZPO 2
0OPZBZPO
1
S0Z0LRJ0 1
S0Z0ZRJ0
a b c d e f g h a b c d e f g h

14 RXf4 Be6 15 Kh1 Nd7 16 Qg3 Bf6 17 Bd3 16. . . Bf6?? 17 RXf6!
BXc3 18 bXc3 QXc3 19 Raf1 Ne5 17 Kh1 Qe5! 18 Bf4 Qc5 19 Bg4!?
14. . . Be6

8
rZ0Z0skZ
8
rZ0Z0skZ 7
ZpZnapop
7
Zpl0apop 6
pZ0obZ0Z
6
pZ0obm0Z 5
Z0l0Z0Z0
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0 4
PZ0ZPABZ
4
PZ0ZPA0Z 3
Z0M0Z0L0
3
Z0M0Z0Z0 2
0OPZ0ZPO
2
0OPZBZPO 1
S0Z0ZRZK
1
S0Z0LRJ0 a b c d e f g h
a b c d e f g h
19 Bh6 Qe5 20 Bf4 Qc5
14. . . Qb6+ 19. . . Ne5 20 Bf5
14. . . Qb6+?! 15 Kh1 QXb2 16 Qg3 Qb6 17 e5
dXe5 18 BXe5 Kh8 19 Nd5! Qd8 20 Rad1 Bd7
21 NXe7 QXe7 22 RXd7 QXd7 23 RXf6 Rg8 24
Bd3 Rac8 25 Rh6!
8
rZ0Z0skZ
15 Qg3 Nd7 16 Bh6 ANSWER:
7
ZpZ0apop
16. . . Qc5+ Like this!
6
pZ0obZ0Z
5
Z0l0mBZ0
4
PZ0ZPA0Z
3
Z0M0Z0L0
2
0OPZ0ZPO
1
S0Z0ZRZK
a b c d e f g h

42
20 BXe6 f Xe6 21 BXe5 QXe5 22 QXe5 dXe5 28. . . QXd5 29 Qg5
20. . . Bf6 The bishop reaches the famed diago- 29 Qf4 g5 30 Qg3 Sacrificing two tempi to try
nal and Black can be quite happy with how the and get that bishop on f5 into the game. Blacks
opening has turned out. last move may look weakening, but this position
21 Rad1 g6 22 Bh6 Bg7 23 BXg7 KXg7 24 Rf4 is still okay for him.
b5 25 Rdf1 b4 26 Nd5 BXd5 27 eXd5 After ex- 30. . . a5 31 c3 bXc3 32 bXc3 QUESTION: White
changing on d5 Black hopes that the beast on e5 doesnt have anything does he? Can we grab on
will prove better than the bishop on f5. White d5? If not, what else could we play?
may have gone on to win this encounter, but so 32. . . QXd5? ANSWER: Unfortunately Black cracks.
far things are okay for Black. This move looked obvious, but suddenly White
27. . . Rae8 can crash through on the kingside.

8
0Z0Zrs0Z
7
Z0Z0Zpjp 8
0Z0Zrs0Z
6
pZ0o0ZpZ 7
Z0Z0Zpj0
5
Z0lPmBZ0 6
0Z0o0Z0o
4
Po0Z0S0Z 5
o0ZqmBo0
3
Z0Z0Z0L0 4
PZ0Z0Z0S
2
0OPZ0ZPO 3
Z0O0Z0L0
1
Z0Z0ZRZK 2
0Z0Z0ZPO
Z0Z0ZRZK
a b c d e f g h 1
a b c d e f g h
27. . . Kh8!? 28 Bd3 a5 29 Rh4 f5! 30 Qh3 Rf7
28 Rh4 ANSWER: 32. . . Rb8! 33 Bb1 f5 34 Rhf4 Rb3 35 RXf5 RXf5
28. . . h6! The white queen must not be allowed 36 BXf5 RXc3 37 Qe1 Rc4 38 Be6 RXa4 39 Qb1
into the black position. Black is still reacting well Qc7 40 Qf5 Qe7
here and now the threat of Qg5 and Qh6+ is par- 33 RXh6! Efimenko is a very strong Ukrainian
ried. Grandmaster and he doesnt need to be asked
twice to sni out a combination around the black
king.
33. . . Rg8
8
0Z0Zrs0Z
7
Z0Z0Zpj0
6
pZ0o0Zpo
5
Z0lPmBZ0
4
Po0Z0Z0S
3
Z0Z0Z0L0
2
0OPZ0ZPO
1
Z0Z0ZRZK
a b c d e f g h

43
34. . . f6 35 RXg5+! f Xg5 36 QXg5+ Kf7 37
Bd7+
8
0Z0ZrZrZ 35 RXg5 RXg5 36 QXg5 White has won a clear
7
Z0Z0Zpj0 pawn and Blacks king is exposed. Efimenko grad-
6
0Z0o0Z0S ually converts.
5
o0ZqmBo0 36. . . Qc4 37 Rd1 Qc5 38 h3 Nc4 39 Qh6+ Ke7
40 Re1+ Ne5 41 Qh4+ Kf8 42 Bd7! Winning
4
PZ0Z0Z0Z the exchange and the game.
3
Z0O0Z0L0 42. . . Ra8 43 Qh8+ Ke7 44 QXa8 KXd7 45 Qb7+
2
0Z0Z0ZPO Ke6 46 Qb3+ Kf5 47 Rd1 Ke4 48 Qc2+ Kf4 49
1
Z0Z0ZRZK Rf1+ Kg5 50 Qf5+ Kh6 51 Qf6+ Kh7 52 Rf5
Black had a solid and acceptable position until
a b c d e f g h
he fell for a trap on move 33. Do take care to
watch out for sacrifices around your king!
33. . . KXh6 34 Qh3+ Kg7 35 Qh7+ Kf6 36
Be4+ Ke6 37 Qf5+!
1-0
34 Rh5

8
0Z0ZrZrZ
7
Z0Z0Zpj0
6
0Z0o0Z0Z
5
o0ZqmBoR
4
PZ0Z0Z0Z
3
Z0O0Z0L0
2
0Z0Z0ZPO
1
Z0Z0ZRZK
a b c d e f g h

34 QXg5+ Kf8 35 c4!


34. . . Kf8

8
0Z0ZrjrZ
7
Z0Z0ZpZ0
6
0Z0o0Z0Z
5
o0ZqmBoR
4
PZ0Z0Z0Z
3
Z0O0Z0L0
2
0Z0Z0ZPO
1
Z0Z0ZRZK
a b c d e f g h

44
White: Barron, M Edmonton
Black: Ganguly, S
2009
Result: 0-1

1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 e6 3 d4 cXd4 4 NXd4 Nf6 5 Nc3


d6 6 Be2 Be7 7 O-O O-O 8 f4 Nc6 9 Be3 a6 10
a4 Qc7 11 Kh1 This combination of a4 and Kh1
8
rZ0Z0skZ
is the most flexible idea at Whites disposal. The 7
Zplbapop
idea is to prevent Black from doing anything im-
mediately, without giving away which plan White
6
pZnopm0Z
might employ himself. 5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
11. . . Bd7 As mentioned in the notes to Karpov- 4
PZ0MPO0Z
Kasparov, this is the line Im recommending. 3
Z0M0A0Z0
2
0OPZBZPO
1
S0Z0LRZK
a b c d e f g h
8
rZ0Z0skZ
7
Zplbapop 12 Nb3
6
pZnopm0Z 12. . . Nb4!? An interesting little sideline.
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
4
PZ0MPO0Z
3
Z0M0A0Z0
2
0OPZBZPO
8
rZ0Z0skZ
1
S0ZQZRZK
7
Zplbapop
a b c d e f g h
6
pZ0opm0Z
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
11. . . Re8 4
Pm0MPO0Z
12 Qe1 White wants everything: to prevent Black
from enjoying any counterplay and to attack on
3
Z0M0A0Z0
the kingside himself.
2
0OPZBZPO
1
S0Z0LRZK
a b c d e f g h

12. . . NXd4 13 BXd4 Bc6 14 Qg3 ZZ


13 Qg3 Kh8 QUESTION: Why was this played,
seeing as White had no immediate threat down
the g-file?

45
8
rZ0Z0s0j 8
rZ0Z0s0j
7
Zplbapop 7
Zplbapop
6
pZ0opm0Z 6
pZ0ZpZ0Z
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0 5
Z0Zno0Z0
4
Pm0MPO0Z 4
Pm0M0O0Z
3
Z0M0A0L0 3
Z0M0Z0L0
2
0OPZBZPO 2
0OPABZPO
1
S0Z0ZRZK 1
S0Z0ZRZK
a b c d e f g h a b c d e f g h

13. . . Rac8 14 e5 Nfd5 15 NXd5 NXd5 16 f5 15. . . NXc3 16 BXc3 dXe5? 17 NXe6! BXe6 18
BXe5
14 e5
16 f Xe5 f6 17 NXd5

8
rZ0Z0s0j 8
rZ0Z0s0j
7
Zplbapop 7
Zplba0op
6
pZ0opm0Z 6
pZ0Zpo0Z
5
Z0Z0O0Z0 5
Z0ZNO0Z0
4
Pm0M0O0Z 4
Pm0M0Z0Z
3
Z0M0A0L0 3
Z0Z0Z0L0
2
0OPZBZPO 2
0OPABZPO
1
S0Z0ZRZK 1
S0Z0ZRZK
a b c d e f g h
a b c d e f g h

14 Rad1 Rac8 15 Bc1 d5! 16 e5 Ne4 17 NXe4 17 eXf6 QXg3 18 hXg3 BXf6
dXe4 18 f5 eXf5 19 c3 Nd3 20 BXd3 eXd3 21
17. . . NXd5 18 c4 QXe5 19 QXe5 f Xe5 20 Nf3
RXd3 g6 22 Bh6 Rfd8 23 Re3 Be6 24 Bg5 Re8
Now an endgame arises by force.
14. . . Nfd5 15 Bd2 QUESTION: Should Black
20. . . Nf4 21 NXe5 NXe2 22 NXd7 RXf1+ 23
take on e5 now or do it after first exchanging
RXf1 Rd8 24 Re1 RXd7 25 RXe2 Kg8 26 Kg1
knights on c3? ANSWER: It is better to capture
Bf6 QUESTION: How to assess this endgame?
on e5 first, because the position will explode if
Try to pick the good and bad points about each
Black doesnt!
sides position. ANSWER: Its a good question!
15. . . dXe5! Lets take a look: 1) White has fewer pawn is-
lands (three to two). 2) The e6-pawn, though
a little weak, is passed. 3) Blacks pieces are
more active than Whites. Indeed, the bishop
on f6 is clearly better than its counterpart on d2.
That was all enough to convince Ganguly that he
should play for a win!
27 Bb4

46
8
0Z0Z0ZkZ
7
ZpZrZ0op
6
pZ0Zpa0Z
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
4
PAPZ0Z0Z
3
Z0Z0Z0Z0
2
0O0ZRZPO
1
Z0Z0Z0J0
a b c d e f g h

27 Be1 Kf7 28 b4 Rd1 29 Kf2


27. . . Rd1+ 28 Kf2 Rc1 29 c5 Bd4+ 30 Kf3 Kf7!
Winning a pawn. The rest is a matter of tech-
nique.
31 Rd2 Rc4 32 Bc3 BXc3 33 bXc3 RXc3+ 34
Ke2 RXc5 35 Rd7+ Kf6 36 RXb7 Rc4 The white
a-pawn disappears, leaving Black two pawns ahead.

0-1

47
White: Aagaard, J British Championship, Great Yarmouth
Black: Gordon, S
2007
Result: 0-1

1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 d6 3 d4 cXd4 4 NXd4 Nf6 5 through on the h7-square. (More positional ideas
Nc3 e6 6 Be2 a6 7 O-O Be7 8 f4 O-O 9 Kh1 will be looked at in the next game.)
Qc7 10 a4 Nc6 11 Be3 Bd7 We finally reach the 17 Qh5
main line of the 6 Be2 variation.
12 Nb3 QUESTION: Why does White retreat
like this? ANSWER: After 11...Bd7 Black wants
to capture on d4 and play ...Bc6. This would put
8
rZ0ZrZkZ
pressure on e4. White argues that ...Bd7 isnt a 7
Zblnapop
useful move for Black and in fact gets in his way.
Thus White decides to spend a move retreating
6
ponopZ0Z
his knight to prove his point.
5
Z0Z0Z0OQ
12. . . b6 Preventing White from going a5 and fix- 4
PZ0ZPO0Z
ing the b6-square. 3
ZNM0A0Z0
13 Bf3 2
0OPZ0ZBO
1
S0Z0ZRZK
a b c d e f g h
8
rZ0Z0skZ
7
Z0lbapop 17 Rf3 Nb4 18 Rh3 g6 19 Qd2 Bf8 20 Rf1 ZZ
6
ponopm0Z 17. . . Nb4 18 Rf2 Compare this position to 17
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0 Rf3, above. Whites queen is active, but he can-
not get his rook to h3 via f3 (for now).
4
PZ0ZPO0Z
3
ZNM0ABZ0
2
0OPZ0ZPO
1
S0ZQZRZK 8
rZ0ZrZkZ
a b c d e f g h
7
Zblnapop
13 g4 Bc8 6
po0opZ0Z
13. . . Rfe8 14 g4 Bc8 QUESTION: Can you re-
member from Karpov-Kasparov in the previous
5
Z0Z0Z0OQ
chapter why Black retreats like this? ANSWER:
4
Pm0ZPO0Z
He vacates d7 for the f6-knight, so that it can 3
ZNM0A0Z0
come back into the game via c5 or e5. 2
0OPZ0SBO
15 g5 Nd7 16 Bg2 Bb7 This is a key position
for this line. EXERCISE: What do you think
1
S0Z0Z0ZK
a b c d e f g h
the plans for White are in this position? What
moves will he play to carry these plans out? AN-
SWER: Whites main plan is to attack! He nor- 18 Rf3 NXc2 19 Rh3 Nf8!
mally plays Qh5, Rf3 and Rh3 to try and crash 18. . . Bf8 We have seen this idea before. Black

48
will be looking to play ...g6 and ...Bg7 in some but if White cant attack the g7- or h7-squares
lines and so reactivate the bishop. then Black is generally okay in this type of posi-
19 Nd4 tion.
25. . . Bf8 26 Kg1 Nc4 27 Bc1 d5! The f8-bishop
can even emerge on d6 or c5 at the right moment.
Objectively this position is equal, but Black def-
8
rZ0ZrakZ initely has chances to better.
7
ZblnZpop 28 Bf4 Qb7 29 b3? ANSWER: By using the
6
po0opZ0Z tactic of interference:
5
Z0Z0Z0OQ 29. . . Ne3! 30 Re1
4
Pm0MPO0Z
3
Z0M0A0Z0
2
0OPZ0SBO
8
0ZrZrakZ
1
S0Z0Z0ZK
7
ZqZ0ZpZp
a b c d e f g h
6
po0Z0OpZ
5
Z0ZpZ0O0
19 Raf1 g6 20 Qh3 Bg7 21 Bd4 e5 4
Pm0M0A0Z
19. . . g6 20 Qh3 Bg7 Another tense position has
arisen. Black awaits developments carefully, hop-
3
ZPM0m0ZQ
ing to spring out from the Hedgehog-style posi-
2
0ZPZ0S0O
tion that he has adopted. Can White avoid being
pricked by the Hedgehogs spikes?
1
Z0Z0S0J0
a b c d e f g h
21 f5 White thinks that he cannot hang about, so
he decides to go for the typical attacking move. 30 BXe3 RXc3 31 Re1 Re4! 32 Rf3 NXc2 33
21. . . eXf5 22 eXf5 BXg2+ 23 KXg2 Ne5 24 Rd1 NXc2 RXc2 34 Rd1 Qc6 35 Bf2 Ree2
30. . . RXc3 31 RXe3 ReXe3 32 BXe3 Nc6

8
rZ0ZrZkZ
7
Z0l0Zpap
8
0Z0Z0akZ
6
po0o0ZpZ
7
ZqZ0ZpZp
5
Z0Z0mPO0
6
ponZ0OpZ
4
Pm0M0Z0Z
5
Z0ZpZ0O0
3
Z0M0A0ZQ
4
PZ0M0Z0Z
2
0OPZ0SKO
3
ZPs0A0ZQ
1
Z0ZRZ0Z0
2
0ZPZ0S0O
a b c d e f g h 1
Z0Z0Z0J0
a b c d e f g h
24 f6 Nc4! 25 Bc1 Bf8
24. . . Rac8 25 f6 As mentioned in the above note 32. . . Qc7
on 24 f6, Black shouldnt be overly scared to see 33 Ne2
this move. Of course, a pawn on f6 can be dan-
gerous (so Im not saying completely ignore it!),

49
8
0Z0Z0akZ 8
0Z0Z0ZkZ
7
ZqZ0ZpZp 7
Z0Z0ZpZp
6
ponZ0OpZ 6
pZ0a0OpZ
5
Z0ZpZ0O0 5
Z0ZpZ0O0
4
PZ0Z0Z0Z 4
PZ0Z0MKZ
3
ZPs0A0ZQ 3
ZPZnA0L0
2
0ZPZNS0O 2
0Z0Z0Z0O
1
Z0Z0Z0J0 1
Z0Z0ZqZ0
a b c d e f g h a b c d e f g h

33 Rf3 NXd4 34 BXd4 RXc2 42 QXd3 QXf4+ 43 Kh3 QXh2+ 44 Kg4 Qh5#
33. . . RXc2 Now Black has something for his play, 42. . . d4 Jacob Aagaard actually became British
being a pawn ahead, and from here on things be- Champion in 2007, despite this loss, and is a
come even more dicult for White. greatly-respected chess author. However, even
34 Nf4 RXf2 35 BXf2 Nb4 36 Qc3 Qd7 37 he couldnt extricate himself from the problems
BXb6 Qg4+ 38 Qg3 Qd1+ 39 Kg2 Bd6 The with his position after such a loose move as 29
key defensive bishop emerges and White finds it b3?. So long as Black defends well on the king-
does so with great eect. side, his position has always seemed to me the
easier to handle!
40 Kh3? In time trouble White blunders, but his
position was dicult anyway.
0-1

8
0Z0Z0ZkZ
7
Z0Z0ZpZp
6
pA0a0OpZ
5
Z0ZpZ0O0
4
Pm0Z0M0Z
3
ZPZ0Z0LK
2
0Z0Z0Z0O
1
Z0ZqZ0Z0
a b c d e f g h

40 Bf2 d4 41 Qf3 Qd2 42 Qa8+ Bf8


40. . . Qf1+ 41 Kg4 Nd3 A deadly pin.
42 Be3

50
White: Martinez Duany, L Barcelona
Black: Fier, A
2009
Result: 1/2-1/2

1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 d6 3 d4 cXd4 4 NXd4 Nf6 5


Nc3 a6 6 Be2 e6 7 O-O Be7 8 f4 Nc6 9 Kh1
O-O 10 Be3 Bd7 11 a4 Qc7 12 Nb3 b6 13 Bf3
8
0s0ZrZkZ
The bishop normally comes here as it covers e4 7
Z0lbapop
as well as the g4-square, which is helpful should
White want to charge with the g-pawn.
6
po0opm0Z
13. . . Rfe8 14 Qd2 Here White isnt trying to
5
O0Z0Z0Z0
push Black o the board with g4-g5, but instead 4
0m0ZPO0Z
is content to manoeuvre around. Plans involving
Bf2-Bg3 and then trying to push with e5 are pos-
3
ZNM0ZBZ0
sible.
2
0OPL0APO
14. . . Rab8 15 Bf2 QUESTION: What is Whites
1
S0Z0ZRZK
a b c d e f g h
plan with Bf2? ANSWER: To play Bg3 and put
the bishop on the h2-b8 diagonal. This would
allow White to play e5, which introduces some 16 Bg3 ZZ
interesting tactics, as you will see very soon. 16 a5
15. . . Nb4! I believe this to be the best reply, 16. . . bXa5!
opening the c-file and stopping the white knight
coming to d5.

8
0s0ZrZkZ
7
Z0lbapop
8
0s0ZrZkZ
6
pZ0opm0Z
7
Z0lbapop
5
o0Z0Z0Z0
6
po0opm0Z
4
0m0ZPO0Z
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
3
ZNM0ZBZ0
4
Pm0ZPO0Z
2
0OPL0APO
3
ZNM0ZBZ0
1
S0Z0ZRZK
a b c d e f g h
2
0OPL0APO
1
S0Z0ZRZK 16. . . b5 17 Bb6 Qc8 18 e5! dXe5 19 f Xe5 Nfd5
a b c d e f g h
20 NXd5 NXd5 21 Qf2
17 NXa5 e5 The knight on b4 helps control the
15. . . Bc8 16 Bg3 Nd7 17 e5 dXe5 18 ZZ d5-square, so Black can challenge the centre like
16 a5 ANSWER: this. The text also prevents White from playing
his e5 trick, as we saw in the notes to Blacks
16th move, above.
18 Bg3 eXf4 19 BXf4 Be6 EXERCISE: What do

51
you think Blacks mini-positional plan should be Raa1 Rbd8 28 b3 Qc8 29 Nd5 NXd5 30 eXd5
in this position? ANSWER: To try and put a Qb7 31 Qd3 Rb8?! This appears a bit strange,
knight on e5. Indeed, ...Nd7-e5 (or ...Ng4-e5 as as now White can capture on a6 for free.
in the game) would blunt the bishop on f4 and
if White ever captures the knight then ...dxe5
would improve Blacks pawn structure.
20 Rfc1 8
0s0ZrakZ
7
ZqZ0Zpop
8
0s0ZrZkZ 6
pZ0o0Z0Z
7
Z0l0apop 5
Z0ZPZ0Z0
6
pZ0obm0Z 4
0Z0Z0A0Z
5
M0Z0Z0Z0 3
ZPZQZ0ZP
4
0m0ZPA0Z 2
0ZPZ0ZPZ
3
Z0M0ZBZ0 1
S0Z0ZRZK
a b c d e f g h
2
0OPL0ZPO
1
S0S0Z0ZK 31. . . Rc8 32 c4 g6
a b c d e f g h
32 c4
20 Rfd1 Bf8 21 BXd6 QXd6 22 QXd6 BXd6 23
RXd6 NXc2
20. . . Bg4
8
0s0ZrakZ
7
ZqZ0Zpop
6
pZ0o0Z0Z
8
0s0ZrZkZ 5
Z0ZPZ0Z0
7
Z0l0apop 4
0ZPZ0A0Z
6
pZ0o0m0Z 3
ZPZQZ0ZP
5
M0Z0Z0Z0 2
0Z0Z0ZPZ
4
0m0ZPAbZ 1
S0Z0ZRZK
3
Z0M0ZBZ0 a b c d e f g h
2
0OPL0ZPO 32 RXa6 Ra8 33 Rc6
1
S0S0Z0ZK 32. . . Qb6 33 Rf3 Rb7 34 Bd2 Qc5 35 Ba5 Qc8
a b c d e f g h
36 b4 g6 37 Raf1 Re5 38 Rf6 Rh5
1/2-1/2
20. . . h6 21 h3 Bf8 22 Rd1 Nd7!
21 BXg4 NXg4 22 h3 Ne5 Black has carried out
his mini-plan and is now very solidly placed in-
deed.
23 Ra4 Bf8 We have seen this defensive regroup-
ing before!
24 Rca1 Qc8 25 Rf1 Nc4 26 NXc4 QXc4 27

52
White: Kupreichik, V Minsk
Black: Ibrahimov, R
2000
Result: 0-1

1 e4 c5 2 Nc3 e6 3 Nf3 d6 4 d4 cXd4 5 NXd4


Nf6 6 g4 Paul Keres was the first to play 6 g4, in
his game against Bogoljubow in Salzburg, all the
8
rmblka0s
way back in 1943! Why, though, would White 7
opZ0Zpo0
play this move this quickly? White often plays
a later g4 later in the Sicilian, but never usually
6
0Z0opm0o
so early. In short, there is no easy way for Black 5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
to refute the audacious advance immediately, es-
pecially with the c8-bishop blocked in, and the
4
0Z0MPZPO
threat of playing g5 to kick the f6-knight back
3
Z0M0Z0Z0
could be quite promising for White. 2
POPZ0O0Z
6. . . h6 This is my recommendation. 1
S0AQJBZR
a b c d e f g h

7 Rg1 Nc6
7 h3
8
rmblka0s 7 g5
7
opZ0Zpo0 7. . . Nc6 8 Rg1 h5! This in my view is the crit-
6
0Z0opm0o ical test of the Keres Attack. Black doesnt let
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0 White get on with his intended plan of g5 driv-
ing the knight back, but rather challenges it head
4
0Z0MPZPZ on. QUESTION: How does 8...h5 prevent White
3
Z0M0Z0Z0 from going g5? ANSWER: It doesnt and in fact
2
POPZ0O0O it appears to encourage this pawn advance, but
there are some good points behind the move, as
1
S0AQJBZR well now see.
a b c d e f g h
9 g5 This appears at first sight to be the most
logical move. The black knight that may now
6. . . a6 7 g5 Nfd7 8 Be3 b5 9 Bg2 Nb6 10 O-O come to g4 can be kicked away with f3 at some
Bb7 11 f4 b4 12 f5!? e5 13 Ne6 f Xe6 14 Qh5+ point and White has his usual kingside space ad-
Kd7 15 f Xe6+ Kc8 16 Nd5 vantage. Of course, things are never that simple!
7 h4 The most direct approach. White isnt hang- 9. . . Ng4 The main point of playing 8...h5. The
ing about; he wants to get g5 in and get it in knight has no intention of going backwards and
quick! charges into Whites position. Reckless or clever?
I hope you will think its the latter!
10 Nb3 QUESTION: Why do you think White
retreated like this? ANSWER: Black is intending
to use his knight on g4 to go ...Qb6!, pinning the
knight on d4 to the f2-pawn.

53
8
rZblka0s 8
rZbZka0s
7
opZ0Zpo0 7
opZ0ZpZ0
6
0ZnopZ0Z 6
0lnopZpZ
5
Z0Z0Z0Op 5
Z0Z0Z0Op
4
0Z0ZPZnO 4
0Z0ZPZnO
3
ZNM0Z0Z0 3
ZNM0Z0Z0
2
POPZ0O0Z 2
POPZQO0Z
1
S0AQJBS0 1
S0A0JBS0
a b c d e f g h a b c d e f g h

10 Be2 g6!? 11 NXc6 bXc6 12 BXg4 hXg4 13 11. . . Bd7 12 Rg2 a6 13 f3 Nge5 14 Be3 Qc7 15
QXg4 Bg7 14 Qg3 Rb8 15 a3 Qa5! 16 Rh1 Qf2 b5 16 a4 b4 17 Nd1 g6 18 a5 Be7 19 Qg3
Ba6 17 Rh3 Be5 18 f4 Bd4 19 b3 e5 20 Bb2 Bc8 20 f4 Nd7 21 Rd2 Bb7
Bc8! 21 Rh1 eXf4 22 Qd3 Be5 23 O-O-O Bg4 12 Bh3 Bg7 13 Nb5?!
24 Rd2 O-O
10 f3 Qb6! 11 Bb5 Ne5 12 Be3 a6 13 BXc6+
bXc6
10. . . Qb6 11 Qe2
8
rZbZkZ0s
7
opZ0Zpa0
6
0lnopZpZ
8
rZbZka0s 5
ZNZ0Z0Op
7
opZ0Zpo0 4
0Z0ZPZnO
6
0lnopZ0Z 3
ZNZ0Z0ZB
5
Z0Z0Z0Op 2
POPZQO0Z
4
0Z0ZPZnO 1
S0A0J0S0
ZNM0Z0Z0
3 a b c d e f g h

2
POPZQO0Z 13 BXg4 hXg4 14 ZZ
1
S0A0JBS0 13. . . Nce5 14 Rg3 Bd7 QUESTION: This looks
a b c d e f g h
good, but could Black have grabbed on f2?

11 Rg2 g6 12 Bf4 Nge5 13 Qe2 a6 14 O-O-O


Qc7 15 Kb1 b5 16 Qe3 Be7
11. . . g6

54
endgame.
8
rZ0ZkZ0s 22 Kg2 e5! 23 BXc3 QXc3 24 Qf3 QXf3+ 25
KXf3 RXh4 Reaching a winning ending. The
7
opZbZpa0 rest of the moves I will give without comment,
6
0l0opZpZ as Black clinically achieves his objective!
5
ZNZ0m0Op 26 Na5 b6 27 Nc4 Ke7 28 Ke3 d5! 29 Nd2
dXe4 30 NXe4 Bc6 31 f3 Ke6 32 a5 b5 33 a6
4
0Z0ZPZnO Rh2
3
ZNZ0Z0SB 0-1
2
POPZQO0Z
1
S0A0J0Z0
a b c d e f g h

14. . . NXf2! 15 Be3 Nfd3+! 16 cXd3 QXb5


15 Nc3 Whites strategy of attacking d6 has failed
and Black has gained plenty of time for develop-
ment. QUESTION: White is, however, threat-
ening f3 trapping the knight on g4. What can
Black do about it? ANSWER: Using his lead in
development, Black has a tactic to prevent it:
15. . . Rc8! 16 a4

8
0ZrZkZ0s
7
opZbZpa0
6
0l0opZpZ
5
Z0Z0m0Op
4
PZ0ZPZnO
3
ZNM0Z0SB
2
0OPZQO0Z
1
S0A0J0Z0
a b c d e f g h

16 f3 RXc3! 17 bXc3 Bb5 18 Qg2 Ne3 19 Qd2


N5c4 20 Qd3 Be5!
16. . . Nc4 17 BXg4 hXg4 18 QXg4 Qb4 So White
has won his pawn, but in return Black has gained
a lot. Threats on c3 hang in the air, both black
rooks are already in the game, and its not sur-
prising that White cant deal with all these threats.
19 Kf1 ANSWER:
19. . . NXb2! 20 BXb2 BXc3 21 RXc3 RXc3 Hav-
ing regained his material, Black is already bet-
ter and he now exchanges o into a favourable

55
White: Fier, A Spanish Team Championship
Black: Ponomariov, R
2009
Result: 1/2-1/2

1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 e6 3 d4 cXd4 4 NXd4 Nf6 5


Nc3 d6 Annotating this game for his Open Si-
cilians column on the ChessPublishing website,
8
rZblka0s
Richard Palliser couldnt resist noting: Yet an- 7
opZ0Zpo0
other strong player decides that the Keres Attack
isnt quite the terrifying weapon it was once con-
6
0ZnopZ0Z
sidered to be. That said, the Keres Attack is the 5
Z0Z0Z0Zn
most popular variation against the Scheveningen
right now and the sub-variation well see in this
4
0Z0MPZ0O
game is one of the most important. I advise the
3
Z0M0Z0Z0
reader to study this line! 2
POPZ0O0Z
6 g4 h6 7 h4 Nc6 8 Rg1 h5 9 gXh5 1
S0AQJBS0
a b c d e f g h

8
rZblka0s 9. . . RXh5 10 Bg5 Rh7!? 11 Qd2 Qb6 12 Nb3
a6 13 O-O-O Be7 14 Kb1 Bd7 15 Rg3 Qc7 16
7
opZ0Zpo0 Bg2 b5 17 a3 Rd8 18 f4 Bc8 19 Nd5!? eXd5 20
6
0Znopm0Z eXd5 Na7 21 Re1 Kf8
5
Z0Z0Z0ZP 10 Bg5 Nf6
4
0Z0MPZ0O
3
Z0M0Z0Z0
2
POPZ0O0Z
8
rZblka0s
1
S0AQJBS0
7
opZ0Zpo0
a b c d e f g h
6
0Znopm0Z
5
Z0Z0Z0A0
9 g5 4
0Z0MPZ0O
9. . . NXh5 Returning to 9...Nxh5: 3
Z0M0Z0Z0
2
POPZ0O0Z
1
S0ZQJBS0
a b c d e f g h

10. . . Qc7!? 11 Qd2 a6 12 O-O-O Bd7 13 Be2


Rc8 14 NXc6 BXc6
10. . . Qb6!? 11 Nb3 a6 12 Qd2 Bd7 13 O-O-O
Qc7 14 Kb1 Ne5 15 Nd4 b5 16 f4 b4! 17 f Xe5
bXc3 18 eXd6 BXd6 19 QXc3 QXc3 20 bXc3 Bc7
11 Rg3!? The move recommended by many sources,

56
including Viktor Gavrikov in Experts vs. the Si- 12 Rd3 Qc7 13 Qe2 Bd7 14 O-O-O Ne5 15
cilian, and one which needs to be taken seriously. R3d2 b5 16 f4 Nc4 17 e5!? NXd2 18 Bg2 Nfe4
QUESTION: Why is White moving his rook like 19 NXe4 NXe4 20 BXe4 Rc8? 21 f5! Qc4 22
this? Why isnt he developing and trying to cas- f Xe6 BXe6 23 Qf3 d5 24 Bd3 Qc5 25 NXe6
tle queenside? ANSWER: That is also a popular f Xe6 26 Bg6+ Kd7 27 Qf7+ Be7 28 Bf5! Rc6
option, but with the rook move White first wants 29 BXe7 Qe3+ 30 Kb1 Qe2 31 BXe6+
to see how Black is going to develop. The rook 12. . . bXc6 13 Qf3 Qa5! Black sees that White
performs a useful function along the third rank will castle queenside and so places his pieces fac-
and now White can consider f4 without worrying ing in that direction. Previous practice had sug-
about ...Qb6 pinning the knight on d4 to the rook gested that White was a little better here:
on g1.
11. . . a6 Black also plays a useful waiting move.

8
rZbZka0s
8
rZblka0s
7
Z0Z0Zpo0
7
ZpZ0Zpo0
6
pZpopm0Z
6
pZnopm0Z
5
l0Z0Z0A0
5
Z0Z0Z0A0
4
0Z0ZPZ0O
4
0Z0MPZ0O
3
Z0M0ZQS0
3
Z0M0Z0S0
2
POPZ0O0Z
2
POPZ0O0Z
1
S0Z0JBZ0
a b c d e f g h
1
S0ZQJBZ0
a b c d e f g h
13. . . e5?! 14 Bc4! Be6 15 BXe6 f Xe6 16 O-O-
O Rb8 17 h5!
11. . . Be7 12 Qd2 a6 13 O-O-O Bd7 14 Bg2 13. . . Bd7 14 O-O-O Be7 15 e5! dXe5 16 Ne4
Rc8 15 f4 Qc7 16 e5!
13. . . Qb6 14 O-O-O Rb8 15 b3 Nh5 16 Rg1 g6
12 NXc6 17 Bc4 Qa5 18 e5!? d5 19 Kb1 Bd7 20 Bf1
Bg7 21 Qe3 Qc7 22 f4 c5 23 Ne2 a5 24 Ng3
NXg3 25 RXg3 a4 26 Be2 c4 27 h5 aXb3 28 cXb3
rZblka0s
8 Ba4 29 Rc1
7
ZpZ0Zpo0 13. . . Rb8 14 Bc4! Qb6 15 Bb3 Nh5 16 Rg1 g6
17 O-O-O Bd7 18 Rge1 Qc7 19 Qd3 a5 20 f4
6
pZNopm0Z Bg7 21 f5
5
Z0Z0Z0A0 13. . . Be7 14 O-O-O d5 15 Bc4 Bb7 16 Bb3 Kf8
4
0Z0ZPZ0O 17 h5
3
Z0M0Z0S0 14 O-O-O Nothing else makes much sense, but
now Black will look to target b2 down the open
2
POPZ0O0Z b-file.
1
S0ZQJBZ0 14 BXf6 gXf6 15 QXf6 Qh5! 16 Rh3 e5 17 Be2
a b c d e f g h
Be7 18 Qg7 Qh6 19 QXh6 RXh6 20 Rh1 RXh4
14. . . Rb8 15 Bc4 QUESTION: Cant White cap-
12 Qd2 Qb6 13 Nb3 Bd7
ture on f6 and win a pawn?

57
8
0sbZka0s
8
0sbZka0s
7
Z0Z0Zpo0
7
Z0Z0Zpo0
6
pZpopZ0Z
6
pZpopm0Z
5
Z0m0O0A0
5
l0Z0Z0A0
4
0l0Z0Z0O
4
0ZBZPZ0O
3
ZBM0Z0S0
3
Z0M0ZQS0
2
POPZQO0Z
2
POPZ0O0Z
1
Z0JRZ0Z0
a b c d e f g h
1
Z0JRZ0Z0
a b c d e f g h
18 Kb1 a5!
18. . . d5 19 Rg4 Qb7 20 Ne4 White wants to get
15 BXf6 gXf6 16 QXf6 Rh6 17 Qf4 e5 18 Qe3
rid of Blacks active knight on c5, which is sup-
RXh4 19 Rg8 Be6 20 Qg3 Rf4 21 Qg7 Ke7
porting the ...a5-a4 advance.
15. . . Nd7! A strong regrouping and one which
fully solves Blacks problems.

8
0sbZka0s
8
0sbZka0s
7
ZqZ0Zpo0
7
Z0ZnZpo0
6
pZpZpZ0Z
6
pZpopZ0Z
5
Z0mpO0A0
5
l0Z0Z0A0
4
0Z0ZNZRO
4
0ZBZPZ0O
3
ZBZ0Z0Z0
3
Z0M0ZQS0
2
POPZQO0Z
2
POPZ0O0Z
1
Z0JRZ0Z0
a b c d e f g h
1
Z0JRZ0Z0
a b c d e f g h
20 Kb1 a5 21 Na4 NXb3 22 aXb3 c5
20. . . NXe4 21 RXe4 Bd7!
15. . . Nh5 16 Rgg1 g6 17 Bb3
16 Qe2 Qb4 17 Bb3 Nc5 18 e5! Fier hurries
to create some play of his own before Blacks a-
pawn begins to advance. QUESTION: What is
Blacks plan in this position?

58
23 c3!? c4
8
0s0Zka0s 23. . . d4 Not just creating a protected passed pawn,
but a move which prevents any action down the
7
ZqZbZpo0 d-file.
6
pZpZpZ0Z 24 Rd3 Bc6 25 Rdf3!? A tricky move and one
5
Z0ZpO0A0 which Black needs to be on red alert against.
4
0Z0ZRZ0O 25. . . Be7!
3
ZBZ0Z0Z0
2
POPZQO0Z
1
Z0JRZ0Z0
8
0s0ZkZ0s
a b c d e f g h
7
ZqZ0apo0
21. . . dXe4?? 22 Rd8#
6
pZbZpZ0Z
22 Rf4
5
Z0o0O0A0
4
0ZPo0S0O
3
ZBZ0ZRZ0
8
0s0Zka0s 2
PO0ZQO0Z
7
ZqZbZpo0 1
Z0J0Z0Z0
6
pZpZpZ0Z a b c d e f g h

5
Z0ZpO0A0 25. . . BXf3? 26 QXf3 QXf3?? 27 Ba4+!
4
0Z0Z0S0O 26 Rg3
3
ZBZ0Z0Z0
2
POPZQO0Z
1
Z0JRZ0Z0 8
0s0ZkZ0s
a b c d e f g h
7
ZqZ0apo0
22 Ra4!? c5 23 QXa6 f6! 24 eXf6 c4 25 QXb7
RXb7 26 Ra8+ Kf7 27 Ba4 gXf6 28 BXd7 RXd7
6
pZbZpZ0Z
29 Be3 RXh4
5
Z0o0O0A0
22. . . c5 23 c4
4
0ZPo0S0O
3
ZBZ0Z0S0
2
PO0ZQO0Z
8
0s0Zka0s 1
Z0J0Z0Z0
7
ZqZbZpo0 a b c d e f g h
6
pZ0ZpZ0Z
5
Z0opO0A0 26 RXf7 BXg5+ 27 hXg5 Rh1+ 28 Kd2 QXf7
29 RXf7 KXf7
4
0ZPZ0S0O 26. . . g6 Here the game was prematurely agreed
3
ZBZ0Z0Z0 drawn.
2
PO0ZQO0Z
1
Z0JRZ0Z0
a b c d e f g h

59
8
0s0ZkZ0s
7
ZqZ0apZ0
6
pZbZpZpZ
5
Z0o0O0A0
4
0ZPo0S0O
3
ZBZ0Z0S0
2
PO0ZQO0Z
1
Z0J0Z0Z0
a b c d e f g h

26. . . g6 27 BXe7 QXe7 28 Rh3 Rh5

1/2-1/2

60
White: Thomassen, J Biel
Black: Cebalo, M
2008
Result: 0-1

1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 d6 3 d4 cXd4 4 NXd4 Nf6 5 Nc3


e6 6 g4 h6 7 h4 Nc6 8 Rg1 h5 9 gXh5 NXh5 10
Bg5 Nf6 We saw all this in the previous game.
8
rZ0Zka0s
Now we come to Whites typical developing plan: 7
ZplbZpo0
queen to d2 followed by castling queenside. With
the king safe, White will then look to open up the
6
pZnopm0Z
position to get at the black king on e8. 5
Z0Z0Z0A0
11 Qd2 Qb6 The queen kicks the knight from 4
0Z0ZPZ0O
d4, before dropping back to c7. 3
ZNM0Z0S0
2
POPL0O0Z
1
Z0JRZBZ0
a b c d e f g h
8
rZbZka0s
7
opZ0Zpo0 14. . . Rc8 15 Qe1 Qc7 16 Kb1 b5!? 17 Bh3
b4 18 Nd5 eXd5 19 eXd5+ Ne7 20 Rd2 Nh5 21
6
0lnopm0Z BXd7+ QXd7 22 Re3 f6 23 Nd4 f Xg5 24 hXg5
5
Z0Z0Z0A0 Nf4 25 Re4 NXd5 26 Ne6 Nc7
4
0Z0MPZ0O 15 Bg2 Not Whites only move:
3
Z0M0Z0Z0
2
POPL0O0Z
1
S0Z0JBS0 8
rZ0Zka0s
a b c d e f g h
7
ZplbZpo0
11. . . a6 12 O-O-O Bd7 13 Be2 Qb6 14 Nb3 6
pZnopm0Z
Qc7 15 h5 b5 16 a3 Be7 17 Qf4 Qd8 18 Bh4
Rg8 19 h6 g6 20 RXd6! BXd6 21 QXd6 NXe4
5
Z0Z0Z0A0
22 BXd8 NXd6 23 Bf6
4
0Z0ZPZ0O
12 Nb3 a6 13 O-O-O 13 Be2 Bd7 14 h5 NXh5
3
ZNM0Z0S0
15 Rh1 g6 16 O-O-O QXf2 17 e5 Qf5 18 eXd6
QXg5! 19 QXg5 Bh6 20 QXh6 RXh6 21 Na4
2
POPL0OBZ
Ne5 22 Nb6 Rd8 23 Nc5 Bc6
1
Z0JRZ0Z0
a b c d e f g h
13. . . Bd7 14 Rg3 Again we see this multipur-
pose rook move. White can now play f4 without 15 Qe2 b5 16 Bg2 b4 17 BXf6 gXf6 18 e5 bXc3
leaving the rook en prise on g1 and the rook can 19 RXc3 f Xe5 20 Qc4 d5 21 RXd5 eXd5 22 BXd5
swing across the third rank in some lines. Rh6 23 BXf7+ Kd8 24 h5 Rd6 25 Nc5 Bh6+
14. . . Qc7 26 Re3 Nd4 27 c3 Nf5 28 Bg6 BXe3+ 29 f Xe3
Rd1+
15 Be2 O-O-O 16 h5 Be7 17 Qf4?! NXh5 18

61
BXh5 f6! 19 Bg4 f Xg5 20 Qd2 Rdf8
15 Bg2 8
0ZrZkZ0s
15. . . Rc8 ANSWER: Either plan is good. It de-
pends how you feel at the board!
7
Z0lbapo0
6
pZ0opm0Z
5
ZpZ0m0A0
4
0Z0ZPZ0O
8
0ZrZka0s 3
ZNM0S0Z0
7
ZplbZpo0 2
POPZQOBZ
6
pZnopm0Z 1
ZKZRZ0Z0
Z0Z0Z0A0
5 a b c d e f g h

4
0Z0ZPZ0O 18. . . b4 19 Nd5 eXd5 20 eXd5 Ne5 21 f4 Bg4!
3
ZNM0Z0S0 19 a3 Now White gets to prevent ...b4 ideas and
2
POPL0OBZ we only witness a positional masterpiece from the
1
Z0JRZ0Z0 respected Croatian Grandmaster Miso Cebalo.
a b c d e f g h 19. . . Nh5 20 Rh3

15. . . Be7 16 f4 O-O-O 17 Qf2 Kb8 18 f5 Ne5


19 Bh3 Nc4 8
0ZrZkZ0s
16 Qe2 Be7 17 Kb1 b5 18 Re3 QUESTION:
Can you think why White may have played this?
7
Z0lbapo0
ANSWER: He sees the threat of ...b4 and wants
6
pZ0opZ0Z
to play Nd5 in reply. Does this work, though? 5
ZpZ0m0An
4
0Z0ZPZ0O
3
ONM0Z0ZR
2
0OPZQOBZ
8
0ZrZkZ0s 1
ZKZRZ0Z0
7
Z0lbapo0 a b c d e f g h
6
pZnopm0Z
5
ZpZ0Z0A0 20 BXe7 KXe7
4
0Z0ZPZ0O 20. . . Nc4 21 Nd4 g6 22 Bf3 EXERCISE: Choose
between one of the following three moves: a)
3
ZNM0S0Z0 22...Bxg5; b) 22...Qc5; c) 22...Nxb2.
2
POPZQOBZ 22. . . Qc5
1
ZKZRZ0Z0
a b c d e f g h

18 f4 b4 19 Na4 Na7!
18. . . Ne5 This is still good, but was there any-
thing better?

62
29 f Xe5 RXe5 30 Qf3 b4 31 Ne4 Rf5 32 Qg3
bXa3
8
0ZrZkZ0s 29. . . RXf5 30 Ne4 a4 31 Nbd2 Bc6 32 NXc4
7
Z0ZbapZ0 bXc4 33 Nd6 Possibly the players were in time
6
pZ0opZpZ trouble, as White gets some unexpected chances
which he didnt deserve, but Black is still clearly
5
Zpl0Z0An better.
4
0ZnMPZ0O 33. . . cXd3 34 NXc8+ Kf8 Cebalo has it all worked
3
O0M0ZBZR out!
2
0OPZQO0Z 35 QXd3 Qd4 Now he wants an ending to sim-
1
ZKZRZ0Z0 plify things.
a b c d e f g h 36 Qe2

22. . . NXb2! 23 BXh5 NXd1! 24 QXd1 b4! 25


aXb4 Qb7 8
0ZNZ0j0Z
22. . . BXg5 23 hXg5 Nf4 24 RXh8+ 7
Z0Z0ZpZ0
23 BXh5 RXh5 24 Nb3 Qb6 25 BXe7 KXe7
Black should not mind his king being in the cen-
6
0ZbZpZpZ
tre in the Scheveningen, as mentioned above. Those
5
Z0Z0orZ0
pawns on e6 and d6 do a great job of preventing
any threats.
4
pZ0l0Z0O
26 f4 a5 EXERCISE: Assess this position. AN-
3
O0Z0Z0Z0
SWER: This is a dream position for Black in this
2
0OPZQZ0Z
variation. He can play ...Rch8 and go after the 1
ZKZRZ0Z0
weak h4-pawn, or he might play for ...b4 and go a b c d e f g h
after Whites king on the queenside. Moreover,
Black has the better pawn structure, so any end- 36 QXd4 eXd4 37 RXd4 Rf1+ 38 Ka2 e5 39 Rd2
ing will be better for him. Rf4 40 Rh2 e4 41 Nb6 Rf3
27 e5 Uh-oh, have we missed something? 36. . . Rf2 37 Qe1 Qc5 38 Ka1
27. . . dXe5 No. White is just playing for tricks.
28 Rhd3 Be8 29 f5
8
0ZNZ0j0Z
7
Z0Z0ZpZ0
8
0ZrZbZ0Z 6
0ZbZpZpZ
7
Z0Z0jpZ0 5
Z0l0o0Z0
6
0l0ZpZpZ 4
pZ0Z0Z0O
5
opZ0oPZr 3
O0Z0Z0Z0
4
0ZnZ0Z0O 2
0OPZ0s0Z
3
ONMRZ0Z0 1
J0ZRL0Z0
2
0OPZQZ0Z a b c d e f g h

1
ZKZRZ0Z0 38 c3 Bd5 39 Nd6 Rg2
a b c d e f g h
38. . . Bg2 39 Nd6 QXc2 40 Nc4 Bd5 41 Rc1

63
Qe2 42 Qb4+ Kg7 43 Nd6 Rf1 44 Qc3 RXc1+
45 QXc1 Bb3 46 Ne8+ Kf8 White decided hed
had enough. Black can play this line positionally,
as Cebalo did, but there were also various tactics
along the way which might have decided things
a little earlier.

0-1

64
White: Eames, R London
Black: DCosta, L
2010
Result: 0-1

1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 d6 3 d4 cXd4 4 NXd4 Nf6 5 Nc3


e6 6 g4 h6 7 h4 Nc6 8 Rg1 h5 9 gXh5 NXh5 10
Bg5 Nf6 11 Be2 QUESTION: Why does White
8
rZ0lka0s
play 11 Be2? Its not as if he is going to play in 7
Z0ZbZpo0
the same way as in the 6 Be2 lines is he? AN-
SWER: Yes, that is true, but this position is very
6
pZnopm0Z
dierent. White wants to play h5 and deny Black 5
ZpZ0Z0AP
the use of this square for his knight. His play is
quite flexible and he might choose Qd2 and 0-
4
0Z0MPZ0Z
0-0 or a Rg3 approach depending on how Black
3
Z0M0Z0Z0
replies. 2
POPLBO0Z
1
S0Z0J0S0
a b c d e f g h

8
rZblka0s 13. . . Be7 14 O-O-O Qc7 15 h6 gXh6 16 BXf6
BXf6 17 Nf5! eXf5 18 Nd5 Qd8 19 QXh6! Be6
7
opZ0Zpo0 20 NXf6+ Ke7 21 Qg5 f Xe4 22 NXe4+ Kf8 23
6
0Znopm0Z Qg7+ Ke7 24 Qf6+
5
Z0Z0Z0A0 13. . . Qb6 14 Nb3 Qc7 15 h6
4
0Z0MPZ0O 14 a3 The most popular move, as ...b4 and ...Nxe4
was definitely in the air. Alternatives:
3
Z0M0Z0Z0
2
POPZBO0Z
1
S0ZQJ0S0
a b c d e f g h
8
rZ0lka0s
11 Rg3
7
Z0ZbZpo0
11. . . a6 12 h5 Bd7 13 Qd2 b5!? QUESTION:
6
pZnopm0Z
Why did Black play this? ANSWER: Black threat-
ens ...b4 to win the e4-pawn, while gaining space
5
ZpZ0Z0AP
on the queenside. Its likely White will castle
4
0Z0MPZ0Z
there very soon which makes the move even more 3
O0M0Z0Z0
appealing. The drawback to it is that now Black
cannot really castle either way, so the king will
2
0OPLBO0Z
have to remain in the centre for a while.
1
S0Z0J0S0
a b c d e f g h

14 NXc6 BXc6 15 a3 Rc8 16 Qd4 Be7 17 O-O-


O Bb7
14 O-O-O?! b4! 15 NXc6 BXc6 16 Nd5 NXe4!

65
17 BXd8 NXd2
14. . . Rc8 15 O-O-O 15 Nb3 Be7 16 Be3 Na5!?
17 NXa5 QXa5 18 RXg7 b4 19 Na2 NXe4 20
8
0ZrlkZ0s
QXb4 Qe5 21 Rg1 RXc2 22 Bd3? NXf2!
7
Z0Zbapo0
15. . . b4 This felt the most natural move. When
6
pZ0opm0Z
White has played a3, this is the typical move to
prise open lines on the queenside.
5
Z0Z0Z0ZP
4
0m0MPZ0Z
3
Z0M0A0Z0
2
0OPLBO0Z
8
0Zrlka0s
1
ZKZRZ0S0
a b c d e f g h
7
Z0ZbZpo0
6
pZnopm0Z 18 h6 g6 19 Nb3 a5 20 Nd4 RXc3!? 21 BXf6
5
Z0Z0Z0AP BXf6 22 QXc3 RXh6 23 Rh1 RXh1 24 RXh1
Qb6 25 Rd1 Nc6
4
0o0MPZ0Z 18. . . Rh7 I like this move to defend the g7-pawn
3
O0M0Z0Z0 (I recommended a similar surprise weapon in the
2
0OPLBO0Z notes to Fier-Ponomariov). The rook still oper-
1
Z0JRZ0S0 ates on the h-file and isnt that susceptible to
attack.
a b c d e f g h
19 f4
15. . . Na5 16 Kb1 Nc4 17 BXc4 RXc4 18 f4 Qa8
19 e5 Ne4 20 NXe4 QXe4 21 eXd6 RXh5
16 aXb4 NXb4 17 Kb1 Be7 8
0ZrlkZ0Z
7
Z0Zbapor
6
pZ0opm0Z
8
0ZrlkZ0s 5
Z0Z0Z0ZP
7
Z0Zbapo0 4
0m0MPO0Z
6
pZ0opm0Z 3
Z0M0A0Z0
5
Z0Z0Z0AP 2
0OPLBZ0Z
4
0m0MPZ0Z 1
ZKZRZ0S0
3
Z0M0Z0Z0 a b c d e f g h
2
0OPLBO0Z
1
ZKZRZ0S0 19 h6 g6
a b c d e f g h 19. . . Qc7 QUESTION: Should White push with
f5 or e5? ANSWER: Both breaks are on the cards
and Black must be ready for both of them. Nor-
17. . . e5!? 18 Nb3 Be6 19 f4 Qb6 20 f5 RXc3
mally such moves will lead to tactics breaking out
21 QXc3 NXe4 22 Qh3 Bd5
after a long spell of manoeuvring and this game
18 Be3 is no dierent in such regard.
20 e5!? My opponent decides that now is the
time to go for it and smash open the position.

66
8
0Z0skZ0Z
8
0ZrZkZ0Z
7
Z0Z0ZpZr
7
Z0lbapor
6
pZ0ZpZpO
6
pZ0opm0Z
5
l0ZPL0Z0
5
Z0Z0O0ZP
4
0m0M0Z0Z
4
0m0M0O0Z
3
Z0Z0Z0Z0
3
Z0M0A0Z0
2
0O0ZBZ0Z
2
0OPLBZ0Z
1
ZKZRZRZ0
a b c d e f g h
1
ZKZRZ0S0
a b c d e f g h
33 Nc2! Qa2+ 34 Kc1 Nc6 35 Qf4 Na5!?
20 f5 e5 21 Nb3 Bc6 22 Bf3 a5 33. . . Qa2+ 34 Kc1 Qa1+ 35 Kd2 QXb2+ 36
20. . . dXe5 21 f Xe5 QXe5 22 Bf4 Qa5 23 Nb3 Ke1?
Qb6 24 h6 g6 A complicated position has arisen.
Black is a pawn up, but anything can happen
here. To be honest, I fall into that category of
players who prefer to be material up than down!
8
0Z0skZ0Z
25 Bg5 Bc6 26 Rgf1 Rd8 27 Nd4 Ne4
7
Z0Z0ZpZr
6
pZ0ZpZpO
5
Z0ZPL0Z0
8
0Z0skZ0Z 4
0m0M0Z0Z
7
Z0Z0apZr 3
Z0Z0Z0Z0
6
plbZpZpO 2
0l0ZBZ0Z
5
Z0Z0Z0A0 1
Z0ZRJRZ0
4
0m0MnZ0Z a b c d e f g h

3
Z0M0Z0Z0 36 Ke3! Nc2+ 37 Kf4 RXd5 38 Nc6! QXe5+
2
0OPLBZ0Z 39 NXe5 g5+ 40 Kg3 RXe5 41 Bd3 Re3+ 42
1
ZKZRZRZ0 Kf2 RXd3 43 RXd3 RXh6
a b c d e f g h
36. . . Nc2+ 37 Kf2 RXd5 Now Black is winning.

27. . . Be4! 28 BXf6 BXc2+ 29 NXc2 RXd2 30 38 Bb5+ RXb5 39 Qg7 A last trick in time trou-
RXd2 BXf6 31 RXf6 NXc2 32 KXc2 RXh6 ble, but Black has enough to deal with it.

28 NXe4 BXe4 29 BXe7 KXe7 30 Qg5+ Ke8 31 39. . . NXd4+ 40 Ke3 RXg7 41 hXg7 Nc2+ 42
Qe5 Bd5 32 c4 EXERCISE: Calculate the conse- Ke2 QXg7
quences of 32...Qa5. Who do you think will come 0-1
out on top after this? Warning: this is quite a
dicult exercise!
32. . . Qa5!? 33 cXd5? Black now obtains the ad-
vantage.

67
White: Haznedaroglu, K European Championship, Warsaw
Black: Navara, D
2005
Result: 0-1

1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 e6 3 d4 cXd4 4 NXd4 Nf6 5 10 f4 Nc4 11 Bc1 Qb6 12 b3 e5!? 13 Nde2 Ne3
Nc3 d6 6 g4 h6 7 h3 ANSWER: The 7 h3 sub- 14 BXe3 QXe3
variation has become popular in recent years and 10. . . g5! QUESTION: Shouldnt Black be devel-
is a firm rival to 7 h4. Instead of trying to push oping instead of lashing out with such a move?
Black o the board, White is content with the ANSWER: 10...g5 actually shows good under-
gain of space that 6 g4 has aorded him. He nor- standing of the position. Whites main pawn
mally tries to play for f4, which allows him to break here is f4, so Black takes steps to prevent it.
push further ahead with any of the e-, f- and g- From a more concrete point of view, White was
pawns at the right moment. threatening 11 f4 to kick the e5-knight away and
so Black needed to do something immediately to
stop that.
11 O-O-O 11 f4 gXf4 12 BXf4 Bd7 13 Nf3 Qa5!?
8
rmblka0s 14 O-O-O Rc8 15 NXe5 dXe5 16 Bd2 Be7 17
7
opZ0Zpo0 Kb1 Qb6
6
0Z0opm0o 11. . . Bd7 12 f4 Probably the critical test. Black
now gets to secure the knight on e5, but at what
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0 cost?
4
0Z0MPZPZ 12. . . gXf4 13 BXf4 Rc8 14 Rhf1
3
Z0M0Z0ZP
2
POPZ0O0Z
1
S0AQJBZR 8
0Zrlka0s
a b c d e f g h 7
ZpZbZpZ0
7 h4
6
pZ0opm0o
7. . . Nc6 8 Be3 a6 9 Bg2 Ne5 10 Qe2
5
Z0Z0m0Z0
4
0Z0MPAPZ
3
Z0M0Z0ZP
8
rZblka0s 2
POPZQZBZ
7
ZpZ0Zpo0 1
Z0JRZRZ0
6
pZ0opm0o a b c d e f g h
5
Z0Z0m0Z0
14 Nf3 Qc7 15 Rhf1 b5 16 a3 Be7 17 Bg3 Nc4!
4
0Z0MPZPZ 18 Rd3 Qa5 19 Be1 b4 20 Nd5 bXa3 21 RXa3
3
Z0M0A0ZP Qb5 22 Rb3 Qa4 23 Kb1 eXd5 24 eXd5 Bb5
2
POPZQOBZ 14. . . b5
1
S0Z0J0ZR
a b c d e f g h

68
18 b3? Qa3+
8
0Zrlka0s 18. . . QXb2+ 19 Kd1 Qa1+ 20 Bc1 Nb2+ 21
Kd2 Nc4+ Black repeats moves to gain time on
7
Z0ZbZpZ0 the clock, which is a sensible decision.
6
pZ0opm0o 22 Kd1 d5 23 Nd4 Nb2+ 24 Kd2 Nc4+
5
ZpZ0m0Z0
4
0Z0MPAPZ
3
Z0M0Z0ZP
8
0ZrZka0s
2
POPZQZBZ
7
Z0ZbZpZ0
1
Z0JRZRZ0
6
pZ0ZpO0o
a b c d e f g h 5
ZpZpZ0Z0
4
0ZnM0ZPZ
14. . . RXc3!? 15 bXc3 Qc7 16 Kb1 Be7 17 Bc1
Ba4 18 Qf2 Nfd7 19 Nb3 Bb5 20 Rfe1 Nb6 21
3
Z0MRZ0ZP
Bf1 Na4
2
PZPJQZBZ
15 Nf3 Nc4! We saw how powerful this knight
1
l0A0ZRZ0
leap can be in the notes to Whites 14th move, a b c d e f g h
above. There are tricks in the air for sure...
16 e5 Trying to punish Black for leaving his king 24. . . NXd3 25 QXd3 Bb4 26 Ne2 QXa2
in the centre. Thats very logical, but this ad- 25 Ke1?
vance allows a wonderful riposte.
16. . . Qa5!! I doubt White even considered this!
Black just ignores Whites previous move and
gets on with the attack. The king on e8 is fine:
8
0ZrZka0s
our friends, the d6- and e6-pawns, are covering
7
Z0ZbZpZ0
him for the time being. Can the queenside at- 6
pZ0ZpO0o
tack break through, though? 5
ZpZpZ0Z0
17 eXf6 Qb4 This simple attack on b2 is very
hard to meet.
4
0ZnM0ZPZ
18 Rd3
3
Z0MRZ0ZP
2
PZPZQZBZ
1
l0A0JRZ0
0ZrZka0s
8 a b c d e f g h

7
Z0ZbZpZ0 25 Kd1 Nb2+ 26 Kd2 NXd3 27 QXd3 Bb4 28
6
pZ0opO0o Ne2 QXa2
5
ZpZ0Z0Z0 25. . . QXc1+ 26 Kf2 Qf4+ 27 Kg1 Qe5 The
4
0lnZ0APZ king has escaped, but White is a pawn down with
the worse position. The end is nigh.
3
Z0MRZNZP 28 Qf2 Nb2 29 Rd2 RXc3 30 NXe6 A desperate
2
POPZQZBZ sacrifice.
1
Z0J0ZRZ0 30. . . BXe6 31 Re1 Qg3 32 RXe6+ f Xe6 33 f7+
a b c d e f g h Kd7
0-1

69
White: Buzeti, J Nova Gorica
Black: Kovacevic, A
2010
Result: 0-1

1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 d6 3 d4 cXd4 4 NXd4 Nf6 5


Nc3 e6 6 g4 h6 7 Be3 White takes advantage of
the fact that Black cannot play ...h5 here, having
8
rZblka0s
already gone ...h6, as he does in Van Kampen- 7
opZ0Zpo0
Popilsky in the next chapter. Whites potential
plans are to play f3, Qd2 and 0-0-0 in English
6
0Znopm0o
Attack style, or to play Bg2 and h3, as he does 5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
in this game. 4
0Z0MPZPZ
7. . . Nc6 3
Z0M0A0ZP
2
POPZ0O0Z
8
rZblka0s
1
S0ZQJBZR
a b c d e f g h
7
opZ0Zpo0
6
0Znopm0o 8 f3 a6 9 Qd2 d5!? 10 O-O-O dXe4 11 Qf2 Qc7
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0 12 Ndb5!? aXb5 13 NXb5 Qb8 14 Bb6 Bb4 15
Kb1 Ba5 16 Nc7+ QXc7 17 BXc7 BXc7
4
0Z0MPZPZ 8. . . Bd7
3
Z0M0A0Z0
2
POPZ0O0O
1
S0ZQJBZR 8
rZ0lka0s
opZbZpo0
a b c d e f g h 7

7. . . a6 8 h3 b5 9 a3 Bb7 10 Bg2 Nbd7 11 Qe2


6
0Znopm0o
g5! 12 h4 Rg8 13 hXg5 hXg5 14 O-O-O Rc8 15 5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
Bd2 Ne5 16 BXg5 RXg5 17 f4 Nf Xg4 18 f Xg5
RXc3! 19 g6 Qg5+ 20 Kb1 Re3 21 gXf7+ Ke7
4
0Z0MPZPZ
22 Qf1 Rg3
3
Z0M0A0ZP
8 h3
2
POPZ0O0Z
1
S0ZQJBZR
a b c d e f g h

8. . . a6
9 Bg2

70
h5! 19 gXh5 g4! 20 NXe5 gXh3 21 Bf3 dXe5 22
Rdd1 b5 23 Bg5 b4 24 Nb1 Bb5
8
rZ0lka0s 11. . . Nc4 12 Rhe1 Best.
7
opZbZpo0
6
0Znopm0o
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
4
0Z0MPZPZ 8
0Zrlka0s
3
Z0M0A0ZP 7
opZbZpo0
2
POPZ0OBZ 6
0Z0opm0o
1
S0ZQJ0ZR 5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
0ZnMPZPZ
a b c d e f g h 4

9 Ndb5 Qb8! 10 Qd2 a6 11 Nd4 b5


3
Z0M0A0ZP
9. . . Ne5
2
POPZQOBZ
1
Z0JRS0Z0
a b c d e f g h

8
rZ0lka0s 12 Kb1 Qb6 13 Ndb5? Qa5
7
opZbZpo0 12 Nb3 Qc7 13 f4 NXb2! 14 Nb5 Qc4
6
0Z0opm0o 12. . . Be7 13 Kb1 Qb6 14 Nb3 Qc7 We have
5
Z0Z0m0Z0 seen this idea many times by now. Pulling the
4
0Z0MPZPZ knight away from d4 could be a crucial tempo
gain for Black later on in the game.
3
Z0M0A0ZP 15 Bc1 b5 16 Nd2 ANSWER:
2
POPZ0OBZ
1
S0ZQJ0ZR
a b c d e f g h

9. . . Be7
8
0ZrZkZ0s
9. . . Be7 10 f4 Qb8 11 O-O NXd4 12 QXd4 Bc6
7
o0lbapo0
13 e5 Nd7!? 14 BXc6 bXc6 15 eXd6 QXd6 16 6
0Z0opm0o
QXg7 Bf6 17 Ne4! 5
ZpZ0Z0Z0
10 Qe2 Rc8 11 O-O-O White has quite a few
moves here:
4
0ZnZPZPZ
11 Ndb5?! Qa5 12 NXa7 RXc3!
3
Z0M0Z0ZP
11 O-O Nc4 12 Bc1 Qb6 13 Nb3 Be7
2
POPMQOBZ
11 f4 Nc4 12 O-O-O? Qb6! 13 b3 NXe3 14
1
ZKARS0Z0
a b c d e f g h
QXe3 e5 15 Nd5 Qc5 16 c4 eXd4 17 RXd4 NXd5
18 eXd5+ Kd8 19 Qc3 Be7 20 b4 Qb6 21 Re4
Bf6 22 Qd2 Re8 23 Rhe1 RXe4 24 RXe4 Qg1+ 16 f4 b4
25 Re1 RXc4+ 16. . . Na3+! Although Black stands well here,
11 Rd1 Nc4 12 Bc1 Qb6 13 Nb3 Be7 14 O-O this is another useful mini-trick to know.
a6 15 Kh1 g5! 16 Rd4 Qc7 17 Nd2 Ne5 18 Nf3 17 bXa3

71
attack in the centre or the kingside.
8
0ZrZkZ0s 23 Bh1 O-O Now Kovacevic decides it is safe
enough to house the king, having calculated that
7
o0lbapo0 he is further ahead in his queenside attack than
6
0Z0opm0o White will be on the other wing.
5
ZpZ0Z0Z0 24 g5 hXg5 25 f Xg5 EXERCISE: Decide whether
or not Black can get away with grabbing the free
4
0Z0ZPZPZ pawn on g5.
3
O0M0Z0ZP 25. . . Nc5
2
PZPMQOBZ
1
ZKARS0Z0
a b c d e f g h 8
0ZrZ0skZ
17 Ka1 NXc2+
7
Z0l0apo0
17. . . QXc3 Now the kings pawn protection is ru-
6
0Zbo0Z0Z
ined, oering Black long-term attacking prospects.
5
opm0o0O0
18 Nb3 e5! As there is no longer a knight able to
4
0Z0ZPZ0Z
come to d5, Black can play this with impunity. 3
O0ZNZ0ZP
19 f4 QUESTION: Should Black capture on f4
here? ANSWER: Black could, but this would
2
PAPZQZ0Z
only help White as at the moment his major
1
ZKZRS0ZB
a b c d e f g h
pieces on the e-file arent doing anything.
19. . . Qc7
25. . . BXg5 26 Rg1 Bh6 27 Qh5 Bb7 28 QXh6
QXc2+ 29 Ka1 QXd1+! 30 RXd1 gXh6
26 Rg1?! EXERCISE: Decide what you would
8
0ZrZkZ0s do here as Black.
7
o0lbapo0
6
0Z0o0m0o
5
ZpZ0o0Z0
4
0Z0ZPOPZ
8
0ZrZ0skZ
3
ONZ0Z0ZP
7
Z0l0apo0
2
PZPZQZBZ
6
0Zbo0Z0Z
1
ZKARS0Z0
5
opm0o0O0
a b c d e f g h 4
0Z0ZPZ0Z
19. . . eXf4 20 BXf4 O-O 21 e5
3
O0ZNZ0ZP
20 Bb2 Bc6 21 Nc1 Nd7 Black delays castling
2
PAPZQZ0Z
so as not to give White an object of attack. It
1
ZKZRZ0SB
a b c d e f g h
is important to note that this doesnt mean that
Black will never castle!
26 NXc5 dXc5 27 h4 b4
22 Nd3 a5 Still not committing the king, thereby
leaving White guessing as to whether he should 26. . . g6?!

72
28 NXc5 QXc5! 29 h5 b4
8
0ZrZ0skZ 28. . . Na4! Now Kovacevic is back on track.
7
Z0l0apZ0 29 hXg6 f Xg6 30 Qh2 QUESTION: What is White
getting up to with this move? ANSWER: The
6
0Zbo0ZpZ idea is to penetrate with the queen down the h-
5
opm0o0O0 file, likely via h6. This would put pressure on the
g6-pawn. However, as stated before, we should
4
0Z0ZPZ0Z remain calm. Here the white king is under more
3
O0ZNZ0ZP pressure down the c-file, and there is a certain
2
PAPZQZ0Z defensive manoeuvre that Black can employ to
help defend. Can you see what it is?
1
ZKZRZ0SB 30. . . NXb2
a b c d e f g h

26. . . Na4!
27 h4?!
8
0ZrZ0skZ
7
Z0lba0Z0
6
0Z0o0ZpZ
8
0ZrZ0skZ 5
opZ0o0O0
7
Z0l0apZ0 4
0Z0ZPZ0Z
6
0Zbo0ZpZ 3
O0ZNZ0Z0
5
opm0o0O0 2
PmPZ0Z0L
4
0Z0ZPZ0O 1
ZKZRZ0SB
3
O0ZNZ0Z0 a b c d e f g h
2
PAPZQZ0Z
30. . . Rf7! 31 Qh6 QXc2+ 32 Ka1 NXb2 33
1
ZKZRZ0SB NXb2 Rh7 34 QXg6+ Kh8
a b c d e f g h
31 NXb2 Rf7! Better late than never! This rook
27 NXc5! dXc5 28 Qh2 Bd6 29 h4 b4 30 h5 move shores up any holes around the king. In-
deed, Blacks king is surprisingly solid, as Whites
27. . . Bd7 28 h5 pieces arent in any decent attacking positions.
32 Rdf1 EXERCISE: Decide whether Black should
exchange o all the rooks or keep them on for a
8
0ZrZ0skZ potential attack.
7
Z0lbapZ0
6
0Z0o0ZpZ
5
opm0o0OP
4
0Z0ZPZ0Z
3
O0ZNZ0Z0
2
PAPZQZ0Z
1
ZKZRZ0SB
a b c d e f g h

73
8
0ZrZ0ZkZ 8
0Z0Z0SkZ
7
Z0lbarZ0 7
Z0lba0Z0
6
0Z0o0ZpZ 6
0Z0o0ZpZ
5
opZ0o0O0 5
opZ0o0O0
4
0Z0ZPZ0Z 4
0Z0ZPZ0Z
3
O0Z0Z0Z0 3
O0Z0Z0Z0
2
PMPZ0Z0L 2
PMPZ0Z0L
1
ZKZ0ZRSB 1
ZKZ0Z0ZB
a b c d e f g h a b c d e f g h

32 Qh6 QXc2+ 33 Ka1 Rh7 34 QXg6+ Kh8 34 Bf3


32. . . RXf1+ 34. . . BXf8 35 Bf3 Qc3 36 Qe2 QUESTION:
Can Black capture on a3 safely?
36. . . Qc5
8
0ZrZ0ZkZ
7
Z0lba0Z0
6
0Z0o0ZpZ
8
0Z0Z0akZ
5
opZ0o0O0
7
Z0ZbZ0Z0
4
0Z0ZPZ0Z
6
0Z0o0ZpZ
3
O0Z0Z0Z0
5
opl0o0O0
2
PMPZ0Z0L
4
0Z0ZPZ0Z
1
ZKZ0ZrSB
3
O0Z0ZBZ0
a b c d e f g h 2
PMPZQZ0Z
1
ZKZ0Z0Z0
32. . . Rh7 33 Qe2 Qc3 a b c d e f g h

33 RXf1 Rf8 Wise: exchanging all the rooks leaves


White with no attack and all the weaknesses. 36. . . QXa3 37 Bg4 BXg4 38 QXg4 Qe3 39 Qe6+
34 RXf8+ Kh7 40 Qd7+ Bg7 41 Nd3
37 Qg2

74
8
0Z0Z0akZ
7
Z0ZbZ0Z0
6
0Z0o0ZpZ
5
opl0o0O0
4
0Z0ZPZ0Z
3
O0Z0ZBZ0
2
PMPZ0ZQZ
1
ZKZ0Z0Z0
a b c d e f g h

37 Bg4 Qg1+
37. . . Be6 38 Bg4 Bf7 39 Qh3 Be7 40 Bd1
BXg5 Resignation may appear somewhat prema-
ture, but the game is up for White as Black is
planning to play ...Qe3, exchanging queens and
threatening mate on c1, which at the very least
leaves Black a clear pawn ahead in an endgame.

0-1

75
White: Short, N Bazna
Black: Sokolov, A
2008
Result: 1-0

1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 e6 3 d4 cXd4 4 NXd4 Nf6 5 Nc3 8. . . Bd7 9 f4!? This line with 9 f4 is probably
d6 6 g4 h6 7 Bg2 where White will be looking towards in the near
future. A quick f4 prevents Black from going ...g5
and stakes out space. In fact, White can con-
sider the e5 push himself, along with both f5 and
8
rmblka0s g5. Meanwhile Blacks counterplay will invari-
7
opZ0Zpo0 ably consist of ...a6, ...b5 and ...Rc8 as usual for
these Sicilian lines.
6
0Z0opm0o
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
4
0Z0MPZPZ
3
Z0M0Z0Z0 8
rZ0lka0s
2
POPZ0OBO 7
opZbZpo0
1
S0AQJ0ZR 6
0Znopm0o
a b c d e f g h
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
7 h3
4
0Z0MPOPZ
7. . . Nc6 QUESTION: Can White take advan-
3
Z0M0Z0ZP
tage of the bishop on g2 and capture on c6, with
a quick e5 to follow?
2
POPZ0ZBZ
8 h3 Opting for the aforementioned transposi-
1
S0AQJ0ZR
a b c d e f g h
tion...
9 Be3
9. . . a6

8
rZblka0s
7
opZ0Zpo0 8
rZ0lka0s
6
0Znopm0o 7
ZpZbZpo0
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0 6
pZnopm0o
4
0Z0MPZPZ 5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
3
Z0M0Z0ZP 4
0Z0MPOPZ
2
POPZ0OBZ 3
Z0M0Z0ZP
1
S0AQJ0ZR 2
POPZ0ZBZ
a b c d e f g h 1
S0AQJ0ZR
a b c d e f g h
8 NXc6 bXc6 9 e5 Nd5! 10 eXd6 BXd6

76
9. . . Qb6!? 10 Nb3 a5!? 11 Qe2 a4 12 Be3 Qd8
13 Nd2 a3 14 bXa3 RXa3 15 Nb3 Be7 16 O-O
O-O 17 Nb5 Ra4 18 Nc3 Ra3 19 Nb5 Ra4 20
8
rZ0ZkZ0s
Nc3 Ra3 21 Nb5 7
Zplbapo0
9. . . NXd4 10 QXd4 Bc6 11 Be3 Be7 12 O-O-O
O-O 13 Rhg1 Nd7 14 Qd2 Rc8 15 h4 Nb6 16
6
pZnopm0o
Qe2 Na4 17 NXa4 BXa4 18 b3 Bd7 19 g5
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
10 Be3 Be7 11 Qe2 ANSWER:
4
0Z0ZPOPZ
11. . . Qc7!
3
ZNM0A0ZP
2
POPZQZBZ
1
S0Z0J0ZR
8
rZ0ZkZ0s a b c d e f g h

7
Zplbapo0 12 O-O-O Rc8 13 NXc6 BXc6 14 Bd4 b5 15 e5
6
pZnopm0o dXe5 16 BXe5 Qb7 17 Rhg1 b4 18 BXf6 BXf6
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0 19 Ne4 BXe4 20 BXe4 Qc7 21 Qf3 g6 22 Kb1
O-O 23 h4 Rfd8 24 h5 g5! 25 f Xg5 BXg5 26
4
0Z0MPOPZ Bd3 Qc6 27 QXc6 RXc6
3
Z0M0A0ZP 12. . . b5 13 a3
2
POPZQZBZ
1
S0Z0J0ZR
a b c d e f g h 8
rZ0ZkZ0s
11. . . b5 12 e5! NXd4 13 BXd4 dXe5 14 f Xe5
7
Z0lbapo0
Nh7 15 O-O-O Rc8 16 Ne4
6
pZnopm0o
12 Nb3 QUESTION: Why has White voluntar-
5
ZpZ0Z0Z0
ily retreated the knight like this? Normally Black
has to work hard to make White do that! AN-
4
0Z0ZPOPZ
SWER: As we saw in the 6 Be2 lines, a set-up
3
ONM0A0ZP
with ...Bd7 is geared towards playing ...Nxd4 and 2
0OPZQZBZ
then ...Bc6 afterwards. White has more space
here due to the f4 push and when you have more
1
S0Z0J0ZR
a b c d e f g h
space you should want to keep pieces on, because
the opponent has less room to manoeuvre within.
Thats the basic idea here! 13 O-O-O Rb8 14 Qf2 a5!?
13. . . Rc8

77
8
0ZrZkZ0s 8
0ZrZ0skZ
7
Z0lbapo0 7
Z0lbapon
6
pZnopm0o 6
pZnopZ0o
5
ZpZ0Z0Z0 5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
4
0Z0ZPOPZ 4
No0ZPOPZ
3
ONM0A0ZP 3
ONZ0A0ZP
2
0OPZQZBZ 2
0OPZ0LBZ
1
S0Z0J0ZR 1
Z0ZRZRJ0
a b c d e f g h a b c d e f g h

13. . . O-O 14 g5 hXg5 15 f Xg5 Nh7 16 h4 Ne5 17 aXb4 NXb4 18 Bb6 Qb8 19 Ba7 Qc7 20 e5
14 O-O Nh7 To prevent any g5 push from White, d5 21 Bd4
but I cant help feeling the knight just ends up 17. . . bXa3 18 bXa3 Nb8 19 Nb6 Rce8 20 c4 Set-
being misplaced here. ting up a Maroczy Bind (the pawns on c4 and e4
help prevent Blacks ...d5 break).
20. . . Bc6 21 Na5 Nf6 22 NXc6 NXc6 ANSWER:
23 e5! Timed to perfection. The newly weakened
8
0ZrZkZ0s d7-square will serve as the launch pad for Whites
pieces.
7
Z0lbapon 23. . . dXe5 24 g5 hXg5 25 f Xg5 Nd4 Deciding to
6
pZnopZ0o sacrifice the piece this way.
5
ZpZ0Z0Z0
4
0Z0ZPOPZ
3
ONM0A0ZP
2
0OPZQZBZ 8
0Z0ZrskZ
1
S0Z0ZRJ0
7
Z0l0apo0
a b c d e f g h 6
pM0Zpm0Z
14. . . O-O!? 15 g5 hXg5 16 f Xg5 Nh7 17 h4 Ne5!
5
Z0Z0o0O0
15 Rad1 O-O 15. . . g5
4
0ZPm0Z0Z
15. . . g5 16 e5! gXf4 17 eXd6 BXd6 18 Nd5!
3
O0Z0A0ZP
Qb8 19 NXf4
2
0Z0Z0LBZ
16 Qf2 b4 Trying to obtain some counterplay.
1
Z0ZRZRJ0
a b c d e f g h
17 Na4
25. . . Nh7 26 Rd7
26 gXf6 BXf6 27 c5 Rd8

78
8
0Z0s0skZ 8
0ZrZ0skZ
7
Z0l0Zpo0 7
Z0O0Zpo0
6
pM0Zpa0Z 6
pZRaqZ0Z
5
Z0O0o0Z0 5
Z0ZNopZ0
4
0Z0m0Z0Z 4
0Z0Z0Z0Z
3
O0Z0A0ZP 3
O0Z0A0ZP
2
0Z0Z0LBZ 2
QZ0Z0ZBZ
1
Z0ZRZRJ0 1
Z0Z0Z0J0
a b c d e f g h a b c d e f g h

27. . . QXc5 28 Nd7 34. . . Qd7 35 Qd2!


28 Rc1 Be7 29 Qa2 Nf5 35 Qc4 Rfe8 36 QXa6 Ra8 37 Qb6 Picking up
the bishop on d6. A masterclass by Nigel Short.
I believe that this little-played 9 f4 move could
become popular quite soon for those looking at
8
0Z0s0skZ new ways to take on the Scheveningen. In reply
7
Z0l0apo0 Black might consider 9...Qb6!? trying to unsettle
the white centre, with interesting play to follow.
6
pM0ZpZ0Z
5
Z0O0onZ0 1-0
4
0Z0Z0Z0Z
3
O0Z0A0ZP
2
QZ0Z0ZBZ
1
Z0S0ZRJ0
a b c d e f g h

29. . . BXc5 30 Na4!


30 RXf5! Typical Short!
30. . . eXf5 31 Nd5 Qd7 32 c6 Qe6 33 c7 Rc8 34
Rc6! Bd6

79
White: Qi Jingxuan Buenos Aires
Black: Andersson, U
1978
Result: 0-1

1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 d6 3 d4 cXd4 4 NXd4 Nf6 5 Kd5 Nf3 39 c4 g3 40 c5 dXc5


Nc3 e6 6 g4 h6 7 g5 This was the original way 10 Ndb5 a6 11 Be3 Qa5 12 Nd4
to play the Keres Attack. White goes 6 g4 to
play a quick g5, and nothing is going to stop 10. . . a6 A typical Sicilian move, preventing any-
him! Why Black should play 6...h6 to slow down thing coming to b5 and allowing the possibility
this g5 kingside advance, in my humble view any- of pushing ...b5 at some point.
way, is demonstrated by Andersson in this game. 11 O-O-O Bd7 12 h4 Be7
Without the g-pawn, White finds it a lot harder
to crash through Blacks position. Remember:
Blacks structure is also slightly the better one
after this move, so any positional, manoeuvring-
8
rZ0ZkZ0s
type game may favour him. 7
ZpZbapo0
7. . . hXg5 8 BXg5 Nc6 9 Qd2 ANSWER: 6
plnopm0Z
9. . . Qb6 Best. This typical manoeuvre sees the
queen attacking that knight on d4 before retreat-
5
Z0Z0Z0A0
ing.
4
0Z0ZPZ0O
10 Nb3 Returning to 10 Nb3:
3
ZNM0Z0Z0
2
POPL0O0Z
1
Z0JRZBZR
a b c d e f g h
8
rZbZka0s 12. . . Qc7 13 Be2 b5 14 Rhe1 Be7 15 f4 b4 16
7
opZ0Zpo0 Nd5 eXd5 17 eXd5 Na5 18 QXb4 NXb3+ 19
6
0lnopm0Z aXb3 a5 20 Qd4 Qa7 21 Qc3 Rc8 22 Bc4 Kf8
5
Z0Z0Z0A0 13 Be2 Qc7 14 f4 O-O-O 15 Kb1 Kb8 16 Bf3
4
0Z0ZPZ0Z Bc8 17 Qe2 ANSWER: By using a nice motif:
3
ZNM0Z0Z0 17. . . Ng8! By threatening ...f6, Black forces White
to exchange the dark-squared bishops. When you
2
POPL0O0O have less space, its good to exchange pieces like
1
S0Z0JBZR this.
a b c d e f g h 18 BXe7 White exchanges as the threat of ...f6
trapping the g5-bishop was on the cards.
10 O-O-O QXd4 11 QXd4 NXd4 12 RXd4 a6 18. . . NgXe7 19 h5 g6
13 f4 Bd7 14 Bg2 Bc6 15 Rd2 Nd7 16 f5 Ne5
17 f Xe6 f Xe6 18 Ne2 Be7 19 BXe7 KXe7 20
Nd4 Raf8 21 NXc6+ bXc6 22 Bf1 g5! 23 Rg2
g4 24 BXa6 Ra8 25 Be2 RXa2 26 Rf1 Nf3 27 b3
Ra1+ 28 Kb2 RXf1 29 BXf1 NXh2 30 Be2 Rh4
31 Kc3 Kf6 32 b4 Ke5 33 Kd3 Rh3+ 34 Kc4
Kf4 35 b5 cXb5+ 36 KXb5 Rh6 37 Kc6 e5 38

80
8
0jbs0Z0s 8
0jbs0Z0Z
7
Zpl0mpZ0 7
Zpl0Z0Z0
6
pZnopZpZ 6
0ZnZ0M0Z
5
Z0Z0Z0ZP 5
Z0ZponZ0
4
0Z0ZPO0Z 4
pZ0Z0OBZ
3
ZNM0ZBZ0 3
O0Z0Z0Z0
2
POPZQZ0Z 2
0OPL0Z0Z
1
ZKZRZ0ZR 1
ZKMRZ0Z0
a b c d e f g h a b c d e f g h

19. . . f5!? 20 Rhg1 f Xe4 21 NXe4 Nd5 22 Qd2 29 Nc5 e4 30 NXa4 d4


Rhf8 29. . . eXf4 30 BXf5
20 a3 gXh5 21 RXh5 RXh5 22 BXh5 f5 Finally,
this freeing move arrives. Objectively the posi-
tion is about equal, but White now overpresses,
presumably because he thought he was better 0jbs0Z0Z
8

here, which he isnt! Zpl0Z0Z0


7

23 Qd2 f Xe4 24 NXe4 e5 25 Ng5?! 6


0ZnZ0M0Z
5
Z0ZpZBZ0
4
pZ0Z0o0Z
8
0jbs0Z0Z 3
O0Z0Z0Z0
7
Zpl0m0Z0 2
0OPL0Z0Z
6
pZno0Z0Z 1
ZKMRZ0Z0
5
Z0Z0o0MB a b c d e f g h
4
0Z0Z0O0Z 30 NXd5 RXd5! 31 QXd5 Ne3
3
ONZ0Z0Z0 30. . . BXf5 31 Rf1
2
0OPL0Z0Z
1
ZKZRZ0Z0
0j0s0Z0Z
a b c d e f g h 8

25 f Xe5 dXe5 26 Qf2


7
Zpl0Z0Z0
25. . . Nf5 26 Bg4 a5! QUESTION: Why did
6
0ZnZ0M0Z
Black play this? ANSWER: To push ...a4, which 5
Z0ZpZbZ0
attacks the knight on b3 and once that moves
away, the d4-square will be in Blacks hands.
4
pZ0Z0o0Z
27 Ne4 a4 28 Nc1 d5 29 Nf6
3
O0Z0Z0Z0
2
0OPL0Z0Z
1
ZKM0ZRZ0
a b c d e f g h

81
31 NXd5 RXd5! 32 QXd5 BXc2+! 33 Ka1
BXd1 34 QXd1 Ne5
31. . . Nd4! Now we see why it was important to
drive away that knight on b3. Suddenly White
experiences unpleasant pressure against c2.
32 Nd3

8
0j0s0Z0Z
7
Zpl0Z0Z0
6
0Z0Z0M0Z
5
Z0ZpZbZ0
4
pZ0m0o0Z
3
O0ZNZ0Z0
2
0OPL0Z0Z
1
ZKZ0ZRZ0
a b c d e f g h

32 QXd4? QXc2+ 33 Ka2 Qb1#


32. . . f3 33 Qc3 Qb6 34 Nb4?

8
0j0s0Z0Z
7
ZpZ0Z0Z0
6
0l0Z0M0Z
5
Z0ZpZbZ0
4
pM0m0Z0Z
3
O0L0ZpZ0
2
0OPZ0Z0Z
1
ZKZ0ZRZ0
a b c d e f g h

34 Nh5 Rc8 35 Qb4 QXb4 36 NXb4 NXc2


34. . . QXf6
0-1

82
White: Meijers, V Dieren
Black: Van Wely, L
1999
Result: 0-1

1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 d6 3 d4 cXd4 4 NXd4 Nf6 5 Nc3


e6 6 Be3 a6 7 Qf3 QUESTION: What is Whites
likely set-up after this move? ANSWER: To cas-
8
rZbZka0s
tle queenside and play g4-g5. The queen can also 7
Zpl0Zpop
go to h3 when there are some tactical threats on
the e6-square and also possibly down the h-file,
6
pZ0opm0Z
as well see further in the note to Blacks 12th 5
Z0m0Z0Z0
move, below. 4
0Z0MPZ0Z
7. . . Nbd7 I quite like this move, which prevents
an immediate 8 g4.
3
Z0M0A0ZQ
8 O-O-O 8 Be2 h5!? 9 Bg5 Qa5 10 Bd2 Qb6
2
POPZ0OPO
11 Nb3 Qc7 12 a4 b6 13 Bg5 Bb7 14 Rd1 Be7
1
Z0JRZBZR
a b c d e f g h
15 Qe3 Nc5 16 Nd2 Rd8 17 O-O Ng4
8 g4? Ne5 9 Qe2 NeXg4
9. . . b5 10 a3 Nc5 11 f3
8. . . Qc7 9 Qh3 The queen eyes up some squares
9. . . b5 10 NXe6 f Xe6 11 QXe6+ Kd8! 12 Bd4
in the black camp, as mentioned above.
Be7
10 f3 b5 11 a3 Preventing the ...b4 push, but as
we shall see, White should not play this move
lightly if he has already castled queenside.
8
rZbZka0s 11. . . Rb8
7
ZplnZpop
6
pZ0opm0Z
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
8
0sbZka0s
4
0Z0MPZ0Z
7
Z0l0Zpop
3
Z0M0A0ZQ
6
pZ0opm0Z
2
POPZ0OPO
5
Zpm0Z0Z0
1
Z0JRZBZR
4
0Z0MPZ0Z
a b c d e f g h 3
O0M0APZQ
2
0OPZ0ZPO
9 Bd3 b5 10 a3 Bb7 11 Kb1 Rc8 12 Qg3 d5 13
QXc7 RXc7 14 eXd5 NXd5 15 NXd5 BXd5 16
1
Z0JRZBZR
a b c d e f g h
a4 e5 17 Nf3 Bc6 18 Rhe1 f6
9. . . Nc5 11. . . e5 12 Nf5 g6 13 Qh4! Ncd7 14 BXb5!!
aXb5 15 NXb5
12 g4 ANSWER:
12. . . Nfd7! Wisely stepping out of the way of

83
the g5 threat.
8
0sbZka0s
7
Z0lnZpZp
8
0sbZka0s
6
pZ0opZpZ
7
Z0lnZpop
5
Zpm0Z0O0
6
pZ0opZ0Z
4
0Z0MPZ0Z
5
Zpm0Z0Z0
3
O0M0APZQ
4
0Z0MPZPZ
2
0OPZ0Z0O
3
O0M0APZQ
1
Z0JRZBZR
a b c d e f g h
2
0OPZ0Z0O
1
Z0JRZBZR 13. . . Nb6 14 g6
a b c d e f g h
14 Qg3 Moving to allow the h-pawn to roll, but
this feels a little slow.
12. . . b4 13 aXb4 RXb4 14 g5 Nfd7 15 g6! Nb6
14. . . b4 Another move we have seen several times
16 QXh7! RXh7 17 gXh7 e5 18 h8Q eXd4 19
before; Black just gets on with his play on the
RXd4 RXd4 20 BXd4 Ne6 21 Be3 Bb7 22 Qh4
queenside.
13 g5 ANSWER: Play the move yourself!
15 aXb4 RXb4 16 h4 Bg7 17 h5 ANSWER:
17. . . O-O! This appears risky, but Van Wely, a
very strong grandmaster, understands that he
has sucient defensive resources. A true Sicil-
8
0sbZka0s ian race now ensues!
7
Z0lnZpop 17. . . gXh5!? 18 RXh5 Qb6 19 b3 RXb3! 20
cXb3 BXd4 21 BXd4 NXb3+ 22 Kc2 NXd4+ 23
6
pZ0opZ0Z RXd4 QXd4
5
Zpm0Z0O0 17. . . Qb6 18 h6 BXd4 19 BXd4 RXd4 20 RXd4
4
0Z0MPZ0Z Nb3+ 21 cXb3 QXd4
3
O0M0APZQ 18 hXg6 hXg6 19 Qh4 White gets the first mate
threat in on h7. Its no time to panic though!
2
0OPZ0Z0O
19. . . Re8 20 f4
1
Z0JRZBZR
a b c d e f g h

13 f4 b4! 14 aXb4 RXb4 15 g5 Nb6 16 f5 Nba4


17 NXa4 RXa4 18 Kb1 eXf5 19 b3 f Xe4 20 Qh4
Rb4 21 Bc4 Qb7 22 g6 RXc4 23 QXh7 RXh7
24 gXh7 Rc3 25 Rhe1 NXb3!
13. . . g6! Now all the threats connected with g6
are stopped dead in their tracks and Black can
look to attack with ...b4 ideas in the near future.

84
8
0ZbZrZkZ 8
0ZbZrZkZ
7
Z0lnZpa0 7
Z0Z0Zpa0
6
pZ0opZpZ 6
pZ0o0ZpZ
5
Z0m0Z0O0 5
Z0A0ZPO0
4
0s0MPO0L 4
0Z0Z0Z0L
3
Z0M0A0Z0 3
ZnMKZ0Z0
2
0OPZ0Z0Z 2
0OPZ0Z0Z
1
Z0JRZBZR 1
l0ZRZBZR
a b c d e f g h a b c d e f g h

20 Qh7+ Kf8 26 Kc4 Na5+ 27 Kd5 Bb7+ 28 KXd6 Bf8+ 29


Kc7 Rc8+ 30 Kb6 Nd7+ 31 Ka7 Ra8#
20. . . Qa5 21 f5 Again it appears that is White
doing all the running, which is true he will be 26. . . BXf5+ 27 Kc4 Be6+ 28 Rd5
soon running with his king!
21. . . eXf5 22 eXf5 Qa1+ 23 Kd2 ANSWER:
23. . . RXd4+! 24 BXd4 Nb3+! 25 Kd3
8
0Z0ZrZkZ
7
Z0Z0Zpa0
6
pZ0obZpZ
8
0ZbZrZkZ 5
Z0ARZ0O0
7
Z0ZnZpa0 4
0ZKZ0Z0L
6
pZ0o0ZpZ 3
ZnM0Z0Z0
5
Z0Z0ZPO0 2
0OPZ0Z0Z
4
0Z0A0Z0L 1
l0Z0ZBZR
3
ZnMKZ0Z0 a b c d e f g h

2
0OPZ0Z0Z 28 Nd5 Na5+ 29 Kd3 QXd1+ 30 Ke3 BXd5+
1
l0ZRZBZR 28. . . NXc5 29 Qh7+ Kf8 30 Qh2 Rc8 31 QXd6+
a b c d e f g h

25 cXb3 QXb2+ 26 Kd3 Nc5+


25. . . Ndc5+ Whites king is chased up the board
8
0ZrZ0j0Z
to its death.
7
Z0Z0Zpa0
26 BXc5
6
pZ0LbZpZ
5
Z0mRZ0O0
4
0ZKZ0Z0Z
3
Z0M0Z0Z0
2
0OPZ0Z0Z
1
l0Z0ZBZR
a b c d e f g h

85
31 QXd6+ Kg8 32 Bg2 QXb2

0-1

86
White: Van Kampen, R Fermo
Black: Popilsky, G
2009
Result: 0-1

1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 d6 3 d4 Nf6 4 Nc3 cXd4 5 NXd4


a6 6 Be3 e6 7 g4 With this, the Perenyi Attack,
White is trying to play in the style of the Keres
8
rmbZka0s
Attack. Having gone ...a6, Black cant quite con- 7
ZpZ0Zpo0
tinue in the manner of the last chapter (with 6
g4 h6), but there are other ideas...
6
pl0opZ0Z
7. . . h5! QUESTION: Why has Black done this?
5
Z0Z0Z0Op
Doesnt it look quite weakening? ANSWER: The 4
0Z0MPZnZ
idea is to meet 8 g5 with 8...Ng4, highlighting the
drawback of White having played Be3.
3
Z0M0Z0Z0
8 g5 ANSWER:
2
POPZ0O0O
1
S0AQJBZR
a b c d e f g h

9. . . Nc6?! 10 NXc6 bXc6 11 f4! Qb6? 12 Qd2!


8
rmblka0s d5 13 h3
7
ZpZ0Zpo0 10 h3 Ne5 11 Be2
6
pZ0opm0Z
5
Z0Z0Z0Op 8
rmbZka0s
4
0Z0MPZ0Z 7
ZpZ0Zpo0
3
Z0M0A0Z0 6
pl0opZ0Z
2
POPZ0O0O 5
Z0Z0m0Op
1
S0ZQJBZR 4
0Z0MPZ0Z
a b c d e f g h
3
Z0M0Z0ZP
8 gXh5 b5! 2
POPZBO0Z
8 g5 1
S0AQJ0ZR
8. . . Ng4! The most active move is also the best a b c d e f g h
response. Just like in the Keres Attack, our knight
comes to g4 to harass the bishop on e3. 11 Nb3 Nbd7
9 Bc1 Qb6 11 f4
11 f4? QXd4! 12 f Xe5 QXd1+ 13 NXd1 dXe5
11. . . g6 Not just defending the pawn on h5, but
preventing White from going g6 himself. We saw
above after 11 Nb3 how dangerous that break can
be.
12 f4 Nec6 The black knights might look like they

87
are stepping on each others toes, but in fact they 18 NXc5 dXc5 19 e5 O-O-O 20 Ne4 Again we
are quite well placed on c6 and d7. see the c5-pawn being attacked and Black now
13 Nb3 Nd7 14 Bf3 Be7 15 Qe2 Qc7 QUES- had to give up a pawn to get his pieces out.
TION: Why did Black retreat the queen to c7? 20. . . Nd4!? 21 BXd4 cXd4 22 RXd4 Bb5 23
Its not being attacked is it? ANSWER: No, its Qe3 RXd4 24 QXd4 Rd8 25 Qa7 Bc6 26 Qe3
not, but the queen has done her duty, kicking
the knight back to b3, and retreats to allow the
b-pawn to advance. This in turn will allow the
c8-bishop to develop.
8
0Zks0Z0Z
16 Be3 Nc5
7
Zpl0apZ0
6
pZbZpZpZ
5
Z0Z0O0Op
8
rZbZkZ0s 4
0Z0ZNO0Z
7
Zpl0apZ0 3
Z0Z0LBZP
6
pZnopZpZ 2
POPZ0Z0Z
5
Z0m0Z0Op 1
Z0J0Z0ZR
4
0Z0ZPO0Z a b c d e f g h

3
ZNM0ABZP 26 Qa8+ Qb8 27 QXb8+ KXb8 28 Rd1 Bd5
2
POPZQZ0Z 26. . . BXe4 27 QXe4 Bc5 28 c3 Qb6 29 Kc2
1
S0Z0J0ZR Be3 Trying hard to create some counterplay. Now
a b c d e f g h that the e4-knight is gone, things are harder for
White, but he shouldnt be worse.
16. . . b5!? 17 O-O-O Nb6 18 Kb1 Nc4 19 Bc1 30 Rh2
Bb7
17 O-O-O EXERCISE: Decide if Black should
play ...b5 and ...Bb7, or go ...Bd7 as that idea is
too slow.
8
0Zks0Z0Z
17. . . Bd7
7
ZpZ0ZpZ0
6
pl0ZpZpZ
5
Z0Z0O0Op
8
rZ0ZkZ0s 4
0Z0ZQO0Z
7
ZplbapZ0 3
Z0O0aBZP
6
pZnopZpZ 2
POKZ0Z0S
5
Z0m0Z0Op 1
Z0Z0Z0Z0
4
0Z0ZPO0Z a b c d e f g h

3
ZNM0ABZP 30 Rd1 RXd1 31 KXd1
2
POPZQZ0Z 30. . . Rd7 31 Re2 Bf2 32 b4 Bg3 33 Kb3 Qg1 34
1
Z0JRZ0ZR Kb2 Qf1 The queen penetrates Whites position
a b c d e f g h and suddenly Van Kampen is struggling to hold
things together.
17. . . b5?! 18 NXc5 dXc5 19 e5 Bb7 20 Ne4 35 Qe3 Kb8 36 a4 h4 37 a5 QXh3 The pawn is

88
regained and now the position becomes crazy!
38 b5 aXb5 39 a6 Qf1 8
0j0Z0Z0Z
7
ZPZ0ZpZ0
8
0j0Z0Z0Z
6
0Z0ZpZpZ
7
ZpZrZpZ0
5
ZpZ0O0O0
6
PZ0ZpZpZ
4
0Z0Z0O0o
5
ZpZ0O0O0
3
J0O0LBa0
4
0Z0Z0O0o
2
0S0Z0Z0Z
3
Z0O0LBa0
1
ZrZ0ZqZ0
a b c d e f g h
2
0J0ZRZ0Z
1
Z0Z0ZqZ0 42 Qd2! b4+ 43 Ka4
a b c d e f g h
42. . . RXb2

39. . . bXa6? 40 Qb6+ Kc8 41 Bc6


40 aXb7 Rd1 Both kings have very few defenders
around them, but who will get there first?
8
0j0Z0Z0Z
41 Ka3 Rb1
7
ZPZ0ZpZ0
6
0Z0ZpZpZ
5
ZpZ0O0O0
8
0j0Z0Z0Z
4
0Z0Z0O0o
7
ZPZ0ZpZ0
3
J0O0LBa0
6
0Z0ZpZpZ
2
0s0Z0Z0Z
5
ZpZ0O0O0
1
Z0Z0ZqZ0
a b c d e f g h
4
0Z0Z0O0o
3
J0O0LBa0 42. . . Ra1+ 43 Kb3 Qc4+ 44 Kc2 BXf4
2
0Z0ZRZ0Z 43 KXb2 Qf2+ 44 QXf2 BXf2 Endgames with
1
ZrZ0ZqZ0 bishops of opposite colours are normally drawn,
a b c d e f g h but the fact that the white kingside pawns are
ripe for the taking swings the game in Blacks
41. . . BXf4! 42 QXf4 Ra1+ 43 Kb4 Ra4+ favour.

42 Rb2? Collapsing. 45 Kb3 Bc5! Very accurate play, preventing the


king coming to b4.

89
8
0j0Z0Z0Z
7
ZPZ0ZpZ0
6
0Z0ZpZpZ
5
Zpa0O0O0
4
0Z0Z0O0o
3
ZKO0ZBZ0
2
0Z0Z0Z0Z
1
Z0Z0Z0Z0
a b c d e f g h

45. . . Be3 46 Kb4 BXf4 47 KXb5 BXe5 48 Kc6


BXc3 49 Kd7 Bd2 50 Ke8 BXg5 51 KXf7
46 Bg2 Kc7 47 c4 Be3 48 cXb5 BXf4 49 b6+
Kb8 50 Kc4 BXe5 51 Kc5 Bf4 52 Kc6 BXg5
53 Kd6

8
0j0Z0Z0Z
7
ZPZ0ZpZ0
6
0O0JpZpZ
5
Z0Z0Z0a0
4
0Z0Z0Z0o
3
Z0Z0Z0Z0
2
0Z0Z0ZBZ
1
Z0Z0Z0Z0
a b c d e f g h

53 Kd7 e5 54 Ke8 f5 55 Kf7 e4 56 KXg6 e3 57


Bf3 h3 58 KXg5 h2 59 KXf5 e2
53. . . Bd8 54 Kd7 g5! 55 KXd8 g4 56 Ke7 h3 57
Bf1 f5 58 KXe6 h2 59 Bg2 f4 Although 16...Nc5
worked out well in this game, I still prefer the
16...b5 and ...Bb7 approach, maybe with ...Nb6
and ...Nc4 to attack. Black also has the option
then to castle on either wing.

0-1

90
White: Zhang, M Parsipanny
Black: Riordan, C
2009
Result: 0-1

1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 d6 3 d4 cXd4 4 NXd4 Nf6 5 8. . . bXa4 9 RXa4 Bb7 10 Nb3 Be7 11 Na5 Qc7
Nc3 a6 6 f3 12 Rb4 QXa5 13 RXb7 Nfd7 14 Bd3 Bf6 15 O-
O O-O 16 Qa1 Qd8 17 Na4
9 Na2 ANSWER:
8
rmblka0s
7
ZpZ0opop
6
pZ0o0m0Z
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
8
rmblka0s
4
0Z0MPZ0Z
7
Z0Z0Zpop
3
Z0M0ZPZ0
6
pZ0opm0Z
2
POPZ0ZPO
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
1
S0AQJBZR
4
Po0MPZ0Z
a b c d e f g h
3
Z0Z0APZ0
6 Be3
2
NOPZ0ZPO
6. . . e6 7 Be3 Here we see Whites most popular
1
S0ZQJBZR
a b c d e f g h
set-up, with Be3 and f3.
7. . . b5 8 a4 ANSWER: 9 Nce2 e5! 10 Nb3 Be6 11 Ng3 h6 12 Qd2 Nc6
13 Rd1 g6 14 c4 h5
8. . . b4 This is the most obvious move and the
best one. The pawn attacks the knight, forcing 9 Na2
it to move to a worse square, which gains time 9. . . e5!
for Black to develop.

8
rmblka0s
7
Z0Z0Zpop
8
rmblka0s 6
pZ0o0m0Z
7
Z0Z0Zpop 5
Z0Z0o0Z0
6
pZ0opm0Z 4
Po0MPZ0Z
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0 3
Z0Z0APZ0
4
Po0MPZ0Z 2
NOPZ0ZPO
3
Z0M0APZ0 1
S0ZQJBZR
2
0OPZ0ZPO a b c d e f g h
1
S0ZQJBZR
a b c d e f g h 9. . . d5 10 e5! Nfd7 11 f4 Qc7 12 c3 bXc3 13 Rc1
Qb7 14 RXc3 Nc5 15 Qc2 Nbd7 16 b4 Ne4 17

91
Rc7 Qb8 18 Bd3 Be7 19 BXe4 dXe4 20 NXe6!
f Xe6 21 Ba7! BXb4+ 22 Ke2
9. . . a5 10 Bb5+ Nbd7 11 O-O Bb7 12 c3! bXc3
13 NXc3 8
rm0Zka0s
10 Nb3 d5 This is the point. By playing ...e5,
Black prevents White going e5 himself, as we saw
7
Z0Z0Zpop
in the previous note.
6
pZ0Zbm0Z
11 Bg5
5
Z0Zqo0A0
4
Po0Z0Z0Z
3
ZNZ0ZPZ0
8
rmblka0s 2
NOPZQZPO
7
Z0Z0Zpop 1
S0Z0JBZR
6
pZ0Z0m0Z a b c d e f g h

5
Z0Zpo0A0 13 QXd5 NXd5 14 O-O-O Nd7 15 Bd3 h6 16
4
Po0ZPZ0Z Bh4 Ne3
3
ZNZ0ZPZ0 13 Bd3 Nbd7 14 O-O
2
NOPZ0ZPO 13. . . Nbd7
1
S0ZQJBZR
a b c d e f g h

11 eXd5 NXd5 12 Bf2 ZZ


8
rZ0Zka0s
11. . . Be6 12 eXd5
7
Z0ZnZpop
6
pZ0Zbm0Z
5
Z0Zqo0A0
8
rm0lka0s 4
Po0Z0Z0Z
7
Z0Z0Zpop 3
ZNZ0ZPZ0
6
pZ0Zbm0Z 2
NOPZQZPO
5
Z0ZPo0A0 1
S0Z0JBZR
a b c d e f g h
4
Po0Z0Z0Z
3
ZNZ0ZPZ0 13. . . Be7 14 BXf6
2
NOPZ0ZPO 14 Nd2 Be7 15 Ne4 Qd4 16 Nc1
1
S0ZQJBZR
a b c d e f g h

12 BXf6 gXf6 13 eXd5 QXd5 14 QXd5 BXd5 15


Bd3 Nd7 16 O-O-O Rg8 17 Bf5 Be6 18 BXe6
f Xe6 19 g3 Nb6 20 a5 Nd5
12. . . QXd5 13 Qe2 Not the most pleasing on the
eye, but White was probably a little unhappy
with his position already. EXERCISE: How to
protect the knight on f6: with 13...Nbd7 or 13...Be7?

92
32 Rc1 Ra4 33 Rc2 Rd4 34 Rc3 Bf5 35 g4 BXd3
36 RXd3 Ke6 37 Ke3 RXd3+ 38 KXd3 g6 39
8
rZ0ZkZ0s Ke4 f5+ 40 gXf5+ gXf5+ 41 Ke3 Kd5 42 Kd3
7
Z0Znapop f4 43 Ke2 Kc4
0-1
6
pZ0Zbm0Z
5
Z0Z0o0A0
4
Po0lNZ0Z
3
Z0Z0ZPZ0
2
0OPZQZPO
1
S0M0JBZR
a b c d e f g h

16 c3 bXc3 17 NeXc3 O-O


16. . . NXe4 Im not sure why Black didnt just
take on b2 here, which just seems very strong.
17 BXe7 Nc3

8
rZ0ZkZ0s
7
Z0ZnApop
6
pZ0ZbZ0Z
5
Z0Z0o0Z0
4
Po0l0Z0Z
3
Z0m0ZPZ0
2
0OPZQZPO
1
S0M0JBZR
a b c d e f g h

17. . . QXb2 18 QXe4 KXe7 19 Nb3 Qc3+ 20


Kf2 BXb3 21 cXb3 QXa1 22 QXb4+ Ke8
18 Qd3 KXe7 19 bXc3 QXc3+ 20 QXc3 bXc3
Black is just a pawn ahead and with a bit of
technique manages to convert it.
21 Ne2 Rhc8 22 Ra3 Rab8 23 NXc3 Rb2 24 Kd2
Nc5 Blacks activity is far too much for Whites
uncoordinated forces to handle.
25 Kc1 Rb4 26 a5 Nb3+ 27 cXb3 RXc3+ 28
Kd2 RcXb3 29 RXb3 RXb3 30 BXa6 Ra3 31 Bd3
RXa5 The rest of the moves I will give without
comment, as they are not directly relevant to the
opening. Black plays for the win and eventually
gets there!

93
White: Almasi, Z European Team Championship, Crete
Black: Cheparinov, I
2007
Result: 0-1

1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 d6 3 d4 cXd4 4 NXd4 Nf6 5


Nc3 a6 6 f3 e6 7 Be3 b5 8 g4
8
rmblka0s
7
Z0Z0Zpo0
8
rmblka0s
6
pZ0opm0o
7
Z0Z0Zpop
5
ZpZ0Z0Z0
6
pZ0opm0Z
4
0Z0MPZPZ
5
ZpZ0Z0Z0
3
Z0M0APZ0
4
0Z0MPZPZ
2
POPL0Z0O
3
Z0M0APZ0
1
S0Z0JBZR
a b c d e f g h
2
POPZ0Z0O
1
S0ZQJBZR 9 h4 b4 10 Nce2 e5 11 Nb3 Be6 12 Ng3 d5 13
a b c d e f g h Rg1 Nc6 14 g5 hXg5 15 hXg5 d4 16 gXf6 dXe3 17
QXd8+ KXd8 18 O-O-O+ Ke8 19 f Xg7 BXg7
8 Qd2 20 Nc5 Nd4 21 NXa6 Bh6 22 Kb1 e2 23 BXe2
NXe2 24 Nc7+ Ke7 25 Nf5+
8 g4 Nbd7 9 g5!
9. . . b4 Not the only move, nor the most popular,
8 g4 h6
but I like this disruptive approach. By immedi-
8. . . h6 ately questioning the knight on c3, Black will de-
velop according to how White reacts.

8
rmblka0s
7
Z0Z0Zpo0
6
pZ0opm0o
8
rmblka0s
5
ZpZ0Z0Z0
7
Z0Z0Zpo0
4
0Z0MPZPZ
6
pZ0opm0o
3
Z0M0APZ0
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
2
POPZ0Z0O
4
0o0MPZPZ
1
S0ZQJBZR
3
Z0M0APZ0
a b c d e f g h 2
POPL0Z0O
1
S0Z0JBZR
8. . . Nfd7 9 Qd2 Nb6 10 O-O-O Bb7 11 Nb3! a b c d e f g h
Nc6 12 Qf2 Nd7 13 h4 Rc8 14 g5
9 Qd2 9. . . Nbd7 10 O-O-O Bb7 11 h4 b4 12 Na4 Qa5
13 b3 Nc5 14 a3 NXa4 15 aXb4 Qc7 16 bXa4

94
10 Na4 Knights on the rim are dim is the saying, 11. . . Ne5! Another one of those whats this?
but the knight notices a good square on b6 and it moves. White has five pieces developed to Blacks
will be protected after Nb3 if it runs into trouble. two, and yet the knight moves yet again! Well,
the idea is to play ...Bd7, exposing the knight on
a4. Also the reader should be used by now to the
fact that the king will remain on e8 for a while,
meaning time can be spent doing other things.
8
rmblka0s The knight on e5 also eyes the f3-pawn and those
7
Z0Z0Zpo0 pawns on d6 and e6 form the usual protective
barrier, meaning there are no immediate threats.
6
pZ0opm0o 12 b3
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
4
No0MPZPZ
3
Z0Z0APZ0 8
rZblka0s
2
POPL0Z0O 7
Z0Z0Zpo0
1
S0Z0JBZR 6
pZ0opm0o
Z0Z0m0Z0
a b c d e f g h 5

10 Nce2 e5 11 Nf5 d5! 12 eXd5 QXd5 13 QXd5


4
No0MPZPZ
NXd5 14 Bf2 Bb7 15 Bg2 g6 16 Ne3 NXe3 17 3
ZPZ0APZ0
BXe3 Nd7 18 Rg1 Bc5 19 BXc5 NXc5 20 f4 e4
21 O-O-O h5 22 g5 Rd8 23 RXd8+ KXd8 24 h4
2
PZPL0Z0O
Kc7
1
Z0JRZBZR
a b c d e f g h
10. . . Nbd7
12 QXb4 Bd7 13 ZZ
12. . . Bd7 13 Nb2
8
rZblka0s
7
Z0ZnZpo0
6
pZ0opm0o 8
rZ0lka0s
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0 7
Z0ZbZpo0
4
No0MPZPZ 6
pZ0opm0o
3
Z0Z0APZ0 5
Z0Z0m0Z0
2
POPL0Z0O 4
0o0MPZPZ
1
S0Z0JBZR 3
ZPZ0APZ0
a b c d e f g h
2
PMPL0Z0O
10. . . Bb7
1
Z0JRZBZR
a b c d e f g h
10. . . Bb7? 11 QXb4! Qc7 12 Nb6 Ra7 13 O-
O-O
13 QXb4 d5 14 Qc3 BXa4 15 bXa4 Rc8 16 Qb2
11 O-O-O 11 QXb4 Qd6!?
11 QXb4 d5! 12 Qd2 dXe4 13 O-O-O Bb7 13. . . d5 Care should be taken before playing such
11 Nc6 Qc7 12 NXb4 d5 13 eXd5 BXb4 14 a move, because the king is still on e8. However,
QXb4 NXd5 15 Qd2 NXe3 16 QXe3 QXc2 as there is no knight on c3, this central pawn

95
break is okay. The f8-bishop also happens to de-
fend b4.
14 Bf4 ANSWER:
8
rZ0Zka0s
7
Z0lbZpo0
6
pZ0Zpm0o
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
8
rZ0lka0s 4
0oBMpZPZ
7
Z0ZbZpo0 3
ZPZ0ZPA0
6
pZ0Zpm0o 2
PZPL0Z0O
5
Z0Zpm0Z0 1
Z0JRZ0ZR
4
0o0MPAPZ a b c d e f g h
3
ZPZ0ZPZ0 17 BXc7 NXd2 18 RXd2 eXf3 19 NXf3 Bc5
2
PMPL0Z0O 17. . . Qa5 Gaining time by attacking a2.
1
Z0JRZBZR
a b c d e f g h

14 eXd5 NXd5
14. . . Qc7 Surprisingly its best to defend the knight 8
rZ0Zka0s
with the queen. It seems at first strange to self-
pin like this, but there is no good way for White
7
Z0ZbZpo0
to take advantage.
6
pZ0Zpm0o
5
l0Z0Z0Z0
4
0oBMpZPZ
3
ZPZ0ZPA0
8
rZ0Zka0s 2
PZPL0Z0O
7
Z0lbZpo0 1
Z0JRZ0ZR
6
pZ0Zpm0o a b c d e f g h
5
Z0Zpm0Z0
4
0o0MPAPZ 17. . . Qb7
3
ZPZ0ZPZ0 18 Kb1 Be7 Finally deciding to develop!
2
PMPL0Z0O 19 h4 Rd8 20 Qe3
1
Z0JRZBZR
a b c d e f g h

14. . . Bd6 15 eXd5 NXd5 16 Nf5!


14. . . Ng6 15 e5!
15 Bg3 dXe4 16 Nc4 ANSWER:
16. . . NXc4! Black hasnt blundered as he can
now capture on c4 and counterattack against Whites
queen on d2.
17 BXc4

96
and seal o the open g-file, which is the only
source of counterplay here for White.
8
0Z0skZ0s 27 Bf2 Rd6 28 Be3 Ng4 29 Rg1 Rfd8 30 Bg5
7
Z0Zbapo0 Qc5 31 Rg2 R8d7 32 Be2 a5 33 Bc1 Rd4 34
6
pZ0Zpm0o Bd3 Qc6 35 Bb2 R4d6 36 Qg3 After a lot of
protracted manoeuvring, Black now decides to go
5
l0Z0Z0Z0 for it.
4
0oBMpZPO 36. . . a4! 37 BXe5 RXd3 38 cXd3 Qb5 This dou-
3
ZPZ0LPA0 ble attack on d3 and e5 regains the pawn while
2
PZPZ0Z0Z keeping an attack.
1
ZKZRZ0ZR 39 Bb2 RXd3 40 Qe1 aXb3 41 aXb3 Rf3 Threat-
ening ...Rf1.
a b c d e f g h

20 g5 Nh5 21 Bh2 e5! 22 Ne2 eXf3


20. . . e5 21 Nf5 BXf5 22 gXf5 QUESTION: Choose
between castling or grabbing another pawn on f3
8
0Z0Z0ZkZ
before trying to castle on the next turn. AN-
SWER: Its best not to be greedy!
7
Z0Z0Zpo0
22. . . O-O Im sure Cheparinov was extremely happy
6
0Z0Z0Z0Z
with how the opening has turned out. The king
5
ZqZ0ZPZp
has been evacuated to safety and all of his pieces 4
0o0ZPZnO
are well placed. 3
ZPZ0ZrZ0
22. . . eXf3 23 Qa7! 2
0A0Z0ZRZ
23 f Xe4 Bc5 24 Qf3 Bd4 Now the bishop enters
the game and it induces White to panic as the
1
ZKZ0L0Z0
a b c d e f g h
threat of ...Qa3 followed by mate is quite strong.
25 RXd4?! 41. . . RXb3
42 Rg1

8
0Z0s0skZ
7
Z0Z0Zpo0 8
0Z0Z0ZkZ
6
pZ0Z0m0o 7
Z0Z0Zpo0
5
l0Z0oPZ0 6
0Z0Z0Z0Z
4
0oBSPZ0O 5
ZqZ0ZPZp
3
ZPZ0ZQA0 4
0o0ZPZnO
2
PZPZ0Z0Z 3
ZPZ0ZrZ0
1
ZKZ0Z0ZR 2
0A0Z0Z0Z
a b c d e f g h
1
ZKZ0L0S0
a b c d e f g h
25 Be1 Qa3 26 c3 bXc3 27 BXc3 BXc3 28 QXc3
25. . . RXd4 26 Bd3 h5! Borrowing from the Keres 42 Ka2 Qa6+! 43 Kb1 Rf1
Attack yet again. The f6-knight will come to g4
42. . . RXb3 43 Qd2 Qc4 44 Rc1 QXe4+ 45 Ka2

97
Rd3 46 Rc8+ Kh7 47 Qg5 Desperately trying for
a counterattack, but Black gets there first.
47. . . Qd5+ 48 Kb1 Rd1+ 49 Rc1

8
0Z0Z0Z0Z
7
Z0Z0Zpok
6
0Z0Z0Z0Z
5
Z0ZqZPLp
4
0o0Z0ZnO
3
Z0Z0Z0Z0
2
0A0Z0Z0Z
1
ZKSrZ0Z0
a b c d e f g h

49 Bc1 Qb3+ 50 Ka1 Qa3+ 51 Kb1 Qd3+ 52


Ka1 Qa6+
49. . . Qd3+ 50 Ka2 Qa6+ 51 Kb1 RXc1+ 52
BXc1 b3 Here we saw the advantages of an early
...b4: Whites set-up is disrupted and Black can
get in an early ...d5 as the knight isnt on c3 any-
more. Of course it all needs to be timed correctly,
but if Black does, a promising middlegame posi-
tion can be reached.

0-1

98
White: Vuilleumier, A Lagos
Black: DCosta, L
2006
Result: 0-1

1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 d6 3 d4 cXd4 4 NXd4 Nf6 5


Nc3 a6 6 Be3 e6 7 f3 b5 8 Qd2 Nbd7 9 O-O-O
This is the most natural set-up for White in the
8
rZ0lka0s
English Attack. He gets castled on the queenside 7
ZbZnZpop
before setting about attacking on the kingside.
Indeed, the g- and h-pawns are normally thrown
6
pm0opZ0Z
forward to try and open up the kingside, where 5
ZpZ0Z0O0
the black king tends to hide out. 4
0Z0MPZ0Z
9. . . Bb7 10 g4 QUESTION: White is threaten-
ing g5 to attack the f6-knight. Where is the
3
Z0M0APZ0
best retreat square for it? ANSWER: The knight
2
POPL0Z0O
wants to go to d7, which means that the other 1
Z0JRZBZR
knight on d7 needs to move out of the way. a b c d e f g h
10. . . Nb6! 11 g5
11. . . Nh5
11. . . Ng8
8
rZ0lka0s 12 Bd3 The idea of this is to allow the c3-knight
to drop back to e2 behind the bishop. This keeps
7
ZbZ0Zpop White controlling any black knight invasion on
6
pm0opm0Z c4 for now anyway!
5
ZpZ0Z0O0 12. . . Rc8
4
0Z0MPZ0Z
3
Z0M0APZ0
2
POPL0Z0O
8
0Zrlka0s
1
Z0JRZBZR
7
ZbZnZpop
a b c d e f g h
6
pm0opZ0Z
5
ZpZ0Z0O0
11 Nb3 4
0Z0MPZ0Z
11 Nb3 Rc8! 12 Na5 Ba8 13 Kb1 Be7 14 Rg1
O-O 15 a3 d5 16 g5 Nfd7 17 eXd5 NXd5 18
3
Z0MBAPZ0
NXd5 BXd5 19 Be2 Qc7 20 Bf4 Ne5 21 Nb3
2
POPL0Z0O
Bd6 22 Bg3 Rfd8 1
Z0JRZ0ZR
a b c d e f g h
11. . . Nfd7 From here the knight can come to
good squares such as c5 and e5.
12. . . b4 13 Nce2
13 Kb1 Getting o the semi-open c-file.
13. . . Ne5 QUESTION: Why does Black move
this knight again rather than develop? ANSWER:

99
To quickly come to the c4-square. Otherwise
White can play f4 and prevent the ...Ne5-c4 ma-
noeuvre.
8
0ZrlkZ0s
7
ZbZ0apop
8
0Zrlka0s
6
pm0opZ0Z
7
ZbZ0Zpop
5
ZpZ0m0O0
6
pm0opZ0Z
4
0Z0MPZ0Z
5
ZpZ0m0O0
3
Z0MBAPZ0
4
0Z0MPZ0Z
2
POPZ0Z0O
3
Z0MBAPZ0
1
ZKZRL0ZR
a b c d e f g h
2
POPL0Z0O
1
ZKZRZ0ZR 14. . . Nbc4 15 f4! b4 16 Na4 NXd3 17 cXd3 Qa5
a b c d e f g h 18 Bc1 Na3+ 19 bXa3 QXa4 20 QXb4 QXb4+
21 aXb4 d5 22 a3 dXe4 23 Rhe1 eXd3 24 f5
13. . . Be7 14 f4 O-O 15 f5 Ne5 16 f Xe6 b4 17 14. . . b4 15 Nce2 d5 16 h4 Bd6 17 Nf4 O-O 18
Nce2 Nbc4 18 BXc4 NXc4 19 Qd3 BXg5 20 g6! Na4 19 gXf7+ RXf7 20 Nf Xe6 Qe8 21 Rg1
BXg5 QXg5 g6 22 h5!
14 Qe1 We have reached one of the critical posi- 14. . . Nec4 15 Bc1 g6!? 16 h4 Bg7 17 Nce2
tions of the English Attack. The queen on e1 cov- Na4! 18 BXc4 bXc4 19 Qb4 Nc5 20 QXc4 O-O
ers against any sacrifices on c3 and White hopes 21 Qb4 Qc7 22 Ka1 d5 23 eXd5 BXd5 24 h5
to launch on the kingside with h4, h5, g6, etc. Rfd8
15 h4 b4

8
0Zrlka0s 8
0ZrlkZ0s
7
ZbZ0Zpop 7
ZbZ0apop
6
pm0opZ0Z 6
pm0opZ0Z
5
ZpZ0m0O0 5
Z0Z0m0O0
4
0Z0MPZ0Z 4
0o0MPZ0O
3
Z0MBAPZ0 3
Z0MBAPZ0
2
POPZ0Z0O 2
POPZ0Z0Z
1
ZKZRL0ZR 1
ZKZRL0ZR
a b c d e f g h a b c d e f g h

14 Qf2 RXc3!? 15 bXc3 Na4 16 Ne2 Qc7 17 h4 15. . . d5


Be7 18 h5 O-O
16 Nce2 d5
14 b3 d5! 15 eXd5? Bb4! 16 Nde2 NXd5 17
Bd4 NXf3
14. . . Be7 Returning to 14...Be7:

100
8
0ZrlkZ0s 8
0ZrlkZ0s
7
ZbZ0apop 7
ZbZ0apop
6
pm0ZpZ0Z 6
pZ0ZpZ0Z
5
Z0Zpm0O0 5
Z0ZnZ0O0
4
0o0MPZ0O 4
0o0M0M0O
3
Z0ZBAPZ0 3
Z0ZRAPZ0
2
POPZNZ0Z 2
POPZ0Z0Z
1
ZKZRL0ZR 1
ZKZ0L0ZR
a b c d e f g h a b c d e f g h

16. . . a5 17 Bb5+ Nbd7 18 h5 19 Bc1 Qc7


16. . . d5 19. . . Qa5
17 eXd5 ANSWER: Although all three moves are
playable, I dont think the game move is the most
testing for Black. 8
0ZrZkZ0s
7
ZbZ0apop
6
pZ0ZpZ0Z
8
0ZrlkZ0s
5
l0ZnZ0O0
7
ZbZ0apop
4
0o0M0M0O
6
pm0ZpZ0Z
3
Z0ZRAPZ0
5
Z0ZPm0O0
2
POPZ0Z0Z
4
0o0M0Z0O
1
ZKZ0L0ZR
a b c d e f g h
3
Z0ZBAPZ0
2
POPZNZ0Z 19. . . Qc7! 20 NXd5 BXd5 21 Qf2 O-O 22 h5
1
ZKZRL0ZR a5 23 g6 f Xg6 24 hXg6 hXg6 25 Qg2 RXf3! 26
QXg6 Bf6 27 Qh7+ Kf8
a b c d e f g h
20 Bc1
17 h5 Nbc4 18 Bc1 Qb6 19 BXc4 NXc4! 20
eXd5 BXd5 21 g6 Bf6! 22 gXf7+ KXf7
17 Ng3 O-O 18 h5 Qc7
17. . . NXd3 Now White wont want to capture on
d3 with the c-pawn as this would ruin his pawn
structure.
18 RXd3 NXd5 19 Nf4

101
24. . . gXh5? 25 Qg3! g6 26 Nb3 Qb5 27 RXh5
Bf6 28 RXd8+ RXd8 29 BXf6
8
0ZrZkZ0s 24. . . Rd5 25 Nb3 Qb5 26 RXd5 QXd5 27 hXg6
7
ZbZ0apop f Xg6
6
pZ0ZpZ0Z 25 h6 Bf6 The defence I had seen after playing
5
l0ZnZ0O0 22...Rfd8. Black defends actively, which is im-
portant in such positions.
4
0o0M0M0O 26 NXe6 This may look crushing, but as a Schevenin-
3
Z0ZRZPZ0 gen player you will learn to keep your head when
2
POPZ0Z0Z others may lose theirs around you.
1
ZKA0L0ZR
a b c d e f g h

20 NdXe6!? f Xe6 21 NXe6 Kf7 22 Bd4 Qa4 23


Rh2 Rhe8 24 h5 Bf6 25 g6+ Kg8 26 h6 Qd7 27
8
0Zrs0ZkZ
gXh7+ Kh8 28 hXg7+ QXg7!
7
ZbZ0Zpo0
20. . . NXf4 21 BXf4 O-O Here I felt Black could
6
pZ0ZNa0O
be content with the position: the two bishops
in an open position and a solid enough king. Of
5
l0Z0A0o0
course White can attack (which my opponent was
4
0o0Z0Z0Z
only too happy to do!) and now the game starts 3
Z0ZRZPZ0
to become interesting... 2
POPZ0Z0Z
22 Be5 Rfd8 Here Black threatens ...Rd5 and
Whites central pieces in the centre look quite
1
ZKZ0L0ZR
a b c d e f g h
uncoordinated. So Vuilleumier goes for the im-
mediate attack:
26 BXf6 gXf6 27 h7+ Kh8
23 g6!? hXg6 24 h5 ANSWER:
26. . . Re8! Cool defence! It is easy to panic when
24. . . g5 Keeping lines as closed as possible must you see such a move as Nxe6, but as mentioned
be best. Why open up files for the opponent to previously, Black hasnt done much wrong so its
use towards your king? hard to believe such sacrifices can work so easily.

8
0Zrs0ZkZ 8
0ZrZrZkZ
7
ZbZ0apo0 7
ZbZ0Zpo0
6
pZ0ZpZ0Z 6
pZ0ZNa0O
5
l0Z0A0oP 5
l0Z0A0o0
4
0o0M0Z0Z 4
0o0Z0Z0Z
3
Z0ZRZPZ0 3
Z0ZRZPZ0
2
POPZ0Z0Z 2
POPZ0Z0Z
1
ZKZ0L0ZR 1
ZKZ0L0ZR
a b c d e f g h a b c d e f g h

102
26. . . f Xe6? 27 BXf6 gXf6 28 QXe6+
26. . . RXd3 27 hXg7 BXg7 28 BXg7 f Xe6 29 QXe6+
KXg7 30 Qe7+ Kg6 31 QXb7
8
0ZrZ0ZkZ
27 hXg7
7
ZbZ0ZpO0
6
pZ0Z0A0Z
5
Z0Z0Zqo0
8
0ZrZrZkZ
4
0o0Z0Z0Z
7
ZbZ0ZpO0
3
Z0ZRZPZ0
6
pZ0ZNa0Z
2
POPZ0Z0Z
5
l0Z0A0o0
1
ZKZ0S0Z0
a b c d e f g h
4
0o0Z0Z0Z
3
Z0ZRZPZ0 29. . . b3! 30 Rc3 QXa2+ 31 Kc1 Qa1+ 32 Kd2
2
POPZ0Z0Z Qa4 33 RXc8+ BXc8 34 Rh1 Qf4+ 35 Ke2
1
ZKZ0L0ZR QXf6
a b c d e f g h 29. . . Qb6 30 Bd4 Qh6 31 Rde3 f6 32 Re8+
RXe8 33 RXe8+ KXg7
27 BXf6 gXf6 28 Re3 Bd5! 30 Bd4 BXf3 Covering h1. White is lost.
27 Re3 RXe6 28 BXf6 RXe3 29 h7+ Kh8 30 31 b3 f6 32 Re7 Be4 33 Re3 BXc2+ 34 Kb2
BXg7+ KXg7 31 QXe3 Qd5 Bb1 As it turned out, it is White who is getting
mated.
27. . . RXe6 28 BXf6

0-1
8
0ZrZ0ZkZ
7
ZbZ0ZpO0
6
pZ0ZrA0Z
5
l0Z0Z0o0
4
0o0Z0Z0Z
3
Z0ZRZPZ0
2
POPZ0Z0Z
1
ZKZ0L0ZR
a b c d e f g h

28 Rh8+ KXg7 29 BXf6+ RXf6 30 RXc8 BXc8


28. . . RXe1+ 29 RXe1 If it was Whites turn, then
Rh1 would be crushing, but one tempo makes a
massive dierence in a position like this.
29. . . Qf5 Not the only good move.

103
White: Zakurdjaeva, I Oropesa del Mar
Black: Zuriel, M
2000
Result: 0-1

1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 d6 3 d4 cXd4 4 NXd4 Nf6 5


Nc3 a6 6 Be3 e6 7 f3 b5 8 Qd2 Nbd7 9 g4
8
rZ0lka0s
7
ZbZnZpop
8
rZblka0s
6
pm0opZ0Z
7
Z0ZnZpop
5
ZpZ0Z0Z0
6
pZ0opm0Z
4
0Z0MPZPO
5
ZpZ0Z0Z0
3
Z0M0APZ0
4
0Z0MPZPZ
2
POPZ0L0Z
3
Z0M0APZ0
1
Z0JRZBZR
a b c d e f g h
2
POPL0Z0O
1
S0Z0JBZR 12 Kb1?!
a b c d e f g h
12 Bd3

9 a4 b4 10 Na2 d5! 11 NXb4 dXe4 12 Be2 12. . . Rc8 13 g5 ANSWER:


Bb7 13 O-O Qc7 14 a5 eXf3 15 BXf3 Ne5 16 13. . . RXc3! Of course!
BXb7 QXb7 17 Nd3 NXd3 18 QXd3 Be7 19
Qb3 QXb3 20 NXb3 Rc8 21 Rfc1 Nd5 22 Bd2
Rc4 23 Be1 Bg5 24 Nd2 Rd4 25 c4 Nb4 26 Rd1
Be3+ 27 Kf1 Nc2 28 Ra4 Ke7 29 Ke2 Rhd8 30
Rc1 NXe1 8
0Z0lka0s
9. . . Nb6 10 O-O-O Bb7 11 Qf2 QUESTION: 7
ZbZnZpop
What is the idea behind this move and how should
Black respond? ANSWER: As we discussed back
6
pm0opZ0Z
in Movsesian-Kasparov, 12 Nxe6 is threatened
5
ZpZ0Z0O0
and also any ...Nc4 forks are avoided. Best now
is to continue with the same knight manoeuvre
4
0Z0MPZ0O
we have seen before:
3
Z0s0APZ0
11. . . Nfd7! Defending its friend on b6 and seek-
2
POPZ0L0Z
ing pastures new, just as you will have seen in 1
Z0JRZBZR
the other games in this chapter. a b c d e f g h

12 h4
13. . . b4 14 Nce2 Nc4
14 bXc3 Qc7 15 h5 ANSWER:
15. . . Na4 As Nimzowitsch said, the threat is
greater than the execution. After this move White
will always need to worry about the c3-pawn,

104
hence why we probably shouldnt capture it im-
mediately.
8
0Z0Zka0s
7
Zbl0Zpop
6
pZ0ZpZ0Z
8
0Z0Zka0s 5
ZpZ0m0OP
7
ZblnZpop 4
nZ0ZpZ0Z
6
pZ0opZ0Z 3
Z0O0APZB
5
ZpZ0Z0OP 2
PZPZNL0Z
4
nZ0MPZ0Z 1
Z0ZRJ0ZR
3
Z0O0APZ0 a b c d e f g h

2
PZPZ0L0Z 19 f4 Nf3+ 20 Kc1 Ba3+ 21 Kb1 NXc3+ 22
1
Z0JRZBZR NXc3 QXc3 23 Bd4 Qb4+ 24 Ka1 e3! 25 QXe3
a b c d e f g h NXd4 26 QXd4 QXd4+ 27 RXd4 BXh1
19. . . eXf3 20 Ng3 Nb2
15. . . d5 16 Kb1 Na4 17 Ne2 dXe4 18 f Xe4 Ndc5
15. . . QXc3 16 ZZ
16 Ne2 d5 As mentioned above, this move frees
the dark-squared bishop and snipes at Whites
8
0Z0Zka0s
centre. 7
Zbl0Zpop
17 Bh3 Ne5 This knight, having searched for 6
pZ0ZpZ0Z
pastures new, finally finds them. It will now join
in the attack and with good eect.
5
ZpZ0m0OP
18 Kd2? Clearly White panicked here and de-
4
0Z0Z0Z0Z
cided to head for the hills. Of course, those hills
3
Z0O0ApMB
arent necessarily any safer! 2
PmPZ0L0Z
1
Z0ZRJ0ZR
a b c d e f g h

8
0Z0Zka0s 20. . . NXc3 21 Rd4 Nc4
7
Zbl0Zpop 21 Rd4 QXc3+ 22 Kf1 Nbc4 23 Bc1 Bc5
6
pZ0ZpZ0Z
5
ZpZpm0OP
4
nZ0ZPZ0Z
3
Z0O0APZB
2
PZPJNL0Z
1
Z0ZRZ0ZR
a b c d e f g h

18 g6 Ba3+ 19 Kb1
18. . . dXe4 19 Ke1

105
8
0Z0ZkZ0s
7
ZbZ0Zpop
6
pZ0ZpZ0Z
5
Zpa0m0OP
4
0ZnS0Z0Z
3
Z0l0ZpMB
2
PZPZ0L0Z
1
Z0A0ZKZR
a b c d e f g h

23. . . Bc5 24 Rd8+ KXd8 25 QXc5 Nd2+

0-1

106
White: Korneev, O Corsica (rapid)
Black: Sasikiran, K
2005
Result: 0-1

1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 d6 3 d4 cXd4 4 NXd4 Nf6 5 RXd3 O-O 21 Qh4 f6 22 Rh3 h6 23 g5 f Xg5 24


Nc3 a6 6 Be3 e6 7 f3 b5 8 Qd2 Nbd7 9 O-O-O f Xg5 Be7 25 BXg7!! BXg5 26 BXh6!! BXh4
Bb7 10 g4 Nb6 11 Qf2 Nfd7 12 Bd3 Returning 27 Rg1+ Kh8 28 RXh4 Qe7 29 Bg7+ Kg8 30
to 12 Bd3: BXf8+ KXf8 31 Rh8+ Kf7 32 Rh7+
13 Nce2
13. . . Nc5

8
rZ0lka0s
7
ZbZnZpop 8
0Zrlka0s
6
pm0opZ0Z 7
ZbZ0Zpop
5
ZpZ0Z0Z0 6
pm0opZ0Z
4
0Z0MPZPZ 5
Zpm0Z0Z0
3
Z0MBAPZ0 4
0Z0MPZPZ
2
POPZ0L0O 3
Z0ZBAPZ0
1
Z0JRZ0ZR 2
POPZNL0O
a b c d e f g h 1
Z0JRZ0ZR
a b c d e f g h
12 Kb1 Rc8 13 Bd3
12. . . Rc8 13 Nce2 ANSWER: 13. . . Ne5? 14 NXe6! f Xe6 15 BXb6
14 Kb1 Be7 This oers the chance to castle when-
ever Black wants; something I think he should
definitely be interested in doing!

8
0Zrlka0s
7
ZbZnZpop
6
pm0opZ0Z 8
0ZrlkZ0s
5
ZpZ0Z0Z0 7
ZbZ0apop
4
0Z0MPZPZ 6
pm0opZ0Z
3
Z0ZBAPZ0 5
Zpm0Z0Z0
2
POPZNL0O 4
0Z0MPZPZ
1
Z0JRZ0ZR 3
Z0ZBAPZ0
a b c d e f g h 2
POPZNL0O
13 Kb1 RXc3! 14 bXc3 Qc7 15 Ne2 d5 16 e5
1
ZKZRZ0ZR
a b c d e f g h
Na4 17 Bd4 NXe5 18 Qg3 Bd6 19 f4 NXd3 20

107
14. . . Nba4!? 15 b3 NXd3 16 cXd3 Nc5 17 Ng3 20 g6 Bf6 A more active square than f8, though
Be7 18 Qb2 b4 19 Nh5 Rg8 20 Ne2 g6 21 Nhf4 going there would have been okay too. The point
a5 22 d4 Nd7 23 d5 e5 24 Nd3 Ba6 is to defend g7, as the g-file is about to be opened.
15 h4 Qc7 16 g5 Nba4 17 Bc1 b4 18 h5 O-O 21 gXh7+ QUESTION: Should the king capture
Both sides have been getting on with their re- on h7 or hide behind the pawn on h8? ANSWER:
spective attacks and the typical Sicilian race is Each position requires you to work out which op-
very much on. tion is best, although here only the game move
19 Qh2 QUESTION: What is a useful defensive works.
set-up that Black can employ here? ANSWER:
...Rfe8 and ...Bf8 is one good way to shore up the
kingside. The bishop will defend g7 and the rook
covers any sacrifices on e6. 8
0ZrZrZkZ
7
Zbl0ZpoP
6
pZ0opa0Z
8
0ZrZ0skZ
5
Z0m0Z0ZP
7
Zbl0apop
4
no0MPZ0Z
6
pZ0opZ0Z
3
Z0ZBZPZ0
5
Z0m0Z0OP
2
POPZNZ0L
4
no0MPZ0Z
1
ZKARZ0ZR
a b c d e f g h
3
Z0ZBZPZ0
2
POPZNZ0L 21 h6 f Xg6 22 hXg7 QXg7
1
ZKARZ0ZR 21. . . Kh8 Definitely the safest move.
a b c d e f g h

19 g6!? h6 20 gXf7+ RXf7 21 Rhg1


19. . . Rfe8!
8
0ZrZrZ0j
7
Zbl0ZpoP
8
0ZrZrZkZ
6
pZ0opa0Z
7
Zbl0apop
5
Z0m0Z0ZP
6
pZ0opZ0Z
4
no0MPZ0Z
5
Z0m0Z0OP
3
Z0ZBZPZ0
4
no0MPZ0Z
2
POPZNZ0L
3
Z0ZBZPZ0
1
ZKARZ0ZR
a b c d e f g h
2
POPZNZ0L
1
ZKARZ0ZR 21. . . KXh7? 22 e5+ NXd3 23 eXf6 NXc1 24
a b c d e f g h
Rdg1! gXf6 25 Qg2 Rg8 26 Qg6+!! RXg6 27
hXg6+ Kg7 28 gXf7+ Kf8 29 Rh8+ Ke7 30
19. . . NXd3 20 cXd3 e5 21 Nf5 BXg5 22 Ka1 f8Q+ RXf8 31 Rg7+ Rf7 32 RXf7+ KXf7 33
Bf6 23 Rhg1 Kh8 Rh7+ Ke8 34 RXc7 NXe2 35 RXb7 NXd4 36

108
RXb4
22 Rhg1 d5 Sasikiran is happy to exchange queens,
as this reduces Whites attacking potential.
8
0ZrZrZ0Z
23 e5
7
Zbl0Zpok
6
pZ0ZpZ0Z
5
Z0ZpZ0ZP
8
0ZrZrZ0j 4
no0M0M0Z
7
Zbl0ZpoP 3
Z0ZPZPZ0
6
pZ0Zpa0Z 2
PO0Z0Z0L
5
Z0mpO0ZP 1
ZKZ0S0S0
a b c d e f g h
4
no0M0Z0Z
3
Z0ZBZPZ0 27 NdXe6! f Xe6 28 h6 gXh6 29 QXh6+!! KXh6
2
POPZNZ0L 30 Rg6+ Kh7 31 Rh1#
1
ZKARZ0S0 27. . . Qb6 28 Nfe2
a b c d e f g h

23 QXc7 RXc7 24 eXd5 BXd5 8


0ZrZrZ0Z
23 Qg2 NXd3 24 cXd3 Qb6 25 Nb3 KXh7 7
ZbZ0Zpok
23. . . NXd3 24 cXd3 6
pl0ZpZ0Z
5
Z0ZpZ0ZP
8
0ZrZrZ0j
4
no0M0Z0Z
7
Zbl0ZpoP
3
Z0ZPZPZ0
6
pZ0Zpa0Z
2
PO0ZNZ0L
5
Z0ZpO0ZP
1
ZKZ0S0S0
a b c d e f g h
4
no0M0Z0Z
3
Z0ZPZPZ0 28 Qg2 QXd4
2
PO0ZNZ0L 28 NdXe6 f Xe6 29 h6
1
ZKARZ0S0 28. . . e5 29 Nf5 Qf6
a b c d e f g h

24 eXf6 QXh2 25 f Xg7+ KXh7


24. . . BXe5 25 Bf4 BXf4 26 NXf4 KXh7 The po-
sition is very unclear and anything could happen.
Indeed, its not surprising that already a deep
combination exists.
27 Rde1 Played to stop ...Qe5, so that now Qg3
is a threat.

109
33 RXg7
8
0ZrZrZ0Z 33. . . Re4 34 RXg7 Rce8 35 Rg2 Bc8 36 Neg3??
7
ZbZ0Zpok
6
pZ0Z0l0Z
5
Z0ZpoNZP
8
0ZbZrZ0j
4
no0Z0Z0Z
7
Z0Z0ZpZ0
3
Z0ZPZPZ0
6
pZ0Z0l0Z
2
PO0ZNZ0L
5
Z0ZpZNZP
1
ZKZ0S0S0
4
no0OrZ0Z
a b c d e f g h
3
Z0Z0ZQM0
2
PO0Z0ZRZ
29. . . b3 30 RXg7+ Kh8 31 a3 Qf6 32 Qh3 e4
33 Ned4 eXd3
1
ZKZ0ZRZ0
a b c d e f g h
30 Qh3
36 Nfg3
36. . . Re1+ 37 RXe1 RXe1+ 38 Kc2 ANSWER:
8
0ZrZrZ0Z 38. . . Qc6+ You have proven yourself as a confi-
7
ZbZ0Zpok dent attacking player if you found this followed
6
pZ0Z0l0Z by the finish:
5
Z0ZpoNZP 39 Kb3
4
no0Z0Z0Z
3
Z0ZPZPZQ 8
0ZbZ0Z0j
2
PO0ZNZ0Z 7
Z0Z0ZpZ0
1
ZKZ0S0S0 6
pZqZ0Z0Z
a b c d e f g h
5
Z0ZpZNZP
30 RXg7+ Kh8 31 Qh3 4
no0O0Z0Z
30. . . e4 31 d4 eXf3 32 QXf3 Kh8 33 Ref1 3
ZKZ0ZQM0
2
PO0Z0ZRZ
8
0ZrZrZ0j
1
Z0Z0s0Z0
a b c d e f g h
7
ZbZ0Zpo0
6
pZ0Z0l0Z 39 Kd2 Qc1+ 40 Kd3 NXb2+ 41 RXb2 Qc3#
5
Z0ZpZNZP 39. . . Qc4+ 40 KXa4 Bd7+ 41 Ka5 Qb5# An
4
no0O0Z0Z entertaining game to say the least! This game
sums up the English Attack: both sides didnt
3
Z0Z0ZQZ0 give an inch and anything could have happened.
2
PO0ZNZ0Z
1
ZKZ0ZRS0 0-1
a b c d e f g h

110
White: Haslinger, S Haarlem
Black: DCosta, L
2011
Result: 1/2-1/2

1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 d6 3 d4 cXd4 4 NXd4 Nf6 5


Nc3 a6 6 Be3 e6 7 f3 b5 8 Qd2 Nbd7 9 g4 Nb6
10 a4!? ANSWER:
8
rZblka0s
10. . . Nc4! Although all three moves are playable,
7
Z0Z0Zpop
I believe the game move to be the strongest... 6
pZ0opm0Z
5
O0Z0Z0Z0
4
0ZpMPZPZ
3
Z0M0APZ0
8
rZblka0s 2
0OPL0Z0O
7
Z0Z0Zpop 1
S0Z0J0ZR
6
pZ0opm0Z a b c d e f g h
5
ZpZ0Z0Z0
4
PZnMPZPZ 12 O-O Bb7 13 g5 Nd7 14 f4 Nc5 15 Qg2 g6
16 Rad1 Qc7 17 Qg4 h6! 18 f5 gXf5 19 eXf5 e5
3
Z0M0APZ0 20 Ne6 f Xe6 21 Qh5+ Kd8 22 f6 Qc6 23 Rd2
2
0OPL0Z0O Kc7 24 g6 Rg8 25 g7 BXg7 26 Qf7+ Qd7 27
1
S0Z0JBZR QXd7+ NXd7 28 f Xg7 RXg7+ 29 Kf2 d5
a b c d e f g h 12 g5 Nd7 13 h4 Bb7 14 h5 Qa5 15 Qg2 Qb4
16 O-O-O Rb8 17 g6 Ba8 18 gXf7+ KXf7 19
10. . . b4 11 Na2 NXa4 12 NXb4 Nc5 13 Nbc6 Kd2!?
Qc7 14 Qa5! QXa5+ 15 RXa5 Bb7 16 b4 Ncd7 12. . . Bb7 13 Na4 Nd7! On the current evi-
17 g5 Ng8 18 b5 aXb5 19 RXa8+ BXa8 20 BXb5 dence I prefer 13...Nd7 to 13...d5 as it allows
e5? 21 Nb8 eXd4 22 BXd4 Black decent counterchances. Of course, theory
10. . . bXa4 11 NXa4 NXa4 12 RXa4 Nd7 13 Be2 can change and the reader can investigate him-
Bb7 14 O-O h5 15 g5 Nc5 16 Ra2 g6 17 b4 Nd7 self whether these lines with 13...d5 might not be
18 Nb3 Ne5 19 Na5 Bc8 20 b5 aXb5 21 Nc6! appealing to him. That is the beauty of chess:
nothing is set in stone and variations can fall in
11 BXc4 bXc4 12 a5 The modern way to play this and out of fashion like the wind.
position. QUESTION: What is Whites plan in
this position? ANSWER: To play Na4 and Nb6
when the b-file will be sealed. This allows White
to castle queenside without needing to worry about
any attacking ideas after ...Rb8.

111
8
rZ0lka0s 8
rZ0lkZ0s
7
ZbZnZpop 7
ZbZnapop
6
pZ0opZ0Z 6
pZ0opZ0Z
5
O0Z0Z0Z0 5
O0Z0Z0Z0
4
NZpMPZPZ 4
NZpZPZPZ
3
Z0Z0APZ0 3
Z0Z0APZ0
2
0OPL0Z0O 2
0OPLNZ0O
1
S0Z0J0ZR 1
Z0JRZ0ZR
a b c d e f g h a b c d e f g h

13. . . d5 14 e5 Nd7 15 f4!? Qh4+ 16 Bf2 QXg4 15 Qb4 Rb8


17 Rg1 Qh5 18 b4 15 h4 h5!? 16 g5 g6 17 Ne2 O-O 18 Nb6 NXb6
14 O-O-O Be7 Best, although again its worth 19 BXb6 Qc8
checking the alternatives: 15. . . O-O 16 Nb6 NXb6 17 BXb6 Qe8! I didnt
want to have my queen on the d-file in the line
of Whites major pieces. Also, after a future ...f5
the queen can possibly swing out to the kingside.
8
rZ0lkZ0s
7
ZbZnapop
6
pZ0opZ0Z 8
rZ0ZqskZ
5
O0Z0Z0Z0 7
ZbZ0apop
4
NZpMPZPZ 6
pA0opZ0Z
3
Z0Z0APZ0 5
O0Z0Z0Z0
2
0OPL0Z0O 4
0ZpZPZPZ
1
Z0JRZ0ZR 3
Z0Z0ZPZ0
a b c d e f g h
2
0OPLNZ0O
14. . . Qc7 15 Ne2 Be7 16 Nb6 NXb6 17 BXb6
1
Z0JRZ0ZR
Qc6 18 Nc3 O-O 19 Rhe1 Rfe8 20 f4 Qc8 21 a b c d e f g h
g5 d5!? 22 eXd5 BXd5 23 NXd5 eXd5 24 QXd5
c3 25 b3 Bb4 26 Kb1 Qg4 27 Rg1 Qe2 28 f5 17. . . Qd7 18 Nc3 Rac8 19 Qe3 Bd8 20 Rd2
Qe5 29 Qc4 Qb5 30 Rd5 QXc4 31 bXc4 Rab8 BXb6 21 QXb6 Rc6 22 Qb4 Qc7 23 Rhd1 Rd8
32 Ka2 Re2 33 Rc1 h6 34 h4 Re4 35 Rcd1 RXc4 24 Na4
36 R1d4 RXd4 37 RXd4
18 Nc3 Rc8 19 h4 QUESTION: Black now has
14. . . Rc8 15 Qc3 Be7 16 Ne2 O-O 17 Bd4 f6 a chance to play a pawn break, but which is bet-
18 Nf4 e5 19 Ne6 eXd4 20 Qb4! Qe8 21 NXf8 ter? a) 19...f5; b) 19...d5. ANSWER: Both are
BXf8 22 QXb7 options, but I probably didnt play the best one!
15 Ne2 19. . . d5!? Even though this turned out well in
the game, I dont think this was the correct pawn
break.

112
8
0ZrZqskZ
8
0ZrZqskZ
7
Z0Z0apop
7
ZbZ0apop
6
pA0ZpZ0Z
6
pA0ZpZ0Z
5
O0ZbZ0Z0
5
O0ZpZ0Z0
4
0ZpZ0ZPO
4
0ZpZPZPO
3
Z0M0LPZ0
3
Z0M0ZPZ0
2
0OPZ0Z0Z
2
0OPL0Z0Z
1
Z0JRZ0ZR
a b c d e f g h
1
Z0JRZ0ZR
a b c d e f g h
21 NXd5! eXd5 22 QXd5 Qa4 23 Kb1 Bf6 24
Bd4 Rb8! 25 BXf6 gXf6 26 Qd4 Rb5
19. . . f5! 20 gXf5 eXf5 21 Rhg1 Qh5 22 Bd4 Rf7
21. . . Ba8! This is better than putting the bishop
20 eXd5 BXd5 on b7, as there it would be susceptible to future
tactics involving Rd7 ideas. Now, having played
a successful pawn break to open up the position
for his bishops, the second player can be happy
8
0ZrZqskZ with the outcome of the opening.
7
Z0Z0apop 22 h5
6
pA0ZpZ0Z
5
O0ZbZ0Z0
4
0ZpZ0ZPO 8
bZrZqskZ
3
Z0M0ZPZ0 7
Z0Z0apop
2
0OPL0Z0Z 6
pA0ZpZ0Z
1
Z0JRZ0ZR 5
O0Z0Z0ZP
a b c d e f g h 4
0ZpZ0ZPZ
20. . . Bb4 21 d6 Qd7 22 Rhf1 Rc6 23 Qd4 QXd6
3
Z0M0LPZ0
24 QXd6 BXd6 25 Ne4
2
0OPZ0Z0Z
21 Qe3
1
Z0JRZ0ZR
a b c d e f g h

22 h5 Qc6

1/2-1/2

113
White: Tomba, I Porto San Giorgio
Black: Fedorchuk, S
2007
Result: 0-1

1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 d6 3 d4 cXd4 4 NXd4 Nf6 5 18 Rhf1 Rf8 19 Rf3 Bd7 20 Rdf1 f6


Nc3 e6 6 Bc4 Be7 7 Bb3 Na6 Here we see an 12. . . QXe4 13 QXe4 NXe4 14 Nb5
extra advantage that Scheveningen players have
over Najdorf players. QUESTION: I can see the
knight wants to come to c5, but why cant it go
via d7? 8
rZbZkZ0s
7
opZ0apop
6
0Z0opZ0Z
5
ZNZ0Z0Z0
8
rZblkZ0s 4
0Z0ZnZPZ
7
opZ0apop 3
ZBZ0Z0Z0
6
nZ0opm0Z 2
POPA0O0O
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0 1
Z0JRZ0ZR
4
0Z0MPZ0Z a b c d e f g h
3
ZBM0Z0Z0
2
POPZ0OPO 14 Be3 Bd7
1
S0AQJ0ZR 14. . . NXd2 QUESTION: Cant White just win
the exchange here with a check on c7?
a b c d e f g h
15 KXd2
7. . . Nbd7 8 BXe6!? f Xe6 9 NXe6 Qa5 10 NXg7+
Kf7 11 Nf5 NXe4? 12 Qh5+ Kf6 13 Qh6+
KXf5 14 g4+ 8
rZbZkZ0s
8 Qf3 Nc5 Now the knight reaches c5 without
Black having to worry about any sacrifices on e6.
7
opZ0apop
The reason why Najdorf players cannot play this
6
0Z0opZ0Z
idea is because they already have a pawn on a6
and so the ...Na6-c5 manoeuvre (which Im sure
5
ZNZ0Z0Z0
they all secretly want to carry out!) is impossible.
4
0Z0Z0ZPZ
9 g4 Qa5 Threatening 10...Ncxe4 winning a pawn.
3
ZBZ0Z0Z0
10 Bd2 QUESTION: Is there anything Black can
2
POPJ0O0O
do here? With this early g4 advance Whites po- 1
Z0ZRZ0ZR
sition looks a little unstable. ANSWER: Black a b c d e f g h
can in fact win a pawn:
10. . . NcXe4! 11 NXe4 Qe5 This double attack 15 Nc7+ Kd7 16 NXa8 NXb3+ 17 aXb3 b5 18
wins Black his piece back. Rhe1 Bb7
12 O-O-O 12 Be3!? QXe4 13 QXe4 NXe4 14 15. . . O-O Were only 15 moves in and Black has
Nb5 Kd7 15 f3 a6 16 f Xe4 aXb5 17 O-O-O Kc7 already obtained a technically won position.

114
16 Kc1 d5 17 f4 Bd7 18 Nd4 Rfe8 19 h3 EX-
ERCISE: How should Black try and make use of
the extra pawn? Which side of the board should
he be playing on?
19. . . b5 ANSWER: Its easiest to try and do some-
thing on the queenside, as most of the black pieces
are there.
20 c3 a5 Black expands to open lines for his bish-
ops.
21 Bc2 Rab8 22 Nf3 Rec8 23 Ne5 Be8 24 Nd3
Rc4 25 Kb1 b4 This gives Black a passed d-pawn.
Notice how Fedorchuk uses the idea of accumu-
lating small advantages in order to improve his
position.
26 cXb4 BXb4

8
0s0ZbZkZ
7
Z0Z0Zpop
6
0Z0ZpZ0Z
5
o0ZpZ0Z0
4
0arZ0OPZ
3
Z0ZNZ0ZP
2
POBZ0Z0Z
1
ZKZRZ0ZR
a b c d e f g h

26. . . aXb4
27 Rhf1 Bd6 28 Bb3 Rc7 29 Rc1 Bb5 30 Rfd1
RXc1+ 31 KXc1 BXd3 32 RXd3 BXf4+ A second
pawn goes. White is hoping that the opposite-
coloured bishops will save him, but with rooks
on the board there is no draw!
33 Kb1 Be5 34 Rd2 g6 35 Bd1 Kg7 36 b3 Rc8
37 Rc2 RXc2 38 KXc2 f5 Normally endings with
bishops of opposite colours are drawish, but here
Black is two pawns to the good and can steam-
roll those central d- and e-pawns quickly down
the board.
39 Kd3 Kf6 40 Ke3 Kg5 41 Kf3 Bd6 Theres no
stopping the e-pawn, whereas Whites two queen-
side pawns are easily held by the pawn on a5.

0-1

115
White: Vazquez Torres, A Collado Villalba
Black: Suba, M
2009
Result: 0-1

1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 d6 3 d4 Nf6 4 Nc3 cXd4 5


NXd4 e6 6 Bc4 Be7 7 O-O This line is called
the Fischer-Sozin Attack, as it was the famous
8
rZbl0skZ
Bobby Fischer who came up with the idea of fol- 7
ZpZ0apop
lowing up Bc4 and 0-0 by attacking the e6-pawn
with f4-f5. Lets see in this game how Black can
6
pZ0opm0Z
cope with this plan. 5
Z0m0Z0Z0
7 a3 O-O 8 Ba2 Nc6 9 O-O Bd7 10 Kh1 NXd4 4
0Z0MPO0Z
11 QXd4 b5 12 f4 a5 13 e5 dXe5 14 f Xe5 Ne8
15 Bf4 Bc6 16 Qf2 Qd7 17 Rad1 Qb7 18 Ne2
3
ZBM0ZQZ0
Nc7 19 Qg3 Rfd8 20 Bg5 BXg2+! 21 QXg2
2
POPZ0ZPO
QXg2+ 22 KXg2 BXg5 1
S0A0ZRJ0
a b c d e f g h
7. . . O-O 8 Bb3 QUESTION: Why does White
always retreat the bishop to b3? The bishop on
c4 prevents Black playing his ...Na6 idea, so why 10. . . e5!? 11 Nf5 BXf5 12 eXf5 e4 13 Qh3 NXb3
not leave it there? 14 aXb3 d5 15 Be3 d4 16 Rfd1 Bc5 17 Ne2
dXe3! 18 RXd8 Rf Xd8 19 b4 Bb6 20 c4 Rd2
11 f5

8
rmbl0skZ
7
opZ0apop
8
rZbl0skZ
6
0Z0opm0Z
7
ZpZ0apop
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
6
pZ0opm0Z
4
0Z0MPZ0Z
5
Z0m0ZPZ0
3
ZBM0Z0Z0
4
0Z0MPZ0Z
2
POPZ0OPO
3
ZBM0ZQZ0
1
S0AQZRJ0
2
POPZ0ZPO
a b c d e f g h 1
S0A0ZRJ0
a b c d e f g h
8 f4 NXe4 9 NXe4 d5 10 Bd3 dXe4 11 BXe4
Nd7 12 Be3 Nf6 13 Bf3 Nd5 14 Bc1 Bf6 15 c3 11 Be3 Qc7 12 f5 b5
Qa5 11. . . e5 12 Nde2 b5 13 g4 Bb7 14 Ng3 EXER-
8 Be3 NXe4 9 NXe4 d5 10 Bd3 dXe4 11 BXe4 CISE: The threat of g5 looms over Blacks head.
Nd7 12 c3 Nf6 13 Bf3 a6 What can we do about it? ANSWER: As we have
8. . . Na6 9 f4 Nc5 10 Qf3 a6 come across already, a wing attack is usually best
countered with a reply in the centre.
14. . . NXb3 15 aXb3 b4

116
8
rZ0l0skZ 8
rZ0l0skZ
7
ZbZ0apop 7
ZbZ0Zpop
6
pZ0o0m0Z 6
pZ0o0a0Z
5
Z0Z0oPZ0 5
Z0Z0oPZ0
4
0o0ZPZPZ 4
0Z0ZPZ0Z
3
ZPM0ZQM0 3
ZPo0ZQM0
2
0OPZ0Z0O 2
0OPZ0Z0O
1
S0A0ZRJ0 1
S0A0ZRJ0
a b c d e f g h a b c d e f g h

15. . . d5! 16 eXd5 Bc5+ 17 Kh1 Bd4 17. . . cXb2 18 f Xe7 bXa1Q 19 eXd8Q Rf Xd8 20
16 g5 f6 g6 21 Nf5
18 bXc3 QUESTION: What should Black do now?
ANSWER: Open lines for the bishops, starting
with our favourite move...
8
rZ0l0skZ 18. . . d5! 19 Ba3 Qb6+ 20 Kh1 Rfd8 21 Rg1
7
ZbZ0apop Kh8 EXERCISE: Work out why this move was
6
pZ0o0m0Z played. ANSWER: It demonstrates the idea of
prophylaxis in chess. White may be threatening
5
Z0Z0oPO0 Nh5 and something on g7 at some point, so the
4
0o0ZPZ0Z king steps o the g-file despite there being no im-
3
ZPM0ZQM0 mediate threats.
2
0OPZ0Z0O 22 Rg2 Rd7
1
S0A0ZRJ0
a b c d e f g h
8
rZ0Z0Z0j
16 Nd5 NXd5 17 eXd5 Qc8 18 g5 Bd8! 19 f6 7
ZbZrZpop
g6 6
pl0Z0a0Z
16 Nce2 d5!
16. . . bXc3 17 gXf6 BXf6
5
Z0ZpoPZ0
4
0Z0ZPZ0Z
3
APO0ZQM0
2
0ZPZ0ZRO
1
S0Z0Z0ZK
a b c d e f g h

22. . . dXe4!? 23 NXe4 a5 24 Re1 a4


23 Re1 Rad8 24 Bc1 a5 25 Qg4 dXe4 26 Be3
Blockading the e4-pawn so as to try and nullify
the power of the bishop on b7 down towards the
white king.

117
8
0Z0s0Z0j
7
ZbZrZpop
6
0l0Z0a0Z
5
o0Z0oPZ0
4
0Z0ZpZQZ
3
ZPO0A0M0
2
0ZPZ0ZRO
1
Z0Z0S0ZK
a b c d e f g h

26 NXe4 h6 27 Be3 Qc6 28 Bg1 Rd1! 29 RXd1


RXd1 30 QXd1 QXe4 31 Qd2 Bg5 32 Qf2 Bh4
33 Qd2 Be1
26. . . Qc6 27 c4 g6 28 Reg1 a4 29 Nh5 Be7 30
bXa4 QXc4 31 f6 Bf8 It may appear that White
resigned prematurely, but in truth he has no at-
tack and Black is going to pick up a4 and just be
two pawns ahead.

0-1

118
White: Li Shilong Moscow
Black: Ehlvest, J
2007
Result: 0-1

1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 e6 3 d4 cXd4 4 NXd4 Nf6 5 15 BXe6 f Xe6 16 QXe4 d5 17 Qd3 Bd7


Nc3 d6 6 Bc4 Be7 7 Bb3 Na6 8 f4 Nc5 9 Qf3 15. . . d5 Black achieves easy equality.
O-O 10 Be3 White plays la Vazquez Torres in
our previous game, except that he has preferred 16 BXd5 eXd5 17 Qd3 Re8 18 Rae1 Bd7 19 Nf3
to develop the dark-squared bishop rather than Qa5 20 Ne5 Bb4 21 Rd1 Bc6
commit his king.
10. . . a5 QUESTION: Why has Black done this?
Now the b5-square is permanently weak. AN- 8
rZ0ZrZkZ
SWER: The idea is to attack the bishop on b3
with ...a4. The knight on c5 is well placed to
7
ZpZ0Zpop
help out with this. The loss of the b5-square isnt
6
0ZbZ0Z0Z
so important and Black can always cover it with
...Bd7 and possibly ...Qb6 in some lines. More
5
l0ZpM0Z0
pressing, though, for White is how to deal with
4
0a0Z0O0Z
this threat of ...a4? 3
oPZQA0Z0
11 O-O 11 O-O-O a4 12 Bc4 a3 13 b3 Nf Xe4 2
PZPZ0ZPO
14 NXe4 NXe4 15 QXe4 d5 16 BXd5 eXd5 17
Qd3 Bf6 18 Kb1 Re8 19 Rhe1 Bg4 20 Rc1 Re4
1
Z0ZRZRJ0
a b c d e f g h
11 a4 e5! 12 Nf5 BXf5 13 eXf5 e4 14 Qe2 NXb3
15 cXb3 d5 16 Rd1 Rc8 17 O-O Bc5 21. . . Bb5 22 QXd5 BXf1 23 QXf7+ Kh8 24
11. . . a4 12 Bc4 a3 13 b3 ANSWER: Rd7 Re7 25 RXe7 BXe7 26 QXe7 Qe1 27 Nf7+
13. . . NcXe4! Reverting to the fork trick. Kg8 28 Nh6+ Kh8! 29 Nf7+ Kg8 30 Nh6+

14 NXe4 NXe4 15 QXe4 Now Black has space 22 Bd4 f6 23 c3


for his bishops to become more involved.

8
rZ0ZrZkZ
7
ZpZ0Z0op
8
rZbl0skZ 6
0ZbZ0o0Z
7
ZpZ0apop 5
l0ZpM0Z0
6
0Z0opZ0Z 4
0a0A0O0Z
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0 3
oPOQZ0Z0
4
0ZBMQO0Z 2
PZ0Z0ZPO
3
oPZ0A0Z0 1
Z0ZRZRJ0
2
PZPZ0ZPO a b c d e f g h

1
S0Z0ZRJ0 23 NXc6 bXc6
a b c d e f g h
23. . . f Xe5 24 cXb4 ANSWER:

119
24. . . Qb5! A neat little tactic. Surprisingly the
white pieces arent well placed.
25 BXe5 QXd3 26 RXd3 Bb5 27 RXd5 BXf1
28 KXf1 Red8 29 RXd8+ RXd8 White may have
two pawns for the exchange, but the b-pawns are
doubled and in reality only Black can win here
(which he eventually does).
30 Ke2 b5 31 Bc3 Kf7 32 Bd2 Ke6 33 Bc1
h5! A nice move, holding back Whites kingside
majority which he would have thought about ad-
vancing with g4 at some point.
34 h3 Kf5 35 Ke3 h4 36 BXa3 Ra8 37 Bc1 RXa2
38 Bd2 RXd2! Transposing to a winning king
and pawn ending. Whites extra b-pawn is of no
use here.
39 KXd2 KXf4 40 Ke2 Ke4 41 Kd2 Kd4 This
idea of ...a5-a4 gives Black good chances for equal-
ity, if not more, and thats something the second
player should certainly be content with.

0-1

120
White: Giroyan, G Porto Carras
Black: Nasuta, G
2010
Result: 0-1

1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 d6 3 d4 cXd4 4 NXd4 Nf6 5


Nc3 e6 6 Bc4 Be7 7 Bg5 White is trying to mix
all the variations into one.
8
rZbZ0skZ
7. . . O-O 8 f4 ANSWER:
7
opZ0Zpo0
8. . . NXe4! 9 NXe4 d5 10 Qe2 Qa5+
6
0Z0Zpm0o
5
Z0ZqM0Z0
4
0Z0M0O0Z
8
rmbZ0skZ 3
Z0O0Z0Z0
7
opZ0apop 2
PO0ZQZPO
6
0Z0ZpZ0Z 1
S0Z0ZRJ0
5
l0ZpZ0A0 a b c d e f g h
4
0ZBMNO0Z 17 QXd5 NXd5 18 c4 Ne3 19 Rfe1 Rd8 20 Ndf3
3
Z0Z0Z0Z0 Nf5 21 Rad1!
2
POPZQZPO 17. . . b6 Now Black gets developed and can be
1
S0Z0J0ZR satisfied with how the opening has turned out.
a b c d e f g h
18 b3 Bb7 19 Rad1 Rfd8 20 Kh1

10. . . BXg5!? 11 NXg5 dXc4 12 O-O-O c3


11 c3 BXg5 12 NXg5 dXc4 13 QXc4 h6 14 Ngf3
Nd7 15 O-O Nf6 16 Ne5 Qd5 QUESTION: Do
8
rZ0s0ZkZ
you think Black would prefer to see White retreat
7
obZ0Zpo0
and keep the queens on, or swap o here? AN- 6
0o0Zpm0o
SWER: With a lead in development we can see
why White thought he should keep pieces on, but
5
Z0ZqM0Z0
in fact White could have gained more time with
4
0Z0M0O0Z
a queen exchange. 3
ZPO0Z0Z0
17 Qe2 2
PZ0ZQZPO
1
Z0ZRZRZK
a b c d e f g h

20 Rd3 Rac8 21 Rfd1 Qe4


20. . . Qc5 21 Qe3 Of course White saw Blacks
next move, but must have assumed he had a win-
ning attack.
21. . . Nd5 22 Qh3 QUESTION: Should Black
capture on c3 with the knight or the queen?

121
22. . . NXc3
8
rZ0s0Z0Z
8
rZ0s0ZkZ
7
obZ0Zko0
7
obZ0Zpo0
6
0o0ZpZ0o
6
0o0ZpZ0o
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
5
Z0l0M0Z0
4
0l0M0O0Z
4
0Z0M0O0Z
3
Z0m0Z0ZQ
3
ZPm0Z0ZQ
2
PZ0Z0ZPO
2
PZ0Z0ZPO
1
Z0ZRZRZK
a b c d e f g h
1
Z0ZRZRZK
a b c d e f g h
24. . . RXd4 25 NXh6+! Kf8 26 QXe6 Qc4 27
Qf5+ Ke8 28 Rfe1+ Re4 29 Qg6+ Kf8 30 Qf5+
22. . . QXc3 23 Rd3 NXf4! 24 RXc3 NXh3 25 Ke8 31 Qg6+
RXh3 RXd4
25 Rde1
23 b4

8
rZ0s0Z0Z
8
rZ0s0ZkZ 7
obZ0Zko0
7
obZ0Zpo0 6
0o0ZpZ0o
6
0o0ZpZ0o 5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
5
Z0l0M0Z0 4
0l0M0O0Z
4
0O0M0O0Z 3
Z0m0Z0ZQ
3
Z0m0Z0ZQ 2
PZ0Z0ZPO
2
PZ0Z0ZPO 1
Z0Z0SRZK
1
Z0ZRZRZK a b c d e f g h
a b c d e f g h

25 QXe6+ Kf8 26 Qe5 Re8 27 Ne6+ RXe6 28


23 NXf7 KXf7 24 QXe6+ Kf8 QXe6 NXd1
23. . . QXb4 24 NXf7 ANSWER: 25. . . QXd4
24. . . KXf7!

122
8
rZ0s0Z0Z
7
obZ0Zko0
6
0o0ZpZ0o
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
4
0Z0l0O0Z
3
Z0m0Z0ZQ
2
PZ0Z0ZPO
1
Z0Z0SRZK
a b c d e f g h

25. . . RXd4! 26 QXe6+ Kf8


26 QXe6+ Kf8 27 Re5 Be4! Preventing Whites
only trick of Rf5+.
28 f5 Qd6 White resigned as he is two pieces
down for not much compensation. Yet again we
saw White banging his head against the brick
wall that is the Scheveningen. Sacrificing all over
like this is generally not likely to work, though
there were some mines for Black to avoid before
he could emerge with the advantage.

0-1

123
White: Mantovani, R Forli
Black: Cebalo, M
1995
Result: 0-1

1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 e6 3 d4 cXd4 4 NXd4 Nf6 5 13 Kh1 Be8 14 Qe1 b5 15 a3 Qb6 16 Rd1 b4


Nc3 d6 6 g3 Be7 7 Bg2 O-O 8 O-O Nc6 This 17 aXb4 NXb4 18 Rd2 a5
is an important tabiya for the Fianchetto Varia- 9. . . Bd7 10 a4
tion. White has a number of moves here do not
be alarmed, though, since so long as you know
the typical ideas for Black in these positions you
cant really go wrong! Plans that White can use 8
rZ0l0skZ
include: 1) Play f4, g4-g5 and attack on the king-
side. White may argue this is an improved ver-
7
opZbapop
sion of certain 6 Be2 lines as there White often
6
0Znopm0Z
played Be2-Bf3-Bg2, so here he saves two tempi
not playing this manoeuvre. If things were that
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
simple, though, everyone would be playing 6 g3
4
PZ0MPZ0Z
rather than 6 Be2! 2) Play a4, Be3 and wait for 3
Z0M0Z0O0
Black to lash out. This is the more restraining
idea. 3) Play Nxc6 and e5, radically altering the
2
0OPZ0OBO
pawn structure and heading for an endgame.
1
S0AQS0J0
a b c d e f g h
9 Re1 Alternatives:

10 NXc6 BXc6 11 Qe2 Rc8 12 Bf4 Qb6 13 Qe3


QXe3 14 BXe3 a6 15 a4 Bd8 16 Bf4 Bc7 17
Red1 Rfd8 18 a5 h6 19 f3 Kh7 20 Be3 g5 21
8
rZbl0skZ Kf2 Kg6 22 Bf1 g4 23 Bd3 Kg7 24 f4 h5 25
Bd4 Rh8 26 Ke3 h4
7
opZ0apop 10. . . a6 11 NXc6 BXc6 QUESTION: Why did
6
0Znopm0Z White take on c6 and allow Black to bring the
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0 bishop to this nice square? ANSWER: So White
could now play:
4
0Z0MPZ0Z 12 a5 Preventing Blacks b-pawn from moving
3
Z0M0Z0O0 and trying to reduce Blacks counterplay. How-
2
POPZ0OBO ever, I very much like the way Cebalo handled
1
S0AQS0J0 his forces from here on.
a b c d e f g h 12. . . Nd7 13 Be3 Qc7 14 Na4 BXa4 15 RXa4
Rfc8 16 c4 ANSWER:
9 Be3 16. . . b5!
9 NXc6
9 Nb3 Qc7 10 a4 b6 11 Nb5 Qd7 12 g4 a6 13
N5d4 NXd4 14 NXd4 Bb7 15 Re1 g6 16 h3 e5
17 Nb3 Bc6 18 a5 b5 19 f4 Qb7
9 b3 Bd7 10 Bb2 Rc8 11 Nde2 Qa5 12 h3 Rfd8

124
having a dark-squared bishop and White only
having a light one, there is no chance of being
8
rZrZ0ZkZ checkmated on g7 here.
7
Z0lnapop 22 h4 h5 Now its Black who is trying to pre-
6
pZ0opZ0Z vent White from doing anything, but maybe this
wasnt necessary.
5
OpZ0Z0Z0
4
RZPZPZ0Z
3
Z0Z0A0O0
2
0O0Z0OBO 8
0srZ0ZkZ
1
Z0ZQS0J0 7
Z0Z0apZ0
a b c d e f g h
6
0l0opZpZ
16. . . Bf6 17 Qd2 Nc5 18 Ra3! Nd7 19 b3 h6
5
o0Z0Z0Zp
20 Rd1 Be7 21 Ra2 Nc5 22 b4 Nd7 23 c5! 4
RZPZPZ0O
16. . . Ne5 17 b3 3
ZPZRZ0O0
17 aXb6 2
0Z0Z0OBZ
1
Z0ZQZ0J0
a b c d e f g h
8
rZrZ0ZkZ
7
Z0lnapop 22. . . Rc5!
6
pO0opZ0Z 23 Bf3 Qc5 24 Qa1 Bd8! Displaying excellent
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0 positional understanding. The text doesnt just
defend the pawn on a5, but brings the bishop
4
RZPZPZ0Z round to the a7-g1 diagonal. Moreover, theres
3
Z0Z0A0O0 not a lot White can do here but wait around.
2
0O0Z0OBO 25 Qa3 Rb4 26 RXb4 aXb4 27 Qa2 Bb6 Here
comes the bishop, ready to probe. It is clearly a
1
Z0ZQS0J0 better piece than its counterpart on f3. The only
a b c d e f g h
thing is: is this enough for Black to win?
28 Kg2 Qe5 29 Rd2 Bd4 30 Qa4 Rb8 31 Ra2
17 cXb5 aXb5 18 Ra3 RXa5
Kg7 32 Qa5 QUESTION: Should Black exchange
17. . . NXb6 18 BXb6 Forced, as otherwise the c4- queens?
pawn was dropping.
32. . . Bc5
18. . . QXb6 QUESTION: Should the players shake
hands on a draw here? ANSWER: Well, lets
take a look at the specifics of the position: 1) If
Blacks bishop could get to c5, it will be far bet-
ter than Whites bishop on g2. 2) The b2- and
c4-pawns are just as weak as Blacks a6-pawn,
which isnt easily attacked. Overall, the position
is just slightly easier for Black to play and thats
why Cebalo decided to try and squeeze something
from it.
19 b3 Rab8 20 Re3 a5 21 Rd3 g6 With Black

125
8
0s0Z0Z0Z 8
0Z0Z0Z0Z
7
Z0Z0Zpj0 7
Z0Z0Zpj0
6
0Z0opZpZ 6
0Z0oplpZ
5
L0a0l0Zp 5
Z0a0Z0Zp
4
0oPZPZ0O 4
0oPZPZ0O
3
ZPZ0ZBO0 3
ZPZQZKO0
2
RZ0Z0OKZ 2
0ZBS0O0Z
1
Z0Z0Z0Z0 1
Z0Z0Z0s0
a b c d e f g h a b c d e f g h

32. . . QXa5 33 RXa5 Bc5 34 Be2 40. . . Qf6+ 41 Ke2 QXf2#


33 Rd2 Qc3 34 Qa2 Ra8 35 Qb2 Ra3 36 Bd1
Ra1 37 Qc2 Rc1 38 Qd3 Qa1 39 Bc2? AN- 0-1
SWER:

8
0Z0Z0Z0Z
7
Z0Z0Zpj0
6
0Z0opZpZ
5
Z0a0Z0Zp
4
0oPZPZ0O
3
ZPZQZ0O0
2
0ZBS0OKZ
1
l0s0Z0Z0
a b c d e f g h

39 Qe2
39. . . Rg1+ 40 Kf3 Qf6+

126
White: Andriasian, Z Hoogeveen
Black: Van Wely, L
2007
Result: 0-1

1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 e6 3 d4 cXd4 4 NXd4 Nf6 5 Nc3


d6 6 g3 Be7

8
rZ0l0skZ
8
rmblkZ0s 7
opZbapop
7
opZ0apop 6
0Znopm0Z
6
0Z0opm0Z 5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0 4
0Z0MPZ0Z
4
0Z0MPZ0Z 3
Z0M0A0O0
3
Z0M0Z0O0 2
POPZQOBO
2
POPZ0O0O 1
S0Z0ZRJ0
1
S0AQJBZR a b c d e f g h
a b c d e f g h

10 Nb3 Ne5 11 Qe2 Qc7 12 Nd4 a6


6. . . Nc6 7 Bg2 Bd7 8 O-O Be7 9 Be3 O-O 10
10. . . a6 11 Rad1 Qc7 Again there are many dif-
Qe2 a6
ferent moves, but sensible replies should do the
7 Bg2 O-O 8 O-O Nc6 9 Be3 By far the most trick.
popular move. This simply develops a piece to-
12 a4 Alternatives include:
wards the centre.

8
rZbl0skZ
8
rZ0Z0skZ
7
opZ0apop
7
Zplbapop
6
0Znopm0Z
6
pZnopm0Z
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
4
0Z0MPZ0Z
4
PZ0MPZ0Z
3
Z0M0A0O0
3
Z0M0A0O0
2
POPZ0OBO
2
0OPZQOBO
1
S0ZQZRJ0
1
Z0ZRZRJ0
a b c d e f g h a b c d e f g h

9 a4 a6 10 Be3 Qc7 11 Qe2 Bd7 12 Rad1 12 g4 NXd4 13 RXd4 e5 14 Rc4 Qd8 15 g5 Ng4
9. . . Bd7 10 Qe2 White continues to sensibly de- 16 Bd2 b5 17 Rb4 BXg5
velop and await events. 12 f4 Rac8 13 f5 b5 14 a3 NXd4 15 BXd4 e5 16

127
Be3 Qc4 17 Rd3 a5 in particular looks like a good target to aim at.
12 h3 b5 13 a3 Rac8 14 NXc6 BXc6 15 Rd2 Qb7 Blacks king is also quite safe on g8 and he will
16 Bg5 a5 17 BXf6 BXf6 18 RXd6 Be5 always have long-term chances against the white
king now that White has played f4.
12. . . Rab8 QUESTION: Why did Black play this
move, rather than move a rook to the semi-open 17 Rfe1 EXERCISE: Choose the move you would
c-file? ANSWER: The idea is to help push ...b5. prefer to play next: a) 17...b4; b) 17...Rfc8; c)
White has a lot of pieces opposing it, so Black 17...Bg4. ANSWER: All three moves are per-
needs to fight for the b5-square. fectly fine for Black!
17. . . Bg4 This is good, but was not the only de-
cent option:

8
0s0Z0skZ
7
Zplbapop 8
0s0Z0skZ
6
pZnopm0Z 7
Z0l0apop
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0 6
0Z0o0m0Z
4
PZ0MPZ0Z 5
ZpZ0o0Z0
3
Z0M0A0O0 4
0Z0ZPObZ
2
0OPZQOBO 3
Z0M0A0O0
1
Z0ZRZRJ0 2
0OPZQZBO
a b c d e f g h
1
Z0ZRS0J0
12. . . Rac8 13 h3 Ne5 14 g4 h6 a b c d e f g h

13 f4 NXd4 14 BXd4 e5! The correct advance.


17. . . b4 18 Nd5 NXd5 19 RXd5 Be6 20 Rd2
17. . . Rfc8 18 Rd2 b4 19 Nd5 NXd5 20 eXd5
Bf6!
8
0s0Z0skZ 18 Bf3 BXf3 19 QXf3 b4 20 f Xe5 dXe5 21 Nd5
NXd5 22 RXd5 QXc2 23 Re2
7
Zplbapop
6
pZ0o0m0Z
5
Z0Z0o0Z0 8
0s0Z0skZ
4
PZ0APO0Z 7
Z0Z0apop
3
Z0M0Z0O0 6
0Z0Z0Z0Z
2
0OPZQZBO 5
Z0ZRo0Z0
1
Z0ZRZRJ0 4
0o0ZPZ0Z
Z0Z0AQO0
a b c d e f g h 3

14. . . b5 15 e5!
2
0OqZRZ0O
15 Be3 b5 16 aXb5 aXb5 Although the position
1
Z0Z0Z0J0
a b c d e f g h
is level right now, I like the fact that there is a
clear plan here for Black: push with ...b4 and see
what we can do on the queenside! The c2-pawn 23 RXe5 Bf6 24 Rh5 QXb2

128
23. . . Qb3 24 Kg2 running in this position.
43 QXf6+ Kh7 44 Kf2? Rc2
0-1
8
0s0Z0skZ
7
Z0Z0apop
6
0Z0Z0Z0Z
5
Z0ZRo0Z0
4
0o0ZPZ0Z
3
ZqZ0AQO0
2
0O0ZRZKO
1
Z0Z0Z0Z0
a b c d e f g h

24 RXe5 Bf6 25 Rh5 BXb2


24. . . f6 25 Qf5 Kh8 26 Rd7 Rf7 27 Bf2 Bf8
Black is happy to exchange rooks, as he is a pawn
to the good.
28 Rd5 Re8 29 Red2 g6 30 Qf3 QUESTION:
Should Black exchange queens?
30. . . Qc4!?

8
0Z0Zra0j
7
Z0Z0ZrZp
6
0Z0Z0opZ
5
Z0ZRo0Z0
4
0oqZPZ0Z
3
Z0Z0ZQO0
2
0O0S0AKO
1
Z0Z0Z0Z0
a b c d e f g h

30. . . QXf3+ 31 KXf3 Rc8 32 g4 Kg8


31 b3 Qc6 32 Qd3 Rc8 33 Ra5 Kg7 34 Ra6
Qc1 35 Qd5 h5 36 Rda2 White is trying hard
to keep Black at bay, but Van Wely eventually
gets through.
36. . . Bc5 37 h4 BXf2 38 RXf2 Rc2 39 Ra2 Rc3
40 Rad2 Qb1 41 Rf3 Rfc7 42 Qd6 QXe4 It
may appear Black has erred by allowing some
counterplay, but in fact Black is making all the

129
White: Kovalevskaya, E St Petersburg
Black: Vitiugov, N
2002
Result: 0-1

1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 e6 3 d4 cXd4 4 NXd4 Nf6 5 Nc3 Whites strategy is: swap o pieces and hope that
d6 6 g3 Be7 7 Bg2 O-O 8 O-O Nc6 9 NXc6 bXc6 his better pawn structure will be to his advantage
10 e5 The logical follow-up; otherwise it doesnt in an endgame.
make sense to exchange knights on c6. 13. . . RXd1+
10. . . dXe5!

8
0sbZ0ZkZ
8
rZbl0skZ 7
o0Z0apop
7
o0Z0apop 6
0ZBZpm0Z
6
0ZpZpm0Z 5
Z0Z0o0Z0
5
Z0Z0o0Z0 4
0Z0Z0Z0Z
4
0Z0Z0Z0Z 3
Z0M0Z0O0
3
Z0M0Z0O0 2
POPZ0O0O
2
POPZ0OBO 1
S0ArZ0J0
1
S0AQZRJ0 a b c d e f g h
a b c d e f g h
13. . . Ba6 14 RXd8+ BXd8 15 b3 Rc8 16 Bb5
10. . . Nd5 11 eXd6 QXd6 12 Ne4 Qc7 13 c4 RXc3 17 BXa6 Bb6 18 Bd3 Bd4 19 Rb1 e4!
Nb6 14 Qe2 e5 15 Be3 14 NXd1 Nd5! I like this move, which at first
11 QXd8 sight doesnt appear to do much. However, White
wanted to play Be3 and that is now prevented.
Secondly, the text tempts White into playing c4
to kick the knight away...
8
rZbL0skZ 15 c4
7
o0Z0apop
6
0ZpZpm0Z
5
Z0Z0o0Z0
8
0sbZ0ZkZ
4
0Z0Z0Z0Z
7
o0Z0apop
3
Z0M0Z0O0
6
0ZBZpZ0Z
2
POPZ0OBO
5
Z0Zno0Z0
1
S0A0ZRJ0
4
0ZPZ0Z0Z
a b c d e f g h 3
Z0Z0Z0O0
11 BXc6 Rb8 12 QXd8 RXd8
2
PO0Z0O0O
11. . . RXd8 12 BXc6 Rb8 13 Rd1 Its clear what
1
S0ANZ0J0
a b c d e f g h

130
15 a3 Ba6 16 b4 Be2! 17 Ne3 Bf3
15. . . Nb4 16 Be4 Bb7 8
0Z0Z0ZkZ
7
o0Z0apop
8
0s0Z0ZkZ
6
0Z0ZpZ0Z
7
obZ0apop
5
Z0Z0o0Z0
6
0Z0ZpZ0Z
4
0ZPZ0Z0Z
5
Z0Z0o0Z0
3
OrZ0Z0O0
4
0mPZBZ0Z
2
ROnZ0O0O
3
Z0Z0Z0O0
1
Z0ANZ0J0
a b c d e f g h
2
PO0Z0O0O
1
S0ANZ0J0 19. . . a5 20 b4!
a b c d e f g h 20 Kf1 e4 21 Be3 NXe3+

16. . . f5! 17 a3 f Xe4 18 aXb4 RXb4 19 RXa7


RXc4 20 Be3 Bb4 21 Kg2 h6
17 BXb7 RXb7 18 a3
8
0Z0Z0ZkZ
7
o0Z0apop
6
0Z0ZpZ0Z
8
0Z0Z0ZkZ
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
7
orZ0apop
4
0ZPZpZ0Z
6
0Z0ZpZ0Z
3
OrZ0m0O0
5
Z0Z0o0Z0
2
RO0Z0O0O
4
0mPZ0Z0Z
1
Z0ZNZKZ0
a b c d e f g h
3
O0Z0Z0O0
2
0O0Z0O0O 21. . . a5
1
S0ANZ0J0 22 f Xe3
a b c d e f g h

18 Bd2 Nd3! 19 b3 e4 20 Bc3 f5 21 Ne3 Bc5 8


0Z0Z0ZkZ
18. . . Nc2 19 Ra2 ANSWER: 7
o0Z0apop
19. . . Rb3! Well done if you saw that White wants
to play b4 and activate the rook on a2.
6
0Z0ZpZ0Z
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
4
0ZPZpZ0Z
3
OrZ0O0O0
2
RO0Z0Z0O
1
Z0ZNZKZ0
a b c d e f g h

131
22 NXe3 f5 23 Nd1 Bf6 24 Ke2 Kf7 25 Kd2
Bd4 26 Kc2 Rf3 27 b4 BXf2
22. . . Bc5

8
0Z0Z0ZkZ
7
o0Z0Zpop
6
0Z0ZpZ0Z
5
Z0a0Z0Z0
4
0ZPZpZ0Z
3
OrZ0O0O0
2
RO0Z0Z0O
1
Z0ZNZKZ0
a b c d e f g h

22. . . Bf6 23 Ke2 Kf8 24 Kd2 Ke7 25 Kc2 Rd3


26 b4 Kd7
23 Ke2 f5 24 Ra1 Kf7 25 Rc1 a5 26 Rc2 g5
27 Nc3 Ke7 28 Nd1 h5 29 Rc3 Rb8 30 Rc2
QUESTION: How can Black open the position to
his advantage? ANSWER: The kingside is where
Blacks pawn majority lies and indeed he has a
nice plan to open things up on that front:
30. . . h4 31 gXh4 g4! Well played. The rook can
gather in the h4-pawn and this leaves White with
another weakness to worry about on h2.
32 Kf1 Rh8 33 b4 A desperate sacrifice for coun-
terplay, but it doesnt work.
33. . . aXb4 34 aXb4 BXb4 35 Rb2 Bd6 36 Nc3
RXh4 37 Nb5 RXh2 38 RXh2 BXh2 The ending
is completely won for Black.
39 c5 Kd7 40 Nd4 Be5 41 c6+ Kd6 42 c7 KXc7
43 NXe6+ Kd6 44 Nd8 Bf6 45 Nb7+ Kc6 46
Na5+ Kb5 47 Nb3 Kc4 48 Nc1 Be5 49 Ke2
Kc3 50 Na2+ Kb3 51 Nc1+ Kb2 52 Kd1 g3 53
Ne2 g2 54 Ke1 Bg3+ Surprisingly it was Black
who called the shots after the queens came o.
I especially liked Vitiugovs 14...Nd5! idea, after
which White was the side struggling to hold on.

0-1

132
White: Van der Weide, K Dutch Championship, Leeuwarden
Black: Van Wely, L
2001
Result: 0-1

1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 d6 3 d4 cXd4 4 NXd4 Nf6 5


Nc3 e6 6 f4 a6 7 Qf3 This is the way to keep
the f4 line independent. QUESTION: What do
8
rmbZka0s
you think Whites set-up will be after this? AN- 7
ZpZ0Zpop
SWER: White generally plays Be3 and g4 to at-
tack Black early on the kingside. The queen on
6
pl0opm0Z
f3 helps support the centre, as well as any future 5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
kingside pawn advances. 4
0Z0ZPO0Z
3
ZNM0ZQZ0
2
POPZ0ZPO
8
rmblka0s
1
S0A0JBZR
a b c d e f g h
7
ZpZ0Zpop
6
pZ0opm0Z 8 a3!? Nc6 9 ZZ
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0 8. . . Qc7 9 g4 QUESTION: Why is White ad-
4
0Z0MPO0Z vancing like this so early, instead of developing
his pieces? ANSWER: As in other variations of
3
Z0M0ZQZ0 the Scheveningen, White can play useful attack-
2
POPZ0ZPO ing moves whilst waiting to see how Black devel-
ops. Of course, Black can do the same!
1
S0A0JBZR 9. . . b5 Our general counter. White opened the
a b c d e f g h
long light-squared diagonal, so Black seeks to put
the bishop on b7 as quickly as possible.
7 g4 e5!? 8 Nf3 BXg4 9 f Xe5 Nfd7! 10 h3 BXf3
11 QXf3 NXe5 12 Qg3 Nbd7 13 Be3 Rc8 14 10 g5 Nfd7 11 Bd3 Bb7 12 Be3 Nc5 13 O-O-O
O-O-O Nf6 15 Bd4 Qc7 16 Rh2 g6 17 Rf2 Bg7 White can also castle kingside here as he does in
18 h4 O-O the next game.
7 Be2 Be7 13. . . NXd3+ 14 RXd3
7. . . Qb6 Here I rather like this queen sortie which
attempts to kick the knight on d4 away.
8 Nb3

133
8
rm0Zka0s 8
0ZrZrZkZ
7
Zbl0Zpop 7
Zblnapop
6
pZ0opZ0Z 6
0Z0opZ0Z
5
ZpZ0Z0O0 5
Z0Z0Z0O0
4
0Z0ZPO0Z 4
po0ZPO0Z
3
ZNMRAQZ0 3
Z0ZNA0M0
2
POPZ0Z0O 2
POPS0L0O
1
Z0J0Z0ZR 1
ZKZRZ0Z0
a b c d e f g h a b c d e f g h

14 cXd3 b4 22 f5 Bf8 23 f6 a3
14. . . Nd7 QUESTION: Hasnt Black lost a lot of 22. . . b3!
time capturing on d3 and is therefore a long way
behind in development? ANSWER: As usual,
those good guys on e6 and d6 shield the king on
e8 and provide it with decent protection. Black
8
0ZrZrZkZ
also doesnt declare which way he may castle, 7
Zblnapop
thereby avoiding giving White a target.
15 Rhd1 b4 16 Ne2 Rc8 17 R3d2 Be7 18 Ng3
6
0Z0opZ0Z
QUESTION: Is it safe for Black to castle now?
5
Z0Z0Z0O0
ANSWER: Yes, as the rook on h8 will need to 4
pZ0ZPO0Z
join the action soon. Moreover, if White tries to
pawn-storm we have our usual defensive methods
3
ZpZNA0M0
to counter with.
2
POPS0L0O
18. . . O-O Now White can see which way to at-
1
ZKZRZ0Z0
a b c d e f g h
tack and the typical Sicilian race to mate is on.
18. . . a5 19 Kb1 a4 20 Nc1 O-O
22. . . a3 23 b3 Qc3 24 Bd4
19 Qf2 a5 20 Kb1 a4 21 Nc1 ANSWER:
23 cXb3 aXb3 24 a3 White employs a typical de-
21. . . Rfe8! The idea is to drop the bishop back fensive idea to reduce the impact of the oncoming
to f8 to protect the king. attack, but Black still has targets.
22 Nd3 ANSWER: Its best to push the pawn 24. . . Qc4! Now we see why the bishop on d3
that attacks two of the opponents defensive pawns. was exchanged earlier. The e4-pawn suddenly
becomes weak and isnt easy to defend.
25 e5

134
8
0ZrZrZkZ 8
0ZrZ0ZkZ
7
ZbZnapop 7
ZbZ0apop
6
0Z0opZ0Z 6
0Z0ZpZ0Z
5
Z0Z0O0O0 5
Z0Z0O0O0
4
0ZqZ0O0Z 4
qmrA0Z0O
3
OpZNA0M0 3
OpZ0L0Z0
2
0O0S0L0O 2
0O0SNZ0Z
1
ZKZRZ0Z0 1
ZKMRZ0Z0
a b c d e f g h a b c d e f g h

25 Qf3 f5 26 Nf2 Nf8 33 aXb4 RXc1+ 34 NXc1 RXc1+!


25. . . dXe5 26 f Xe5 Qb5 Now the queen eyes up 33. . . Nc2 34 QXb3 Be4 Amazingly even with
the e5-pawn. the queens exchanged, White is in huge trouble
27 Qf4 Rc4 28 Bd4 EXERCISE: Spot Blacks due to his king position.
best square for the knight (which isnt really in 35 QXa4 RXa4 36 Nc3 There was no real de-
the game at the moment). ANSWER: d5 would fence.
be a lovely square, for both defensive and attack-
ing purposes.
28. . . Nb6 29 Ne2 Nd5 30 Qg3 Qa4 Inching for-
ward. Now sacrifices can be considered as all the
black pieces are in good positions.
8
0ZrZ0ZkZ
31 Ndc1 Rec8 32 h4
7
Z0Z0apop
6
0Z0ZpZ0Z
5
Z0Z0O0O0
8
0ZrZ0ZkZ 4
rZ0AbZ0O
7
ZbZ0apop 3
O0M0Z0Z0
6
0Z0ZpZ0Z 2
0OnS0Z0Z
5
Z0ZnO0O0 1
ZKMRZ0Z0
4
qZrA0Z0O a b c d e f g h
3
OpZ0Z0L0 36 Ka2 NXa3 37 bXa3 RXa3+ 38 Kb2 Rb8+
2
0O0SNZ0Z 36. . . NXa3+ 37 Ka2 Raa8 38 NXe4
1
ZKMRZ0Z0
a b c d e f g h

32 NXb3 Nb4! 33 Nec1 Be4+ 34 Ka1 Nc2+ 35


Ka2 BXa3!
32 QXb3 RXc1+! 33 NXc1 RXc1+ 34 RXc1
QXb3
32. . . Nb4 33 Qe3

135
8
rZrZ0ZkZ
7
Z0Z0apop
6
0Z0ZpZ0Z
5
Z0Z0O0O0
4
0Z0ANZ0O
3
m0Z0Z0Z0
2
KO0S0Z0Z
1
Z0MRZ0Z0
a b c d e f g h

38 bXa3 RXa3+ 39 Kb2 Rb8+


38. . . Nc2+ 39 Kb3 White either missed Blacks
next or, more likely, he sportingly allowed a neat
finish:
39. . . Na1#
0-1

136
White: Mortensen, E Copenhagen
Black: Hansen, C
1995
Result: 0-1

1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 d6 3 d4 cXd4 4 NXd4 Nf6 5 be happy to see this little nudge. If White now
Nc3 a6 6 f4 e6 7 Qf3 Qb6 The by now usual castles queenside we have a lever to open up that
manoeuvre. side with ...b4 and the text also doesnt develop
a piece, meaning Black isnt likely to be wiped
o the board any time soon.
12. . . Nc5 Moving the knight again, but we saw
in the previous game how this makes way for the
8
rmbZka0s other knight on b8 to come to d7.
7
ZpZ0Zpop 13 Be3 Nbd7 14 O-O Here, compared to the
6
pl0opm0Z previous game, White decides its safer to castle
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0 kingside than queenside. For now those advanced
kingside pawns arent a problem, but should the
4
0Z0MPO0Z position ever open up...
3
Z0M0ZQZ0 14 O-O-O Be7 15 Kb1 Rb8 16 h4 b4 17 aXb4
2
POPZ0ZPO NXd3 18 RXd3 Ba8
1
S0A0JBZR 14. . . Be7 15 Nd4 QUESTION: So the knight re-
a b c d e f g h turns to d4, but does that mean Black has won or
lost a tempo with his ...Qb6-c7 idea? ANSWER:
7. . . Qc7 Now that White has played his knight back to
d4, Black has indeed won a tempo. Imagine if
8 Nb3 Qc7 9 g4 Black had played 7...Qc7 instead of 7...Qb6: the
knight would already be on d4, so White would
have an extra move. Of course, chess isnt that
8
rmbZka0s easy, but Black can claim a minor victory when
White loses time like this!
7
Zpl0Zpop 15. . . O-O 16 Qh5 White decides to attack with
6
pZ0opm0Z his pieces instead of pawn-storming. QUESTION:
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0 How to deal with the oncoming Rf3 and Rh3?
4
0Z0ZPOPZ ANSWER: Remain cool, calm and collected; then
play a defensive manoeuvre which should be fa-
3
ZNM0ZQZ0 miliar by now...
2
POPZ0Z0O 16. . . g6! 17 Qh6 Rfe8 18 Rf3 Bf8 19 Qh4 Bg7
1
S0A0JBZR 20 Rh3 Nf8 Just in time! Were you worried for
a moment? Do not be if youve read the whole
a b c d e f g h
book to this point, you should have been cool as
9 a4 b6 10 Bd3 Bb7 11 O-O g6 12 Bd2 Bg7 13 instructed!
Rae1 Nbd7 14 Kh1 O-O 15 Qh3 d5! 16 eXd5 21 Rf1 ANSWER:
NXd5 21. . . e5! I like this move, as it creates room for
9. . . b5 10 Bd3 Bb7 11 g5 Nfd7 12 a3 This se- the pieces to join the game.
cures the knight on c3, but Black should always

137
8
0Z0ZrmkZ
8
rZ0ZrmkZ
7
ZbZ0ZRZp
7
Zbl0Zpap
6
pZ0o0ZpZ
6
pZ0o0ZpZ
5
Zpl0Z0O0
5
Zpm0o0O0
4
0Z0Z0Z0L
4
0Z0MPO0L
3
O0MBs0Z0
3
O0MBA0ZR
2
0ZPZ0S0O
2
0OPZ0Z0O
1
Z0Z0Z0J0
a b c d e f g h
1
Z0Z0ZRJ0
a b c d e f g h
30 RXb7 RXd3+ 31 Kh1 Qc6+ 32 Kg1 Rf3 33
RXf3 QXf3 34 Rc7 Qe3+ 35 Kg2 Re5!
21. . . Rac8 22 f5 eXf5 23 eXf5 Ba8 24 f6 Qb7 25
30. . . RXd3! 31 RXf8+
Qg4 Nfd7 26 f Xg7 Ne5
21. . . Re7!? 22 Nde2 Rae8 23 Qf2 Ncd7 24 Bd4
e5 25 f Xe5 NXe5 26 Nf4? Ng4!
22 f Xe5 RXe5 23 Rhf3 Re7 24 Nde2 Rae8 25
8
0Z0ZrSkZ
Nf4 ANSWER:
7
ZbZ0Z0Zp
25. . . BXc3! Again, timed to perfection. Giving
6
pZ0o0ZpZ
up this bishop requires nerve as the dark squares
around the king can become weak, but all the
5
Zpl0Z0O0
other black pieces are so well placed that Hansen
4
0Z0Z0Z0L
believes this exchange should work for him. 3
O0MrZ0Z0
26 bXc3 NXe4 Not just winning a pawn, but lib- 2
0ZPZ0S0O
erating both of Blacks rooks and the bishop on
b7.
1
Z0Z0Z0J0
a b c d e f g h
27 Ne2 NXc3 28 NXc3 RXe3 29 RXf7 Qc5!
It appears that White is the one attacking, but 31 cXd3? Re1#
Blacks counterattack is alive and kicking.
31. . . RXf8 32 cXd3 RXf2 33 QXf2 QXc3 A very
30 R1f2 well played game by Black. Hansen timed his
...e5 break at the correct moment and then de-
fused his opponents counterplay with 25...Bxc3.

0-1

138
White: Polgar, J 7th matchgame, Aruba
Black: Polugaevsky, L
1991
Result: 0-1

1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 d6 3 d4 cXd4 4 NXd4 Nf6 5


Nc3 a6 6 f4 e6 7 Bd3 b5 This feels a bit risky,
but White cannot take advantage of the long di-
8
rm0lka0s
agonal towards a8. Blacks bishop will come to 7
ZbZnZpop
b7 and attack the centre from there.
8 Qf3 Bb7 9 g4!? ANSWER:
6
pZ0opZ0Z
5
ZpZ0Z0Z0
4
0Z0MPOPZ
3
Z0MBZQZ0
8
rm0lka0s
2
POPZ0Z0O
7
ZbZ0Zpop
1
S0A0J0ZR
a b c d e f g h
6
pZ0opm0Z
5
ZpZ0Z0Z0 9. . . h6 10 Be3 Nbd7 11 ZZ
4
0Z0MPOPZ 10 Be3 Nc5 11 O-O-O Nbd7
3
Z0MBZQZ0
2
POPZ0Z0O
1
S0A0J0ZR
8
rZ0lka0s
a b c d e f g h 7
ZbZnZpop
9 Be3 Nbd7 10 g4 b4 11 Nd1 e5 12 Nb3 d5 13
6
pZ0opZ0Z
Nf2 Be7 14 O-O-O O-O 15 f5 Qc7 16 g5 dXe4
5
Zpm0Z0Z0
17 NXe4 NXe4 18 BXe4 Rfc8 19 Rd2 BXe4 20 4
0Z0MPOPZ
QXe4 a5 21 Kb1 a4 22 Nc1 a3 23 Rhd1 aXb2
24 RXd7 bXc1Q+ 25 BXc1 Qa5 26 Qd5 b3! 27
3
Z0MBAQZ0
QXb3 Rcb8
2
POPZ0Z0O
9 g4
1
Z0JRZ0ZR
a b c d e f g h
9. . . Nfd7! However, I prefer the text move to
9...h6. The knight hops out of the way of the
threat and wanders over to pastures new on the 11. . . b4 12 Nce2 Nbd7 13 Kb1 Qc7 14 g5 g6
queenside. 15 h4 Bg7 16 h5 Rg8! 17 Ng3 O-O-O
12 h4

139
8
rZ0lka0s 8
rZ0ZkZ0s
7
ZbZnZpop 7
ZblnZpap
6
pZ0opZ0Z 6
pZ0opZpO
5
Zpm0Z0Z0 5
Z0m0Z0Z0
4
0Z0MPOPO 4
0o0MPOPZ
3
Z0MBAQZ0 3
Z0ZBAQZ0
2
POPZ0Z0Z 2
POPZNZ0Z
1
Z0JRZ0ZR 1
ZKZRZ0ZR
a b c d e f g h a b c d e f g h

12 g5 b4 13 Nce2 Qc7 14 Kb1 g6 15 h4 Bg7 16 hXg6 hXg6 17 RXh8+ BXh8 18 Rh1 O-O-O
12. . . b4 13 Nce2 Qc7 14 Kb1 g6! QUESTION: 16. . . Bf6 17 g5 Be7! It appears that White has
Surely its bad to weaken yourself on the side of gained a lot of time on the kingside by pushing
the board where you are being attacked, so why those pawns with tempo, but by playing h6 Pol-
is Black doing this? ANSWER: To fianchetto the gar can no longer prise the black king open with
bishop to g7 which will hold Blacks position to- g5-g6, which as we know is the normal method.
gether. Remember too that Black doesnt have 18 Ng3 QUESTION: When will Black be able to
to castle kingside into the attack! castle? ANSWER: Now!
18. . . O-O! As long as he watches out for a mate
on g7, Black deems that his king should be safe
enough on the kingside. The situation is very
8
rZ0Zka0s dierent now with that pawn on h6 blocking the
h-file.
7
ZblnZpZp 19 Rhe1 a5 Commencing a pawn storm down the
6
pZ0opZpZ queenside towards the white king. And why not?
5
Z0m0Z0Z0 20 Bb5
4
0o0MPOPO
3
Z0ZBAQZ0
2
POPZNZ0Z
8
rZ0Z0skZ
1
ZKZRZ0ZR
7
ZblnapZp
a b c d e f g h 6
0Z0opZpO
5
oBm0Z0O0
14. . . Be7 15 g5 Rc8
15 h5 Bg7 16 h6
4
0o0MPO0Z
3
Z0Z0AQM0
2
POPZ0Z0Z
1
ZKZRS0Z0
a b c d e f g h

20 Qg4 NXd3! 21 cXd3 Nc5 22 f5 Ba6 23 f Xg6


hXg6 24 Qe2 d5

140
20. . . Rac8 21 Rc1?! Obviously concerned about but this merely gives away the b-file.
the c2-pawn, but this is a little passive. QUES- 25. . . bXc3 26 RXc3
TION: What can Black play here? ANSWER:
There are a few good moves, but...
21. . . d5! ...is another well-timed central break
which opens the position to Blacks advantage.
8
0Zrs0ZkZ
7
Z0l0apZp
6
0m0ZpZpO
5
o0mbZ0O0
8
0ZrZ0skZ 4
0Z0M0OQZ
7
ZblnapZp 3
Z0S0A0M0
6
0Z0ZpZpO 2
PO0ZBZ0Z
5
oBmpZ0O0 1
ZKZ0S0Z0
4
0o0MPO0Z a b c d e f g h
3
Z0Z0AQM0 26 Nb5 Qb7 27 NXc3 Nba4!
2
POPZ0Z0Z 26. . . Qb7! 27 Rc2 Ne4! EXERCISE: How does
1
ZKS0S0Z0 Black gain a big advantage after 28 Rec1?
a b c d e f g h
28 RXc8
21. . . a4
22 eXd5
8
0ZRs0ZkZ
7
ZqZ0apZp
8
0ZrZ0skZ 6
0m0ZpZpO
7
ZblnapZp 5
o0ZbZ0O0
6
0Z0ZpZpO 4
0Z0MnOQZ
5
oBmPZ0O0 3
Z0Z0A0M0
4
0o0M0O0Z 2
PO0ZBZ0Z
3
Z0Z0AQM0 1
ZKZ0S0Z0
POPZ0Z0Z
2 a b c d e f g h

1
ZKS0S0Z0 28 Rec1 RXc2! 29 NXc2 Na4 30 b3 BXb3!
a b c d e f g h
28. . . RXc8 29 NXe4
22 e5 Nb6 23 b3 Ne4 24 NXe4 dXe4 25 Qh3
Nd5!
22. . . BXd5 23 Qg4 Rfd8 24 Be2 Nb6 Another
dream position for Black. White cannot do any-
thing apart from try and parry Blacks threats.
Polugaevsky simply funnels his pieces towards
the queenside and looks for a breakthrough.
25 c4 Lashing out to try and gain some space,

141
32. . . Qd5! 33 aXb4 aXb4
8
0ZrZ0ZkZ 33 NXc2 RXc2 34 Bd4 ANSWER:
7
ZqZ0apZp
6
0m0ZpZpO
5
o0ZbZ0O0 8
0Z0Z0ZkZ
4
0Z0MNOQZ 7
ZqZ0apZp
3
Z0Z0A0Z0 6
0Z0ZpZpO
2
PO0ZBZ0Z 5
o0Z0Z0O0
1
ZKZ0S0Z0 4
0Z0AbOQZ
a b c d e f g h
3
O0Z0Z0Z0
29 Rc1 Nc3+! 30 RXc3 RXc3 31 bXc3 Nc4+ 32 2
0OrZBZ0Z
Nb3 NXe3
29. . . BXe4+ 30 Ka1 Nd5 31 Bf2
1
J0Z0S0Z0
a b c d e f g h

34 Rb1 BXa3! 35 bXa3 Ra2+!


8
0ZrZ0ZkZ 34. . . BXa3! 35 Rb1
7
ZqZ0apZp
6
0Z0ZpZpO
5
o0ZnZ0O0 8
0Z0Z0ZkZ
4
0Z0MbOQZ 7
ZqZ0ZpZp
3
Z0Z0Z0Z0 6
0Z0ZpZpO
2
PO0ZBA0Z 5
o0Z0Z0O0
1
J0Z0S0Z0 4
0Z0AbOQZ
a b c d e f g h 3
a0Z0Z0Z0
31 Bd2 Nb4 32 a3 Qd5 33 aXb4 aXb4
2
0OrZBZ0Z
31. . . Nb4 32 a3 Nc2+
1
JRZ0Z0Z0
a b c d e f g h

35 bXa3 Qb3
8
0ZrZ0ZkZ 35. . . Qb3 Once White played h6 and sealed the
7
ZqZ0apZp h-file, the black king was able to safely castle.
6
0Z0ZpZpO This gave Polugaevsky all the time in the world
to attack on the other side.
5
o0Z0Z0O0
4
0Z0MbOQZ 0-1
3
O0Z0Z0Z0
2
0OnZBA0Z
1
J0Z0S0Z0
a b c d e f g h

142
White: Simacek, P Hustopece (rapid)
Black: Movsesian, S
2009
Result: 0-1

1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 d6 3 d4 cXd4 4 NXd4 Nf6 5


Nc3 e6 6 Bg5 Be7 7 f4 Trying to play a la the
6 Bg5 Najdorf. Instead of this pawn push White
8
rmblkZ0s
has a variety of queen moves at his disposal: 7
opZ0apo0
6
0Z0opA0o
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
4
0Z0MPO0Z
8
rmblkZ0s 3
Z0M0Z0Z0
7
opZ0apop 2
POPZ0ZPO
6
0Z0opm0Z 1
S0ZQJBZR
5
Z0Z0Z0A0 a b c d e f g h
4
0Z0MPO0Z
3
Z0M0Z0Z0 8 Bh4 NXe4! 9 BXe7 NXc3 10 BXd8 NXd1 11
ZZ
2
POPZ0ZPO 8. . . BXf6 9 Qd2 O-O 10 O-O-O QUESTION:
1
S0ZQJBZR Yes, its nice to have the bishop-pair, but isnt
a b c d e f g h
our d6-pawn about to come under attack? AN-
SWER: Well, it may do, although Blacks next
7 Qd3 a6 8 O-O-O b5 9 f4 b4 10 Nce2 Bb7 11 protects it to some extent, but we have already
BXf6 BXf6 12 Qc4 O-O 13 QXb4 Qc7 seen the power of a bishop on f6 and this game
7 Qe2 Qa5 8 h4 Nc6 9 Nb3 Qc7 10 O-O-O a6 definitely furthers that case.
11 g4 b5 12 a3 b4 13 aXb4 NXb4 14 Bg2 Rb8 10. . . a6 Preventing Ndb5 when the d6-pawn would
15 Be3 a5 16 g5 Ba6 17 Qd2 Nd7 18 f4 O-O have been doomed.
7 Qd2 11 g4 Nc6 EXERCISE: Has the super grandmas-
7. . . h6! Here we see the dierence with the Na- ter missed that White can now win the d6-pawn?
jdorf: ...Be7 is a much more useful move than Try to calculate what may have convinced Black
...a6. Indeed, Black has some tricks up his sleeve to play this move. ANSWER: 11...Nc6 develops
that ensure White cannot reach the dangerous a piece, clears the long diagonal for the bishop
theoretical lines he may crave. on f6, helps open the b-file once Black recaptures
on c6, and there is a tactical shot behind Movs-
8 BXf6 esians play.
12 NXc6 bXc6 13 QXd6

143
8
rZbl0skZ 8
0sbZ0ZkZ
7
Z0Z0Zpo0 7
Z0Z0apZ0
6
pZpLpa0o 6
pZpZpZ0o
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0 5
Z0Z0O0o0
4
0Z0ZPOPZ 4
0ZBZ0OPZ
3
Z0M0Z0Z0 3
O0Z0Z0Z0
2
POPZ0Z0O 2
PZPJ0Z0O
1
Z0JRZBZR 1
Z0ZNZ0ZR
a b c d e f g h a b c d e f g h

13 h4!? 21 f Xg5? BXg5+


13. . . Qb6 14 e5 Rd8 15 Qa3 Qe3+ 16 Kb1 21. . . gXf4 22 Rf1 Bg5 23 Nf2 c5 24 Nd3 Bd7
RXd1+ 17 NXd1 QXa3 18 bXa3 Rb8+ 19 Kc1 25 Kc3 Bc6 26 NXf4 Rd8 27 Nd3 Be3 28 BXa6
Be7 Black will regain the a3-pawn and be at least
This routine grab lets Blacks bishops do the talk-
equal. ing, although this was a rapid game so neither
20 Bc4 QUESTION: What should Black play player had time to calculate properly.
next? ANSWER: Although Whites queenside 28. . . Bd4+ 29 Kd2 BXe5 This position is defi-
formation has already been destroyed, a second nitely easier for the bishops.
front can be opened up on the other side. The 30 h4 Bg7 31 Ke2 Ra8 32 Bc4 Ra4! Again the
next move is very much a grandmasterly one. grandmaster eschews the routine grab of material
20. . . g5! Congratulations if you spotted this! Or for something better.
should I say, didnt grab immediately on a3? 33 Bb3 Re4+ 34 Kd2 c4 35 Nb4 Bb5 With the
bishop on b3 trapped, it is in essence game over.
White only plays on as both players were likely
down to their last couple of minutes.
8
0sbZ0ZkZ 36 Rg1 cXb3 37 aXb3 Re2+ 38 Kd1 Rh2 39 a4
Be2+ 40 Kc1 Bd4 41 Rg3 Be5 42 Rg1 RXh4 43
7
Z0Z0apZ0 Nc6 Bf4+ 44 Kb2 RXg4 45 Re1 Rg2 46 a5 h5
6
pZpZpZ0o 47 Ka3 h4 48 c4 Bd6+ 49 Ka4 Bf3 50 Nd4 Ba8
5
Z0Z0O0o0 Blacks h-pawn is the faster. The main trick to
remember is the 7...h6 8 Bh4 Nxe4! idea (which
4
0ZBZ0OPZ we saw earlier in Giroyan-Nasuta from Chapter
3
O0Z0Z0Z0 Five). This equalizes and also gives Black chances
for a pleasant endgame grind.
2
PZPZ0Z0O
1
Z0JNZ0ZR 0-1
a b c d e f g h

20. . . BXa3+ 21 Kd2


21 Kd2

144
White: Metz, H Budapest
Black: Dao Thien Hai
1995
Result: 0-1

1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 d6 3 d4 cXd4 4 NXd4 Nf6 5


Nc3 e6 6 Bg5 Be7 7 Qd2 a6 8 O-O-O b5 9
f3 White is trying to play as he often does in the
8
rZ0l0skZ
Richter-Rauzer variation of the Classical Sicilian, 7
ZbZnapop
but again here Black enjoys a more flexible de-
velopment.
6
pZ0opA0Z
5
ZpZ0Z0Z0
4
0Z0MPZPO
3
Z0M0ZPZ0
8
rmblkZ0s 2
POPL0Z0Z
7
Z0Z0apop 1
Z0JRZBZR
6
pZ0opm0Z a b c d e f g h

5
ZpZ0Z0A0 12 Be3 b4 13 Nce2 d5! 14 g5 Nh5
4
0Z0MPZ0Z 12. . . NXf6 13 g5 Nd7 14 Bd3 Rc8 15 Kb1 Ne5
3
Z0M0ZPZ0 16 f4 Nc4 17 Qh2 EXERCISE: Which of the fol-
2
POPL0ZPO lowing three moves would you play and why? a)
17...Qb6; b) 17...d5; c) 17...b4.
1
Z0JRZBZR
a b c d e f g h

9 Bd3 Bb7 10 Rhe1 Nbd7 11 f4 b4 12 Na4 Qa5


13 b3 Nc5 14 a3 Rc8 15 aXb4 NXb3+ 16 NXb3 8
0Zrl0skZ
QXa4 17 Kb2 d5
9. . . Bb7 10 h4 O-O 11 g4 Nbd7 QUESTION:
7
ZbZ0apop
Arent we quite far behind in our attack, since
6
pZ0opZ0Z
White has already got in g4 and h4? ANSWER:
5
ZpZ0Z0O0
For White to even try and break through, he has
to play h5, g5 and g6. Moreover the bishop on
4
0ZnMPO0O
g5 is currently blocking the way. So that gives
3
Z0MBZ0Z0
Black four moves to conjure up some attacking 2
POPZ0Z0L
ideas. If you think thats possible, then you are
a Sicilian player!
1
ZKZRZ0ZR
a b c d e f g h
12 BXf6 White decides not to waste time by
bringing the bishop back in order to play g5. 17 BXc4 RXc4 18 f5 b4! 19 Nce2 BXe4 20 f Xe6
BXh1 21 RXh1 Qa5
17. . . d5!? ANSWER: After this push White nor-
mally chooses to play e5, blocking the centre, so I
hope you had an idea behind 17...d5 if you chose

145
it. an exchange down, but as weve seen before with
these ...Rxc3 ideas (Movsesian-Kasparov comes
to mind from Chapter One), Black has compen-
sation since the white king doesnt enjoy much
protection.
8
0Zrl0skZ 23 h5 Rc4 24 Ke3 ANSWER:
7
ZbZ0apop
6
pZ0ZpZ0Z
5
ZpZpZ0O0
4
0ZnMPO0O 8
0Z0Z0Z0Z
3
Z0MBZ0Z0 7
ZbZ0apok
2
POPZ0Z0L 6
pZ0ZpZ0Z
1
ZKZRZ0ZR 5
lpZpO0OP
a b c d e f g h 4
0ZrM0O0Z
17. . . Qb6
3
Z0Z0J0Z0
17. . . b4 18 Nce2
2
PZPZ0Z0L
18 e5 The typical move to close the position, but
1
Z0ZRZ0ZR
a b c d e f g h
White is in for a shock... QUESTION: Can you
now see why ...d5 was played? ANSWER: Black
can uncork the following combination: 24 g6+ Kh6 25 Ke2

18. . . NXb2! 19 KXb2 RXc3!! The sacrifices rain 24. . . RXd4! Giving up another exchange! The
down on White. sacrifices rain down upon White like a cold shower.

20 BXh7+ Not so much a Greek Gift sacrifice, 25 KXd4


but a clearance of the d3-square for the king.
(How many times has that been said before?)
8
0Z0Z0Z0Z
7
ZbZ0apok
6
pZ0ZpZ0Z
8
0Z0l0skZ 5
lpZpO0OP
7
ZbZ0apoB 4
0Z0J0O0Z
6
pZ0ZpZ0Z 3
Z0Z0Z0Z0
5
ZpZpO0O0 2
PZPZ0Z0L
4
0Z0M0O0O 1
Z0ZRZ0ZR
3
Z0s0Z0Z0 a b c d e f g h
2
PJPZ0Z0L
1
Z0ZRZ0ZR 25 RXd4 Qc3+ 26 Rd3 d4+ 27 Ke2 QXc2+ 28
Rd2 d3+
a b c d e f g h
25. . . Qb4+ 26 Ke3 Qc3+ 27 Ke2
20 KXc3 Qa5+ 21 Kb2 Ba3+ 22 Kb1 Qc3
20. . . KXh7 21 KXc3 Qa5+ 22 Kd3 Rc8 Black is

146
8
0Z0Z0Z0Z
7
ZbZ0apok
6
pZ0ZpZ0Z
5
ZpZpO0OP
4
0Z0Z0O0Z
3
Z0l0Z0Z0
2
PZPZKZ0L
1
Z0ZRZ0ZR
a b c d e f g h

27 Rd3 d4+ 28 Kf2 QXc2+


27. . . d4 Its amazing how Black is two exchanges
down and yet has a huge attack!
28 g6+ Kh6 Blacks king is safe enough here. His
queen and bishops now cause havoc.
29 Rhg1 Qf3+ 30 Ke1 Bb4+ 31 Rd2 Qe3+ 32
Kd1 Bf3+ 33 Kc1 Qa3+ 34 Kb1 Bc3! Forcing
mate. Metz sportingly allows Black to complete
the job.
35 Qg3 Qb2# Here a typical Sicilian position
with opposite-side castling arose and suddenly
Black could sacrifice a lot of his pieces. Be on
the lookout for these wild sacrifices!

0-1

147
White: Durao, J Nice Olympiad
Black: Andersson, U
1974
Result: 0-1

1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 d6 3 d4 cXd4 4 NXd4 Nf6 5


Nc3 e6 6 Bd3 Returning to 6 Bd3:
8
rZblka0s
7
opZ0Zpop
6
0Znopm0Z
8
rmblka0s 5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
7
opZ0Zpop 4
0Z0MPZ0Z
6
0Z0opm0Z 3
Z0MBZ0Z0
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0 2
POPZ0OPO
4
0Z0MPZ0Z 1
S0AQJ0ZR
a b c d e f g h
3
Z0MBZ0Z0
2
POPZ0OPO 6. . . a6
1
S0AQJ0ZR 6. . . Be7
a b c d e f g h
7 Be3 Be7 8 O-O O-O 9 f4 EXERCISE: Which
move would you play here? a) 9...a6; b) 9...e5;
6 Qe2 Nc6 7 NXc6 bXc6 8 g4 h6 9 Bg2 e5 10 c) 9...Nxd4. ANSWER: All three are of course
h3 Qb6 11 f4? Be7 12 f5 Ba6 13 Qf3 d5! 14 playable, but Andersson gains an immediate edge
eXd5 cXd5 15 NXd5 NXd5 16 QXd5 Bh4+ with a nice mini-combination:
6 Qf3 Nc6 7 Be3 Be7 8 Be2 O-O 9 Rd1 NXd4 9. . . NXd4 10 BXd4 e5! 11 Be3
10 BXd4 Qa5 11 Be3 Bd7 12 O-O Bc6
6 Bb5+ Nbd7 7 f4 a6 8 BXd7+ NXd7!? 9 Qf3
Qb6! 10 Nb3 Be7 11 Be3 Qc7 12 O-O-O O-O
13 f5 b5 14 a3 Rb8 15 g4 Ne5 16 Qg3 a5 17 g5
8
rZbl0skZ
Re8! 18 f6 Bf8! 7
opZ0apop
6. . . Nc6 QUESTION: Why did Black play this, 6
0Z0o0m0Z
rather than any other move? 5
Z0Z0o0Z0
4
0Z0ZPO0Z
3
Z0MBA0Z0
2
POPZ0ZPO
1
S0ZQZRJ0
a b c d e f g h

11 f Xe5 dXe5 12 BXe5 Ng4! 13 Bf4 Qb6+ 14


Kh1 Nf2+ 15 RXf2 QXf2
11. . . Ng4 This is one reason why the bishop prefers

148
to be on e2, as then moves like this leap are pre- technique in converting his advantage it is typi-
vented. Now Black seizes the bishop-pair. cally impressive.
12 Qf3 NXe3 13 QXe3 eXf4 14 QXf4 ANSWER: 26 Qg5 Bg7 27 Bd3 Re5 28 Qf4 Qe7 29 Qf2
14. . . Bf6! As expected, Andersson knows where Rc8 30 Ra3 Re8 31 Bb1 Re2 32 Qf3 Re1 33
to place his pieces. The dark-squared bishop al- Bc2 RXf1+ 34 QXf1 Qe2 35 Bd3 Qd2
ready gives Black more than a pleasant game. It 0-1
is far better on e5, controlling the whole board,
than on e7.

8
rZbl0skZ
7
opZ0Zpop
6
0Z0o0a0Z
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
4
0Z0ZPL0Z
3
Z0MBZ0Z0
2
POPZ0ZPO
1
S0Z0ZRJ0
a b c d e f g h

14. . . Qb6+ 15 Kh1 QXb2 16 Nd5 Bd8 17 QXd6


Be6 18 Rfb1!
15 Qd2 Be6 16 Nd5

8
rZ0l0skZ
7
opZ0Zpop
6
0Z0oba0Z
5
Z0ZNZ0Z0
4
0Z0ZPZ0Z
3
Z0ZBZ0Z0
2
POPL0ZPO
1
S0Z0ZRJ0
a b c d e f g h

16 Kh1 Rc8 17 Nd5 BXb2 18 Rab1 BXd5 19


eXd5 Bc3
16. . . BXb2 17 Rab1 Bd4+ 18 Kh1 b6 19 c4 Be5
20 Qe3 Rc8 21 Rb3 g6 22 Ra3 Qd7 23 Be2 Rc5
24 Ra6 BXd5 25 eXd5 Re8 Observe Anderssons

149
White: Exercise 1 ?
Black: ?
2012
Result: *

8
0ZrZkZ0s
7
ZpZbapo0
6
pl0opm0o
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
4
0ZnZPZPZ
3
ZNM0Z0ZP
2
POPZQOBZ
1
Z0ARZRZK
a b c d e f g h

150
White: Solution to Exercise 1 ?
Black: ?
2012
Result: *

8
0ZrZkZ0s
7
ZpZbapo0
6
pl0opm0o
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
4
0ZnZPZPZ
3
ZNM0Z0ZP
2
POPZQOBZ
1
Z0ARZRZK
a b c d e f g h

16. . . g5 17 Rd4 Qc7 18 Nd2 Ne5 19 Nf3 h5


*

151
White: Exercise 2 ?
Black: ?
2012
Result: *

8
0Z0Z0skZ
7
Zbl0apop
6
pZ0opZPZ
5
ZpZ0m0ZP
4
nZ0ZPZ0Z
3
Z0OBAPZ0
2
PZPZNL0Z
1
ZKZRZ0ZR
a b c d e f g h

152
White: Solution to Exercise 2 ?
Black: ?
2012
Result: *

8
0Z0Z0skZ
7
Zbl0apop
6
pZ0opZPZ
5
ZpZ0m0ZP
4
nZ0ZPZ0Z
3
Z0OBAPZ0
2
PZPZNL0Z
1
ZKZRZ0ZR
a b c d e f g h

20. . . f Xg6 21 hXg6 h6


*

153
White: Exercise 3 ?
Black: ?
2012
Result: *

8
0Z0skZ0Z
7
Z0lbapor
6
pZnopm0Z
5
ZpZ0Z0A0
4
0Z0ZPO0O
3
ONM0Z0S0
2
0OPL0ZBZ
1
ZKZRZ0Z0
a b c d e f g h

154
White: Solution to Exercise 3 ?
Black: ?
2012
Result: *

8
0Z0skZ0Z
7
Z0lbapor
6
pZnopm0Z
5
ZpZ0Z0A0
4
0Z0ZPO0O
3
ONM0Z0S0
2
0OPL0ZBZ
1
ZKZRZ0Z0
a b c d e f g h

19. . . Bc8 20 Nd5 eXd5 21 eXd5


*

155
White: Exercise 4 ?
Black: ?
2012
Result: *

8
0Zrlka0s
7
ZbZnZpop
6
pm0opZ0Z
5
ZpZ0Z0Z0
4
0Z0MPZPZ
3
Z0M0APZ0
2
POPZ0L0O
1
ZKZRZBZR
a b c d e f g h

156
White: Solution to Exercise 4 ?
Black: ?
2012
Result: *

8
0Zrlka0s
7
ZbZnZpop
6
pm0opZ0Z
5
ZpZ0Z0Z0
4
0Z0MPZPZ
3
Z0MBAPZ0
2
POPZ0L0O
1
ZKZRZ0ZR
a b c d e f g h

14. . . RXc3 15 bXc3


*

157
White: Exercise 5 ?
Black: ?
2012
Result: *

8
0s0ZrakZ
7
ZbZ0lpZp
6
pZ0opZpZ
5
Z0o0Z0O0
4
PZ0mPO0L
3
Z0M0Z0ZR
2
0OPZ0ZBO
1
Z0A0ZRZK
a b c d e f g h

158
White: Solution to Exercise 5 ?
Black: ?
2012
Result: *

8
0s0ZrakZ
7
ZbZ0lpZp
6
pZ0opZpZ
5
Z0o0Z0O0
4
PZ0mPO0L
3
Z0M0Z0ZR
2
0OPZ0ZBO
1
Z0A0ZRZK
a b c d e f g h

25. . . h5 26 gXh6 QXh4 27 RXh4 Kh7


*

159
White: Exercise 6 ?
Black: ?
2012
Result: *

8
rZ0ZrZkZ
7
ZblnZpap
6
po0opZpZ
5
Z0Z0Z0O0
4
Pm0ZPO0Z
3
ZNM0A0ZR
2
0OPZ0LBO
1
Z0Z0ZRZK
a b c d e f g h

160
White: Solution to Exercise 6 ?
Black: ?
2012
Result: *

8
rZ0ZrZkZ
7
ZblnZpap
6
po0opZpZ
5
Z0Z0Z0O0
4
Pm0ZPO0Z
3
ZNM0A0ZR
2
0OPZ0LBO
1
Z0Z0ZRZK
a b c d e f g h

22. . . Re7 23 Bd4 e5 24 f Xe5 BXe5


*

161
White: Exercise 7 ?
Black: ?
2012
Result: *

8
rZ0ZrZkZ
7
ZblnZpap
6
po0opZpZ
5
Z0Z0Z0O0
4
Pm0APO0Z
3
ZNM0Z0ZQ
2
0OPZ0SBO
1
Z0Z0ZRZK
a b c d e f g h

162
White: Solution to Exercise 7 ?
Black: ?
2012
Result: *

8
rZ0ZrZkZ
7
ZblnZpap
6
po0opZpZ
5
Z0Z0Z0O0
4
Pm0APO0Z
3
ZNM0Z0ZQ
2
0OPZ0SBO
1
Z0Z0ZRZK
a b c d e f g h

22. . . e5 23 f Xe5 NXe5 24 BXe5 RXe5 25 RXf7


Re7 26 RXe7 QXe7
*

163
White: Exercise 8 ?
Black: ?
2012
Result: *

8
0sbZ0skZ
7
Z0l0apop
6
0Z0opZ0Z
5
opZ0mPO0
4
0Z0ZPZ0Z
3
ONM0A0L0
2
0OPZ0Z0O
1
Z0JRZ0ZR
a b c d e f g h

164
White: Solution to Exercise 8 ?
Black: ?
2012
Result: *

8
0sbZ0skZ
7
Z0l0apop
6
0Z0opZ0Z
5
opZ0mPO0
4
0Z0ZPZ0Z
3
ONM0A0L0
2
0OPZ0Z0O
1
Z0JRZ0ZR
a b c d e f g h

18. . . Re8 19 f6 Bf8 20 f Xg7 BXg7


*

165
White: Exercise 9 ?
Black: ?
2012
Result: *

8
rZ0l0skZ
7
ZbZ0apop
6
pZ0o0m0Z
5
Z0Z0oPZ0
4
0o0ZPZPZ
3
ZPM0ZQM0
2
0OPZ0Z0O
1
S0A0ZRJ0
a b c d e f g h

166
White: Solution to Exercise 9 ?
Black: ?
2012
Result: *

8
rZ0l0skZ
7
ZbZ0apop
6
pZ0o0m0Z
5
Z0Z0oPZ0
4
0o0ZPZPZ
3
ZPM0ZQM0
2
0OPZ0Z0O
1
S0A0ZRJ0
a b c d e f g h

16 Nce2 d5
*

167
White: Exercise 10 ?
Black: ?
2012
Result: *

8
rZ0ZkZ0s
7
ZblnZpap
6
pZ0opZpZ
5
Z0m0Z0OP
4
0o0MPO0Z
3
Z0ZBAQZ0
2
POPZNZ0Z
1
ZKZRZ0ZR
a b c d e f g h

168
White: Solution to Exercise 10 ?
Black: ?
2012
Result: *

8
rZ0ZkZ0s
7
ZblnZpap
6
pZ0opZpZ
5
Z0m0Z0OP
4
0o0MPO0Z
3
Z0ZBAQZ0
2
POPZNZ0Z
1
ZKZRZ0ZR
a b c d e f g h

17. . . Rg8 18 Ng3 O-O-O


*

169
White: Exercise 11 ?
Black: ?
2012
Result: *

8
rmblka0s
7
ZpZ0Zpop
6
pZ0opm0Z
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
4
0Z0MPO0Z
3
Z0M0ZQZ0
2
POPZ0ZPO
1
S0A0JBZR
a b c d e f g h

170
White: Solution to Exercise 11 ?
Black: ?
2012
Result: *

8
rmblka0s
7
ZpZ0Zpop
6
pZ0opm0Z
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
4
0Z0MPO0Z
3
Z0M0ZQZ0
2
POPZ0ZPO
1
S0A0JBZR
a b c d e f g h

8. . . Qb6 9 Nb3 Qc7


*

171
White: Exercise 12 ?
Black: ?
2012
Result: *

8
0sbZka0s
7
Z0l0Zpop
6
pZ0opm0Z
5
Zpm0Z0Z0
4
0Z0MPZPZ
3
O0M0APZQ
2
0OPZ0Z0O
1
Z0JRZBZR
a b c d e f g h

172
White: Solution to Exercise 12 ?
Black: ?
2012
Result: *

8
0sbZka0s
7
Z0l0Zpop
6
pZ0opm0Z
5
Zpm0Z0Z0
4
0Z0MPZPZ
3
O0M0APZQ
2
0OPZ0Z0O
1
Z0JRZBZR
a b c d e f g h

13. . . Nfd7

8
0sbZka0s
7
Z0lnZpop
6
pZ0opZ0Z
5
Zpm0Z0Z0
4
0Z0MPZPZ
3
O0M0APZQ
2
0OPZ0Z0O
1
Z0JRZBZR
a b c d e f g h

13. . . b4 14 aXb4 RXb4 15 g5 Nfd7 16 g6 Nb6


17 QXh7

173
White: Exercise 13 ?
Black: ?
2012
Result: *

8
rZ0Z0skZ
7
Zplbapop
6
pZ0opm0Z
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
4
Pm0MPO0Z
3
Z0M0A0L0
2
0OPZBZPO
1
S0Z0ZRZK
a b c d e f g h

174
White: Solution to Exercise 13 ?
Black: ?
2012
Result: *

8
rZ0Z0skZ
7
Zplbapop
6
pZ0opm0Z
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
4
Pm0MPO0Z
3
Z0M0A0L0
2
0OPZBZPO
1
S0Z0ZRZK
a b c d e f g h

14. . . Kh8
*

175
White: Exercise 14 ?
Black: ?
2012
Result: *

Fen: r2qk2r/3b1pp1/p2bp2p/3nn3/1p1N1BP1/1P3P2/PNPQ3P/2KR1B1R
w kq - 0 16

8
rZ0lkZ0s
7
Z0ZbZpo0
6
pZ0apZ0o
5
Z0Znm0Z0
4
0o0M0APZ
3
ZPZ0ZPZ0
2
PMPL0Z0O
1
Z0JRZBZR
a b c d e f g h

176
White: Solution to Exercise 14 ?
Black: ?
2012
Result: *

8
rZ0lkZ0s
7
Z0ZbZpo0
6
pZ0apZ0o
5
Z0Znm0Z0
4
0o0M0APZ
3
ZPZ0ZPZ0
2
PMPL0Z0O
1
Z0JRZBZR
a b c d e f g h

16 Nf5
*

177
White: Exercise 15 ?
Black: ?
2012
Result: *

8
rZ0Z0skZ
7
Zpl0apop
6
pZ0o0m0Z
5
Z0Z0oPZ0
4
PZbZPZPZ
3
Z0M0A0Z0
2
0OPZBZ0O
1
S0Z0LRJ0
a b c d e f g h

178
White: Solution to Exercise 15 ?
Black: ?
2012
Result: *

8
rZ0Z0skZ
7
Zpl0apop
6
pZ0o0m0Z
5
Z0Z0oPZ0
4
PZbZPZPZ
3
Z0M0A0Z0
2
0OPZBZ0O
1
S0Z0LRJ0
a b c d e f g h

16. . . d5 17 g5 NXe4 18 NXe4 dXe4 19 f6 Bc5


*

179
White: Exercise 16 ?
Black: ?
2012
Result: *

8
0ZrZka0s
7
Z0l0Zpop
6
pZ0ZpZ0Z
5
ZpZbZ0Z0
4
nZnMNZPZ
3
Z0ZBZPZ0
2
POPZ0L0O
1
ZKARS0Z0
a b c d e f g h

180
White: Solution to Exercise 16 ?
Black: ?
2012
Result: *

8
0ZrZka0s
7
Z0l0Zpop
6
pZ0ZpZ0Z
5
ZpZbZ0Z0
4
nZnMNZPZ
3
Z0ZBZPZ0
2
POPZ0L0O
1
ZKARS0Z0
a b c d e f g h

20. . . NaXb2 21 BXb2 NXb2 22 KXb2 BXe4 23


BXe4 Qc3+ 24 Kb1 Ba3
*

181
White: Exercise 17 ?
Black: ?
2012
Result: *

8
rmblkZ0s
7
opZ0apop
6
0Z0opm0Z
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
4
0Z0MPZ0Z
3
ZBM0Z0Z0
2
POPZ0OPO
1
S0AQJ0ZR
a b c d e f g h

182
White: Solution to Exercise 17 ?
Black: ?
2012
Result: *

8
rmblkZ0s
7
opZ0apop
6
0Z0opm0Z
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
4
0Z0MPZ0Z
3
ZBM0Z0Z0
2
POPZ0OPO
1
S0AQJ0ZR
a b c d e f g h

8. . . Na6

8
rZblkZ0s
7
opZ0apop
6
nZ0opm0Z
5
Z0Z0Z0Z0
4
0Z0MPZ0Z
3
ZBM0Z0Z0
2
POPZ0OPO
1
S0AQJ0ZR
a b c d e f g h

8. . . Nbd7 9 BXe6 f Xe6 10 NXe6 Qa5 11 NXg7+


Kf7 12 Nf5

183
White: Exercise 18 ?
Black: ?
2012
Result: *

8
0jbs0Z0s
7
Zpl0apo0
6
pZnopm0Z
5
Z0Z0Z0A0
4
0Z0ZPO0O
3
ZNM0ZBZ0
2
POPZQZ0Z
1
ZKZRZ0ZR
a b c d e f g h

184
White: Solution to Exercise 18 ?
Black: ?
2012
Result: *

8
0jbs0Z0s
7
Zpl0apo0
6
pZnopm0Z
5
Z0Z0Z0A0
4
0Z0ZPO0O
3
ZNM0ZBZ0
2
POPZQZ0Z
1
ZKZRZ0ZR
a b c d e f g h

18. . . Ng8
*

185