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AMENDMENTS 1

PREFACE 2
1. INTRODUCTION 3
1.1. NSC FEATURES 4
1.2. PHYSICAL LAYOUT 6
1.3. MEANING OF THE LEDs 7
2. INSTALLATION 9
2.1. UNPACKING 9
2.2. SELECTING A SUITABLE SITE 9
2.3. CONNECTING THE POWER 10
2.4. CONNECTING CABLES 11
2.4.1. S0 Socket 11
2.4.2. V.24 Interface 12
2.5. LOADING NSC APPLICATIONS TO FEPROM 14
2.5.1. Loadable NSC applications 15
2.5.2. Starting the Application Loader 15
2.5.3. Application Loader Commands 16
2.5.4. Load an Application: +app 16
2.5.5. Erase an Application: -app 17
2.5.6. Quit the Application Loader: ^C 17
3. CONFIGURING THE NSC 18
3.1. DIAL-UP CONNECTION 18
3.2. LEASED LINE CONNECTION 19
4. SOPHO IS3000 PROJECTING ASPECTS 21
4.1. DNRs, ROUTE AND BUNDLE OPTIONS 21
4.2. OM COMMANDS 22
4.3. MONITORING FUNCTIONS 25
4.4. HOW IT WORKS IN GENERAL 26
5. PROGRAMMING THE NSC 27
5.1. GENERAL SETTINGS 27
5.1.1. Destination Number 27
5.1.2. Extension MSN 1 27
5.1.3. Extension MSN 2 27
5.2. MODEM RELATED SETTINGS 28
5.3. PROGRAMMING ACTIONS 30
Table of contents

5.3.1. To start programming Mode: 30

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5.3.2. To exit programming Mode: 30
5.3.3. To re-initialise the modem: 31
5.4. TERMINAL SETTINGS 31
5.5. COMMAND ENTRY 32
5.6. GENERAL COMMANDS 32
5.7. PROGRAMMABLE SETTING COMMANDS 33
5.8. PARAMETER TYPES 34
5.8.1. <msn1> 34
5.8.2. <msn2> 34
5.8.3. <speed> 34
5.8.4. <boolean> 34
5.8.5. <number> 35
5.8.6. <seconds> 35
5.8.7. <string> 35
5.9. EXAMPLE OF MODEM SETTINGS 36
5.9.1. Dial Up with No Dial Tone (Loopback via SOPHO) 36
5.9.2. Dial Up with Dial Tone (Direct connection to PSTN) 37
5.9.3. Leased Line 37
5.10. REPLY MESSAGES 38
5.10.1. Normal Reply Messages 38
5.10.2. Extended Reply Messages 39
6. DESIGNING CUSTOM MODEM SETTINGS 40
7. TECHNICAL DATA 44
Table of contents

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AMENDMENTS
The items that follow are incorporated in the update of this manual from issue 9601 to 9901:

CHAPTER/ SECTION DESCRIPTION


Chapter 4 Example renewed.

The items that follow are incorporated in the update of this manual from issue 9901 to 0107:

CHAPTER/ SECTION DESCRIPTION


Chapters 2 & 5 Added: V.24 cable is shielded.

1
PREFACE
This manual describes the hardware and software installation of the SOPHO Network
Signalling Convertor (SOPHO NSC) which can be connected to the SOPHO iS3000 ISPBXs
equipped with System Software 805 or higher.

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1. INTRODUCTION

The SOPHO Network Signalling Convertor (NSC) is a multi-functional ISDN terminal adaptor
designed specifically for carrying Private Virtual Networking (PVN) signalling between
SOPHO iS3000 systems, using analogue lines.
The NSC is used in the PVN environment as a terminal adaptor, converting digital PVN
signalling from a 64 kbits/s channel to V.24 signals. These V.24 signals are then transmitted via
a modem to a peer configuration as shown in figure 1.1.

Figure 1-1 SOPHO NSC Connection.

The intervening network can consist of either a 2-wire PSTN connection, leased lines or a
loopback to a SOPHO iS3000 system connected via an analogue connection and/or an ISDN
network to a peer SOPHO iS3000 system equipped with an NSC.
Two configurations are possible for connecting the NSC to the public (analogue) network: the
direct an indirect connection.

Direct connection : the modem connected to the NSC is directly routed through the public
network, e.g. by 2-wire switched connections or 2-wire leased lines; see figure
1.2.

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Figure 1-2 Direct Analogue Connection.

Indirect connection : the analogue output wires (a/b) of the modem are looped back into the
SOPHO iS3000 via an analogue port; see figure 1.3. A connection to the public
network is made via an analogue or digital trunk line capable of carrying modem
signals.

Figure 1-3 Indirect Analogue or Digital Connection.

It is not necessary to have the same configuration option at both ends of the signalling
connection. The direct connection and the indirect connection using digital trunks can be used
together. For example when a large iS3000 system (with 2 Mbits/s trunks) is connected to a
small satellite iS3000 system which only has a direct connection to the PSTN.

1.1. NSC FEATURES

The NSC has the following main features:

- 230V AC powering by means of an internal transformer;


- Wall or desk mounting possibility or stackable;
- Only point-to-point connections possible (fixed destination DNR projected in the NSC);
- The NSC uses only one B channel;

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- Programming the NSC via the V.24 interface is possible using a standard terminal or a PC
equipped with a standard terminal emulation program;
- Hayes compatible modems are used.

The NSC hardware (see figure 1.4.) consists of the following functional blocks:

- Mains Transformer and Switched Mode Power Supply (SMPS);


- 2 line circuits: only one of these (S0-1) is used by the NSC application; the other line circuit
is used in non-NSC applications;
- A microprocessor which controls the D channel, the LEDs, the data interfaces and the S0
interface circuit;
- RAM memory;
- EEPROM memory;
- EPROM memory.

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Figure 1-4 Functional Block Diagram of the NSC.

1.2. PHYSICAL LAYOUT

Figure 1.5. shows the layout of the front and bottom edges of the NSC.

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Figure 1-5 Front and Bottom View of the NSC.

1.3. MEANING OF THE LEDs

The LEDs are only of significance during the first installation and testing of the NSC, therefore
it is not important that the LEDs are visible during normal operation.

- LED 1: indicates the status of power and the S0 bus connection between the NSC and the
SOPHO iS3000. When an ISDN call is being established or is established on S0-1 then this
LED is either solid or flashing green. Otherwise it is red or red flashing to indicate whether
the bus is activated or not; see table 1.1.
- LED 2: indicates the status of the V.24 port. When the NSC is communicating to the
modem the LED flashes green. This will occur on initialisation, recycling or call starts. The
LED flashes alternately red and green when in programming mode; see table 1.2.

Table 1-1 Meaning of the LED 1 (independent of the status of LED 2).

LED 1 POWER / S0 BUS


Off Power off.
RED Power on, layer 1 activated, self test failure.

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LED 1 POWER / S0 BUS
RED flash Power on, layer 1 not activated.
GREEN flash Establishing a PVN call.
GREEN PVN call established.
RED/GREEN -
Table 1-2 Meaning of the LED 2 (independent of the status of LED 1).

LED 2 MODEM PORT


Off Modem not on line.
RED Self test failure.
RED flash Modem not connected/fault.
GREEN flash Modem initiation/recycle/call start.
GREEN Modem on line.
RED/GREEN Programming.

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2. INSTALLATION

This section provides the information required to plan and accomplish the mechanical and
electrical installation of the NSC. Because the NSC facilities are partly dependent on the ISPBX
functions it is necessary to have a good understanding of the projecting and maintenance
procedures of the ISPBX.

2.1. UNPACKING

After unpacking the equipment shipping carton, inspect the contents for any damage that may
have occurred during shipment. In the event of damage, contact the nearest PHILIPS
representative. The shipping carton of the NSC only contains the NSC. Mains cabling, cabling
for the interconnection of the NSC and modem V.24 connectors and a cable to connect the
NSC to a wall socket will be separate items that are delivered in addition to the NSC.

2.2. SELECTING A SUITABLE SITE

The NSC should be mounted so that it is close to the modem for convenient connection of
the V.24 interface cables. Consideration should also be given to the location of the nearest AC
power outlet and telephone line circuits. For installation diagnostics it is useful to position the
unit where the LEDs can be easily seen. The LEDs are not important during normal operation.

WARNING: DO NOT MOUNT THE NSC NEAR HEATERS AND DO NOT


EXPOSE THE UNIT TO MOISTURE.

The NSC can be placed on top of or underneath the modem or another NSC.
Wall mounting requires the removal of the wall bracket. Removing this cover is potentially
hazardous and should only be done by suitably qualified persons. Before removing the wall
bracket the installer must ensure all cables are disconnected. Removal of the wall bracket is
achieved by removing the screw on the bottom edge of the unit; see figure in chapter 1. The
bracket should be positioned so all cable connections are on the bottom edge. Mounting
screws for the bracket must be seated in fully to prevent them touching the PCB when the
unit is re-attached. The unit is reattached by slotting in the front cover and inserting the screw
on the bottom edge; see figure 2.1.
In case the NSC is stacked or placed on a desk, fit the four plastic feet at the wall bracket.

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Figure 2-1 Wall Mounting Holes.

2.3. CONNECTING THE POWER

Power is supplied via a 2.5 A appliance inlet on the bottom edge of the unit. An appliance
power cord is supplied with the unit. Before connecting the NSC to a power outlet, ensure
that the voltage and frequency of the power outlet selected are the same as those specified
on the label affixed to the NSC.
The NSC is a Class II apparatus. No protective conductor (PE) is required nor provided.

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The V.24 port may be connected to earthed equipment.
Connect the power cord to the power outlet and switch on the supply. When the NSC is
powered on both LEDs will turn red (for 6 seconds) as the unit performs its self tests.
Then LED1 (red) and LED2 (green) start blinking for 12 seconds as the NSC begins operation.
After 12 seconds both LEDs continue blinking but both in red.
Per NSC/modem combination two mains power sockets are required.

2.4. CONNECTING CABLES

The NSC is equipped with two S0 sockets, labelled S0-1 and S0-2, and a V.24 DCE female
socket. Only the S0-1 and the V.24 socket should be connected for normal operation of the
NSC.

WARNING: S0-2 SHOULD NOT BE CONNECTED.

2.4.1. S0 Socket

The S0 sockets are both 8 way modular (RJ45) sockets. S0-1 is used for connection of the NSC
to the SOPHO iS3000 digital extension port (DTX-I).
The pin configuration of S0-1 is shown in figure 2.2.

Figure 2-2 NSC Line Cord Socket.

The NSC is considered to be terminal equipment therefore it does not include terminators on
the S0 interface. The S0-1 socket should be connected with a terminal line cord (normal length
6m.) which terminates in an 8 way plug. At the other end the terminal line cord should be
connected to the wall socket. The wall socket must always be fitted with two 100 Ohm (5%,
0,5 Watt) termination resistors.

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The NSC is not line powered but must detect the phantom voltage provided by the DTX-I to
operate. When the NSC is correctly connected to the SOPHO iS3000 the LED 1 will stop
flashing and remain steady red. This indicates that the So bus is activated and the NSC is ready
to communicate with the ISPBX. If the NSC does not detect a phantom voltage and So bus
activation LED 1 remains flashing red.

2.4.2. V.24 Interface

The interchange circuit pin assignment of the NSC is consistent with DCE interchange circuits
with female contacts. The NSC operates these circuits as a DCE which requires a special
shielded cross-over cable for connection to a modem. Connection to a PC for installation
requires a straight cable (pins match one to one).
Figure 2.3. shows the connector pin layout.

Figure 2-3 V.24 Interface Connector Pin Layout.

The pin assignment for the interface circuits supported by the NSC is listed in table 2.1.
Table 2-1 V.24 Interface Pin Assignment.

TO/FROM
PIN CIRCUIT MNEMONIC DESCRIPTION DCE
1 - - N.C. -
2 103 TXD Transmitted Data to
3 104 RXD Received Data from
4 105 RTS Request to Send to
5 106 CTS Clear to Send from
6 107 DSR Data Set Ready (not used by NSC from
application)
7 102 GND Signal Ground/Common Return -
8 109 DCD Data Carrier Detect from
9 ... 19 - - N.C. -
20 108.2 DTR Data Terminal Ready to
21 - - N.C. -
22 125 CI Ring Indicator (not used by NSC from
application)
23 ... 25 - - N.C. -

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The shielded cross-over cable supplied with the NSC is suitable for connecting the NSC to a
modem. This cable has the cross connections shown in figure 2.4.

Figure 2-4 NSC - Modem Cable Cross Connection.

When programming the NSC, the modem cable must be disconnected and either a dumb
terminal or PC must be plugged into the V.24 port, using a shielded "straight" cable as shown
in figure 2.5. (25 pins) or 2.6. (9 pins).

Figure 2-5 Cable NSC - PC or dumb Terminal (25 pins).

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Figure 2-6 Cable NSC - PC (9 pins).

Before connecting the NSC to the modem the NSC must be configured. Configuration of the
NSC sets up its operation for the installation site by setting DNRs, MSNs as well as selection
of the modem commands to operate the particular modem. Configuration of the NSC is
described in chapter 3.
If the NSC has already been configured then it can be cabled to the modem using the supplied
shielded cross-over cable. Using other V.24 cables may result in incorrect connection and
faulty operation of both the NSC and connected equipment. If the modem is powered up it
should be initialised by pressing the Program/Reset button on the NSC briefly. This results in
the LED 2 flashing green. Once the modem is successfully initialised, LED 2 is turned off and
the NSC is ready for operation.
At this time LED 1 is steady red and LED 2 is off.

2.5. LOADING NSC APPLICATIONS TO FEPROM

The NSC has two PROMs which can contain application firmware.
The first is the boot PROM of which the contents can not be changed in the field. It runs
whenever the NSC is powered up and contains:

- memory test routine


- application loader
- application start routine

The second PROM is a FEPROM which contains the NSC application. The application loader
(in the boot PROM) allows an application to be loaded into the FEPROM, using a PC running
terminal emulation software and connected to the V.24 port of the NSC.

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Commonly available terminal emulation software (e.g. Procomm, Crosstalk, HyperTerm) that
supports file transfer by the XMODEM or XMODEM-1K file transfer protocol is needed.
A standard DTE-DCE cable is required; see figures 2.5 & 2.6.
Other characteristics are:

baud rate in the range 1200 ... 57600


data format 8 bits
parity no
stop bit 1 bit
Xon/Xoff protocol disabled
handshaking enabled or disabled
The application loader can also be used to display identification data of the PROMs and to
erase an application from the FEPROM.
When no application has been loaded, the two NSC LEDs are flashing red.

2.5.1. Loadable NSC applications

A loadable and valid NSC application is a binary file containing a signature and a checksum that
are checked during loading:

- If a correct signature is not present, the application is not loaded and the previous installed
application is preserved (if one was present).
- If the signature is valid, but the checksum is wrong, the previous installed application is
erased because the checksum can not be verified until the new application has been
loaded.

2.5.2. Starting the Application Loader

Starting the Application Loader

Actions

1. Connect the PC to the NSC V.24 port.


2. Start the terminal emulation and set it to the valid baud rate, data format and the
connected serial port.
3. Power off and on the NSC.
4. Press the ESCAPE key (ESC) quickly a few times until a message is displayed containing
identification information of the FEPROM data. The 'Power' LED is switched off and the
'V.24' LED is set to red.
5. Press the ESC key again: the identification information of the FEPROM data is redisplayed.
The identifiaction message contains a code, a hexadecimal checksum and a text string

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identifying the boot PROM and the FEPROM application (when present). Examples of the
various possibilities are:
- BOOT [17FE] 3522 254 22990 (FEPROM with valid application installed)
APP [23BA] 9562 904 23000
- BOOT [17FE] 3522 254 22990 (FEPROM but no application installed)
- BOOT [17FE] 3522 254 22990 (FEPROM not fitted)
**** Flash EPROM not installed
If the ESC key is not pressed within 5 seconds after power up, starting the application
loader has failed. The boot PROM program continues with the normal power-up
sequence and attempts to start the loader application. This may cause characters of data
(e.g. modem setup commands) to appear on the screen.
6. Power off and on the NSC to retry starting the loader.

2.5.3. Application Loader Commands

Once the identifiaction message is displayed, the application loader waits for commands. It
does not display a prompt, but it responds with a ? when an unexpected character is received.
After 60 seconds of inactivity the loader will quit automatically.
Table 2-2 Commands Accepted by the Loader.

COMMANDS MEANING
ESCAPE Display information message.
+app Load an application.
-app Erase an application.
ctrl C (^C) Quit the application loader.
ctrl X (^X) twice Abort the download.

Note: An unexpected character has been received if the Loader returns the ? character
as a reply.

2.5.4. Load an Application: +app

First a prompt message is displayed:


Send application - ^X^X to abort
Next a character is sent periodically to the PC and appears on the display.
Start an XMODEM or XMODEM-1K file transfer ('upload') to the NSC (XMODEM-1K file
transfer is preferred for faster transfer).
The only kind of file that can be sent is a valid NSC loadable application. When the user waits
too long (more than 20 seconds) to start the upload, the command is aborted.
If it is necessary to abort upload, the control key ^X can be pressed twice.
When the file transfer starts successfully, the application loader checks for a valid signature at
the beginning of the file; it aborts loading when no valid signature is found.

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During loading the 'Power' LED flashes green as each block of received data is programmed
into the FEPROM. Periodically there is a pause as a sector in FEPROM is erased: then the LED
flashes red.
When the entire application file has been transferred, its checksum is calculated and verified.
When the application is valid the message 'Loaded OK' and the application identification data
is displayed.
Application loading can be interrupted by giving an abort command on the terminal emulator,
e.g. ESC for PROCOMM. Alternatively the NSC 'Program/Reset' button can be pressed. The
application loader displays an error message and waits for a new command.
If there are too many errors during file transfer the application loader displays an error
message and loading is aborted.

2.5.5. Erase an Application: -app

If it is necessary to erase an application without loading a new one use the -app command.
Before the application is erased, a confirmation prompt is displayed:
Erase - are you sure? (y/n)
Typing 'y' will erase the application, otherwise the command is aborted.
During erase the 'Power' LED is red.

2.5.6. Quit the Application Loader: ^C

To quit the application loader while it is waiting for a command, the control key ^C can be
pressed. A confirmation message is displayed. Alternatively the NSC 'Program/Reset' button
can be pressed.
If no command is given within 60 seconds, the application loader will quit automatically.

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3. CONFIGURING THE NSC

This section describes the minimum settings for programming the NSC.
Two possible direct connection scenarios are described in this document, these are:

- the dial-up connection;


- the leased line.

It is assumed that both of these connection types have the SOPHO iS3000 systems connected
directly via a public network or leased line.
Configurations where the a/b pair of the modem (see figure 1.2.) is routed through the
SOPHO iS3000 only require the 'destination number' to reflect the required route; see
chapter 4. for a description of 'destination number'.
The hotline facility must be used to make the connection through the iS3000 system and the
intervening network.

3.1. DIAL-UP CONNECTION

In the dial-up connection the two NSC units are connected together via modems which are
linked over the switched analogue network; see figure 3.1.

Figure 3-1 Dial up Line Connections.

DIAL-UP CONNECTION

The PVN signalling channel is established as follows:


Actions

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1. ISPBX #1 sends a call setup request to NSC #1 via the ISDN D-channel. The NSC sends
back a call proceeding message.
2. NSC #1 tells Modem #1 to dial through the switched network to the destination number
programmed into NSC #1. This should be the number of Modem #2.
3. Whenever Modem #2 sees ring voltage on the analogue line it sends a RING message to
NSC #2. The NSC counts the incoming rings and when it receives the programmed
number of rings with no more than 10 seconds between each ring, it instructs Modem #2
to answer the call. When it is more than 10 seconds, the modem must be programmed
for auto answer, or the number of rings before answer must be set to 1.
4. Once Modem #2 answers the call, the two modems send training tones back and forth
until they synchronise and agreed on the communications protocol and speed. The
modems then send connect messages to their NSC. These messages include the
negotiated link speed (it is not advised to use speed negotiation).
5. The ISPBX #1 sends ISDN connect messages to the NSC #1 and the NSC #2 sends
connect messages to ISPBX #2.
6. The ISPBXs can then send PVN messages over the B-channel.

3.2. LEASED LINE CONNECTION

In leased line operation the two NSC units are connected via modems over a leased analogue
line; see figure 3.2.

Figure 3-2 Leased Line Connections.

Because there is no dialling or ring voltage, the NSC / modem operation differs in this case
from dial-up line operation.

1. Initially both NSC's make their modems go off hook and into the originate mode. In this
mode the modems wait for incoming answer tones. If the modem gives up (e.g. times out)

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then the NSC will recycle the modem and send it off hook again.
2. ISPBX #1 sends a call setup request to NSC #1 via the ISDN D-channel. The NSC sends
back a call proceeding message.
3. NSC #1 hangs up Modem #1 and then tells it manually to answer the call. Modem #1 will
go off hook again and sends answer tone. When modem #2 hears this tone it will respond
with its own tone. The two modem send training tones back and forth until they
synchronise and agreed on the communications protocol and speed. The modems then
send connect messages to their NSC.
4. The ISPBX #1 sends ISDN connect messages to the NSC #1 and the NSC #2 sends
connect messages to ISPBX #2.
5. The ISPBXs can then send PVN messages over the B-channel.

Note: This is different to how modems are usually used on leased lines.

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4. SOPHO iS3000 PROJECTING ASPECTS

The various projecting actions which have to be executed in both ISPBXs are given in this
chapter and are based on the example illustrated in figure 4.1. For detailed PVN information
reference is made to the Facility Implemetation Manual - Networking and Routing.
The following items have to be projected/checked for PVN:

- number analysis;
- route and bundle characteristics;
- hotline relations to connect the NSC via the DTX-I to the hatch;
- profile of the S0 bus to which the NSC is connected;
- timer values.

Figure 4-1 SOPHO NSC Indirect connection.

4.1. DNRs, ROUTE AND BUNDLE OPTIONS

The following must be projected as a DDI route:

- Destination/route table/route/bundle 24: analogue trunk (master);


- Destination/route table/route/bundle 124: DPNSS trunk (master);
- Destination/route table/route/bundle 25: analogue trunk (slave);
- Destination/route table/route/bundle 125: DPNSS trunk (slave).

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The BSP-IDs used are:

- BSP-ID 2300: DTX-I digital NSC (master);


- BSP-ID 4300: DTX-I digital NSC (slave);
- BSP-ID 2403: ALC analoge modem line (master);
- BSP-ID 4403: ALC analoge modem line (slave).

4.2. OM COMMANDS

CLUSTER ID
This example uses a closed number scheme. Note that system option 40 must be TRUE .

MASTER SLAVE
CHCLID:2; CHCLID:3;

TRUNK/NETWORK ACCESS

MASTER SLAVE
ASINTN:0,74,1,21,24; ASINTN:0,75,1,21,25;
ASINTN:0,3,1,91,124; ASINTN:0,2,1,91,125;
DESTINATIONS

MASTER SLAVE
CHDSTC:24,64,1,0,24; CHDSTC:25,65,1,0,25;
CHDSTC:124,74,0,0,124; CHDSTC:125,75,0,0,125;
OUTGOING ANALYSIS TREES

MASTER SLAVE
ASEXTN:64,4,1,4,4,00; ASEXTN:65,2,1,4,4,00;
ASEXTN:64,88,1,4,4,00; ASEXTN:65,88,1,4,4,00;
ASBLCK:74,0,1,4,10; ASBLCK:75,0,1,4,10;
ASBLCK:74,1,1,4,10; ASBLCK:75,1,1,4,10;
ASBLCK:74,2,1,4,10; ASBLCK:75,2,1,4,10;
ASBLCK:74,3,1,4,10; ASBLCK:75,3,1,4,10;
ASBLCK:74,4,1,4,10; ASBLCK:75,4,1,4,10;
ASBLCK:74,5,1,4,10; ASBLCK:75,5,1,4,10;
ASBLCK:74,6,1,4,10; ASBLCK:75,6,1,4,10;
ASBLCK:74,7,1,4,10; ASBLCK:75,7,1,4,10;
ASBLCK:74,8,1,4,10; ASBLCK:75,8,1,4,10;
ASBLCK:74,9,1,4,10; ASBLCK:75,9,1,4,10;
ROUTE TABLES

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MASTER SLAVE
CHROTA:24,0; CHROTA:25,0;
24,1,1; 25,1,1;
CHROTA:24,1; CHROTA:25,1;
25,1,1; 25,1,1;
CHROTA:24,2; CHROTA:25,2;
25,1,1; 25,1,1;
CHROTA:124,0; CHROTA:125,0;
124,1,1; 125,1,1;
24,0,1; 25,0,1;
CHROTA:24,1; CHROTA:25,1;
124,1,1; 25,1,1;
24,0,1; 25,0,1;
CHROTA:24,2; CHROTA:25,2;
124,1,1; 125,1,1;
24,0,1; 25,0,1;
ROUTE/BUNDLE CHARACTERISTICS

MASTER SLAVE
CHRTCG:24,01110000,440444; CHRTCG:25,01110000,440444;
CHRTCG:124,00000000,440444; CHRTCG:125,00000000,440444;
CHRTCI:24,1011000000,002399999,34; CHRTCI:25,1011000000,002399999,34;
CHRTCI:124,1000000000,000300000,34; CHRTCI:125,1000000000,000300000,34;
CHRTCO:24,00010,0; CHRTCO:25,00010,0;
CHRTCO:124,00000,0; CHRTCO:125,00000,0;
CHBNDC:24,2,00000100000000,22; CHBNDC:25,2,00000100000000,22;
CHBNDC:124,2,01000100000000,516; CHBNDC:125,2,01000100000000,516;
ASBSPB:124,97; ASBSPB:125,97;
CHBNDC:124,2,01000100000000,516,0,98 CHBNDC:125,2,01000100000000,516,0,98
; ;
ASLINE:24,1,12,1,0; ASLINE:25,1,12,1,0;
ASLINE:24,2,12,1,1; ASLINE:25,2,12,1,1;
ASLINE:24,3,12,1,2; ASLINE:25,3,12,1,2;
ASBNDL:125,125; ASLINE:25,4,12,1,3;
ASBNDL:125,125; ASBNDL:125,125;
PVN ROUTE/CHANNELS
The relation between the channels and the original route can be given at the originating side
with the OM command below. The RIN (Route Identification Number) on both sides is 1234
and 74 is the TAC keytone trunk for user channels in the master and 75 in the slave.

MASTER SLAVE
CHPVNR:124,2300,74,1234,0; CHPVNR:125,4300,75,1234,1;
1,0,0; 1,0,0;
The 'DNR' of the S0 bus in the extension tree (tree 0) is 8800: the PVN signalling channel
address.

23
In case also PVN on digital lines (PVN normal mode) is used, a different 'DNR 8800' for the
PVN signalling channel is required (for example 8600) because the ISPBX must be able to
discriminate between PVN normal mode and PVN modem mode.
The user channel DNRs, in this example 8801 ... 8803, can be the same.

MASTER SLAVE
ASINTN:0,8800,1,133; ASINTN:0,8800,1,133
ASINTN:34,8801,1,132; ASINTN:35,8801,1,132;
ASINTN:34,8802,1,132; ASINTN:35,8802,1,132;
ASINTN:34,8803,1,132; ASINTN:35,8803,1,132;
ASPVNU:8801; ASPVNU:8801;
ASPVNU:8802; ASPVNU:8802;
ASPVNU:8803; ASPVNU:8803;
HATCH
For the communication with the PVN signalling channel, an IMP-like protocol is used.
Therefore hatches should be assigned on both sides, using OM command:
Minimum one hatch per ISPBX must be projected. The preferred number of hatches is 2 per
ISPBX, provided that one PVN route is present.

MASTER SLAVE
ASPCTB:12,7,12,16,6104; ASPCTB:12,7,12,16,6104;
ASPCTB:12,7,13,16,6104; ASPCTB:12,7,13,16,6104;
ASSIGN BOARD

MASTER SLAVE
ASBRDS:12,1,22,3404,255; ASBRDS:12,1,22,3404,255;
EXTENSION PROFILES
The extensions 2300 and 4300 must have a 'data CV' and must be allowed to receive 64 kbit/
sec. unrestricted calls by means of OM command: CHDNRS.
To prevent disturbance by intrusion or call waiting tones the extensions 2300, 2403, 4300 and
4403 must be made data protected by means of command:

MASTER SLAVE
CHDNRC:2403,11,3,0; CHDNRC:4403,11,3,0;
CHDNRC:2300,11,1,2; CHDNRC:4300,11,1,2;
CHDNRS:2300,0,94; CHDNRS:4300,0,94;
CHMSNP:11,1,2,2; CHMSNP:11,1,2,2;
CHMSNP:11,1,3,2; CHMSNP:11,1,3,2;
CHFMSN:2300,2; CHMSNF:2300,2;
ASFACM:4,2300&2403; ASFACM:4,4300&4403;
TIMERS
The time, that a channel is kept reserved, can be tuned/defined with OM command:

24
MASTER SLAVE
CHPVNT:124,1,1,16382,1,16382; -
CHPVNT:125,1,1,16382,1,16382; -
The timer of both the signalling channel and user channel is set to 16382 minutes. If 16382
minutes (approx. 11 days) is considered not to be long enough then two PVN sequence tables
can be projected. The result is that every time that an other sequence table is activated the
timers of 16382 minutes are restarted, so the timers will never expire.
NETIMER 192 "PVN signalling channel set-up guard time" (default 12 sec.) and NETIMER 198
"PVN hatch communication guarding time" (default 30 sec.) must be projected longer than the
time needed to set-up the modem connection (modem waiting time).See the 'wait time'
settings of the NSC-box. However mind that NETIMER 192 also determines the time before
a call will overflow to the next route in the route table in case of a defective modem or NSC

HOTLINES
The hotlines are necessary to connect the NSC via the DTX-I to the hatch and for the modem
interconnection.

MASTER SLAVE
CHHOTL:2300,8800,0,0,1; CHHOTL:4300,8800,0,0,1;
CHHOTL:2403,744403,0,0,1; CHHOTL:4403,742403,0,0,1; *)
*) See the 'destination' setting of the NSC-box. It must be 'empty'.

SECURITY
The PVN security must be the same for the master and the slave. Example security code (old/
new): 123456. Project as follows:

MASTER SLAVE
CHPVNS:; CHPVNS:;
123456; 123456;
123456; 123456;
123456; 123456;

4.3. MONITORING FUNCTIONS

The various PVN aspects can be displayed using the following OM commands:

DIPVNR : display the PVN route data.


DIPVNU : display all UCA's in a unit.

25
DIPVNT : display the iSNet PVN timers for each sequence
table.
DITRAF : object 1 can be used (in case of one call) to check
whether actual two lines in the ATU route are
occupied: one signalling channel and one user channel.
object 21 shows the status of the hatches.
Verify that hatches are connected to the signalling channel:

- make a call from the ISPBX 1 to 8800; a "ticker tone" should be heard.
- make a call from the ISPBX 2 to 8800; a "ticker tone" should be heard.
- test with a data DNR (BSPT=94) and dial 2300/4300 to test that the signalling channel
setup is correct.

4.4. HOW IT WORKS IN GENERAL

A call is made from extension 2-2400 to 3-4400. The system tries to establish a connection via
route 124. It recognises that the call must be set up via PVN. For one PVN link a signalling
channel and an user channel is necessary.
First the signalling channel is set up. The signalling address is 2300 (see DIPVNR) therefore the
ISPBX 1 calls 2300. The NSC answers the call and activates the modem. From the modem
(extension 2403) a call is set-up to the modem in the opposite ISPBX 2, 74-4403. This can be
done either by hotline or by programming a destination number in the NSC.
In ISPBX 2 the modem answers the call and activates the NSC. From the NSC (extension
4300) a call is set-up to PVN signalling channel address 8800 (via a hotline). Now at both sides
a hatch is connected to the line. The hatches are used for the IMP/HDLC communication.
When the signalling channel is available, the user channel can be set up.
ISPBX 1 asks the opposite site for a free User Channel Address (UCA) via the signalling
channel and uses this address in combination with the user channel prefix (74, see DIPVNR).
So ISPBX 1 calls 74-8801. The DDI part of this number (8801) is analyzed in the incoming tree
of the opposite ISPBX 2 and is recognised as PVN user channel address. Via the signalling
channel the destination number (etc.) will be signalled. This is normal DPNSS call handling. The
connection between the caller via the user channel to the destination will be established.
The time that a PVN user channel is reserved, is defined with CHPVNT. When the timer of
the signalling channel is set to 16382 minutes then the signalling channel need not to be set-up
for new PVN connections. The result is a faster call set-up. Only when no calls are present for
a period of 16382 minutes, then the signalling channel is released.

26
5. PROGRAMMING THE NSC

The NSC has a number of programmable settings (general settings and modem related
settings) controlling its operation. Depending on the type of connection some of these settings
may act differently or be ignored.

5.1. GENERAL SETTINGS

5.1.1. Destination Number

This is the telephone number of the peer NSC's modem. This option is ignored in leased line
connections. In case an indirect connection via a SOPHO iS3000 is used, no destination
number is required. The 'Hotline' option can be used to establish a connection to the peer
PABX.

5.1.2. Extension MSN 1

This is the multiple-subscriber-number used for making calls on the So bus. It is also used when
checking incoming ISDN calls. This number can only contain digit characters and may be up to
10 characters long. It can not be blank.

5.1.3. Extension MSN 2

This is a second multiple-subscriber-number used for checking incoming ISDN calls. This
option can be a number (like MSN1) or it may be set to "*" or "#". If set to "*" the NSC accepts
any compatible ISDN call. When set to # then this settings is ignored and only MSN1 is used
for acceptance of calls on the So bus. The preferred settings for the multiple-subscriber-
numbers are (via B0):

- MSN1 : 2
- MSN2 : #

If B1 of the same S0 bus is used then it is advised to configure the NSC as follows:

- MSN1 : 3
- MSN2 : #

Note: It is not possible to connect 2 NSC boxes to one S0 bus.

27
The SOPHO iS3000 should be projected according to the values selected, using OM
command CHMSNP.

5.2. MODEM RELATED SETTINGS

Programming the modem is achieved by the NSC sending Hayes AT commands over the V.24
interface. The following settings are controlled by the NSC. Preferred settings have been
highlighted.

Operational Speed
This is the speed (in bits/s) that the NSC initially communicates with the modem. Many
modems will automatically limit the maximum connection speed to this value. Possible
values for this field are: 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, 14400, 19200, 28800, 38400.
Minimum Speed
This determines the minimum speed that the NSC will accept a modem connection at.
Valid values for this field are: 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600,14400, 19200, 28800, 38400.

Note: If the link speed (as reported in the connect reply) is below this value then the NSC
automatically drops the call.

Fixed V.24 Speed


This option determines whether the V.24 speed on the NSC should change to follow the
connection speed or not. When this option is ON the NSC keeps the V.24 speed fixed at
the operational speed: this means that the number of calls that can be handled on that
speed is also fixed. When this option is OFF the NSC changes the V.24 speed to follow the
connection speed as reported by the modems connect reply: this means that the number
of calls that can be handled also varies per speed. This can be a disadvantage when the
modems operate on a low speed. Therefore it is advised not to use speed negotiation.
Note that the modem must be configured for the same behaviour.
CTS Flow Control
When this option is ON CTS hardware flow control is enabled in the NSC. With CTS flow
control the NSC pauses the transmission of data characters whenever the modem lowers
the CTS line. This is used by the modem when it is speed matching between different
connection and V.24 speeds. It is recommended that this option is set whenever the fixed
V.24 speed option is set.

Note: CTS flow control is only used when the modem is on-line, when disconnected the
NSC ignores the CTS control line.

Direct Cable Connection


A direct cable connection is used when the NSCs are directly connected without using

28
modems. This option is set ON normally only for test purposes but also allows the NSC
to be used with multiplexing equipment where direct hardware control is required. For
connection of two NSCs via the V.24 interface requires the shielded cross over cable as
described in chapter 2. Call start and clear down is signalled via the DTR/DCD control
lines. With this option ON only the 'Operational Speed', 'Wait for Connection Timeout'
and 'CTS flow control' settings are used.
Leased Line Connection
This flag is used to indicate whether the modems are connected via dial-up or leased lines.
The way in which the NSC uses the modem varies depending on this option. See chapter
3 for details.
Number of Rings Till Answer
This option is the number of rings the NSC should see before it attempts to answer an
incoming call via the modem. When set to zero the NSC will not answer incoming calls -
in this case the call should be answered using some other external mechanism (e.g. auto-
answer on the modem).
Wait for Connection Timeout
This options is the number of seconds the NSC waits while trying to start an outgoing or
incoming connection. If carrier is not present by this time then the NSC abandons the
connection attempt. Setting to zero disables the timeout (ie. waits forever). Note that
many modems also have a carrier timeout (see the modems S7 register).
Initialisation String
This is the modem command string used to "initialise" the modem. This string is sent
whenever the NSC restarts. This string can contain multiple modem command lines. See
chapter 6. for a discussion on what to put in the initialisation string.
Attention String
This is the modem command string which should make the modem respond "OK". It is
used to check that the modem is present and powered up when the NSC restarts. If this
string is blank then the check is skipped.
Recycle String
This modem command string is sent after the initialisation string and whenever the NSC
is recycling after a call or call attempt. It is always sent at the operational speed. Normally
this string should contain at least "AT^M" so the modem speed adjusts back to the
operational speed after a call.
Dial Prefix String
For dial-up line connections this string should contain the start of the dialling command.
This string will be followed by the destination number and then the dial suffix string. For
leased lines this string should contain the complete "dial" command which is used to make
the modem go off hook and wait for answer tone.
Dial Suffix String
For dial-up line connections this string should contain the end of the dialling command. It
is not used for leased line connections.

29
Answer String
This is the modem command string to make the modem answer a call. For dial-up lines
this should pick up the incoming (ringing) call. For leased lines it should make the modem
go off hook and generate answer tone.
Hangup String
This is the modem command string used to hang up the modem. During hangup the NSC
automatically lowers DTR. If the modem is programmed for hangup on lowering DTR
then the hangup string may be blank.
Shutdown String
This string is sent when "shutting down". This occurs when the NSC changes to
programming mode. This string could be used (for example) to disable modem auto-
answer preventing the modem from answering incoming calls when the NSC is in
programming mode.

5.3. PROGRAMMING ACTIONS

The NSC has to be programmed using a dumb terminal or terminal emulation software on a
PC. The terminal should be connected to the NSC's V.24 using a shielded straight (pins map 1
to 1) serial cable.

5.3.1. To start programming Mode:

To start programming Mode:

Actions

1. Press and hold the Program/Reset button for at least 3 seconds. LED 2 should eventually
change to Red and Green Flashing (it may spend up to 10 seconds in the green flashing
state before this).
2. Unplug the modem and plug the terminal or PC into the serial port of the NSC.
3. Press Enter several times until the programming prompt appears.

5.3.2. To exit programming Mode:

To exit programming Mode:

Actions

1. Unplug the terminal or PC from the V.24 port.


2. Plug the modem into the V.24 port. Ensure the modem is turned on.

30
3. Press the Program/Reset button briefly.
LED 2 may go solid green before going off for 5 seconds. After this 5 second period it will
flash green while the NSC sends the initialisation string to the modem. Finally LED 2 will
go off.

5.3.3. To re-initialise the modem:

To re-initialise the modem:

If you want to re-initialise the modem again for any reason (for example you left programming
mode with the modem not plugged in or turned off) then:
Actions

1. Ensure the modem is plugged into the serial port and turned on.
2. Press the Program/Reset button briefly.
LED 2 should flash green for a while and then go off.

5.4. TERMINAL SETTINGS

The terminal or PC terminal emulation program should be set up for the communications
parameters as given in table 5.1.
Since the NSC assumes it is connected to a dumb terminal the only characters it outputs are
as given in table 5.2.
Table 5-1 Communications Parameters.

PARAMETER VALUE
Baud rate 9600 bits/s
Parity None
Data bits 8
Stop bits 1
Flow control Off
Terminal emulation Teletype (TTY)

Table 5-2 Characters Outputs.

CHARACTER CODE FUNCTION


Printable characters 0x20 to 0x7E Character to display.
Carriage-Return 0x0D Move cursor to start of line.
Line feed 0x0A Move cursor down one line.
Backspace 0x08 Move cursor left one position (can be either
destructive or non-destructive).

31
When entering characters the NSC will strip the 8th bit off (except for "Extended Enter"). As
well as printable characters (0x20 to 0x7E) the NSC handles the special keys as given in table
5.3. All other control codes will be ignored. The NSC will echo back correctly received
characters.
Table 5-3 Handling of Special Characters.

HEX
FUNCTION KEY CODE DESCRIPTION
Enter Enter, Return, CR, Ctrl- 0x0D End of line, process command (use normal reply
M messages).
Backspace BS, , 0x08 Remove last character typed on line.
Backspace DEL 0x7F Remove last character typed on line.
Wipe Line Ctrl-W 0x17 Erase current line.
Wipe Line Ctrl-X 0x18 Erase current line.
Previous Line Ctrl-P 0x10 Erase current line and replace with previously
entered command line.
Tab TAB 0x09 TAB character, replaced with single space.
Extended Enter 0x9D End of line, process command and use extended
reply messages. This is normally only used by
automated programs (e.g. NSC Configuration
Manager).

5.5. COMMAND ENTRY

The NSC is programmed by entering command lines. A command line starts with a command
name, followed by any needed parameters, and is terminated with the Enter key. The
maximum length of the command line is 200 characters. Before the Enter key is pressed the
special keys can be used to edit the command line. Once the Enter key is pressed the
command is processed. Any response or error messages will be displayed and then the
prompt will be output again.
Command names are case insensitive. As well as the full command name many commands also
have an abbreviation which can be used.

5.6. GENERAL COMMANDS

The NSC understands the following general commands as given in table 5.4.
Table 5-4 General Commands.

COMMAND
NAME ABBREVIATION FUNCTION
COPYRIGHT CR Re-displays the initial copyright message again.
VERSION VN Displays the version of the NSC software, for example:
VERSION=1.00 (3522 254 23000)
SHOWALL SH Displays all option settings.

32
COMMAND
NAME ABBREVIATION FUNCTION
SAVE Save all the option settings to EEPROM. Note: When
programming mode is exited by pushing the button the
settings will automatically be saved if they have been
changed.
UNDO Undo all changes to the settings since either the last Save
command, or programming was started.
DEFAULT Load the NSC factory defaults.
REM Remark. The command line is ignored. Useful for putting
comments in script files which are "downloaded" to the
NSC.

5.7. PROGRAMMABLE SETTING COMMANDS

To display or set the value of a program setting use the following command name or
abbreviation as given in table 5.5.
To display the current value for a programming option enter just the command name or
abbreviation for that option. For example:
>recycle
RECYCLE="AT&D2^M"
>
To set the value for a programming option enter the command name or abbreviation followed
by the new value. The command name and parameter should be separated by spaces or an
equals (=) sign. Extra spaces around the parameter will be ignored. The new setting will be
redisplayed. For example:
>speed 9600
SPEED=9600
>minspeed=2400
MINSPEED=2400
>at AT^M
ATTENTION="AT^M"
>hangup =
HANGUP=""
>
Table 5-5 Command Names and Abbreviations.

ABBREVIATI PARAMETE
COMMAND NAME ON R PROGRAM SETTING
DESTNUM DN <string> Destination number.
MSN1 M1 <msn1> Extension MSN 1.
MSN2 M2 <msn2> Extension MSN 2.
SPEED SP <speed> Operational speed.
MINSPEED MS <speed> Minimum speed.

33
ABBREVIATI PARAMETE
COMMAND NAME ON R PROGRAM SETTING
FIXEDSPEED FS <boolean> Fixed V.24 speed.
FLOWCONTROL FC <boolean> CTS Flow control.
LEASEDLINE LL <boolean> Leased Line.
RINGS RI <number> Number of rings till answer.
WAITTIME WT <seconds> Wait for connection timeout.
INITIALISE IN <string> Initialisation string.
RECYCLE RC <string> Recycle string.
ATTENTION AT <string> Attention string.
DIALPREFIX DP <string> Dial prefix string.
DIALSUFFIX DS <string> Dial suffix string.
ANSWER AN <string> Answer string.
HANGUP HU <string> Hangup string.
SHUTDOWN SD <string> Shutdown string.
DlRECTCABLE DC <boolean> Direct cable connection.

Note: Even if the abbreviation is used, the display of the value will use the full command
name of the option. The output from the SHOWALL command can be captured
and used as commands to program another NSC to the same settings.

5.8. PARAMETER TYPES

5.8.1. <msn1>

This is a string which is only allowed to contain digit characters. Surrounding quotes are
optional when entering this value. This string can not be blank.

5.8.2. <msn2>

This is a string which is only allowed to contain digit characters, or be the string "*" or "#".
Surrounding quotes are optional when entering this value. This string can not be blank.

5.8.3. <speed>

This indicates a communications speed in bits/sec. Valid values for this parameter are:
1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, 14400, 19200, 28800, and 38400.

5.8.4. <boolean>

This indicates a setting that can be either on or off. When entering this parameter the following
values can be used: (case insensitive)

34
Y, YES, T, TRUE, 1, ON to set parameter on.
N, NO, F, FALSE, 0, OFF to set parameter off.
When displaying this value the NSC always uses YES or NO.

5.8.5. <number>

This value is a decimal number in the range 0 to 255.

5.8.6. <seconds>

This value is a decimal number in the range 0 to 255.

5.8.7. <string>

A string is a sequence of characters which is sent to the modem as written. The case sensitive
of characters is preserved. Normally the string should be surrounded by quotes (" ") but they
can be omitted if the string doesn't contain quotes and has no leading or trailing spaces.
The special character sequences as given in table 5.6. can be used inside a string:
Table 5-6 Special Character Sequences.

CHARACTER SEQUENCE MEANING


^character Control code (where character is a single character) e.g. ^M is carriage-
return.
~ Pause one second at this point when outputting the string.
^" Put a quote character into the string.
^~ Put a tilde character into the string.
^^ Put a caret character into the string.

To enter a blank (empty) string either use two quotes (" "), or use the variation of the
command with an equals sign (=). For example:
>dialsuffix " "
DIALSUFFIX=" "
>hangup=
HANGUP=" "

Note: All strings (including MSN1, MSN2 and DNR) are packed together into a single
large string buffer. This means there is a limit on the total length of the sum of all
strings, but not a limit on each individual string. An "Illegal value" error message
will be reported if you try to change a string such that the total length would exceed
the size of the string buffer.

35
5.9. EXAMPLE OF MODEM SETTINGS

This section contains examples of modem settings applicable for a US Robotics Sportster
modem used in combination with a direct or indirect analogue connection or a leased line
configuration.

WARNING: IN THE FOLLOWING EXAMPLES THE STRING ^M~AT IS GIVEN


AFTER EVERY FOUR COMMANDS. SOME MODEMS ARE NOT
CAPABLE OF PROCESSING FOUR COMMANDS. NOTE THAT IN
CASE OF PROBLEMS IT MIGHT BE NECESSARY THAT THE
STRING HAS TO BE INSERTED MORE FREQUENT.

5.9.1. Dial Up with No Dial Tone (Loopback via SOPHO)

USRobotics Sportster 14K4


DESTNUM=" "
MSN1="2"
MSN2="*"
SPEED=19200
MINSPEED=1200
FIXEDSPEED=YES
FLOWCONTROL=YES
LEASEDLINE=NO
RINGS=3
WAITTIME=60
INITIALISE="ATZ4^M~ATQ0V1E1F1X3TM1S0=0S2=255S7=60^M~AT&A0&B1&C1
&D2&H1&I0&K0&M0&N0&R1&S0&Y3^M~ATY0&W0^M"
RECYCLE="AT&D2&Bl^M
ATTENTION="AT^M"
DIALPREFIX="ATDT"
DIALSUFFIX="^M"
ANSWER="ATA^M"
HANGUP=" "
SHUTDOWN="ATS0=0^M"
DIRECTCABLE=NO

Note: No check on dial tone is performed.

36
5.9.2. Dial Up with Dial Tone (Direct connection to PSTN)

USRobotics Sportster 14K4


DESTNUM="<dest num>"
MSN1="2"
MSN2="*"
SPEED=19200
MINSPEED=1200
FIXEDSPEED=YES
FLOWCONTROL=YES
LEASEDLINE=NO
RINGS=3
WAITTIME=60
INITIALISE="ATZ4^M~ATQ0V1E1F1X7TM1S0=0S2=255S7=60^M~AT&A0&B1&C1
&D2&H1&I0&K0&M0&N0&R1&S0&Y3^M~ATY0&W^M"
RECYCLE="AT&D2&B1^M"
ATTENTION="AT^M"
DIALPREFIX="ATDT"
DIALSUFFIX="^M "
ANSWER="ATA^M"
HANGUP=" "
SHUTDOWN="ATS0=0^M"
DIRECTCABLE=NO

Note: No check on dial tone is performed.

Check that the DIP switches are set to the factory defaults of:

1 = OFF 2 = OFF
3 = ON 4 = OFF
5 = ON 6 = OFF
7 = OFF 8 = ON
Ensure that pins 2-3 swap switch is set to standard. Note that these DIP switch settings apply
to both direct dial and leased line modem settings.

5.9.3. Leased Line

USRobotics Sportster 14K4


DESTNUM=" "
SPEED=19200
MINSPEED=1200

37
FIXEDSPEED=YES
FLOWCONTROL=YES
LEASEDLINE=YES
RINGS=3
WAITTIME=250
INITIALISE="ATZ^M~ATQ0V1E1F1X3M2S0=0S2=255S7=250^M~AT&A0&B1&C1&
D2&H1&I0&K0&M0&N0&R1&S0&Y3^M~AT&W^M"
RECYCLE="AT&D2&B1^M"
ATTENTION="AT^M"
DIALPREFIX="ATX3D^M"
DIALSUFFIX=" "
ANSWER="ATA^M"
HANGUP=" "
SHUTDOWN="ATS0=0^M"
DIRECTCABLE=NO
Check that the DIP switches are set to the factory defaults of:

1 = OFF 2 = OFF
3 = ON 4 = OFF
5 = ON 6 = OFF
7 = OFF 8 = ON
Ensure that pins 2-3 swap switch is set to standard. Note that these DIP switch settings apply
to both direct dial and leased line modem settings.

5.10. REPLY MESSAGES

The NSC may send the following messages back to the user during programming:

5.10.1. Normal Reply Messages

>
Network Signal Convertor
Version N (c)1995 Philips Electronics N.V.
Save OK
Save Error
Undo OK
Undo Error
Default OK
No value expected for this command
Invalid command
Illegal value

38
Illegal characters following parameter - ignored
<option>=<value>

5.10.2. Extended Reply Messages

Extended reply messages are intended for when the NSC programming interface is being used
by automatic computer programs (for example they are used by the NSC configuration
manager). The NSC will use extended replies whenever the command line was completed
using the extended enter character rather than the normal enter key. Each of the normal reply
messages are prefixed with an indication of what type of message they are:

<NSC> used as an extended prompt.


<MSG> used for general messages.
<INFO> used for option value messages.
<ERROR> used for error messages.
for example:
<NSC>
<MSG>Network Signal Convertor
<MSG>Version N (c)1995 Philips Electronics N.V.
<MSG>Save OK
<ERROR>No value expected for this command
<INFO><option>=<value>

39
6. DESIGNING CUSTOM MODEM SETTINGS

The first thing to do when creating a custom modem configuration is to decide the following.
Note that both the NSC and the modem must be programmed for the same behaviour.

Fixed vs Variable V.24 Speed


In fixed V.24 operation the speed on the serial port remains the same independent of the
connection (link) speed. The modem performs buffering and speed matching between the
two data flows at different speeds. With variable V.24 speed operation the serial port
speed changes to follow the speed of the connection. The modem doesn't have to perform
buffering or speed matching. With some modems you can not use variable V.24 speed
operation as they don't support the same speeds on their V.24 port as they do for
connections. It is recommended that you always use fixed V.24 operation if possible.
CTS Flow Control
When CTS flow control is enabled the modem can pause the NSC's transmission of
characters by lowering the CTS control line. This is normally called "Hardware flow
control" in the modem manuals. The modem needs to do this when speed matching to
stop its internal buffer being over-run. Thus you should always enable CTS flow control
when using fixed V.24 speed operation. It is recommended that you always enable CTS/
Hardware flow control if possible.
NSC Answer vs Modem Auto-answer
For dial up lines you need to decide whether the NSC or the modem is responsible for
answering incoming calls. With NSC answer the modem sends RING messages when it
sees ring voltage from an incoming call. The NSC counts these RING messages and when
it has seen enough it send the modem a manual answer command. With Modem auto-
answer the modem automatically answers the incoming call (after a programmed number
of rings). Once the modem has established the connection it informs the NSC with a
CONNECT message. It is recommended that NSC Answer is used rather than modem
auto-answer.
DTR vs Escape sequence Hangup
With DTR hangup the NSC tells the modem to hangup the current call by briefly holding
DTR low. Alternatively the NSC can send a special sequence of characters (called the
Escape sequence) followed by a modem hangup command. The escape sequence usually
involves "pauses" to stop it being mistakenly detected in the normal data flow. It is
recommended that DTR hangup is always used since it is a lot more reliable, and that the
escape sequence is disabled in the modem.
After this you can start creating your modem configuration. The following gives some
guidelines on choosing the value for each NSC program option; see also chapter 4. for
details on each one.
Operational Speed

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For variable V.24 speed operation this should be set to the highest connection (link) speed
that the modem supports. For fixed V.24 speed operation this should be set to a
supported serial port speed the same or greater than the highest connection speed of the
modem. As a guideline use 19200 bits/e for 14400 modems, and 38400 bits/e for 28800
modems.
Minimum Speed
Normally set this to the minimum value of 1200 bits/e. Change this if you want to fail
(hangup) low speed connections.
Fixed V.24 Speed
Set this flag if using fixed V.24 speed operation.
CTS Flow Control
Set this flag is using CTS/Hardware flow control.
Leased Line Connection
Set this flag if using a leased line connection.
Direct Cable Connection
Set this flag if using a direct serial cable connection.
Number of Rings Till Answer
If using modem auto-answer then set this to zero. Otherwise set this to the number of
rings after which you want the NSC to answer the incoming call. A typical value would be
3. Note: The time taken to answer an incoming call may be subject to local regulations.
Wait for Connection Timeout
For a dial-up connection this would typically be set to something like 60 seconds, and then
adjusted if needed. For leased line connections this would normally be set to a much higher
value (e.g.250 seconds) or disabled altogether (set to 0).
Initialisation String
This string and the Recycle String are responsible for programming the modem correctly
and placing it into a known state. The initialisation string is only sent once when the
modem powers up or when the NSC button is pressed. The recycle string is sent between
every call attempt. Thus it is normally desirable to have the recycle string very short (and
quick) and use the initialisation string for most of the modem programming.
This is especially important for leased line operation.
The first thing you should do is go through the modem manual and record the desired and
default values for all the modem options along with the modem command to set that
option. Some of the items to check are given in table 6.1.

Table 6-1 Modem Items to check.

STANDARD AT
ITEM COMMAND
Fixed vs Variable V.24 speed operation
CTS flow control
Modem auto-answer enabled or disabled S0= x

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STANDARD AT
ITEM COMMAND
DTR hangup mode &Dx
Escape sequence character S2=x
Command echo on E1
Modem displays result codes (not quiet) Q0
Display verbose result code (message not number format) V1
Use connect messages with speed information X1 (or higher)
The DCD control line follows the true carrier &C1
Tone or Pulse dialling as needed T or P
Speaker volume and mode as desired LxMx
Dial tone and busy detection as needed X1, X2, X3 or X4
Reported CONNECT speed is true link speed
Guard tone as desired &Gx
Disable error control, data compression, and MNP
Asynchronous mode
Carrier wait time S7=x
S/W flow control disabled
The initialisation string should take the modem from (possibly) unknown programming values
to the desired values. Typically the first command in an initialisation string recalls some known
values (e.g. the modem's factory default profile). After this are modem commands to change
all the items where the default is different to the desired values. Finally the new values should
be programmed into the default modem EEPROM profile (if it has one).

Recycle String
The recycle string contains any initialisation that should be performed between calls or call
attempts. Normally you should include at least the blank modem command "AT^M" to
remind the modem what the operational speed is.
Attention String
For a normal modem this string should be "AT^M" which sends a blank command.
Dial Prefix String
For leased line connections this should be the manual dial command. However you may
need to include turning dial-tone checking off. A typical string would be "ATX3D^M". For
dial-up line connections this string should contain the start of the dialling command (e.g.
"ATD"). You may wish to include a pulse or tone dial command as well.
Dial Suffix String
This string is only used in dial-up connections. Normally it is just the end of command line
character "^M".
Answer String
In dial-up line connections this string should contain the modem command to manually
answer an incoming call. For leased-line operation it should put the modem into answer
mode. In both cases it is normally "ATA^M^".
Hangup String

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If DTR hangup is being used then this string should be blank. If escape sequence hangup is
being used this should contain the escape sequence followed by a hangup command.
Typically this would look like "~~+++~~ATH0^M".
Shutdown String
This string should contain any modem commands needed to "shutdown" the modem.
Typically this would be used to disable modem auto-answer.

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7. TECHNICAL DATA

Line Interface (S0-1)


Connector type : 8 pins RJ45 according to ISO 8877
Electrical characteristics : according to CCITT, Rec 1.430
Line Code : AMI
ISPBX Interface : DTX-I
Distances : The distances depend on the cable characteristics.

Data Specifications
B channel Coding : CCITT A-Law.
V.24 Interface : 1200 up to 38400 bits/s.
Complies with V.10 up to speeds of 19200 bits/s 9 volt signalling
levels.
Asynchronous LAPB data encoding.

Power Supply
Mains power : 220 to 240 AC V 10%.
Connector type : Appliance inlet according to IEC 320 standard sheet C8.
Power Consumption : 15VA maximum.

Mechanical
Dimensions : 297x178x50mm.
Weight : 2kg.
Construction : IP20 (according to IEC529).

Environment
Operating
- temperature : according to DIN IEC 721 (+ 5 + 40 ).
- humidity : 10 to 85%.
Storage
- temperature : according to DIN IEC 721 ( - 5 + 45 ).
- humidity : 5 to 95%.

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