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College of Technology
London

&
CTL

College of Technology London

Master of Business Administration


COURSE HANDBOOK June 2010 intake

TERM 2: HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT MBA

CONTENTS

1. MBA Course Structure ............................................................................. Error! Bookmark not defined.

2. UWL MBA Regulations ............................................................................................................................ 2

3. Assessment Schedule ............................................................................................................................. 7

4. Tools of Strategic Planning...................................................................................................................... 8

5. Workplace Psychology .......................................................................................................................... 15

6. International Human Resource Management........................................................................................ 20

7. Quality Systems ..................................................................................................................................... 29

8. Managing Diversity ................................................................................................................................ 34

9. Human Resource Management Project ................................................................................................ 39

© 2010 Univerity of Wales Lampeter and College of Technology London


Unauthorised reproduction of this document is not permitted. www.ctlondon.ac.uk (v.0210)
MBA COURSE STRUCTURE

TERM 1:
Core Modules (60 Credits)

Mba2310-L Finance for Non Financial Managers


Mba1710-lL Human Resource Management
Mba2210-L Marketing Management
Mba2110-L Defining Entrepreneurship
Mba2410-L Introducing Leadership
Mba6010-L Framework for Research

TERM 2:
Core Modules (20 Credits) + Pathway Modules (40 Credits)
Core Modules
Mba1810-L Tools of Strategic Planning
Mba1910-L Workplace Psychology

1. Marketing 2. Human Resource Management

Mba0710-L Consumer Behaviour Mba1310-L International Human Resource


Mba0510-L Global Marketing Management
Mba0610-L Integrated Marketing Mba1410-L Quality Systems
Communications Mba1210-L Managing Diversity
Mba2510-L Marketing Project Mba1010-L HR Project

3. Information Management 4. Entrepreneurship

Mba0810-L Management Information Systems Mba2710-L Management Practice


Mba0310-L Business Decision Making Mba2810-L Growing & Managing Entrepreneurial
Mba0210-L E-Business Strategy Business
Mba0410-L Information Management Project Mba2910-L Innovation
Mba0110-L Entrepreneurial Project
5. Banking and Finance
MBA3010-L Bank Financial Management 6. Information Security Management
MBA3110-L Corporate Finance
MBA3210-L International Financial Markets MBA0810-L Management Information Systems
MBA3310-L Banking and Finance Project MBA4310-L Information Security for Managers
MBA4410-L Ethical Issues in ICT
7. Leadership MBA4510-L Computer Forensics

Understanding Leadership
Developing Leadership
Leading and Managing Events
Leadership Project

TERM 3:
Mba1660-L Dissertation (60 Credits)

Note: Pathways are offered subject to minimum demand

College of Technology London Page 2


2. UWL MBA REGULATIONS
The MBA delivered at the College of Technology London is the full University of Wales Lampeter MBA
programme. The MBA rules and regulations that students must abide by are set and administered by the
University of Wales Lampeter.

DEFINITIONS:
Part I: Terms 1 & 2 having all the 12 taught modules
Part II: Dissertation stage

1. PROGRESSION
a) Progression from Term 1 to Term 2

Achievement of a minimum of 20 credits (pass in minimum two modules) is required to


progress from Term 1 to Term 2. Any student falling short of this requirement shall be
required to repeat Term 1 for a maximum mark of 40% in the failed modules.

b) 2. Progression from Part I to Part II

To progress from Part I (Taught modules stage) to Part II (Dissertation stage) a student is
required to achieve all the 120 credits (pass in all the 12 modules) of terms 1 & 2. Any
student falling short of this needs to resit and pass those failed modules for a maximum of
40% marks before progressing to the dissertation stage.

2. FAILURE
a) Absence/ Non-submission

Students who are absent from the whole or part of a written examination or who fail to submit
set coursework by the required date(s) will be deemed to have failed in the module(s) in
question.

b) Mark achievement

Students whose overall marks in a module falls short of 40% have failed in the module in
question.

3. MAXIMUM NUMBER OF RESIT ATTEMPTS


c) Taught Modules

Candidates who fail in a module shall be allowed to resit the assessments of the module in
question on the subsequent occasion. At the discretion of the Exam Board students may be
allowed for a second re-sit attempt. Please note that the maximum number of resit
attempts a student may be allowed take in a module is TWO only. Failure to pass the
module within these attempts may lead to withdrawal from the programme.

d) Dissertation

If a Dissertation is failed by the examiners the candidate may re-present it ONCE only. A fee
shall be payable for the examination of such a re-presented dissertation.

Note: Candidates who are re-examined in a module (taught module or dissertation) shall be eligible for
the bare pass mark of 40% only.

College of Technology London Page 3


1. IMPORTANT CHANGES IN REGULATIONS FROM THE TERM STARTING OCTOBER
2009

1.1 ASSIGNMENTS SUBMISSION


There will be NO LATE SUBMISSION provision for all course works (assignment, reports, dissertation,
st
etc.) from 1 October 2009.

This implies that if the work misses the deadline IT WILL NOT BE MARKED

This change in regulation is applicable to all NEW & RETURNING students.

1.2 DISCIPLINARY ACTION PROCEDURES


Student records, including attendance sheets, unexcused absences and lateness are reviewed by the
course coordinators regularly at the end of every week.

On review if the student’s attendance is below the minimum requirement of 85% the following disciplinary
process will be applied:

A. Counselling
At the end of the first two weeks, students falling below the minimum requirement of 85% attendance
will be counselled by the coordinator.

Counselling will be on a one-to-one basis and will aim at understanding the reasons behind their
absence and render help if possible and required.

Discussion during the counselling will be recorded and it would be signed and dated by the student as
well as the coordinator. This document will remain in the student’s file throughout the remainder of the
course for all further referrals.

The objective of counselling is to ensure that the student is not having problems with studies, settling
in the UK or any other difficulties hindering their studies. It is not a disciplinary process.

If you cannot attend a counselling meeting, please inform the Course Coordinator by email. Failure to
inform the College may result in your status being set to “EXCLUSION”.

B. Written Warning
Students, who have been counselled will be monitored for attendance on a regular basis; students
whose attendance falls below 85% at any point in time after counselling, will be served a Written
Warning either in person or through recorded post.

C. Exclusion
Even after receiving the written warning, students who fail to improve their attendance will be
recommended for exclusion. Coordinators will send the Recommendation for Exclusion Letter to
the student giving them the option to appeal in writing within 5 working days from the date of this letter.

The request for appeal will be considered ONLY if authentic evidence of any mitigating circumstances
(which were not submitted earlier either during counselling or after the written warning) is submitted
along with the appeal. If the appeal is referred to the ‘Appeals Committee’, the committee will meet
and discuss the appeal. The date and time of the meeting will be informed to the student with the
option to attend the meeting. The outcome will be informed to the student within 5 working days of the
meeting.
If the appeal is unsuccessful the student will be excluded from the College.

Exclusion from the college will affect the student’s right to complete the course and in the case of
overseas students on a student visa, the right to remain in the United Kingdom.

College of Technology London Page 4


2. GOOD PRACTICE IN ASSIGNMENT WRITING
Before starting to look specifically at the assignment(s) for a module you will:

 Attend the lecture and classroom sessions


 Read, understand and assimilate the course material
 Read around the topic, firstly using any core texts and then using various academic sources
(increasingly academic papers at levels 5, 6 and 7)
 Undertake any follow-up activities suggested by the lecturer, and complete any formative
assessment activities that have been provided
 Discuss topics from the module within class workshops and seminars, and possibly with small,
informal student groups

Look carefully at the assignment brief. Think about exactly:

 What is the topic of the assignment?


 What does the brief expect you to do? If you are uncertain check the meaning with the module
lecturer.
 Consult the marking criteria for the distribution of marks
 What are the parameters – word limits, submission deadlines etc.?
 Are there specific requirements in terms of format, use of empirical data, reference to particular
academic (or other) information sources?

Stages in constructing an assignment:

 Collect together relevant information from various sources – take notes in your own words, jot down
short quotations that you might use verbatim, make an accurate record of the source of all items of
information with precise bibliographic references
 Plan what you want to say to answer the assignment brief – you might use mind-mapping to connect
information/concepts/ examples/theory together. Develop a structure/framework (perhaps headings
and subheadings if a report)
 Start writing – if you have a planned structure you can start writing anywhere and then gradually fill
out the different sections, although some people like to write from the beginning to the end.
 As you write – make sure all information, ideas, concepts, theories etc. are correctly referenced
 Make sure your writing engaged with the hierarchy of process –

1. Knowledge
2. Manipulation
3. Application
4. Analysis
5. Synthesis
6. Evaluation

 Purely describing situations and theories is only reaching level one. You must show by using critical
writing and logical thinking they you have higher level skills. The higher the level of study the higher
up this sequence your approach should sit.
 Correct and re-correct your writing. Read through from the beginning several times, check back that
it answers the question in a logical and critical way. Check for spelling and grammar. Check for
appropriateness and consistency of style and presentation.
 Check that all information is referenced both in the text, and in a bibliography. Check that this
formatting of this referencing is appropriate and consistent (Harvard system)
 Check that you have answered the assignment brief, and addressed each of the marking criteria.
 Check your writing against the published criteria for different grade bands (see programme
handbook)

Mistakes to avoid:

 Using too many quotations. Quotations should only be used occasionally – when the way in which
the original author has said something is crucial to what you want to say; in all other situations
quotations are not necessary. If you want to include case study details and/or bibliographic details
College of Technology London Page 5
these can be copied from a good source, or sources, and should be included as appendices with the
source clearly indicated.
 Writing a description only. Your assignment must demonstrate that you can analyze and synthesise
information together.
 Not answering the question/brief set. Read the question carefully – what does it want? Do not
provide too much background breadth or contextual material; this is important but the focus must be
on answering the question.
 Not writing sufficient yourself. If the word limit is 2500 words most of these should be written by you
in your own words (not as quotations etc.) If the word limit is 2500, your work should be close to
this, + - 10% is acceptable. Paraphrasing (with appropriate referencing) is useful to summarise
another person’s point of view, but should be limited. Most of what you write in an assignment
should be your own words, critique and discussion.

DO NOT:

 Re-use text that you have previously submitted for another assignment. Each assignment is a new
piece of work and must be an entirely new piece of writing.
 Copy text/paragraphs from a proposal (for project or dissertation) into the final project report or
dissertation.

When re-sitting an assignment you should NOT re-use and upgrade a previously submitted piece of
work. You should write a new assignment. There will normally be a new assignment brief. In modules
where a generic assignment is used you should produce a new piece of work – this will mean using new
case studies/ developing a new example etc. If you are allowed to revise a previous submission you will
be clearly told this, and so should assume this is not the case (unless told).

Unfair practice detected first time will be recorded as first offence and any subsequent work
submitted and suspected of unfair practice will be automatically referred for an investigation and
could lead to the termination of your studies.

College of Technology London Page 6


3. ASSESSMENT SCHEDULE
MBA - Term 2 - Human Resource Management - Assessment Schedule

SUMMER INTAKE (June 2010)

Assignment 1 Assignment 2 Examination


S. Module
Module name
No. Code Submission Submission
Weightage Due Weightage Due Weightage Due Duration
Type Type

August /
1 MBA1810-L Tools for Strategic Management 100% September 2 hrs
2010
August /
2 MBA1910-L Workplace Psychology 100% September 2 hrs
2010

23-Aug-
3 MBA1310-L International Human Resource Management 100% OTS
10

25-Aug-
4 MBA1410-L Quality Systems 100% OTS
10

23-Aug-
5 MBA1210-L Managing Diversity 100% OTS
10

Proposal
25-Aug-
6 MBA1010-L HRM Project 1st July HSS 100% OTS
10
2010

OTS - Turn-it-in submission


HSS - Hard & Soft copy submission

Refer to the Student Portal (http://resources.ctlondon.ac.uk) for more Submission Type Instructions

NOTE: THERE IS NO LATE SUBMISSION – IF YOU MISS SUBMISSION DEADLINE YOUR ASSESSMENT WILL NOT BE MARKED

College of Technology London Page 7


Department of Management and Information Technology

4. TOOLS OF STRATEGIC PLANNING

MBA1810-L: MBA CORE MODULE

TERM 2

College of Technology London Page 8


Tools of Strategic Planning

A. MODULE SUMMARY
Module Code and Title: Tools of Strategic Planning

Code: MBA1810-L Level: M (7)

Credits: 10 Terms Taught: 1

Assessments: Examination (100%)

Teaching Methods: Lectures, Case Studies, Workshops, Presentations, Group work

Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None

Taught in the medium of


No Incompatibles: None
Welsh:

Number of
Lectures/workshops per 2 hours Contact Hours: 20 hours
week:

Syllabus: The following themes are explored:


• Definition, key elements, core areas and importance of
Strategy
• The tools of internal and external environmental analysis,
including: SWOT, PESTE, Value Chain, Boston Box,
Cultural, Porter’s Five Forces, Stakeholder analyses
• Strategic choices
• Strategy implementation

Learning Outcomes: By the end of the sessions students should be able to:
• Describe how corporate strategies are determined
• Demonstrate how the internal and external organisational
environment is analysed
• Recognise the influence of culture, values and power within
the organisation
• Apply strategic tools, including SWOT, PESTE, Value
Chain, Boston Box, Cultural, Porter’s Five Forces and
Stakeholder analyses;
• Differentiate between and determine appropriate strategic
choices
• Consider the consequences of strategy implementation

Transferable and other Development and application of:


skills: • Written and oral communication skills
• Planning
• Application
• Information gathering
• Analytical skills
• Synthesising skills
• Group work

College of Technology London Page 9


Tools of Strategic Planning

B. MODULE DESCRIPTION
Effective strategic development and management is dependent on comprehensive and current
information and data regarding an organisation’s internal competencies and its external operating
environment.

This module provides students with an understanding of the principals of strategic management and
introduces a variety of analytical tools of environmental analysis. Students explore the use of models,
such as the Value Chain, Portfolio Analysis, Stakeholder Analysis, Porter’s Five Forces, etc.
Students will also explore the pros and cons of strategic choices and consider the impact of and
consequences of strategy implementation.

The following elements will be included:

• Definition, key elements, core areas and importance of strategy


• Tools of internal environmental analysis
• Tools of external environmental analysis
• Competitor and customer analysis
• Strategic choices at various levels of the organisation
• Suitability and feasibility
• Implementation issues

Teaching sessions will be interactive and will involve students in practical exercises, case study analysis
and discussions. This will facilitate the development of analytical, evaluation, communication, team and
leadership skills through self-directed discovery and peer assisted learning.

Assessment will be formative through questioning and task setting during learning sessions and via one
examination.

C. LECTURE SCHEDULE

Week 1 – Defining Strategy


 Introducing emergent and prescriptive strategies

Week 2 - Generic Perspectives


 Key players and approaches

Week 3 – 4 Environmental Scanning


 Assessing the external environment

Week 5 – 6 Environmental Scanning


 Assessing the internal environment

Week 7 - Generic Strategies


 Porter’s generic strategies applied

Week 8 - Competitive and Growth Strategies and Maximising Value


 Bowman’s clock and other strategies

Week 9 – Making Choices


 Determining the right fit

College of Technology London Page 10


Tools of Strategic Planning

Week 10 – Implementation and its Possible Consequences


 Change Management

D. REFERENCES

Main Recommended Texts


nd
1. Burnes, B., 2 ed. (1996) Managing Change. Financial Times Management.
nd
2. Dobson, P. et al, (2004), Strategic Management, Issues and cases, 2 ed., Blackwell Publishing
3. Fitzroy, P. & Hulbert, J. (2004) Strategic Management, Wiley HE
4. Hill, C. W. L et al. (1998) Strategic Management..Houghton Mifflin
th
5. Johnson, G. & Scholes K. (2002) Exploring Corporate Strategy, 6 ed. FT Prentice Hall
6. Lynch, R. (2000) Corporate Strategy. Pearson Education Ltd.
7. Stevens, D. (1997) Strategic Thinking: success secrets of big business projects, McGraw Hill.
8. Thompson, A. & Strickland, A. (1997) Strategic Management: Concepts and Cases. McGraw
Hill.
9. Wickham, P. A. (1998) Strategic Entrepreneurship, FT Prentice Hall.

Other Reading
1. Abell, D. (1978) “Strategic windows”, Journal of Marketing, Vol 42, pg 21–28, July 1978.
2. Abell, D. (1993) Managing with dual strategies, The Free Press (Macmillan Inc.), New York,
1993,
3. Ansoff, I. (1957) Strategies for diversification, Harvard Business Review, Boston, 1957
4. Ansoff, I. (1965) Corporate Strategy McGraw Hill, New York, 1965
5. Ansoff, I. Declerck, R. and Hayes, R. (1976) From Strategic Planning to Strategic
Management, John Wiley, New York, 1976
6. Axelrod, R. and Cohen, M. (1999) Harnessing Complexity : Organizational implications of a
scientific frontier The Free Press, New York, 1999
7. Barnard, C. (1938) The function of the executive, Harvard University Press, Cambridge Mass,
1938.
8. Barney, J. (1991) “Firm Resources and Sustainable Competitive Advantage”, Journal of
Management, vol 17, no 1, 1991.
9. Barton, D.L. (1995) Wellsprings of Knowledge, Harvard Business school Press, Boston, 1995.
10. Berry, L. (1995) On Great Service, Free Press, New York, 1995.
11. Buzzell, R. and Gale, B. (1987) The PIMS Principles: Linking Strategy to Performance, Free
Press, New York, 1987.
12. Castells, M. (1996) The Rise of the Networked Society :The information age, Blackwell
Publishers, Cambridge Mass, 1996.
13. Camp, R. (1989) Benchmarking: The search for industry best practices that lead to superior
performance, American Society for Quality Control, Quality Press, Milwaukee, Wis., 1989.
14. Chaffee, E. (1985) “Three models of strategy”, Academy of Management Review, vol 10, no. 1,
1985.
15. Chandler, A. (1962) Strategy and structure: Chapters in the history of industrial enterprise,
Doubleday, New York
16. Christensen, C. (1997) "The Innovator's Dilemma", Harvard Business School Press, Boston,
1997
17. Collins, J. and Porras, J. (1994) Built to Last, Harper Books, New York, 1994.
18. Collins, J. and Porras, J. (1996) “Building Your Company's Vision”, Harvard Business Review,
September/October 1996.
19. Crosby, P. (1979) Quality is Free, McGraw Hill, New York, 1979.
20. David, Fred (2006), Strategic Management: Concepts and Cases, Prentice Hall, 2006,
21. Davidow, W. and Uttal, B. (1989) Total Customer Service, Harper Perenial Books, New York,
1990.
22. Deming, W.E. (1982) Quality, Productivity, and Competitive Position, MIT Center for Advanced
Engineering, Cambridge Mass., 1982.
23. Dixon, P. (2003) Futurewise - Six Faces of Global Change, Profile Books, London, 2003
24. Drucker, P. (1954) The Practice of Management, Harper and Row, New York, 1954
25. Drucker, P. (1968) The Age of Discontinuity, Heinemann, London, 1969 (also Harper and Row,
New York, 1968).
26. Drucker, P. (1973) Management, Harper and Row, New York, 1983-paperback

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Tools of Strategic Planning

27. Dudik, E. (2000) Strategic Renaissance, Amacon, New York, 2000


28. Evens, P. and Wurster, T. (1997) “Strategy and the New Economics of Information”, Harvard
Business Review, Sept/Oct 1997.
29. Feignbaum, A. (1983) Total Quality Control, 3rd edition, McGraw Hill, Maidenhead, 1990.
30. Frank, R. and Cook, P. (1995) The Winner Take All Society, Free Press, New York, 1995.
31. Garratt, B. (1987) The Learning Organization, Fontana Books, London, 1987.
32. Gronroos, C. (1994) “From marketing mix to relationship marketing: towards a paradigm shift
in marketing”, Management Decision, Vol. 32, No. 2, pp 4–32, 1994.
33. Gladwell, M. (2000) The Tipping Point, Little Brown, New York, 2000.
34. Hamel, G. & Prahalad, C.K. (1989) “Strategic Intent”, Harvard Business Review, May–June
1989.
35. Hamel, G. & Prahalad, C.K. (1990) “The Core Competence of the Corporation”, Harvard
Business Review, May–June 1990.
36. Hamel, G. & Prahalad, C.K. (1994)Competing for the Future, Harvard Business School Press,
Boston, 1994
37. Hammer, M. and Champy, J. (1993) Reengineering the Corporation, Harper Business, New
York, 1993.
38. Handy, C. (1989) The Age of Unreason, Hutchinson, London, 1989.
39. Heskett, J. (1986) Managing in the Service Economy, Harvard Business School Press, Boston,
1986.
40. Heskett, J. Jones, T. Loveman, G. Sasser, E. and Schlesinger, L. (1994) “Putting the service
profit chain to work”, Harvard Business Review, March/April 1994.
41. Heskett, J. Sasser, E. and Schlesinger, L. (1997) The Service Profit Chain, Free Press, New
York, 1997.
42. Hill, Charles W. L. and Jones, Gareth R. (2006) Strategic Management Theory: An Integrated
Approach, 2006
43. Holland, J. (1995) Hidden Order: How adaptation builds complexity Addison-Wesley, Reading
Mass., 1995.
44. Isenberg, D. (1984) “How managers think”, Harvard Business Review, November–December
1984.
45. Isenberg, D. (1986) Strategic Opportunism: Managing under uncertainty, Harvard Graduate
School of Business, Working paper 9-786-020, Boston, January 1986.
46. Jarillo, J.-C. (1993) Strategic Networks: Creating borderless organizations, Butterworth-
Heinemann, Oxford, 1993
47. Jarillo, J.-C. (2003) Strategic Logic, Palgrave McMillan, New York, 2003 (Exist also in other
languages)
48. Juran, J.M. (1992) Juran on Quality, Free Press, New York, 1992.
49. Kaplan, R. S. and Norton, D. P. (1992) “The balanced scorecard: measures that drive
performance”, Harvard Business Review, Jan–Feb, 1992, pp71–80.
50. Katsioloudes, Marios (2006). Strategic Management. Butterworth-Heineman, an imprint of
Elsevier.
51. Kearney, A.T. (1992) Total Quality Management: A business process perspective, Kearney
Pree Inc, 1992.
52. Kelly, S. and Allison, M.A. (1999) The Complexity Advantage, McGraw Hill, New York, 1999.
53. Kingman-Brundage, J. (1993) “Service Mapping” pp 148–163 In Scheuing, E. and Christopher,
W. (eds.), The Service Quality Handbook, Amacon, New York, 1993.
54. Kotter,J. (1982) The general manager, Free Press, New York, 1982.
55. Leibold, M. Probst, G. and Gibbert, M. (2001) Strategic Management in the Knowledge
Economy, Wiley, Erlangen 2001
56. Levinson, J.C. (1984) Guerrilla Marketing, Secrets for making big profits from your small
business, Houghton Muffin Co. New York, 1984,
57. Levy, D. (1994) “Chaos Theory and Strategy: Theory, Application, and Managerial
Implications”, Strategic Management Journal, vol 15, 1994.
58. Lewis, J. (1999) Trusted Partners, Free Press, New York, 1999.
59. Liekskin, J.P. (1996) “Knowledge, Strategy, and the Theory of the Firm”, Strategic
Management Journal, vol 17, winter 1996.
60. Lovelock, C. (1994), Product Plus: How Product + Service = Competitive Advantage, McGraw
Hill, New York, 1994.
61. Markides, C. (1999). “A dynamic view of strategy” Sloan Management Review, vol 40, spring
1999, pp55–63.
62. Markides, C. (1997). “Strategic innovation” Sloan Management Review, vol 38, spring 1997,
pp31–42.

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63. McKenna, R. (1997) Real time: Preparing for the age of the Never Satisfied Customer, Harvard
Business School Press, Boston, 1997.
64. Mc Namee, P.(2004) The Strategy Compass: Timeless Strategic Direction for all Businesses,
www.lulu.com.
65. Mintzberg, H. (1973), The Nature of Managerial Work, Harper and Roe, New York, 1973.
66. Mintzberg, H. (1987), “Crafting Strategy”, Harvard Business Review, July/August 1987.
67. Mintzberg, H. and Quinn, J.B. (1988) The Strategy Process, Prentice-Hall, Harlow, 1988.
68. Mintzberg, H. (1994), “The Fall and Rise of Strategic Planning”, Harvard Business Review,
Jan/Feb 1994.
69. Mintzberg, H. Ahlstrand, B. and Lampel, J. (1998), Strategy Safari : A Guided Tour Through
the Wilds of Strategic Management, The Free Press, New York, 1998.
70. Moncrieff, J. (1999). “Is strategy making a difference?” Long Range Planning Review, vol 32,
no2, pp273–276.
71. Moore, G. (1991), Crossing the Chasm, Harper Collins, New York, 2nd ed 1999.
72. Moore, J. (1993), “Predators and Prey”, Harvard Business Review, Vol. 71, May–June, pp 75–
86, 1993.
73. Naisbitt, J. (1982) Megatrends, Warner Books, New York, 1982 I
74. Ohmae, K. (1982) The Mind of the Strategist McGraw Hill, New York, 1982.
75. Parasuraman, A. Zeithaml, V. and Berry, L. (1988) “SERVQUAL: A multiple-item scale for
measuring consumer perceptions of service quality”, Journal of Retailing, Spring 1988, pp 12–
40.
76. Pascale, R. and Athos, A. (1981) The Art of Japanese Management, Penguin, London, 1981,
77. Pascale, R. (1990) Managing on the Edge, Simon and Schuster, New York, 1990.
78. Peters, T. and Waterman, R. (1982) In Search of Excellence, Harper Colllins, New york, 1982.
79. Peters, T. and Austin, N. (1985) A Passion for Excellence, Random House, New York, 1985
(also Warner Books, New York, 1985
80. Pine, J. and Gilmore, J. (1997) “The Four Faces of Mass Customization”, Harvard Business
Review, Vol 75, No 1, Jan–Feb 1997.
81. Pine, J. and Gilmore, J. (1998) “Welcome to the Experience Economy”, Harvard Business
Review, July–August 1998.
82. Pine, J. and Gilmore, J. (1999) The Experience Economy, Harvard Business School Press,
Boston, 1999.
83. Porter, M. (1979) “How competitive forces shape strategy”, Harvard business Review,
March/April 1979.
84. Porter, M. (1980) Competitive Strategy, Free Press, New York, 1980.
85. Porter, M. (1987) “From Competitive Advantage to Corporate Strategy”, Harvard Business
Review, May/June 1987, pp 43–59.
86. Porter, M. (1996) “What is Strategy”, Harvard Business Review, Nov/Dec 1996.
87. Porter, M. (2001) “Strategy and the Internet”, Harvard Business Review, March 2001.
88. Porter, M. and Millar, V. (1985) “How Information Technology gives you Competitive
Advantage”, Harvard Business Review, July/August 1985
89. Probst, G. Raub, S. and Romhardt K. (1999) Managing Knowledge, Wiley, London, 1999
(Exists also in other languages)
90. Quinn, J.B. (1992) Intelligent Enterprise, The Free Press, New York, 1992.
91. Rehfeld, J.E. (1994) Alchemy of a Leader: Combining Western and Japanese Management
skills to transform your company, John Whily & Sons, New York, 1994,
92. Reichheld, F. and Sasser, E. (1990) “Zero defects: Quality comes to services”, Harvard
Business Review, September/October 1990.
93. Reichheld, F. (1996) The Loyalty Effect, Harvard Business School Press, Boston, 1996.
94. Rifkin, J. (2000) The Age of Access, Putnum Books, New York, 2000
95. Schartz, P. (1991) The Art of the Long View, Doubleday, New York, 1991.
96. Schmitt, B. (2003) Customer Experience Management, The Free Press, New York, 2003.
97. Schmitt, B. and Simonson, A. (1997) In Marketing Aesthetics: The strategic management of
brands, identity, and image The Free Press, New York, 1997.
98. Schumacher, E.F. (1973) Small is Beautiful: a Study of Economics as if People Mattered,
99. Schlesinger, L. and Heskett, J. (1991) Customer Satisfaction is rooted in Employee
Satisfaction, Harvard Business Review, November–December 1991.
100. Schonberger, R. (1982) Japanese Manufacturing Techniques, The Free Press, 1982, New
York.
101. Schuck, G. (1985) “Intelligent Workers: A new predagogy for the high tech workplace”,
Organizational Dynamics, Autumn 1985.
102. Selznick, P. (1957) Leadership in Administration: A Sociological Interpretation, Row, Peterson,
Evanston Il. 1957.

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Tools of Strategic Planning

103. Senge, P. (1990) The Fifth Discipline, Doubleday, New York, 1990, (also Century,, London,
1990)
104. Sewell, C. and Brown, P. (1990) Customers for Life, Doubleday Currency, New York, 1990.
105. Shapiro, C. and Varian, H. (1999) Information Rules, Harard Business School Press, Boston,
1999.
106. Slywotzky, A (1996) Value Migration, Harvard Business School Press, Boston, 1996.
107. Slywotzky, A., Morrison, D., Moser, T., Mundt, K., and Quella, J. (1999) Profit Patterns, Time
Business (Random House), New York, 1999,
108. Smith, W. (1966) “Product Differentiation and Market Segmentation as Alternative Marketing
Strategies”, Journal of Marketing, July 1966.
109. Steiner, G. (1979) Strategic Planning: What every manager must know, The Free Press, New
York, 1979.
110. Stewart, T. (1997) Intellectual Capital, Nicholas Brealey, London, 1997, (also DoubleDay, New
York, 1997).
111. Sveiby, K.E. (1997) The New Organizational Wealth : Managing and measuring knowledge-
based assets, Berrett-Koehler Publishers, San Francisco, 1997.
112. Tellis, G. and Golder, P. (2002) Will and Vision: How late comers grow to dominate markets,
McGraw Hill, New York, 2002.
113. Treacy, M. and Wiesema, F. (1993) “Customer intimacy and other Value Disciplines”, Harvard
Business Review Jan/Feb 1993.
114. Tregoe, B. and Zimmerman, J. (1980) Top Management Strategy, Simon and Schuster, 1980,
New York,
115. Tichy, N. (1983) Managing Strategic Change: Technical, political, and cultural dynamics, John
Wiley, New York, 1983.
116. Toffler, A. (1970) Future Shock, Bantom Books, New York, 1970.
117. Toffler, A. (1980) The Third Wave, Bantom Books, New York, 1980.
118. Traverso, D. (2000) Outsmarting Goliath, Bloomberg Press, Princeton, 2000.
119. van der Heyden, K. (1996) Scenarios: The art of strategic conversation, Wiley, New York,
1996.
120. Wack, P. (1985) “Scenarios: Uncharted Waters Ahead”, Harvard Business review, September
October, 1985.
121. Wacker, W. and Taylor, J. (1997) The 500 Year Delta, Capstone Books, Oxford, 1997.
122. Warden, John A. III and Russell, Leland A. Winning In FastTime-Harnessing the competitive
advantage of Prometheus in Business and Life, Venturist Publishing, Montgomery, AL, 2002.
123. Wickens, P.D. (1995) The Ascendant Organization, MacMillan Press, 1995, London,
124. Woo, C. and Cooper, A. (1982) “The surprising case for low market share”, Harvard Business
Review, November–December 1982, pg 106–113.
125. Zaleznik, A. (1977) “Managers and Leaders: Are they different?”, Harvard Business Review,
May–June, 1977.
126. Zaleznik, A. (1989) The Managerial Mystique, Harper and Row, New York, 1989.
127. Zuboff, S. (1988) In the Age of the Smart Machine, Basic Books, New York, 1988

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Department of Management and Information Technology

5. WORKPLACE PSYCHOLOGY

MBA1910-L: MBA CORE MODULE

TERM 2

College of Technology London Page 15


Workplace Psychology

A. MODULE SUMMARY
Module Code and Title: Workplace Psychology

Code: MBA1910-L Level: M (7)

Credits: 10 Terms Taught: 1

Assessments: Examination (100%)

Teaching Methods: Lectures, Workshops, Case Studies, Presentations, Group work

Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None

Taught in the medium of


No Incompatibles: None
Welsh:

Number of
Lectures/workshops per 2 hours Contact Hours: 20 hours
week:

Syllabus: • Work psychology: its origins and subject matter


• Personality and behaviour
• Individual differences and group behaviour
• Perceptual and communication differences
• The major approaches to motivation and learning
• Empowerment
• Power and politics

Learning Outcomes: By the end of the sessions students should be able to:
• Identify and understand the importance of individual and
groups behaviour in respect of personality, barriers to
perception and the formative processes of attitudes, values
and beliefs
• Describe and explain the issues surrounding empowerment
• Define and assess interpersonal processes of
communication
• Present an overview of the current state of knowledge of
memory and learning
• Analyse the main communication factors central to
effectiveness at work
• Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of flexibility and
in the workforce

Transferable and other Development and application of:


skills: • Learning
• Written and oral communication skills
• Planning
• Group work
• Information gathering
• Presentation
• The interpretation of data

College of Technology London Page 16


Workplace Psychology

B. MODULE DESCRIPTION
What our ancestors discovered a long time ago still remains true: ‘groups can achieve much more than
individuals acting alone’. We are, like many other creatures on earth, social animals; we enjoy the
company of others and achieve psychological satisfaction and material gain from organised activity. In
fact, our society is dependant on collective organised activity. However, when individuals are engaged in
collective organised activities, conflict is never far away. Managing organisations is to a large extent
about managing people.

The study of Workplace Psychology draws on many disciplines, such as psychology, social psychology,
sociology, anthropology, economics, etc. This module explores the development of Workplace
Psychology as a discipline and probes the influences on individual and group behaviour. Other areas to
be explored include how we learn and how we develop effective communication skills.

The key elements of the module are:

• The background to and definition of Workplace Psychology


• Personality types and traits
• Interpersonal communications and the psychology of perception
• The nature of motives and motivation processes as influences on behaviour
• The main components of the cognitive and behaviourist approaches to learning
• The influences on group cohesiveness and performance
• The definitions and elements of empowerment
• The relationship between power and influencing
• Definition and benefits of the Learning organisation

Teaching sessions will be interactive and will involve students in practical exercises, case study analysis,
scenario building and discussions. Students will be encouraged to self and peer analyse. This will
facilitate the development of analytical, evaluation, synthesising, communication, team and leadership
skills through self-directed discovery and peer assisted learning.

Assessment

Assessment will be formative through questioning and task setting during learning sessions and via one
examination.

C. LECTURE SCHEDULE
Week 1 - Introduction to Workplace Psychology
Background to and definition of the discipline

Week 2 - Personality types and traits

Week 3 and 4 - Interpersonal communication and the psychology of perception

Week 5 - Motives and motivation

Week 6 - The psychology of learning

Week 7 - Defining and understanding groups

Week 8 - Defining Empowerment

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Workplace Psychology

Week 9 - The relationship between power and influencing

Week 10 - The learning organisation

D. REFERENCES
1. Buchanan, D & Huczynski, A (1997) Organisational Behaviour, NY: Prentice Hall, (3rd ed)
2. Greenberg, J. (2005) Managing Behaviour in Organizations, Prentice Hall
3. Robbins, Stephen P (2004) Organizational Behavior - Concepts, Controversies, Applications. 4th
Ed. Prentice Hall

Extended Reading List


1. Abramson, L. , Seligman, M.E.P. & Teasdale,J. (1978). Learned helplessness in humans:
Critique and reformulation. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 87, 49-74.
2. Allport, G. W. (1985). The historical background of social psychology. In G. Lindzey & E.
Aronson (Eds.), The handbook of social psychology. New York: McGraw Hill.
3. Allport, G. W. (1937). Personality: A psychological interpretation. New York: Holt, Rinehart &
Winston
4. Argyris, C. & Schön, D. A. (1996). Organizational learning II: Theory, method, & practice.
Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley.
5. Asch, S. E. (1955). Opinions and social pressure. Scientific American, pp. 31-35.
6. Asch, S. E. (1946). "Forming impressions of personality." Journal of Abnormal and Social
Psychology 41, 258-290
7. Ashkenas, R., Ulrich, D., Jick, T. & Kerr, S. (2002). The boundaryless organization: Breaking the
chains of organizational structure. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
8. Bandura, A., Ross, D. & Ross, S. A. (1961). Transmission of aggression through imitation of
aggressive models. Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, 63, 575-582.
9. Baron, J. (1982). Intelligence and Personality. In R. Sternberg (Ed.). Handbook of Intelligence.
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
10. Batson, C. D. (1998). Altruism and prosocial behavior. In D. T. Gilbert, S. T. Fiske, & G. Lindzey,
(Eds.),The handbook of social psychology. New York: McGraw Hill.
11. Bem, D. (1970). Beliefs, attitudes, and human affairs. Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole.
12. Bossidy, L. & Charan, R. (2002). Execution: The discipline of getting things done. New York:
Crown Business.
13. Buchanan, D & Huczynski, A (1997) Organisational Behaviour, NY: Prentice Hall, (3rd ed)
14. Cialdini, R. B. (2000). Influence: Science and practice. Allyn and Bacon.
15. Daft, R. L. (2004). Organization Theory and Design (8th ed.). Mason, OH: South-Western.
16. Engler, Barbara (2006). Personality Theories. Houghton Mifflin.
17. Festinger, L. (1957). A theory of cognitive dissonance. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.
18. Festinger, L. & Carlsmith, J. M. (1959). Cognitive consequences of forced compliance. Journal of
Abnormal and Social Psychology, 58, 203-211.
19. Evans, W. H., Jr. (1992) Managing the burnout factor. Mortgage Banking 53(1), 119-123.
Retrieved June 2, 2006, from ABI/Inform Global
20. Field, L. (1997) Impediments to empowerment & learning within organizations. The Learning
Organization 4(4), 149-158. Retrieved November 17, 2006, from Emerald Journals
21. Ford, R. (2006) Organizational learning, change & power: Toward a practice-theory framework.
The Learning Organization 13(5), 495-524. Retrieved November 17, 2006, from Emerald
Journals
22. Gergen, K. J. (1973). Social psychology as history. Journal of Personality and Social
Psychology, 26, 309-320.
23. Greenberg, J. (2005) Managing Behaviour in Organizations, Prentice Hall
24. Gryskiewicz, S. S. (1999). Positive turbulence: Developing climates for creativity, innovation, and
renewal. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
25. Handy, C. (1990). The Age of Unreason. Boston: Harvard Business School Press.
26. Haney, C., Banks, W.C. & Zimbardo, P.G. (1973). Interpersonal dynamics in a simulated prison.
International Journal of Criminology and Penology, 1, 69-97.
27. Heathfield, S. M. (2006). Employee empowerment. Human Resources: About, Inc. Accessed
November 1, 2006 from
http://humanresources.about.com/od/glossarye/a/empowerment_def.htm

College of Technology London Page 18


Workplace Psychology

28. Hersey, P., Blanchard, K. H. & Johnson, D. E. (1996). Management of organizational behavior:
Utilizing human resources (7th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.
29. Honold, L. (1997) A review of the literature on employee empowerment. Empowerment in
Organizations 5(4), 202-212. Retrieved November 24, 2006, from Emerald Journals
30. Jamali, D., Khoury, G. & Sahyoun, H. (2006) From bureaucratic organizations to learning
organizations. The Learning Organization 13(4), 337-352. Retrieved November 17, 2006, from
Emerald Journals
31. Isbister, J. N. (1985) "Freud, An Introduction to his Life and Work" Publisher: Polity Press:
Cambridge, Oxford.
32. Janis, I. L. (1972). Victims of groupthink. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin Company.
33. Kanter, R. M. (1988, February 5-6). Empowering people to act on ideas. Executive Excellence.
34. Keidel, R. W. (1995). Seeing organizational patterns: A new theory and language of
organizational design. San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler.
35. Latane, B. (1981). The psychology of social impact. American Psychologist, 36, 343-356.
36. Landes, L. (1994) The myth & misdirection of employee empowerment. Training 31(3), 116-117.
37. Lewin, K. (1951). Field theory in social science: Selected theoretical papers. D. Cartwright (Ed.).
New York: Harper & Row.
38. Milgram, S. (1975). Obedience to authority. Harper and Bros.
39. Mischel, W. (1999). Introduction to Personality. Sixth edition. Fort Worth, Texas: Harcourt Brace.
40. Perloff, R. M. (2003). The dynamics of persuasion. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.
41. Ryckman, R. (2004). Theories of Personality. Belmont, CA: Thomson/Wadsworth
42. Scarnati, J. T. & Scarnati, B. J. (2002) Empowerment: The key to quality. The TQM Magazine
14(2), 110, . Retrieved November 17, 2006, from ABI/Inform Global
43. Schweitzer, C. (2004) Light-bulb leadership: Creating a culture where innovation is in.
Association Management 56(8), 31-42. Retrieved January 30, 2006, from OmniFile Full Text
Mega
44. Scott, S. G. & Bruce, R. A. (1994) Determinants of innovative behavior: A path model of
individual innovation in the workplace. Academy of Management Journal 37(3), 580-607.
Retrieved March 9, 2006, from ABI/INFORM Complete
45. Senge, P. M. (2006). The fifth discipline: The art & practice of the learning organization (Revised
ed.). New York: Currency/Doubleday. (Original work published 1996)
46. Sherif, M. (1954). Experiments in group conflict. Scientific American, 195, 54-58.
47. Spreitzer, G. M. (1996) Social structural characteristics of psychological empowerment.
Academy of Management Journal 39(2), 483-504. Retrieved November 17, 2006, from
ABI/Inform Global
48. Tajfel, H. & Turner, J. C. (1986). The social identity theory of intergroup behavior. In S. Worchel
& W. G. Austin (Eds.), Psychology of intergroup relations. Chicago, IL: Nelson-Hall.
49. Thorndike, E. L. (1920). "A Constant Error on Psychological Rating." Journal of Applied
Psychology, vol. IV, 25-29
50. Weick, Karl E (1979) The Social Psychology of Organizing 2nd Ed. McGraw Hill
51. Weightman J (1999) Introducing organisational behaviour London: Longman.

College of Technology London Page 19


Department of Management and Information Technology

6. INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

MBA1310-L: MBA PATHWAY MODULE

TERM 2

College of Technology London Page 20


International Human Resource Management

A. MODULE SUMMARY
Module Code and Title: International Human Resource Management

Code: MBA1310-L Level: M (7)

Credits: 10 Terms Taught: 1

Assessments: 1 x assignment 2,500 words (100%)

Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars, Workshops, Case Studies, Presentations,


Group work

Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None

Taught in the medium of


No Incompatibles: None
Welsh:

Number of
Lectures/workshops per 2 hours Contact Hours: 20 hours
week:

Syllabus: The following themes are explored:


• Organisational structure and strategy
• Multinational Enterprises and national cultures
• International Operations
• Corporate HRM
• Standards, Ethics and Codes of Conduct
• Selection and Management – international employees
• Training and Management Development
• Rewards and Benefits, including compensation
• IHRM – a professional approach

Learning Outcomes: To equip students with the knowledge they need to:
• Understand the distinctions between HRM and IHRM
• Develop an appreciation of the practices and policies
required of the IHRM function
• Understand the global context of strategic HRM
• Appreciate the professional role, competence and expertise
of the IHRM specialist.

Transferable and other Development and application of:


skills: • Critical thinking and creativity
• Problem solving and decision making
• Information and knowledge gathering
• Effective use of communication and information technology
• Personal effectiveness
• Effective performance within a team environment
• Leadership and performance management
• Ethics and value management
• Ability to conduct research into management issues
• Learning through reflection on practice

College of Technology London Page 21


International Human Resource Management

B. MODULE DESCRIPTION
INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT is about managing the human resource in the
international context, the international environment. With business increasingly international in scope,
and the management of human resources critical to business success, the subject merits its own
consideration. This module looks at IHRM issues faced by multinational organisations and enterprises.
There is a focus on the problems faced by businesses that must perform in more than one country, the
strategic implications and those for practices and policies. Managing people in both the public and
private sectors can be an extremely difficult and complex process. However, people are an
organisation’s most important resource and they are crucial for ensuring its success. To be effective on
an international scale, human resource management must address the people management issues
which can span international borders.

The Aims of the Pathway Module – International Human Resource Management

To develop the student’s knowledge and understanding of:

1. Framing global HR within the context of economic, technological and strategic drivers of
business,
2. The HR implications of a global strategy and the HR implications of working in different
countries,
3. How multinational and other organisations ands enterprises adopt global solutions in delivering
international HRM,
4. The impact of international HRM on Organisational effectiveness,
5. The key areas to success in IHRM,
6. The professional function of IHR Departments within multinational enterprises.

The learning and teaching strategy aims to develop independent learners, which is consistent with
Masters Level study.

There will be integration of theory and practice in all modules. Students will be encouraged to use
empirical and original research into a current business management issues. The class room based
teaching will be interactive and students will be expected to read and research widely and to participate
freely during teaching and seminar sessions.

Students are expected to be able to demonstrate a range of cognitive and intellectual skills and
techniques specific to business and management, as well as personal and interpersonal skills.

Students are expected to come to lecturers prepared, by reading the journal and/or chapter
books provided.

College of Technology London Page 22


International Human Resource Management

C. LECTURE SCHEDULE
Week 1 - International Human Resource Management – An Introduction

Week 2 - Globalisation and HRM

Week 3 - Multinational Enterprises and National Cultures

Week 4 - Operating in an International Environment

Week 5 - Developing Global Themes

Week 6 - Managing International Mobility

Week 7 - The Contribution of Corporate HRM

Week 8 - International Assignees

Week 9 - Standards, Ethics and Codes of Conduct

Week 10 - Developing Global Human Resource Management Professionals

D. REFERENCES
Main Recommended Texts
1. Deresky Helen, (2008), International Management: managing across boarders and cultures, London:
Pearson Education Ltd.
2. Mendenhall, M.E. Oddou G.R. & Stahl G.K (2007 )Readings and Cases in International Human
th
Resource Management, 4 ed., Oxon: Routledge.
3. Edwards Tony & Rees Chris (2006) International Human Resource Management: Globalization,
National systems & Multinational Companies, Essex: Pearson Education Ltd.
4. Briscoe Dennis R. & Schuller Randall S. (2004) International HRM, 2nd ed., Routledge
nd
5. Schneider Susan C. and Barsoux Jean-Louis, (2003) Managing Across Cultures, 2 ed. Essex:
Pearson education Ltd.

Other Recommended Texts


1. Millmore M., Lewis P., Saunders M., Thornhill A. & Morrow T. (2007) Strategic Human Resource
Management: contemporary issues, Essex: Pearson Education Ltd.
2. Leopold John, Harris Lynette & Watson Tony (2005) The Strategic Management of Human
Resources, Essex: Person Education Ltd.
3. Sparrow P., Brewster C. & Harris H. (2004) Globalising Human Resource Management, Routledge
4. Bach Stephen (2005) Managing Human Resources, Blackwell Publishing
5. Greer Charles R. (2001) Strategic Human Resource Management: a general managerial
perspective, FT Prentice Hall

In addition to professional journals and web based resources, students are directed to the following
selected reference works.

Reading Preparation
L1: Mark E. Mendenhall, Gary R Oddou and Gunter K. Stahl, ‘Introduction and Introductory
reading and cases: “the white water rapids of Robin Earl”’ pp.1-16 in Mendenhall, M.E. Oddou G.R.
th
& Stahl G.K. (2007 )Readings and Cases in International Human Resource Management, 4 ed., Oxon:
Routledge

L2: Mark E. Mendenhall, J. Stewart Black, Robert J. Jensen and Hal B. Gregersen, ‘ Seeing the
elephant: Human Resource Management challenges in the age of Globalization’ pp. 19-34 in
College of Technology London Page 23
International Human Resource Management

Mendenhall, M.E. Oddou G.R. & Stahl G.K. (2007 )Readings and Cases in International Human
th
Resource Management, 4 ed., Oxon: Routledge

L3: Roger Hallowell, David Bowen and Carin-Isabel Knoop, ‘Four Seasons goes to Paris’ pp. 317-
348 in Mendenhall, M.E. Oddou G.R. & Stahl G.K. (2007 )Readings and Cases in International Human
th
Resource Management, 4 ed., Oxon: Routledge

L4: Allan Bird and Schon Beechler, ‘The link between business strategy and IHR practices’ pp.
35-46 in Mendenhall, M.E. Oddou G.R. & Stahl G.K. (2007 )Readings and Cases in International Human
th
Resource Management, 4 ed., Oxon: Routledge

L5: Papers on the Public drive (:P)


a) Paul R. Sparrow (2006) Globalization of HR at a Functional level
b) Sheila M. Rioux, Paul R. Bernthal & Richard S. Wellins, DDI: Development Dimensions
International, The Globalization of HR Practices

L6: Jaime Bonache and Zulima Fernandez, ‘Strategic staffing in multicultural companies: a
resource-based approach’ pp. 99-118 in Mendenhall, M.E. Oddou G.R. & Stahl G.K. (2007 )Readings
th
and Cases in International Human Resource Management, 4 ed., Oxon: Routledge

L7: Susan C. Schneider and Jean-Louis Barsoux, Ch3: ‘Interacting spheres of culture’, pp. 51-78
nd
in Schneider Susan C. and Barsoux Jean-Louis, (2003) Managing Across Cultures, 2 ed. Essex:
Pearson education Ltd.

L8: No readings

L9: Sanjiv Sachdev, ‘International corporate social responsibility and employment relations’, pp.
262-281 in Edwards Tony & Rees Chris (2006) International Human Resource Management:
Globalization, National systems & Multinational Companies, Essex: Pearson Education Ltd.

Extended Reading List


The Context and Nature of HRM
th
1. Torrington Derek, Hall Laura & Taylor Steven, (2001), Human Resource Management, 5 ed., FT
Prentice Hall
2. Maund Linda, (2005), An Introduction to Human Resource Management: theory and practice,
Palgrave.
rd
3. Bratton John and Gold Jeffrey, (2003), Human Resource Management, Palgrave 3 .
4. Hall Laura & Torrington Derek, (1998), the Human Resource Function The Dynamics of Change And
Development, FT Prentice Hall
5. Dowling, P. J. & Welch D. E., (2004), International Human Resource Management, Thomson,
London
6. Harris H., Brewster C. & Sparrow P., (2003), International Human Resource Management, CIPD,
London
7. Brewster C., Harris H. and Sparrow P., (2002), Globalizing HR: Executive Brief, CIPD, London
8. Briscoe D.R. & Schuler R.S., (2004), International Human Resource Management, Routledge,
London
9. Budhwar P., (2004), Managing Human Resources in Asia-Pacific, Routledge, London
10. Evans P., Pucik V. & Barsoux J-L., (2002), the Global Challenge: Frameworks for International
Human Resource Management, McGraw Hill, New York
11. Harzing A-W. & Ruysseveldt J.V., (2004), International Human Resource Management, Sage,
London
12. Sparrow P.R., Brewster C. & Harris H., (2004), Globalizing Human Resource Management,
Routledge, London
13. Marchington Mick & Wilkinson Adrian, (2005), Human Resource Management at Work, CIPD
14. Rayner Charlotte & Adam-Smith Derek, (2005), Managing and Leading People, CIPD
15. Greer Charles R., (2001), Strategic Human Resource Management: a general managerial
perspective, FT Prentice Hall
16. Corbridge Marjorie & Pilbeam Stephen, (1998), Employment Resourcing, FT Prentice Hall
17. Stewart Jim, (1999), Employee Development Practice, FT Prentice Hall
18. Wexley Kenneth N. & Latham Gary P, (2001) Developing and Training Human Resources in
Organisations, FT Prentice Hall
19. Thorpe Richard & Homan Gilian, (2000), Strategic Reward Systems, FT Prentice Hall.

College of Technology London Page 24


International Human Resource Management

20. Bach Stephen & Sisson Keith, (2000), Personnel Management: a Comprehensive Guide to Theory
rd
and Practice, 3 ed.
rd
21. Bratton John & Gold Jeffrey, (2003) Human Resource Management Theory and Practice, 3 ed.
22. Legge Karren, “HRM: rhetoric, reality and hidden agendas” in: John Storey (ed.) (1995) Human
Resource Management: a Critical Text.
nd
23. Noon Mike & Blyton Paul, (2002) The Realities of Work,2 ed., Chapter 2 ‘The changing context of
work’ and Chapter 3 ‘The meaning of work’.
24. Redman Tom & Wilkinson Adrian, (2001), ‘In Search of Human Resource Management’, in: Redman
T and Wilkinson A (eds.) (2001) Contemporary Human Resource Management: Text and Cases.
25. Towers Brian, (2003), ‘The Changing Employment Relationship’, in: Towers B (ed.) (4th edn., 2003)
The Handbook of Employment Relations Law and Practice.

Recruitment and Selection


rd
1. Bratton John & Gold Jeffrey, (2003) Human Resource Management Theory and Practice, 3 ed.,
Chapters 6 & 7
2. Marchington Mick & Wilkinson Adrian, (1996), Core Personnel and Development, Chapter 6
3. Iles Paul & Salaman Graeme, “Recruitment, selection and assessment” ” in: John Storey (ed.) (1995)
Human Resource Management: a Critical Text.
4. Newell Sue & Shackleton Viv, (2000), “Recruitment and Selection” in: Stephen Bach and Keith
rd
Sisson (eds.) (2000), Personnel Management: a Comprehensive Guide to Theory and Practice, 3
ed.

Managing Diversity and Ensuring Fairness


nd
1. Noon Mike & Blyton Paul, (2002) The Realities of Work, 2 ed., Chapter 10 “Unfair discrimination at
work”.
2. Pritchard Helen, (2003), ‘Discrimination in Employment’ in: Towers B (ed.) (4th Edn. 2003) The
Handbook of Employment Relations Law and Practice.
3. Dickens Linda, “Still Wasting Resources’ Equality in Employment” in: Stephen Bach and Keith Sisson
rd
(eds.) (2000), Personnel Management: a Comprehensive Guide to Theory and Practice, 3 ed.
4. Ackers Pete, ‘Employment Ethics’ in: Redman T and Wilkinson A (eds.) (2001) Contemporary
Human Resource Management: Text and Cases.
5. Lorbiecki A. & Jack G., (2000), "Critical turns in the Evolution of Diversity Management", British
Journal of Management, 11 (Sep)
6. Woodhams C. & Danieli A., (2000), "Disability and Diversity - a Difference too Far?", Personnel
Review, 29 (3)
7. Skinner D. (2000) "The Reality of Equal Opportmoduleies - The Expectations and Experiences of
Part-time Staff and their Managers", Personnel Review, 28, (5-6).
8. Lee D., (2000), "An Analysis of Workplace Bullying in the UK", Personnel Review, 29 (5)
9. Einarsen S., (1999), "The Nature and Causes of Bullying at Work", International Journal of
Manpower, 20 (1-2)

Family-Friendly Policies
1. Lewis S., (1996), the Work-Family Challenge: Rethinking Employment, London: Sage
2. McLee L. et al (2000), "Family Friendly Policies and Practices in the Oil and Gas Industry:
Employers' Perspectives", Work, Employment and Society, 14 (3)
3. Crompton R. & Birkelund GE (2000), Employment and Caring in British and Norwgian Banking: An
Exploration through Individual careers", Work, Employment and Society, 14 (2)
4. Dex S & Joshi H (1999), "Careers and Motherhood: Policies for Compatibility, Cambridge Journal of
Economics, 23 (5)
5. Rothausen TJ et al. (1998), "Family-friendly Backlash - Fact or Fiction? The Case of Organizations'
On-site Child Care Centres,", Personnel Psychology, 51 (3)
6. Dex S. & Scheibl F., (2001), "Flexible and Family-friendly Working Arrangements in UK-Based
SMEs: Business Cases", British Journal of Industrial Relations, 39 (3)
7. Hewitt P. (1993), About Time: The Revolution in Work and Family Life, London: IPPR/Rivers Oram
Press
8. Moss P. & Fonda N. (eds), (1980), Work and the Family, London: Temple Smith
9. Brannen J. et al, (1994), Employment and Family Life: A Review of Research in the UK (1980-1994),
London: Institute of Education

College of Technology London Page 25


International Human Resource Management

Health, Safety & Welfare; Sickness and Absence


rd
1. Bratton John & Gold Jeffrey, (2003), Human Resource Management Theory and Practice, 3 ed.,
Chapter 5
2. Bach Stephen, “The Working Environment” in: Sissons Keith (ed.) (1994) Personnel Management: a
Comprehensive Guide to Theory and practice in Britain.
3. Barrett Brenda, (2003), ‘Health and Safety’ in: Towers B (ed.) (2003) The Handbook of Employment
th
Relations Law and Practice, 4 ed..
4. Cunningham Ian & James Phil, (2003), ‘Managing Health and Safety’ in: Towers B (ed.) (2003) the
th
Handbook of Employment Relations Law and Practice, 4 Ed.
5. Harris Lynette, (2003), ‘Managing sickness and absence’ in: Towers B (ed.) (2003) The Handbook of
th
Employment Relations Law and Practice, 4 ed.

Training and Development


rd
1. Bratton John & Gold Jeffrey, (2003) Human Resource Management Theory and Practice, 3 ed.,
Chapter 10
2. Marchington Mick & Wilkinson Adrian, (1996), Core Personnel and Development, Chapters 8, 9, 10
3. Hyman Jeff, “Training and development – the employers’ responsibility?” in: Brian Towers (ed.)
nd
(1996) The Handbook of Human Resource Management, 2 ed.
4. Ashton David & Felstead Alan, “Training & Development” ” in: Storey John (ed.) (1995) Human
Resource Management: a Critical Text.7
5. Keep Ewart, “towards the learning organisation?’” in: Bach Stephen & Sisson Keith (eds.) (2000),
rd
Personnel Management: a Comprehensive Guide to Theory and Practice, 3 Ed.
6. Storey John & Tate William, “Management development” in: Bach Stephen & Sisson Keith (eds.)
rd
(2000), Personnel Management: a Comprehensive Guide to Theory and Practice, 3 Ed.
7. Stewart Jim, ‘Managing training and development’ in: Towers B (ed.) (2003) The Handbook of
th
Employment Relations Law and Practice, 4 ed.

Payment and Reward; Performance Management


rd
1. Bratton John & Gold Jeffrey, (2003), Human Resource Management Theory and Practice, 3 ed.,
Chapters 9 and 8
2. Story John & Sisson Keith, (1993), Managing Human Resources and Industrial Relations, Chapter 6
“Performance management and performance related pay”
3. Kessler Ian, ‘Pay and performance’ in: Towers B (ed.) (2003) The Handbook of Employment
th
Relations Law and Practice, 4 Ed.
4. Kessler Ian, “Remuneration systems” ” in: Bach Stephen & Sisson Keith (eds.) (2000), Personnel
rd
Management: a Comprehensive Guide to Theory and Practice, 3 ed.
5. Bach Stephen, ‘From performance appraisal to performance management’ in Bach Stephen &
Sisson Keith (eds.) (2000), Personnel Management: a Comprehensive Guide to Theory and Practice,
rd
3 ed.
6. Edwards Paul, “Discipline; towards trust and self-discipline?’ in: Bach Stephen & Sisson Keith (eds.)
rd
(2000), Personnel Management: a Comprehensive Guide to Theory and Practice, 3 Ed.
7. Coates G., (1996), "Performance Appraisal and Women's 'performance' in a Trust Hospital", Health
Manpower Management, 22 (5)
8. Redman T. & Mathews BP., (1995), "Do Corporate Turkeys Vote for Christmas: Managers' Attitudes
towards Upward Appraisal", Personnel Review, 24 (7)
9. Hind P. & Baruch Y., (1997), "Gender Variations in Perceptions of Performance Appraisal", Women
in Management Review, 12 (6)

Legislation and the Role of Government


1. Anderman Steven, ‘Overview: the law and the emplopyment relationship’ in: Towers B (ed.) (2003)
th
The Handbook of Employment Relations Law and Practice, 4 ed.
2. Blyton Paul & Turibull Peter, (1998) The Dynamics of Employee Relations, Chapter 6: ‘the Role of
nd
the State’, 2 ed.

Employment Relations & Collective Bargaining


rd
1. Bratton John & Gold Jeffrey, (2003) Human Resource Management Theory and Practice, 3 ed.,
Chapter 12

College of Technology London Page 26


International Human Resource Management

2. Undy Roger, ‘Trade unions and the employment relationship’ in: Towers B (ed.) (2003) The
th
Handbook of Employment Relations Law and Practice, 4 ed.
3. Bacon Nik, ‘Employee Relations’ in: Redman T and Wilkinson A (eds.) (2001) Contemporary Human
Resource Management: Text and Cases.
4. Story John & Sisson Keith, (1993), Managing human resources and industrial relations, Chapter 9
“Managing with trade unions”
nd
5. Blyton Paul & Turnbull Peter, (1998) The Dynamics of Employee Relations, 2 ed.
6. Tailby Stephanie & Winchester David, “Management and Trade Unions: Towards Social Partnership”
in: Bach Stephen & Sisson Keith, (eds.) (2000), Personnel Management: a Comprehensive Guide to
rd
Theory and Practice, 3 ed.

Employee Involvement
rd
1. Bratton John & Gold Jeffrey, (2003) Human Resource Management Theory and Practice, 3 ed.,
Chapter 11
2. Ramsay Harvie, “Involvement, empowerment and commitment” in: Brian Towers (ed.) (1996) The
nd
Handbook of Human Resource Management, 2 ed.
3. Marchington Mick & Wilkinson Andrian, “Direct participation” ” in: Bach Stephen & Sisson Keith (eds.)
rd
(2000), Personnel Management: a Comprehensive Guide to Theory and Practice, 3 ed.

College of Technology London Page 27


International Human Resource Management

ASSIGNMENT - REPORT

Describe, and critically evaluate the internal and external factors that determine
employment relations in company’s that are multinational, working globally, but
originating in the UK.

You may, with the agreement of your Lecturer, choose to examine multinational companies that originate
in countries other than the UK. If you elect to do this, state clearly which country you have chosen when
submitting your assignment.

The report should be approx. 2,500 words and must also be underpinned by appropriate academic
theories and models.

This assignment is worth 100% of the Module Mark.

Marking Criteria

1. Evidence of background reading, research and use of academic references 20%


2. Discussion and Evaluation 50%
3. Conclusion 20%
4. Essay structure and presentation 10%

For assignment submission deadline date please refer to the


assessment schedule on page no. 7.

College of Technology London Page 28


Department of Management and Information Technology

7. QUALITY SYSTEMS

MBA1410-L: MBA PATHWAY MODULE

TERM 2

College of Technology London Page 29


Quality Systems

A. MODULE SUMMARY
Module Code and Title: Quality Systems

Code: MBA1410-L Level: M (7)

Credits: 10 Terms Taught: 1

Assessments: 1 x 2,500 word assignment (100%)

Teaching Methods: Lectures, Presentations, Workshops, Case Studies, Group work

Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None

Taught in the medium of


No Incompatibles: None
Welsh:

Number of
Lectures/workshops per 2 hours Contact Hours: 20 hours
week:

Syllabus: Quality assurance


• Understand the meaning and importance of quality assurance.
• Have awareness of the different accreditation standards, and to
understand their basic requirements.
• Understand how to achieve most benefit from performance of
internal quality control (IQC), internal quality assessment (IQA)
and external quality assessment (EQA).
• Assessment and external quality assessment programmes
• Setting up internal quality audit programmes, preparing audit
checklists, performing internal quality audits
• Brief introduction to statistical analysis of quantitative internal
quality control data
• Consider critical control points in processes and how they may
be managed.
• Raise non-compliance notes and implement corrective actions.
• Performing a customer survey.

Learning Outcomes: By the end of the sessions students will be able to:
• Describe how Quality Assurance fits into the Human Resource
Management function
• Explain the meaning of quality in terms of the products and / or
services
• Have knowledge of the main QA systems in common use
• See quality procedures as processes.
• Be aware of statistical process control to help control and
analyse processes.
• Get more value from data obtained from internal quality and
know how to place QA systems in general management

Transferable and other Students are expected to be able to demonstrate a range of


skills: cognitive and intellectual skills and techniques specific to business
and management, as well as personal and interpersonal skills. The
following are some of the skills which the programme is designed to
develop:
• Critical thinking and creativity
• Problem solving and decision making

College of Technology London Page 30


Quality Systems

• Information and knowledge gathering


• Numeracy and quantitative skills
• Effective use of communication and information technology
• Two-way communication!
• Personal effectiveness
• Effective performance within a team environment
• Leadership and performance management
• Ethics and value management
• Ability to conduct research into management issues
• Learning through reflection on practice
• Application of theory to practice
• Individual, group and leadership development

College of Technology London Page 31


Quality Systems

B. MODULE DESCRIPTION
Modern writers propose that Quality should not be separated from production. Everyone has to take
responsibility for his or her proportion of the quality effort – including those outside the organization who
nevertheless contribute towards the total quality of the supply chain. Quality and customer satisfaction
are responsibilities for all in the business.

This module seeks to chart the development of Quality systems, to describe their use and application,
and to assess their continuing development in the context of organizations seeking to meet the changing
demands of customers and of ‘globalisation’.

This module covers the key ideas:

 Defining Quality
 Getting systems right
 Measuring performance
 Finding and eradicating faults
 Reducing waste
 Organisational commitment
 Costs and failures
 Control and improvement

C. LECTURE SCHEDULE

Week 1 - History and Background

Week 2 - European Excellence Model

Week 3 – Understanding Processes

Week 4 – Quality Systems

Week 5 - ISO9001

Week 6 – Quality Tools and Techniques

Week 7 - People and Involvement

Week 8 – Managing Performance and Measures

Week 9 – Auditing a Quality System

Week 10 - Customer Surveys

Assessment:

One Written Assignment in Report Format. 2500 words – 100%

College of Technology London Page 32


Quality Systems

D. REFERENCES
Main Recommended Texts
1. Niven Paul R. (2003) Balanced Scorecard Step-by-step for Government and Nonprofit Agencies
John Wiley & Sons Inc
Hardcover
2. H. James Harrington, et al (1997) Business Process Improvement Workbook: Documentation,
Analysis, Design and Management of Business Process Improvement McGraw-Hill Publishing
Co.
Hardcover
3. Wayne W. Eckerson (2005) Performance Dashboards: Measuring, Monitoring, and Managing
Your Business John Wiley & Sons Inc, Hardcover
4. John Maxey, et al. (2004) The Lean Six Sigma Pocket Toolbook. McGraw-Hill Publishing Co.
5. Philip Crosby (1995) Quality without Tears – The Art of Hassle Free Management McGraw-Hill
Publishing Co.
6. Ray Tricker (2005) ISO 9001: 2000 for Small Businesses. Butterworth-Heinemann Ltd,
7. Oliver Wight (2005) The Oliver Wight Class A Checklist for Business Excellence. International
Inc. John Wiley & Sons Inc.
8. John S. Oakland (2004) TQM: Text with Cases Leslie J. Porter Butterworth-Heinemann Ltd.
9. Travers, M. (2007) the New Bureaucracy, The Policy Press, Bristol

ASSIGNMENT

Select one quality system from those studied in this course.

Critically analyse how your chosen quality system might enhance performance
management in an organisation of your choice.

Guide length: One written assignment in report format of 2,500 words.


This assignment forms 100% of your overall Module mark.

Marking Criteria

1. Evidence of background reading and research 10%


2. Use and application of academic theories, models etc 25%
3. Critical analysis 35%
4. Conclusions and recommendations 20%
5. Structure and Presentation 10%

For assignment submission deadline date please refer to the


assessment schedule on page no. 7.

College of Technology London Page 33


Department of Management and Information Technology

8. MANAGING DIVERSITY

MBA1210-L: MBA PATHWAY MODULE

TERM 2

College of Technology London Page 34


Managing Diversity

A. MODULE SUMMARY
Module Code and Title: Managing Diversity

Code: MBA1210-L Level: M (7)

Credits: 10 Terms Taught: 1

Assessments: 1 x 2,500 word assignment (100%)

Teaching Methods: Lectures, Workshops, Discussions, Scenarios

Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None

Taught in the medium of


No Incompatibles: None
Welsh:

Number of
Lectures/workshops per 2 hours Contact Hours: 20 hours
week:

Syllabus: • An overview on diversity,


• The Diversity Legislation Framework,
• Equality and Human Rights (EHRC) Business Plan 2008/2009,
• Equality Scheme 2008/2009,
• Survey Report 2007 Diversity in Business: a focus on progress,
• Legal Cases,
• Commission for racial equality: A lot done, a lot to do: The
vision for an integrated Britain,
• Modern Multiculturalism, by Trevor Philips CRE Chair,
• UWL Quality and Diversity Policy.

Learning Outcomes: By the end of the sessions students should be able to:
• Demonstrate awareness of a range of current issues in the
management of diversity and a diverse workforce,
• Have knowledge of the legal framework and the latest papers
regarding equality and diversity,
• Discuss the effects of increasing diversity on business
management,
• Link together current issues, media coverage and management
thinking.

Transferable and other Students are expected to be able to demonstrate a range of


skills: cognitive and intellectual skills and techniques specific to business
and management, as well as personal and interpersonal skills.
• critical thinking and creativity
• problem solving and decision making
• effective use of communication and information technology
• personal effectiveness
• effective performance within a team environment
• leadership and performance management
• ethics and value management
• ability to conduct research into management issues
• learning through reflection on practice

College of Technology London Page 35


Managing Diversity

B. MODULE DESCRIPTION
The Managing Diversity Module aims to improve the effectiveness of organisations by ensuring that
everyone who works and volunteers for them can realise their potential.

The module gives a brief introduction to the concept of managing diversity in the workplace and reviews
current thinking on what works (and what doesn't). It is motivated by the belief that organisations and
managers must grasp the significance of changes to the workplace in relation to globalisation, increasing
diversity and the complexity of management.

Managing diversity is about valuing differences. It is about treating people with dignity and allowing
everyone to be able to perform to their level of ability. Diversity differs from the traditional view of equal
opportunities because it covers a much wider framework than legal requirements; it is an important
change of emphasis. All employees must accept the differences between individuals and to value the
benefits that such diversity brings.

Workplace Diversity incorporates the principle that all workers should receive equal rights but, rather
than ignoring the differences between people in terms of their gender, age, ability or dis-ability, ethnicity,
race and so on, this diversity should be recognised and respected. By valuing the varying qualities that
different workers bring to their job and organisation, managers may create an environment where
everyone feels valued for their individual talents, and where his or her skills and competencies are fully
utilised.

Unleashing all employees' full potential benefits the bottom line. Embracing diversity brings to an
organisation a wide range of experience, ideas and creativity whilst giving the individual employee a
feeling of being enabled to work to their full potential.

This module will assist the manager in the context of a modern business or other complex organisation
managing the world’s workforce.

C. LECTURE SCHEDULE

Week 1 - An overview on Diversity

Week 2 - The Diversity Legislation Framework

Week 3 - Equality and Human Rights (EHRC) Business Plan 2008/2009

Week 4 - Equality Scheme 2008/2009

Week 5 - Survey Report 2007 Diversity in Business: a focus on progress

Week 6 - Legal Cases

Week 7 - Commission for Racial Equality: “A lot done, a lot to do: the vision for an
integrated Britain”

Week 8 - Modern Multiculturalism, by Trevor Philips CRE Chair

Week 9 - UWL Equality and Diversity Policy

Week 10 - Personal Assessment

College of Technology London Page 36


Managing Diversity

D. REFERENCES
Main Recommended Texts
1. EHRC Business Plan 08-09,
http://www.equalityhumanrights.com/en/aboutus/mission/Pages/BusinessPlan0809.aspx
2. Equality Scheme 08-09,
http://www.equalityhumanrights.com/en/publicationsandresources/pages/equalityandhumanrightsco
mmissionpublications.aspx
3. A lot done, a lot to do - the CRE's vision for an integrated Britain, Employment p.18,
http://www.equalityhumanrights.com
4. Modern Multiculturalism,
http://www.equalityhumanrights.com/en/newsandcomment/speeches/Pages/powellspeech.aspx
5. Survey Report 2007 Diversity in Business: a focus on progress,
http://www.cipd.co.uk/subjects/dvsequl/general/_dvstybsfcs.htm

Recommended Texts and Sources


Students will be expected to monitor the media for relevant coverage; Management Journals; Various
Business Management books; and Internet coverage of key issues

1. Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD), http://www.cipd.co.uk


2. Equality Challenge Unit Homepage, http://www.ecu.ac.uk
3. Equality and Human Rights Commission, http://www.equalityhumanrights.com
4. EYEOA, European Year of Equality Opportunity for All,
http://ec.europa.eu/employment_social/eyeq/index.cfm?language=EN
5. EYID, European Year for Intercultural Dialogue, http://www.interculturaldialogue2008.eu (EU site),
http://inter.culture.info (UK site)
6. MPG, Migration Policy Group, http://www.migpolgroup.com
7. ACAS (the advisory, conciliation and arbitration service), http://www.acas.org.uk
8. Business Link (practical advices for employing people), http://www.businesslink.gov.uk
9. Department for Enterprise and Regulatory Reform, http://www.berr.gov.uk
10. Personel Today, http://personeltoday.com
11. BNET, http://www.bnet.co.uk

Extended Reading
1. Clements, P. And Jones, J. (2008) The Diversity Training Handbook, 3rd ed., London: Kogan Page
2. Rasmussen, T. (2006) Diversity Mosaic Participant work: Leading Diversity, London: John Wiley and
sons Ltd.
3. Gordon, J. (2006) Pfeiffer’s classic Activities for Diversity Training, London: John Wiley and Sons
Ltd.
4. Foster, C. and Harris, L., (2005), ‘Ch. 5, From Equal opportunities to diversity management’, in J.
Leopold, L. Harris and T. Watson (eds)The Strategic Mamagement of Human Resources, Essex:
Pearson Education Ltd.
5. Kossek, E.E. (ed) and Lobel, S.A. (2005) Human Resource Strategies for Transforming the
Workplace, Blackwell
6. Stockdale, M.S. and Crosby, J. (2003), The psycology and Management of Workplace Diversity,
London: John Wiley and Sons Ltd.
7. Pritchard, H. (2003) ‘Discrimination in Employment’, in Towers B (ed.) (4th edn., 2003) The
Handbook of Employment Relations Law and Practice
8. Noon, M. & Blyton, P. (2nd edn., 2002) ‘Chapter 10 “Unfair discrimination at work”’, The Realities of
Work
9. Ackers, P. ‘Employment Ethics’ in Redman T. and Wilkinson A. (eds.) (2001) Contemporary Human
Resource Management: Text and Cases
10. Albrecht, M.H. (2000) International Human Resource Management: Managing Diversity in the
Workplace, London John Wiley and Sons Ltd.
11. Dickens, L. ‘Still Wasting Resources? Equality in Employment’ in Stephen Bach and Keith Sisson
(eds.) (3rd edn., 2000), Personnel Management: a Comprehensive Guide to Theory and Practice
12. Lorbiecki, A. & Jack, G. (2000) ‘Critical turns in the Evolution of Diversity Management’, British
Journal of Management, 11 (Sep)
13. Woodhams, C. & Danieli, A. (2000), ‘Disability and Diversity - a Difference too Far?’, Personnel
Review, 29 (3)
14. Skinner, D. (2000) ‘The Reality of Equal Opportunities - The Expectations and Experiences of Part-
time Staff and their Managers’, Personnel Review, 28, (5-6).

College of Technology London Page 37


Managing Diversity

15. Lee, D. (2000) ‘An Analysis of Workplace Bullying in the UK’, Personnel Review, 29 (5)
16. Einarsen S. (1999) ‘The Nature and Causes of Bullying at Work’, International Journal of Manpower,
20 (1-2)

Employment Law
1. Cabrelli,D.(2008) Employment Law, Essex: Pearson Education Ltd.
2. Benny,R., Sargeant M. & Jefferson M. (2008) Q&A Employment Law, Oxford: Oxford University
Press
rd
3. Nairs J. (2008) Employment Law for Business Students, 3 ed., Essex: Pearson Education Ltd.
th
4. Sargeant, M. & Lewis, D. (2008) Employment Law, 4 ed., Essex: Pearson Education Ltd.

ASSIGNMENT
Explain and critically evaluate the contribution HR Managers make to the challenges imposed by
having an increasingly a diverse workforce.

Your work should concentrate on the HR Managers role and the challenges and you may place your
analysis in an international context or a national context of your choice.

Guide length: 2,500 words


This assignment is worth 100% of the Module Mark.

Marking Criteria

1. Evidence of background reading and research 25%


2. Use and application of academic theories, models, etc. 25%
3. Depth and scope of discussion 40%
4. Essay or Report structure and presentation 10%

For assignment submission deadline date please refer to the


assessment schedule on page no. 7.

College of Technology London Page 38


Department of Management and Information Technology

9. HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PROJECT

MBA1010-L: MBA PATHWAY MODULE

TERM 2

College of Technology London Page 39


Human Resource Management Project

A. MODULE SUMMARY
Module Code and Title: Human Resource Management Project

Code: MBA1010-L Level: M (7)

Credits: 10 Terms Taught: 1

Assessments: 500 word Project Proposal


2,500 word Project Assignment (100%)

Teaching Methods: Supervision

Pre-requisites: HRM Core Co-requisites: None

Taught in the medium of


No Incompatibles: None
Welsh:

Number of
Lectures/workshops per 2 hours Contact Hours: 20 hours
week:

Syllabus: This module requires students to undertake a substantial piece of


project work that will blend rigorous academic understanding of
HRM topics and issues with self-reflection, contemporary HR and
management practice and detailed case study of a particular
organisation (which may be an organisation with which the student
has gained professional experience).

Learning Outcomes: By the end of the sessions students should be able to:
• demonstrate a rigorous understanding of the academic
literature available by researching a specific HR issue.
• show the ability to summarise pertinent literature
coherently.
• have knowledge of, and the ability to present in an
intelligible and appropriate manner, supporting case
material, documentary and statistical evidence confirming
an academic or practical argument.

Transferable and other Development and application of:


skills: • Comprehension
• Application
• Analytical skills
• Synthesising skills

College of Technology London Page 40


Human Resource Management Project

B. THE PROJECT

ASSESSMENT 1

The Project Proposal

To be submitted for assessment and approval in week two of the Module. The proposal must include the
following sections:
 Title
 Aim of Project
 Objectives
 Methodology
 Timetable of work
Detailed work should not commence on the project until the proposal has been approved, however
students should commerce any relevant literature and data searches as soon as possible

ASSESSMENT 2

The Project

The project is intended for those with an applied interest in Human Resource Management. It
should form the focus of an in depth investigation of a particular HR issue or problem in people
or organisational management. This should not involve primary research such as interviews or
questionnaires etc. It should be a critical examination of a specific issue based on existing data
and information, and your own observation of one company/organisation /commercial institution
or aspect of that organisation.

Students should be able to demonstrate the ability to apply knowledge and skills gained from the HR
modules together with an understanding of the wider context of that knowledge. Through their project
work, they will show:

 A rigorous understanding of the academic literature available by researching a subject area of


their choice; and the ability to summarise that literature coherently;
 The ability to present in an intelligible and appropriate manner, supporting case material such as
documentary and statistical evidence confirming an academic or practical argument;
 A critical awareness of their own professional experience in the context of the issue/topic being
addressed in the light of an understanding of knowledge and theory gained from the marketing
modules of the programme;

Marking Criteria

1. Evidence of background reading and research 20%


2. Depth and scope of analysis and examples 40%
3. Relevant application of academic theories, models etc. 30%
4. Structure, clarity, proofing and professional presentation 10%

College of Technology London Page 41


Human Resource Management Project

For assignment submission deadline date please refer to the


assessment schedule on page no. 7.

C. REFERENCES
Main Recommended Texts

1. Derek Torrington, Laura Hall & Steven Taylor, (2007), Human Resource Management, 7th ed.
FT Prentice Hall
2. Linda Maund (2005) An introduction to human resource management: theory and practice,
Palgrave.
rd
3. John Bratton and Jeffrey Gold (2003) Human Resource Management, Palgrave 3 .
4. Laura Hall & Derek Torrington, (1998), The Human Resource Function The Dynamics of Change
And Development, FT Prentice Hall
5. Mick Marchington and Adrian Wilkinson (2005) Human Resource Management at Work, CIPD
6. Charlotte Rayner and Derek Adam-Smith (2005) Managing and Leading People, CIPD
7. Charles R. Greer, (2001), Strategic Human Resource Management, A General Managerial
Perspective, FT Prentice Hall
8. Marjorie Corbridge & Stephen Pilbeam, (1998), Employment Resourcing, FT Prentice Hall
9. Jim Stewart, (1999), Employee Development Practice, FT Prentice Hall
10. Kenneth N Wexley & Gary P Latham, (2001) Developing and Training Human Resources in
Organisations, FT Prentice Hall
11. Richard Thorpe & Gilian Homan, (2000), Strategic Reward Systems, FT Prentice Hall..

Extended Reading Lists

In addition to Professional Journals and Web based resources, students are directed to the
following selected reference works.

The Context and Nature of HRM


1. Stephen Bach and Keith Sisson (eds.) (3rd edn., 2000), Personnel Management: a
Comprehensive Guide to Theory and Practice.
2. John Bratton & Jeffrey Gold (3rd edn., 2003) Human Resource Management Theory and
Practice,
3. Karen Legge, “HRM: rhetoric, reality and hidden agendas” in: John Storey (ed.) (1995) Human
Resource Management: a Critical Text.
4. Mike Noon & Paul Blyton (2nd edn., 2002) The Realities of Work, Chapter 2 ‘The changing
context of work’ and Chapter 3 ‘The meaning of work’.
5. Tom Redman and Adrian Wilkinson (2001) ‘In Search of Human Resource Management’, in:
Redman T and Wilkinson A (eds.) (2001) Contemporary Human Resource Management: Text
and Cases.
6. Brian Towers (2003) ‘The Changing Employment Relationship’, in: Towers B (ed.) (4th edn.,
2003) The Handbook of Employment Relations Law and Practice.

Recruitment and Selection


1. John Bratton & Jeffrey Gold (3rd edn., 2003) Human Resource Management Theory and
Practice, Chapters 6 & 7
2. Mick Marchington & Adrian Wilkinson (2000) Core Personnel and Development, Chapter 6
3. Paul Iles & Graeme Salaman “Recruitment, selection and assessment” ” in: John Storey (ed.)
(1995) Human Resource Management: a Critical Text.
4. Sue Newell & Viv Shackleton (2000) “Recruitment and Selection” in: Stephen Bach and Keith
Sisson (eds.) (3rd edn., 2000), Personnel Management: a Comprehensive Guide to Theory and
Practice.

College of Technology London Page 42


Human Resource Management Project

Managing Diversity and Ensuring Fairness


1. Mike Noon & Paul Blyton (2nd edn., 2002) The Realities of Work, Chapter 10 “Unfair
discrimination at work”.
2. Helen Pritchard (2003) ‘Discrimination in Employment’ in: Towers B (ed.) (4th edn., 2003) The
Handbook of Employment Relations Law and Practice.
3. Linda Dickens “Still Wasting Resources? Equality in Employment” in: Stephen Bach and Keith
Sisson (eds.) (3rd edn., 2000), Personnel Management: a Comprehensive Guide to Theory and
Practice.
4. Pete Ackers: ‘Employment Ethics’ in: Redman T and Wilkinson A (eds.) (2001) Contemporary
Human Resource Management: Text and Cases.
5. Lorbiecki A. & Jack G., (2000) "Critical turns in the Evolution of Diversity Management", British
Journal of Management, 11 (Sep)
6. Woodhams C. & Danieli A., (2000), "Disability and Diversity - a Difference too Far?", Personnel
Review, 29 (3)
7. Skinner D. (2000) "The Reality of Equal Opportmoduleies - The Expectations and Experiences of
Part-time Staff and their Managers", Personnel Review, 28, (5-6).
8. Lee D., (2000), "An Analysis of Workplace Bullying in the UK", Personnel Review, 29 (5)
9. Einarsen S., (1999), "The Nature and Causes of Bullying at Work", International Journal of
Manpower, 20 (1-2)
Family-Friendly Policies
1. Lewis S., (1996), The Work-Family Challenge: Rethinking Employment, London: Sage
2. McLee L. et al (2000), "Family Friendly Policies and Practices in the Oil and Gas Industry:
Employers' Perspectives", Work, Employment and Society, 14 (3)
3. Crompton R. & Birkelund GE (2000), Employment and Caring in British and Norwgian Banking:
An Exploration through Individual careers", Work, Employment and Society, 14 (2)
4. Dex S & Joshi H (1999), "Careers and Motherhood: Policies for Compatibility, Cambridge
Journal of Economics, 23 (5)
5. Rothausen TJ et al. (1998), "Family-friendly Backlash - Fact or Fiction? The Case of
Organizations' On-site Child Care Centres,", Personnel Psychology, 51 (3)
6. Dex S. & Scheibl F., (2001), "Flexible and Family-friendly Working Arrangements in UK-Based
SMEs: Business Cases", British Journal of Industrial Relations, 39 (3)
7. Hewitt P. (1993), About Time: The Revolution in Work and Family Life, London: IPPR/Rivers
Oram Press
8. Moss P. & Fonda N. (eds), (1980), Work and the Family, London: Temple Smith
9. Brannen J. et al, (1994), Employment and Family Life: A Review of Research in the UK (1980-
1994), London: Institute of Education

Health, safety & welfare; sickness and absence


1. John Bratton & Jeffrey Gold (3rd edn., 2003) Human Resource Management Theory and
Practice, Chapter 5
2. Stephen Bach “The Working Environment” in: Keith Sissons (ed.) (1994) Personnel
Management: a Comprehensive Guide to Theory and practice in Britain.
3. Brenda Barrett (2003) ‘Health and Safety’ in: Towers B (ed.) (4th edn., 2003) The Handbook of
Employment Relations Law and Practice.
4. Ian Cunningham & Phil James (2003) ‘Managing Health and Safety’ in: Towers B (ed.) (4th edn.,
2003) The Handbook of Employment Relations Law and Practice.
5. Lynette Harris (2003) ‘Managing sickness and absence’ in: Towers B (ed.) (4th edn., 2003) The
Handbook of Employment Relations Law and Practice.

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Human Resource Management Project

Training And Development


1. John Bratton & Jeffrey Gold (3rd edn., 2003) Human Resource Management Theory and
Practice, Chapter 10
2. Mick Marchington & Adrian Wilkinson (1996) Core Personnel and Development, Chapters 8, 9,
10
3. Jeff Hyman “Training and development – the employers’ responsibility?” in: Brian Towers (ed.)
(2nd edn., 1996) The Handbook of Human Resource Management
4. David Ashton & Alan Felstead “Training & development” ” in: John Storey (ed.) (1995) Human
Resource Management: a Critical Text.
5. Ewart Keep “Towards the learning organisation?’” in: Stephen Bach and Keith Sisson (eds.) (3rd
edn., 2000), Personnel Management: a Comprehensive Guide to Theory and Practice.
6. John Storey and William Tate “Management development” in: Stephen Bach and Keith Sisson
(eds.) (3rd edn., 2000), Personnel Management: a Comprehensive Guide to Theory and
Practice.
7. Jim Stewart ‘Managing training and development’ in: Towers B (ed.) (4th edn., 2003) The
Handbook of Employment Relations Law and Practice.

Payment and Reward; Performance management


1. John Bratton & Jeffrey Gold (3rd edn., 2003) Human Resource Management Theory and
Practice, Chapters 9 and 8
2. John Story & Keith Sisson (1993) Managing human resources and industrial relations, Chapter 6
“Performance management and performance related pay”
3. Ian Kessler ‘Pay and performance’ in: Towers B (ed.) (4th edn., 2003) The Handbook of
Employment Relations Law and Practice.
4. Ian Kessler “Remuneration systems” ” in: Stephen Bach and Keith Sisson (eds.) (3rd edn.,
2000), Personnel Management: a Comprehensive Guide to Theory and Practice.
5. Stephen Bach ‘From performance appraisal to performance management’ in Stephen Bach and
Keith Sisson (eds.) (3rd edn., 2000), Personnel Management: a Comprehensive Guide to Theory
and Practice.
6. Paul Edwards “Discipline; towards trust and self-discipline?’ in: Stephen Bach and Keith Sisson
(eds.) (3rd edn., 2000), Personnel Management: a Comprehensive Guide to Theory and
Practice.
7. Coates G. (1996), "Performance Appraisal and Women's 'performance' in a Trust Hospital",
Health Manpower Management, 22 (5)
8. Redman T. & Mathews BP., (1995), "Do Corporate Turkeys Vote for Christmas: Managers'
Attitudes towards Upward Appraisal", Personnel Review, 24 (7)
9. Hind P. & Baruch Y., (1997), "Gender Variations in Perceptions of Performance Appraisal",
Women in Management Review, 12 (6)

Legislation and the role of Government


1. Steven Anderman, ‘Overview: the law and the emplopyment relationship’ in: Towers B (ed.) (4th
edn., 2003) The Handbook of Employment Relations Law and Practice.
2. Paul Blyton and Peter Turibull (2nd edn., 1998) The Dynamics of Employee Relations, Chapter
6: ‘the Role of the State’

Employment Relations & Collective Bargaining


1. John Bratton & Jeffrey Gold (3rd edn., 2003) Human Resource Management Theory and
Practice, Chapter 12
2. Roger Undy ‘Trade unions and the employment relationship’ in: Towers B (ed.) (4th edn., 2003)
The Handbook of Employment Relations Law and Practice.

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Human Resource Management Project

3. Nick Bacon ‘Employee Relations’ in: Redman T and Wilkinson A (eds.) (2001) Contemporary
Human Resource Management: Text and Cases.
4. John Story & Keith Sisson (1993) Managing human resources and industrial relations, Chapter 9
“Managing with trade unions”
5. Paul Blyton & Peter Turnbull (2nd edn., 1998) The Dynamics of Employee Relations
6. Stephanie Tailby and David Winchester “Management and Trade Unions: Towards Social
Partnership” in: Stephen Bach and Keith Sisson (eds.) (3rd edn., 2000), Personnel Management:
a Comprehensive Guide to Theory and Practice.

Employee involvement
1. John Bratton & Jeffrey Gold (3rd edn., 2003) Human Resource Management Theory and
Practice, Chapter 11
2. Harvie Ramsay. “Involvement, empowerment and commitment” in: Brian Towers (ed.) (2nd ed.,
1996) The Handbook of Human Resource Management
3. Mick Marchington and Adrian Wilkinson “Direct participation” ” in: Stephen Bach and Keith
Sisson (eds.) (3rd edn., 2000), Personnel Management: a Comprehensive Guide to Theory and
Practice.

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