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WHICH COLOUR SHOULD I USE? WHAT CAMERA IS FOR YOU


LEONIE NORTON DANIEL SMITH

CHOOSING THE PERFECT FRAME MY ART IS MY PASSION


BRETT A JONES MARION HUGHES

FULL OF TIPS, IDEAS AND TECHNIQUES


READY TO PAINT SERIE

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Editors Letter
Editors Letter
W
elcome to our latest edition of Artists Back you to meet as well as a visit to Ballarat Gallery.
to Basics. In this issue, Leonie Norton
discusses colour. In her article she talks We love to receive your feedback so please
about the colour variations of warm through to send your emails to simon@wpco.com.au or send
cool colours using just three colours for both. Its a letter to Artists Back to Basics, PO Box 8035
amazing to think, from these six primary use colours, Glenmore Park NSW 2745. Also we have some
she has a palette of 450 colours. Its an amazing great subscription offers for you so you dont miss
article that will easily expand your colour choices. an issue, turn to page 27 and subscribe today.
Also in this issue, we give you some great ideas We are looking forward to hearing from you!
for choosing the correct camera to capture the
moments that you want to add to your list of future
paintings. We also have four fantastic artists for Simon Mullen

4 Artists Back to Basics


ontents
24

Issue No.8-1 2017


PENCILS DOWN WITH
54 BRETT A JONES
18 In The Frame - Part 1
62 In The Frame - Part 2

FEATURE ARTISTS
8 Marion Hughes
28 Gilly Huber
42 Lyn Donald
54 Wayne Malkin

FEATURES
24 Drawing Inspiration - On The Farm
- Ellen Lee Osterfield
38 Camera Buyser Guide - Daniel Smith
56 Which Colours Should I Use?
- Leonie Norton
66 Gallery - Art Gallery of Ballarat

18 70 Teacher's Pet

Cover image by: Gilly Huber


8
42 28
Profile

My Art is my
Passion!
with Marion Hughes

Owning a gallery and painting every day, this artist loves to experiment
and push the watercolour medium to the limit.

I have always done some sort of


creative pursuit, but my art has
manifested into a desire and a
passion I cannot live without. I used to
draw when I was a child as far back
as I can remember. My first encounter
with painting was more than 20 years
ago when I started going to what

Blue Mountains NSW

8 Artists Back to Basics


Understated

was then known as Folk Art. I found


myself getting very absorbed with this,
but it was by chance that a woman did
a workshop on how to use the paint as
watercolour that really got me started.
My main love is watercolour. I paint
in other mediums, but will always
be fascinated with this medium as
there is no other that gives you the
translucency in the final result.
My very first workshop was at the
Mitchell School of Art held at Charles
Sturt University in Bathurst, NSW. I
was supposed to do a watercolour The Blue Vase
workshop with Stella Pearce, whose
work I had come across in Berry,
Lorrikeet in Flight
NSW, but due to the lack of numbers,
I ended up in Keith Norris class.
Here my adventure began. Keith,
unfortunately, has now passed away,
but we became quite good friends and
he would be one of the influences that
has led me to where I am today. He
gave me confidence in my own ability
and kept pushing me to go on when I
thought I was going backward in
my efforts.
Other influences have been Barry
and Lucy McCann, Joseph Zubukvic,
Herman Pekel, Loraine Lewitzka, Paul
Margocsy, Amanda Hyatt and John
Lovett. I have learnt so much from
attending their workshops. I even went
to Julian Ashton one school holiday
session and attended a year of TAFE
to feed my knowledge and help with

Artists Back to Basics 9


Profile

in a few, but the last five years, I


have held back from entering due
to other commitments and the fact
that I was originally living in the Blue
Mountains in NSW in my earlier years
of painting, where it was easy to
enter a lot of art events. I now live in
Gladstone in Queensland where it
is a lot harder to do the logistics.
I was always a contender for the
annual Blacktown Art Exhibition
when living in the Blue Mountains.
I entered many of my local art
exhibitions there and was rewarded
with many prizes for my work.
I lived in Nambucca Heads for
18 months and taught my own
little group of students there. It was
Pots of Ink there that I was approached by
Sawtell Art Societys member Helen
Goldsmith who asked me to take
over her class for a term as she
had medical problems that needed
attention, and was not able to teach.
I was very honoured, as she had
seen my work and requested that I
was the only suitable person to take
charge of her class in her absence.
A great honour. Unfortunately,
Nambucca was not good for us
financially, so we moved to Gladstone
where my partner had work.
Now living in Gladstone, I
have been entering into our big
annual art Exhibition, the Martin
Hanson Memorial Awards. This
Exhibition brings in artists from all
over the state and nationally.
I own and run gallery67 in
Tiptoe through the Tulips Gladstone. It is the only commercial
art gallery here and we have been
techniques. My most recent workshop here now for just on a year.
was with Cherry Hood to learn her I paint every day and it only feeds
technique for painting larger-than-life my passion. My inspiration comes
faces. I was awarded a grant from the from nature and my surroundings. My
RADF in our community in conjunction main subject is wildlife and particularly
with our Regional Gallery and Council birds, but I am currently exploring
and of course Art Queensland. This painting on nautical charts. Using
has fuelled a love of figurative and nautical subjects, mainly the older
portraiture in my learning journey. type yachts for the moment, I hope
All of the above have resulted in me to expand and paint commissions
getting to the point I am now, and able for anyone interested in having their
to pass on a little of what I learnt to yacht painted on either their chart
the small group of students I have. or one of the ones I have acquired.
I have entered many exhibitions Painting takes me into another
over the years, and had success world sometimes, and is a great

10 Artists Back to Basics


Should I Get It Fire Extinguisher Study Spring Bounty

way of forgetting any worries. are that of amazement as no one


The techniques I use are varied. piece is the same. That may be to
I love to experiment and push the my disadvantage, but I dont want
watercolour medium to the limit. I to have my work look all the same.
paint in my own style which I cannot So what are the major lessons I
really categorise as I tend to paint have learnt? To improve, you must
how I feel. Reactions to my work practice every day. Never assume

Denise's Flowers Kingfisher

Artists Back to Basics 11


Profile

Mine

your way is the only way. There is


always a lot of room for improvement.
Dont be afraid to fail, as from
failure comes a lesson learnt.

Contact details:
Mobile: 0403 520 422
Email: mjmhughes@live.com.au
Web: www.artbymarion.com
or www.gallery67.com.au
Facebook: https://m.facebook.
com/artbyMarionHughes
Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/
gallery67Gladstone (gallery67)
Facebook:
https://m.facebook.com/profile.
php?id=398826403642520
(Gladstone Art Workshops) Q

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L AU N C HI N G 01 JULY 2017
12 Artists Back to Basics
Back to Basics

King Kookaburra
By Marion Hughes

Using just one brush, the artist creates a fabulous homage


to the king of the Australian bush.

Step One
Draw up your subject.

Step Two
Block in the dark areas of the bird
with a mix of Indanthrone Blue (or Ultramarine
Blue) and Burnt Sienna, varying the mix and
creating a feather like pattern, lifting off colour
as you go to create the feather formation
on the Kookaburras back and wings..
Leave an area on the side of the
wing white, as this will be painted in
Prussian Blue to form the blaze.. Back
and wing feathers blocked in.
Even though I am blocking in, I am
still painting individual feather shapes
to create the look of feathers.

Step Three
Block in the top beak with a mix of
Indanthrone Blue (or Ultramarine Blue)

tQBHF4BVOEFSTHTN
Rough watercolour paper
t#SVTI&TDPEB1FSMB
/P VTFBSPVOECSVTI
with a good point)
t8BUFSDPMPVST
Burnt Sienna Burnt Sienna
Indanthrone Blue
(Daniel Smith). Can use
Ultramarine Blue
Prussian Blue (can use
Phthalo Blue)
New Gamboge Yellow
Final t8IJUF(PVBDIF
Step one Step two (A) Step two (B)

and Burnt Sienna, making the Step Five


mix more blue than brown. Using a thin gouache mix, roughly put in
Lift off some of the colour just above a wash over the lighter head area, then
the bottom part of the beak, but darken using fine strokes and mixes of Burnt
the part where the top and bottom Sienna and Burnt Sienna + Indanthrone
CFBLKPJO8IFO ESZ BOE VTJOH B #VSOU Blue (or Ultramarine Blue), paint in
Sienna wash, paint the bottom part of some details to depict shadows and
the beak. A touch of New Gamboge feather like marks around the head.
Yellow has been used to yellow off
slightly on underside of the beak. Step Six
Using gouache again, start putting in the
Step Four light detail around the feathers on the
Block in the eye with Burnt Sienna, leaving back and wings. Darken some feathers
a white area for the reflection. Let dry. as required. Continue in this way until
Paint the white area we reserved the dark areas of the back and wings
on the wing in Prussian Blue and are detailed to your requirements.
let dry. /PUF /PU FWFSZ GFBUIFS IBT UP CF

Step two (c) Step three Step four (A)

Artists Back to Basics 15


Back to Basics

Step four (B) Step five Step six

done. Put in as much detail as Step Nine


required for the viewer to get the Using gouache, dry brush over
impression of feathers. Darken the body in places and flick into wings
feathers as needed to vary. where the body meets to give the illusion
of fluffy feathers. You can negatively
Step Seven paint into these fluffy bits o form feathers.
Using the dark mix Burnt Sienna + Paint in the variations in the tummy
Indanthrone Blue (or Ultramarine feathers. Kookaburras are not white,
Blue), negatively paint in the details but a mixture of flecks of varying
of the feathers that make up the egrees in their body feathers.
blaze on the side of the wing.
Step Ten
Step Eight Block in the tail as shown, using pure
Make up a wash using gouache Burnt Sienna. Using the dark mix, put
and Burnt Sienna (just enough to in the tail markings. Paint in gouache to
discolour the white), and a tiny bit border the tail and bottom of the tail.
of New Gamboge Yellow and brush
this mix on the body, getting lighter Step Eleven
and adding more white towards Paint the feet with greyish mix using
the tail. Let this dry completely. 8IJUF (PVBDIF #VSOU 4JFOOBBOE

Step seven Step eight Step nine


Step twelve

Step ten (A) Step ten (B) Step thirteen

Indanthrone Blue (or Ultramarine Let some of the paper show through.
Blue). Put in detail with the dark mix. You should get a result as shown.
Now the best bit ... the eye! Earlier I Now for the background. I used an
blocked in the eye with Burnt Sienna. olive green mixed from Burnt Sienna,
Indanthrone Blue, New Gamboge
Step Twelve Yellow and a little Prussian Blue.*
Using a dark mix Burnt Sienna +
Indanthrone Blue (or Ultramarine Step Fourteen
Blue), or use a straight black, Using a fairly wet brush, wet the
carefully paint in an iris around area around the top half of the
the reflection mark. (If the white kookaburra and spread to where
is lost, it can be put in again you want it, then ever so carefully
MBUFSVTJOH8IJUF(PVBDIF
pick up the green mix and drop it
Using the black, also paint in a thin around the bird, moving the pigment
line around the whole eye area. around until you get the desired
Using gouache, paint in two C like effect. Make it very light. Hold the
marks on the top and bottom of the paper so the paint flows towards
eye. Once dry, use a very light wash the outside i.e. upside down. Do
of blue to slightly darken the pupil. the same with the bottom half.
It is at this stage I go around and /PUF.BLFTVSFZPVNBLFFOPVHI
put in small details like the scars of the colour to do the whole of When painting in
on the beak and any highlights that the area you want to cover. watercolour it is best to start
are needed to finish off the bird. off too light. You can always
Final Step add a darker tone and build
Step Thirteen Use gouache to soften the area up the intensity required.
1BJOUJOHUIFCSBODI8FUUIFBSFBPGUIF around the kookaburras tummy and
t (FU JOUP UIF IBCJU PG
branch in stages. Using the two colours put some feathers in again as the
taking excess water out
Burnt Sienna and Indanthrone Blue (or wash tends to make hard lines that
of your brush. Keep an
Ultramarine Blue), touch the underside need softening. And so we have a
old towel or paper towel
of the branch with mixes of the colours completed painting of a kookaburra.
handy at all times.
or on their own to form a bark like
appearance. Because the branch is Contact details: t " CSVTI XJUI B HPPE QPJOU
fairly wet, the watercolour will pretty Marion Hughes can get you through
much form its own pattern and blend. Mobile: 0403 520 422 the whole painting.
This gives the appearance of bark on a Email: mjmhughes@live.com.au t 5IJT EFNP XBT EPOF
tree. Do not cover the whole of the area. Web: www.artbymarion.com.au Q using only one brush.

Artists Back to Basics 17


Pe n c i l s D o w n

In the Frame- part 1


by Brett A. Jones

T
he perfect frame is the one you made. Exhibition grade picture framing
really dont notice as its done its is both a bit of a black art and fascinating
job of leading your eye to the art, subject unto itself. Its also an integral
which is being presented in its best part of any worthwhile fine art original
possible light by the framing choices done on paper and warrants a close

Fig 1: The idea of this frame was to use the went in. It had been in 3 art shows with the
matte to suggest the colour and proportions frame in figure one and gotten nowhere.
of a 2B Lumograph pencil (black, white, blue,
wood colour) to try and add to the artwork. A Fig 3: The moulding on the left is a pro job,
perfect example of a framing fail, trying to be the one on the right a home job. Despite
too smart for my own good mucking around picking the best of the four corners for the
with the basic premises of picture framing. photo its still immediately apparent that
its sub-standard. It either is or it isnt with
Fig 2: As soon as I went back to the basic frame corner quality and the simple fact is
principles of framing a monochrome you just cant do it without the right gear.
chiaroscuro work with white background (i.e. The scuffs and scratches on the left hand
Plain black certificate frame moulding, one moulding was damage from being roughly
white cored matte layer with positive bevel cut, handled at art shows, when the drawing later
of a neutral tone lighter than the darkest tones sold for thousands of dollars I was happy
in the composition) it w n the next art show it to replace the frame with a new one.

Fig 1
Fig 2

18 Artists Back to Basics


Fig 3 Fig 4

familiarity to not only take best advantage far as quality goes, the perfect quality Fig 4: Dedicated frame moulding saw.
of it but also to help avoid making actual barometer in fact. If the corners are
bad decisions that can easily either ANYTHING BUT PERFECT then not Fig 5: Pneumatic precision frame
distract/detract from your finished artwork only does the quality of the framing in moulding clamp, with Alan beavering
or in the worst case scenario destroy general come instantly into question away in the background. Good
any potential impact it may have had but just as quickly the art it surrounds. framing shops get a lot of work.
altogether (figures 1 & 2). There are a It doesnt matter if the framing Fig 6: Just part of Alans moulding stock. The
great many aspects and considerations materials are world class and the art other part about tackling the framing yourself
when it comes time to frame your work, a masterpiece, if the frame moulding is the space taken to store an ever expanding
the most important always being to and matte boards corners have any pile of various framing materials where it can
stick to the plan and let your framing visible flaws (i.e. anything but flawless) all be easily accessed but away from heat,
choices add to the artwork by being then the entire pieces quality is instantly moisture, insects, dust, etc. Hmmmm.
invisible, or in other words be a frame for subconsciously pulled down by anyone
the art, not a point of interest in itself. who sees it to that lowest common Fig 7: Modern ornate frame moulding
denominator (figure 3). Many years never really matches properly on the
Quality Barometer ago in my dark ages I wanted to make corners as the corners are no longer
It all comes down to the corners as my own frames out of sheer financial specially moulded but with or without

Fig 5 Fig 6 Fig 7

Artists Back to Basics 19


Pe n c i l s D o w n

now seems as good a juncture as any


to vociferously thank both Adrian Sherry
(posthumously) and Alan Muir from Out
of the Square Picture Framing in Hervey
Bay for all youve done and continue to
do for me and all the other struggling
artists trying to make a start from zero
with nothing or less. A lot of what I now
know about exhibition grade framing
(why would you want anything less)
is because of Adrian and then Alans
generosity of spirit and knowledge. The
long road of becoming a full time artist
was certainly made infinitely easier
having a good framer behind me.
OK, about these frame thingys then....

Mouldings
Fig 8
The actual frame itself is called the
moulding and comes in a vast array of
qualities, styles, materials, and prices
desperation until a wise old professional (figure 6). Everything from the ever
that annoying modern compromise
framing wizard (R.I.P. Adrian) explained popular thin, plain certificate framing,
to quality this kind of thing is best left
and demonstrated how to make frame right up to the glaringly ostentatious, six
for big paintings, wedding photos
corners perfect, after watching all the inch wide, heavily ornamented, gilt kind
and wall mirrors in McMansions. As
extremely careful steps on several large of thing you see on the walls of dusty
a pencil artist its not an area of the
precision machines he had to do to old mansions. They are actually called
sample wall I tend to pester as a rule.
make just one frame I realised its really mouldings from those days back when
not possible without very specialised overly fancy heavily ornamented frames
machinery and the hard won experience were more often than not gold painted
required to make them sing their song plaster moulded over a plain timber
on key (figures 4 & 5). If the corners base, especially the ones with really
are PERFECT theyre invisible, anything overblown ornate corners (figure 7).
less than perfect they stand out like the Choosing the right moulding for each
proverbial and immediately destroy any individual artwork, like every other part
chance your original artwork ever had of the artistically creative experience is
of being seen in its best light let alone and should be a very personal thing but
creating that elusive illusion of something there are some long standing and quite
extra special. Adrian told me to go and common sense traditions for want of a
draw like my whole life depended on it better word when it comes to choosing
(it did) and he would look after me with moulding for the different mediums
the framing side till I got on my feet. He (figure 8). When framing most kinds
told me from then on when I came in of oil paintings (figure 9) the skys the
to pick up framed work to wait till there limit as far as what suits and doesnt
were no customers and his wife was suit, it really comes down to the size
out of hearing before any mention of and subject of the work and the colours
business passed between us. He most and overall tone of the composition,
definitely did look after me with prices but as a general rule oil paintings are
during all those dark circle days and framed without glass or matte board
when a few years later he retired due surround (and a lot of the time without
to ill health and he sold the legendary even a backboard), and watercolours
Hillyard St. Picture Framing business are framed under glass with matte
to the next owner Alan Muir there was board/s and backboard. With both
only one condition apparently, to look traditional oils and modern water-acrylics
after one special case which turned out there is an increasing tendency toward
to be me. Im about to wax profound stretched canvases which while certainly
on some specific foibles of framing but possible to frame are more usually not

20 Artists Back to Basics


Fig 9 Fig 10

Fig 8: The vast difference between an


nowadays. Stretched canvases are I will mostly be concentrating on what eminently suitable moulding choice
acceptable to hang without framing I know of the framing of drawings in for a work in graphite and something
in homes, galleries and all levels of graphite and pastels. Unlike paintings you could kill a red kangaroo with,
competitive art shows as long as the on stretched canvases there is no just by showing it to him.
hanging cord and d-rings are up to avoiding the absolute necessity of
standard (cord must be woven sash good framing when dealing with Fig 9: The frame on this oil painting suits it
cord or wire, not string or twine), and the either of these drawing mediums but fine with the deep darks and bright colours
visible edges (canvas covered sides) serendipitously when framing works (in in the composition offset by the dark tone
are either a continuation of the artwork graphite anyway) its a long accepted and gold fancy bits in the moulding. You
or at the very least neatly painted (which standard to stick to the plainest and never use glass or matte when framing
looks fine and seems to be gaining in narrowest styles available (figure oil paintings. Hmm, wondering now
popularity as an intentional edge finish). 10). A serendipitously welcome how it would look in an ornate satin black
This kind of thing means pre-stretched aspect of these thinnest, plainest frame. The magnitude of the framing
canvases are becoming more and more mouldings being the most suitable decision is truly astonishing regarding
popular across the board with painters for works in graphite is the fact the overall effect it has on the art.
as framing costs are always zero apart that they are the most inexpensive.
from a bit of hanging cord and d-rings . While you should always at least Fig 10: This is the bit of wall I humbug
try to leave the price out of framing the most, only old friend missing from this
Very Dusty Brushes considerations when presenting your image is the plain back certificate frame
My paintbrushes have long original artwork in its best possible (see figure 8). The least used for works in
languished on a dusty shelf here light, for most artists including graphite in this image would be the blonde
where drawing has ruled the roost for myself, the lower the overall cost wood options. Black is generally always
decades so for the rest of this article of framing can be kept the better. the new black when framing 2B graphite.

Artists Back to Basics 21


Pe n c i l s D o w n

Fig 11 Fig 12

Abitablingornot? to serve the best interests of your


Often so-called traditional artwork (the entire aesthetic point
standards go out of style, date of the frame in the first place).
badly, or never made much aesthetic
sense in the first place and can be Framing Colour
easily and happily ignored but thin/ Pastels are a lot more fun as they
plain mouldings on works in graphite offer the best of all worlds when it comes
certainly isnt one of them. A fine gold to framing choices. You are open to
or silver detail line on the moulding selecting from a much wider range of
can sometimes suit certain drawings mouldings all the way from thin/plain
but mostly a simple, unadorned to fairly fancy, relatively heavier ones.
black, woodstained, or neutral colour The full colour aspect of pastels allows
choice is the best way to go when for much greater latitude but its still so
choosing the framing for monotone very easy to overwhelm a pastel with
works in graphite. Coloured pencil even a slightly less than ideal let alone
work might sometimes benefit an actual bad choice so take your time
from a complimentarily coloured and remember its all about presenting
moulding depending on the subject the work at its best, not picking the most
and brightness of the colours in the striking framing in the shop just because
composition but its all so very easy to you like it in itself or it matches the
distract attention, clash with, or even colours in the artwork. The moulding IS
completely overwhelm the art once the frame but is also just one part of the
you step across that line and start entire visual effect when talking about
playing around with brightly coloured drawn artworks. Every bit as important
Fig 11: Alarm bells should be aringin if frame mouldings, so you have to be and every bit as easy to bugger up with
you find yourself close to this part of the very careful not to get carried away a poor choices is the all important matte.
wall. Step away from the bright colours with enthusiasm when making the
unless youre framing a painting of clowns selection in the framing shop (figure Matte Board
having a paint fight in bright sunlight. 11). It can be very tempting when Matte board is an amazing material
looking at the bewildering range of and serves quite a few purposes, the
Fig 12: Digital matte scalpel cutter. Always different mouldings on offer to want most important of course being the
a lot better result than with the best steel ruler, to pick something very bright or fancy function as a moisture buffer zone
Stanley knife and good intentions every time. but it will almost always badly fail between the original and the outside

22 Artists Back to Basics


world, almost like the barometric lungs millimetres of paper behind the matte. the less chance there is of pillowing or
of the framed original. The glass might The drawing paper can extend behind rippling developing in the work over long
be hard up against the moulding and the matte all the way to the moulding periods of time. The artwork is only
the back taped up all neat with archival itself, in fact its a much better idea to ever taped at a few spots on the top
framing tape (for the first couple of years crop the paper the original is drawn on edge and hung behind the matte like a
anyway) but the moulding, drawing, by covering it with the matte as part of curtain, with very specifically purposed
matte board, and backboard are all the framing process than cutting it with non-acidic hanging tape always used,
expanding and shrinking at different scissors. Unless the paper is too big which has the very rare combination
rates the whole time as weather to fit inside the frame moulding itself, of qualities found in tape of being very
conditions change. In reality the artwork in that case theres no choice but to thin but strong, with non-acidic but
is continually writhing back and forth trim (very carefully) the excess. The extremely aggressive adhesive. This
in very slow motion. Matte boards ability to move the drawing around curtain hanging method is essential
only ever used when framing work under the window cut in the matte as the different materials found in any
under glass. This is always the case gives a perfect last opportunity to framed originals expand and contract
with works on paper, which includes balance and settle your composition at different rates with fluctuations in
watercolour, pastel, graphite, in fact any by choosing the EXACT physical temperature and humidity so paper
medium which uses paper as a base. position and EXACTLY how much of the will always pillow out or ripple badly
Art under glass by definition comes with background surrounding the subject will if taped down all around the edges.
its own little sealed in (more or less) be seen, something you cant do with Seeing a paper based artwork
eco-system. It will breathe through a stretched canvas, or even a canvas pillowing is always a dead giveaway of
the matte. Another important function board or panel being framed. Its not an amateur framing job. And as with
of the matte is its use as a window to only unnecessary but actually counter- the frame moulding corners, anything
hang the drawing paper behind. While productive to trim your original down but flawlessly cut bevel edges really
there can be as much of the original so there is only the 2mm minimum does tragically detract from the potential
drawing visually cropped as there is covered by the matte. The more paper for an artwork to attain that illusory mark
room behind the matte board to hide there is extending behind the matte of creative perfection, class, and quality
it there only HAS to be a couple of the more structurally integral it is and so hard to hit already (figure 12). Q

Artists Back to Basics 23


Drawing Inspiration

On the farm
By Ellen Lee Osterfield

T his painting is a combination of


things I enjoy painting, cows,
birds, flowers and old houses!
I have chosen to paint this in
canvas and give you the option
of framing or not! Hence the oval
in the centre of the canvas!

Acrylic on a gallery edged canvas Step One


51cm x 60cm. I have made this I decided to draw my design straight
one a little different to show you onto the canvas as I already had
what you can do to dress up the a plan in my mind for this design.

Final

24 Artists Back to Basics


I dont always do things this way
but was eager to start on this
one! I dont recommend that you
do things this way often as it can
lead to disappointment if your
plan doesnt quite come together,
I still like to sketch up on a pad
most of the time. I used a Prussian
Blue and Warm White mix for the
sky adding Turners Yellow and Step one
Red Violet for the sunny areas.
I blocked in the old farmhouse
using Red Violet, Ultramarine
Blue and Burnt Umber plus Warm
White and scattered these colours
around the base of the house.

Step Two
I was working fairly loosely as I
wanted a much more laid back
style to this work. After blocking in
much of the ground using mixes of
Ultramarine Blue, Cobalt Blue, Red
Violet and Turners Yellow, I started
working more detail into the house.
I used Burnt Umber, Ultramarine
and Red Violet for this, adding
highlights with Turners Yellow and
Warm White. The fence posts were
painted with the same colours.

Step Three
Wisteria is one of my favourite Step Two
flowers and the broken down
veranda with its exposed beams Step Three
made the ideal support for this
creeper! Red Violet, Ultramarine and
Warm White make a lovely shade of
Mauve for these flowers. Springtime
is also a favourite season when the
trees show off their blossoms and
I couldnt resist adding a couple of
these beauties to my farmyard.

Step Four
Working on the blossom branch I
used Titanium White for the main
petals plus Ultramarine Blue and Red
Violet plus White for the shadows
underneath the petals. I also painted
in the blossom tree using the
same colours and mixed in a little
Drawing Inspiration

Step Four

Step FIve

with Warm White and Turners Yellow.


Some long grass along the path
completed the scene. For this
I used Turners Yellow, Warm
White and mixes of Red Violet
and Ultramarine Blue for the
shadows. I dabbled mixes of the
various colours along the path.
Burnt Umber for the tree trunk. At this point I decided to paint
I started work on the cow using around the oval using a Blue Grey mix
H Burnt Umber and Ultramarine and for
the Rosellas I used Napthol Crimson,
(Ultramarine, Red Violet, Warm White
and a small amount of Burnt Umber).
Yellow Light, Burnt Umber and
t/FWFSCFBGSBJEUPNBLF Ultramarine Blue plus Warm White. Step Six
DIBOHFTJGZPVUIJOLJUXJMM After setting the painting aside
JNQSPWFZPVSQBJOUJOH Step Five for a few days I made the
I have perched another Eastern decision to change the colour
t5IFSFBSFPGDPVSTFUJNFT Rosella in the blossom tree and around the oval as I felt the dark
XIFOZPVIBWFUPKVNQJO added some wire to the fence using grey was a little too strong!
iCPPUTBOEBMMBTUIFZTBZw Warm White with a little Burnt Umber It took a few coats of my cream
BOETJNQMZTFFIPXJUXJMMUVSO and Ultramarine Blue, some Napthol colour mix to cover the grey but I am
PVU5IFCFBVUZPG"DSZMJDJT Crimson was added to the mix for much happier with the result, having
UIBUZPVDBOBMXBZTQBJOUPWFS the rusty wire along the top. I finished now achieved the sunny spring day
UIFDBOWBTBOETUBSUBHBJO the cow adding shine on the side I was looking for. Happy Painting! Q
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Artis
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Presented by
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Profile

The Peoples
Choice
with Gilly Huber

Happiest when her subject is complicated, detailed and absorbing,


this artist favours glazing, detail and precision.

A rt has always been a part of


my life. In my childhood, living
in Wiltshire, an English rural
county, I drew horses and animals,
inspired by the countryside and
the many books that I was always
reading. As an adolescent and teen I
progressed into drawing my favourite
movie stars and pop idols, and even
through my working life I continued
sketching the people and animals
around me. For many years I just drew
in pencil but eventually, about 20 years
ago, I was introduced to colour with
pastels. I felt comfortable because
to me it was still drawing. I was
interested in watercolour and oils but
never felt satisfied with my attempts
until, a few years ago, I discovered
the works of Susan Harrison-Tustain
and Arleta Pech, who finally guided
me in the direction I wanted to go.
Of course, according to current
trends and critics I do everything
wrong! Not technically, but in the
manner of application and realism.
I enjoy glazing in the manner of
the Old Masters Rembrandt and

Left: Escape to the Country

Opposite page
Top: Enquiring Minds
Bottom: Natures Palette

28 Artists Back to Basics


Vermeer are two of my idols. I love the planning, the patience, and the
building luminosity and richness meditative quality achieved, not the
with thin layers of transparent and end result. I often feel disappointed
semi-transparent pigments, using when my signature has been added
opaque paint only for a touch of as it means the painting is finished,
highlight or a little definition here and with nothing more to be done.
there. Glazing uses a lot less paint,
which means that I dont mix a lot of
pigments on the palette, preferring
the layers on the canvas to achieve
the subtlety of colour that I desire.
And I am at my happiest when
my subject is complicated, detailed
and absorbing, when I can use my
paintbrush to depict realistic textures
such as lace, tree bark, fur and
feathers that seem possible to be
touched as if they were the real thing.
I dont reject modelling compounds,
plein air painting, thick paint
application or alla prima I have
tried them all but none satisfy me
in the way that glazing, detail and
precision do. I do not understand why
a painting needs to be completed in
a couple of hours. I enjoy what I do
and I want it to last. For me, it is the
journey of the painting that matters,

Artists Back to Basics 29


Profile

Although I had no formal training in


art, save the many hundreds of books
and magazines Ive accrued over
the years, and the demonstrations
and workshops Ive attended, I was
trained in an engineering drawing
office and, doubtless, this is the
genesis of my passion for detail and
precision. I also love my camera
and frequently compose the basic
composition of my paintings through
the lens. I often use several photos
to build a painting, always taking
care to maintain a constant light
source direction to ensure realism.
My subject usually dictates which
medium I will employ. With pastels, I
use rough- textured, coloured sheets,
usually harmonious with my colour
scheme. For watercolour I prefer
a 300gsm medium rough sheet
stretched and taped to a board. If
using oils, I have my framer stretch
my canvases for me and I then
apply up to five layers of gesso,

30 Artists Back to Basics


sanded between each application,
for a smooth surface. I rarely apply a
base coat to the canvas as I find the
pristine white a joy on which to work.
Both pastels and watercolours need
to be framed under glass, and I now
find I have to work in smaller formats
as, nowadays, I find it difficult to lift
them into the boot of my car. Oils
can be unframed and easier, but the
restrictions of exhibitions can also
limit size, which is a pity because I
really enjoy working on a large piece.
Realism does have its drawbacks. I
have been rejected from an exhibition
because my work is too realistic!!
However, in the main my work is
appreciated and I have sold many
paintings over the years and received
several awards. In particular, I am
often the recipient of the Peoples
Choice awards at exhibitions and this,
to me, is the highest accolade as it
is the opinion of many, not just the
subjective choice of a single judge.
Although not considering myself
a teacher, I do act as Volunteer
Tutor for the Art Group at the Swan
Valley Community Centre, and am
often invited to be demonstrator
at other groups in the Perth area.
I belong to the WA Society of Arts,
The Pastel Society of WA, Trigg Art
Club and Wanneroo/Joondalup Art
Group. I frequently enter exhibitions
and enjoy the interaction with
other artists and the public.
In September I took part in a
month-long exhibition at Houghtons
Winery in the Swan Valley with four
other artists, and in November
2017 I will be presenting a solo
exhibition at the ZigZag Gallery in
Kalamunda, a hills suburb of Perth.

Top right: Safely Home


Right: He Who Dares

Opposite page
Top: Glorious Gold Bunnies
Bottom: Silver Study

Artists Back to Basics 31


Profile

Solo Exhibitions
t'FCSVBSZo'MFFUJOH.PNFOUT
Guildford Village Pottery
t0DUPCFSo".JYFE1BMFUUFo
Mals Art Studio, Whiteman Park

Joint Exhibitions
t'FCo%JWFSTJUZPG'JWF
Houghtons Winery
t0DUo8PPEBOE#SVTIo
Celtic Swan Gallery, Upper Swan
t"QSJMo5IF4QJSJUPGUIF
Thoroughbred Exhibition Ascot
Racecourse (where I won both
The Best in Show Award and
the Peoples Choice Award
for the same painting!)

Awards
t.BZ1FPQMFT$IPJDF"XBSEo
Trigg Art Group Autumn Exhibition
t"QSJM1FPQMFT$IPJDF
Award St Mary Magdalene
Church Art Exhibition
t0DU8JOOFSo/FX
Beginnings Competition Swan
Valley Community Centre,
Spring Art & Craft Exhibition
t4FQUOEQMBDFo1FPQMFT
Choice Award Trigg Art
Group Spring Exhibition
t.BZ1FPQMFT$IPJDF"XBSE
Trigg Art Group Autumn Exhibition
t"QSJM#FTUJO4IPX
and Peoples Choice The
Spirit of the Thoroughbred
Exhibition, Ascot Racecourse
t%FDFNCFS8JOOFSo
Favourite Subject Competition
Australian Artist Magazine
t0DUPCFS1FPQMFT$IPJDF
Baskerville Art Exhibition
t4FQUFNCFS1FPQMFT$IPJDF
Pastel Society Exhibition
t4FQUFNCFS1FPQMFT

Top left: Old Hand New Chum


Middle left: Neigh-bours
Left: Passing Time

Opposite page
Top: Wine and Roses
Bottom left: Our Lives Matter Too
Bottom right: Ever Watchful
Choice Wanneroo-Joondalup Second Place Rural/
Art Society Exhibition Rural Art Award Nominee
t0DUPCFS1FPQMFT$IPJDF t4FQUFNCFS8JOOFSo
Baskerville Art Exhibition Trigg Art Group Exhibition
t.BZ8JOOFSo5SJHH t0DUPCFSo(JEHFHBOOVQ
Art Group Exhibition Agricultural Show
t0DUPCFSo(JEHFHBOOVQ First Place Portrait
Agricultural Show Second Place Portrait
First Place Portrait First Place Rural/Rural Art
First Place Floral Award Nominee
Second Place Floral Second Place Rural
Second Place Seascapes t0DUPCFS#FTUJO4IPX
t'FCSVBSZ'JOBMJTUo'MPXFST Rural Art Award Nominee
& Gardens Competition Gidgegannup Agricultural Show
Australian Artist Magazine t.BZ8JOOFSo5SJHH
t0DUPCFSo(JEHFHBOOVQ Art Group Exhibition
Agricultural Show
First Place Portrait Contact details:
First Place Floral Email: gilly@gillyhuberart.com
Second Place Floral Web: www.gillyhuberart.com Q

Artists Back to Basics 33


Back to Basics

Indulgence
By Gilly Huber

Never before have strawberries looked


so plump and delicious!

t$BOWBTTIFFUUBQFE
to hard board
t7FHFUBCMFQBSDINFOU
tear-off palette
t#SVTIFTBWBSJFUZPG8FTUBSU
BDSZMJDCSVTIFT 4DIBSGGNPPO
TDSVCCFSTBOECMFOEJOHNPQ
t4PGUHSFZQBTUFMQFODJMUP
USBOTGFSESBXJOHUPDBOWBT
t8JOTPS/FXUPO
Liquin medium
t1BQFSUPXFMT
t$MFBOVQXJUI"SU4QFDUSVN
"SU$MFBOBOE$ISPNB
*ODSFEJCMF#SVTI$MFBOFS
t7BSOJTIXJUI"SU4QFDUSVN
%BNBS7BSOJTI
t"SU4QFDUSVNPJMQBJOUT
Raw Umber
o1UIBMP#MVF
o"MJ[BSJO$SJNTPO
o4BQ(SFFO
o6MUSBNBSJOF#MVF
o#VSOU4JFOOB
o5JUBOJVN8IJUF
t8JOTPS/FXUPOPJMQBJOUT
o#SJMMJBOU3FE
Final Transparent Yellow

34 Artists Back to Basics


Step one Step two

Step One The canvas was a spare piece left 5JQ,FFQ


*CFHBOXJUIUIF DPNQMFUFE QBJOUJOH over from the last time I had several
BMSFBEZWJTVBMJTFE JO NZ NJOE UIFO TUSFUDIFE DBOWBTFT QSFQBSFE TP * ZPVS-JRVJO
collected the objects I needed and KVTU UBQFE JU UP B CPBSE BT * SFBMMZ JOUIFGSJEHF
purchased the fresh strawberries. XBOUFE UP HFU HPJOH PO UIJT QJFDF
*ONZTUVEJP* ESBQFE EBSL DMPUIT * SFEFGJOFE NZ USBOTGFSSFE JNBHF which stops
BOEBOPME MBDF UBCMFDMPUI BOE XJUI WFSZ EJMVUFE 3BX 6NCFS  * VTF JUTPMJEJGZJOH
BSSBOHFEUIFPCKFDUT BOE MJHIUJOH odourless solvent to dilute as turps
BGUFSXIJDI*UPPL BCPVU  JNBHFT TJUT CBEMZ JO NZ MVOHT  BOE MJHIUMZ JOUPKFMMZ
XJUINZEJHJUBM 4-3 DBNFSB indicated all of the lace holes.
GSFRVFOUMZBEKVTUJOH UIF EJSFDUJPO
PGUIFMJHIUJOH BOE UIF QMBDFNFOU Step Three
PGUIFPCKFDUT BOE UBLJOH JNBHFT 6TJOH 1UIBMP #MVF "MJ[BSJO
GSPNBTNBOZ EJGGFSFOU BOHMFT BT $SJNTPO BOE 4BQ (SFFO * NJYFE
possible. I also took shots with the B CFBVUJGVM MVNJOPVT CMBDL BOE
HMBTTCPUIFNQUZ BOE GJMMFE "MM QBJOUFE UIF CBDLHSPVOE *UT B
JNBHFTXFSFUIFO USBOTGFSSFE UP NZ CVTZ QBJOUJOH TP UIJT JT BO BSFB
DPNQVUFSBOE * TQFOU B MPOH UJNF UP BMMPX UIF FZF UP SFTU 1BJOUJOH
TUVEZJOHUIFN BMM VOUJM * TFMFDUFE lace is not as hard as it looks.
just one (shown) from which to paint 8JUI UIF TBNF NJY JO EJGGFSFOU
BMPOHXJUIUIF SFBMMJGF TFUVQ TUSFOHUIT * QBJOUFE BMM PG UIF MBDF
IPMFT 5IF NBKPSJUZ PG UIF XIJUF
Step Two cloth is just the white of the canvas!
"MUIPVHI*QSFGFS UP ESBX NZ I use a lot of Liquin medium as
DPNQPTJUJPOT GSFFIBOE GPS UIF * MJLF NZ QBJOU UP CF UIJO BOE
BDDVSBDZPGUIF CPUUMF BOE HMBTT USBOTQBSFOU BOE UP SFBMMZ GMPX
TIBQFT*VTFE UIF HSJE NFUIPE I also painted the first shadow
POUSBDJOHQBQFS 3VCCJOH UIF HMB[FT PO UIF MBDF VTJOH 6MUSBNBSJOF
SFWFSTFPGUIF USBDJOH QBQFS XJUI #MVF BOE #VSOU 4JFOOB QMVT TPNF
BTPGUHSFZQBTUFM XIJDI BCTPSCT of the reflected colour from the
JOUPQBJOUXJUIPVU EJTDPMPVSBUJPO * XJOF CPUUMF  4BQ (SFFO JO POF BSFB
USBOTGFSSFEUIF JNBHF UP NZ DBOWBT BOE "MJ[BSJO $SJNTPO JO BOPUIFS

Artists Back to Basics 35


Back to Basics

Step three Step four

"UUIJTTUBHF UIFQBJOUJOH BQQMJFE UIF4BQ(SFFOPOUIFMBDF 


JTWFSZCBTJDBOESPVHI TFFOUISPVHIUIFCPUUMFTIPVMEFS
t $POUSBTU JT MJHIU OPU XIJUFQBJOU
and neck and beneath the shadow;
t 1MBDF EBSLFTU EBSL BMPOHTJEF Step Four HMPXFEUISPVHI5IFTUFNPGUIFHMBTT
MJHIUFTU MJHIU GPS HSFBU DPOUSBTU 0ODFNZCBTJDVOEFSQBJOUJOHXBT XBTNFSFMZBKVNCMFPGTIBQFTBOE
t 6TF UIJO USBOTQBSFOU HMB[FT ESZ*BQQMJFEUIFGJSTUUSBOTQBSFOU TIBEPXT OPUIJOHEFGJOJUF"GJSTUHMB[F
UP CVJME EFQUI BOE SJDIOFTT HMB[FTUPUIFXJOFCPUUMFBOEHMBTT PG#SJMMJBOU3FEXBTBQQMJFEUPUIF
t 5IF VOEFS HMB[F NVTU CFESZ VTJOH1UIBMP#MVFBOE"MJ[BSJO TUSBXCFSSJFTBOE6MUSBNBSJOF#MVFXJUI
CFGPSF BQQMZJOH UIF OFYUHMB[F $SJNTPO MFBOJOHTUSPOHMZUPXBSET #VSOU4JFOOBCFHBOUPEFGJOFUIFTJMWFS
UIFMBUUFSGPSUIFMPWFMZCVSHVOEZ EJTI"MJHIUNJYPG5SBOTQBSFOU:FMMPX
t #MFOE TPGUMZ UP TVHHFTUGPSN
wine colour. I did leave some white BOE4BQ(SFFOJOEJDBUFEUIFMFBWFT
t "MXBZT FNQMPZ MPTU DBOWBTTIPXJOHGPSUIFIJHIMJHIUT  "MUIPVHIJUXBTOUBQQBSFOUPO
BOE GPVOE FEHFT CVUXBTOUUPPQSFDJPVTBTUIFTF UIFEJHJUBMJNBHF NZSFBMMJGFTFUVQ
t 5IFSF NVTU CF B RVJFUBSFBPG could be defined later with white DMFBSMZTIPXFEUIFSFGMFDUJPOPGUIF
UIF QBJOUJOH GPS UIF FZFUPSFTU QBJOU5IJOOFE#VSOU4JFOOBXBT strawberries and silver dish in the
t ,FFQ ZPVS -JRVJO NFEJVN TUSPLFEPOUPUIFTJEFTPGUIFHMBTT TJEFPGUIFCPUUMF TP*BEEFEUIFN
BOE QBMFUUF JO UIF GSJEHF (MB[JOHEPFTOUNFBO
t "MXBZT VTF UIF CFTU Step Five DPNQMFUFMZDPWFSJOHUIF
RVBMJUZ NBUFSJBMT *DPOUJOVFEEFFQFOJOHUIFHMB[FT  VOEFSMZJOHQJHNFOUKVTUDFSUBJO
VTJOHUIFTBNFQJHNFOUTGPSFBDI BSFBTTPUIBUUIFQBJOUJOHMPPLT
t 0CTFSWF ZPVS TVCKFDU
BSFBBTOPUFEJO4UFQT5ISFFBOE SFBMJTUJDBOEIBTBHMPX
t $POTUBOUMZ QSBDUJTF 'PVS#FDBVTFUIFGJSTUCBTJDHMB[FT *OFBUFOFEUIFIJHIMJHIUTPOUIFCPUUMF
ZPVS ESBXJOH TLJMMT XFSFESZ PODFUIFOFYUHMB[FXBT XJUIUPVDIFTPG5JUBOJVN8IJUF

36 Artists Back to Basics


5JQ$POUSBTUJT
MJHIU OPUXIJUF
1MBDFZPVSEBSLFTU
EBSLOFYUUPZPVS
MJHIUFTUMJHIU
and it will pop.

Final Step
'VSUIFSHMB[FTPOUIFTJMWFSEJTI
HBWFJUTIJOF4IBEPXTPOUIF
strawberries were achieved with
"MJ[BSJO$SJNTPOQMVTTPNFPGUIF
deep shadow colour of the dish
CFJOHQVMMFEJOUPUIFN MPTJOH
FEHFT5IJTDPMPVSXBTBMTP
CMFOEFEJOUPUIFMFBWFT XIJDI
were deepened with Ultramarine
#MVFBOE4BQ(SFFO)JHIMJHIUT
XFSFTUSFOHUIFOFEBOE*NBEF
some minor adjustments
BOEUJEZJOHVQ
I took a black and white photo
XJUINZJ1BEXIJDITIPXFEUIBU
TPNFWBMVFTSFRVJSFEBEKVTUNFOU 
after which point I could see no
further work that needed to be
EPOFA*OEVMHFODFXBTDPNQMFUF

Contact details
Email: gilly@gillyhuberart.com Step five
Web: www.gillyhuberart.com Q

Artists Back to Basics 37


Keep It Simple Photography

Camera Buyers
Guide
Daniel Smith

The main considerations when choosing the right camera for


you include the final output and overall quality, camera size and
portability, the requirement for extra lenses, low light capability,
the cost of the kit, and your area of interest, amongst other
things. We have listed the main categories below to help assist
your decision and a few notable cameras in each series.
Digital camera technologies have advanced quickly and continue
to do so. Every new model of camera sees better image quality
and more features generally at a lower price. Technically speaking,
Nikon D7100
resolution and overall image quality has well and truly surpassed
that of 35mm film. Advancements in low light performance and
digital specific features have created a market of advanced
cameras that have very capable manual and automatic modes.
There are a many different options when it comes
to choosing digital cameras and these can be
grouped under a few basic categories.

Digital SLR (Single Lens Reflex) from long lenses for sports, portrait
These cameras have a built in mirror lenses, wide-angle landscape lenses
Olympus SP100 and prism that adds to the overall size and lenses for low light shooting.
and weight but with this comes the
ability to see directly through the lens Nikon D7100
in real time and a quick autofocus. Nikons high resolution DSLR camera
This view is not hindered by electronic has an excellent image sensor providing
viewfinders or any sort of delay. very good low light performance and
These cameras are generally the top a sharp image. The 51 focus points
choice for professional photographers, and 7 frames per second make
however models are available to it a good camera for fast moving
accommodate beginners, enthusiast subjects. This is a wonderful camera
and professionals alike. One main for capturing good image clarity in a
advantage of this type of camera variety of different lighting situations.
system is the large range of accessories
and the versatility that comes with Canon 5D mkIII
that. There are many lenses that are One of Canons most popular
available to use on this style of camera cameras from the last couple of

38 Artists Back to Basics


Olympus OM-D EM-1

years, the Canon 5D mkIII provides using the live exposure mode
wonderful low light performance so as you change settings you
and a professional feature set. will see the effect instantly. This
This camera is the go to for is handy for visualising the final
people shooting a wide range of results. Mirrorless cameras are a
subjects and is a wonderful camera great choice for those who are size
for people shooting portraits, and weight conscious and for the
weddings, landscapes and fine art photographer who is on the move.
photographs. The large camera
sensor provides a great perspective Olympus OM-D EM-1
which will be familiar to people The Olympus series of mirrorless
who have shot film in the past. cameras have combined a retro look
with the functionality of a professional
Mirrorless Cameras camera. The Olympus OM-D EM-1 is Fujifilm Finepix X100s
The mirrorless range of cameras, its current flagship model. It boasts
also referred to as Compact System a 3.0 inch titling rear screen, WiFi
Cameras, are a series of cameras to share your images, an excellent
that are styled on their DSLR sensor, and is dust, splash and
counterparts (above). By removing freeze proof. This style of camera has
the mirror and prism they have a been very popular with documentary
much smaller form factor than a photographers and street shooters.
DSLR with very similar options. The size makes it suitable for
Lenses are still interchangeable with discreet documentary shooting.
these camera but the weight and
physical size are drastically less. Panasonic GH4
Instead of offering a view directly The Panasonic GH4 has developed
through the lens, your viewfinder an excellent reputation when it comes
and screen displays an electronic to video. The GH4 will shoot 4K
(digital) view, and although there is video and has been a popular choice
often a slight delay, most screens for enthusiast and professional
are able to display the image filmmakers. Whilst a very competent

Artists Back to Basics 39


Keep It Simple Photography

stills shooter, the Panasonic GH4 the past. As much nostalgic in design
has really been designed with video as it is practical, the camera layout
in mind. It offers a range of different allows for easy access to the manual
video and still shooting modes for all controls. There is a simplicity to the
situations. The lens mount is a micro- X100s, and with its fixed lens and
four thirds so there are many suitable basic controls the user can focus on
lenses from the Olympus and automatic or manual exposure easily.
Panasonic brands as well as manual
adapters for older manual lenses. Mobile phone cameras
Samsung Galaxy Smart phones have become a
S4 Zoom - 4G Compact standard addition to pockets and
The pocket compact camera is handbags and have initiated a
Daniel Smith is a not what it used to be. In the days change in the traditional camera
of film these cameras where often market. Many people now use a
Sydney based artist fairly basic, offering zoom, flash smart phone in place of a regular
and photographer. on/off and a button to take the camera and to remain competitive
picture. The newer style of compact many cameras have evolved to
He currently works camera contains a large range include some of the features that
at Digital Camera of features with some cameras make phones the more popular
utilising DSLR functionality. choice such as the sharing of
Warehouse as the There are a few categories within the images. Images are quite good
Video Producer compact market; basic compacts from smartphone cameras but for
that offer a simpler set of controls the most part the quality will be
and Educational but still provide a large range of better in a traditional camera. The
Co-ordinator. Daniel features; superzoom compacts that reasoning for this is that the lenses
provide giant lenses allowing you to and sensors are usually much bigger
has a BA in Fine zoom right in on the action, these and better quality in a traditional
Arts and is currently cameras will often have manual camera. Some advantages are the
controls; premium compacts that ability to easily share your images,
studying a Masters have a higher than standard image apps for editing, and the fact that
in Cross Disciplinary quality and often a premium design; it is always in your pocket. There
and rangefinder styled compacts are some cameras available that
Art and Design at that are based on an older style have complete phone functionality
The College of Fine of film camera, these rangefinders including the ability to make calls.
sport a viewfinder, have manual
Arts (UNSW). controls and are often larger than Samsung Galaxy S4 Zoom - 4G
other compacts, and unlike a DSLR This hybrid camera and phone
or mirrorless, the lenses are fixed offers the Android experience
and cannot be interchanged. complete with optional photo apps,
a good size sensor and the ability
Olympus SP100 to download traditional apps such
The Olympus SP100 is a compact as Angry Birds . A great phone
camera that also fits into the that will provide superior images
superzoom category. It has a gigantic to the traditional smart phone.
50x optical zoom that in traditional
35mm terms is a 24-1200mm lens. Sony Smartphone Lens
To get a lens this size in a DSLR Attachment Camera - DSCQX10
the lens would be physically huge. This novel camera is actually just
The SP100 is a good all-rounder half of a camera that clips onto
with a range of features. It offers your smart phone. Control is all
some very easy to use automatic done through the phone with an
picture modes and manual controls. app via Bluetooth. The sensor and
lens are in the unit itself but all
Fujifilm Finepix X100s controls are operated and the photo
A high end compact, the Fujifilm is taken through the app. A handy
X100s is styled like a rangefinder of add-on to your smart phone. Q

40 Artists Back to Basics


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Profile

Art Chose Me
with Lyn Donald

Will I die famous? Probably not, but I will definitely die happy and fulfilled
art is my way of adding happiness to the world.

F ortunately, drawing and


painting is a learned skill
just like playing the violin
or driving a car. Lyn knew from
a young age that she wanted to
be an artist. It doesnt mean she
was a child protg, in fact far
from it, she just knew that when
she was creating art she was at
her happiest and felt fulfilled. She
doesnt believe it was a conscious
choice, as art chose her and from
an early age she spent every spare
minute drawing and painting. Lyn
says the love of creating art has
been her first love for as far back
as she can remember. Even though
its always been there and she
could never ignore its existence,
she still had to work at it.
Her love of colour and nature
began on the Sunshine Coast in
Queensland where she was born
and grew up. Lyn was lucky to grow
up on a farm with a supportive
Mother who always encouraged
her, and fostered her love of nature,
colour, drawing and painting. She
was also raised in a time when a
vivid imagination was a necessity, as
modern technological games were
far off into the future and games
and play depended on being able
to invent your own outdoors. What a
bonus that was for a budding artist.
Looking back, she feels the
Gill Graphite catalyst was when her Aunty bought
her first Painting at the age of four.

42 Artists Back to Basics


A typical four-year-olds drawing,
nothing special, but that one little
gift instantly inspired her and
stayed with her for life. She realised
she had the power within her to
give people pleasure, and from What!
then on spent every spare minute
drawing and painting, and every
bit of pocket money on kiddies
art supplies. She was a persistent
child, and although she knew her
art wasnt that good, she knew she
could find a way to make it better
and dreamt of being famous one
day. After all, she figured, Other
people can do it, so why cant I?
Her Aunty, an avid artist herself,
would spend hours showing her
small details like the intricacies of
stamens in a flower and how it all
fitted together. Perhaps this is why
shes drawn to paint flowers today,
and look for the small detail in
nature that people would normally
overlook. Things like how that small
stamen erupts from the folded
petals in the centre of the flower,
or how interesting the wrinkles
fall on worn, work weary hands.
As Lyn grew she became more
realistic, and realised she needed
a real job to make her way
in life, taking classes wherever
and whenever she could. Books
helped fill the gaps, but of course,
when youre teaching yourself,
you really have no idea of what
you dont know and often no
idea of how to gel it altogether.
This all changed for Lyn when
she met the person she is most
eternally grateful for, for unlocking
her potential, improving her visual A Prayerful Life Graphite
perception and teaching her so

Artists Back to Basics 43


Profile

of red earth, mulberry coloured


mountains, and sanguine bushes.
Even in this nothingness landscape
beautiful flowers bloom, if you are
patient, observant and inquisitive.
Shes fully aware how everything in
life is transitory, particularly beauty and
nature, and this drives her to capture the
essence and beauty before it fades and
is gone forever. Beauty is everywhere,
even in mundane things and its our
mission as artists to transform the
ordinary into extra ordinary.
Her work varies from bold, large,
colourful florals in a contemporary
realism style, to detailed tonally
shaded graphite drawings resembling
a painting in graphite. Shes inspired
by small details in nature that
people would normally overlook.
Lyn feels creating art is her life
purpose; its my way of adding
happiness to the world. This also
includes helping others release their
often smothered creativity, so they too
Joyce's Roses can enrich their lives producing good
art, and, for this reason, she loves to
teach - to show people that if one
has the desire, art can be a learned
much. Artist, teacher and author talent just like learning the violin or
Cindy Wider, the author of Paint driving a car, and is not limited to a
in your Pyjamas. Lyn was delighted few lucky souls bestowed with the
to learn that a solid foundation of rare gift of being born with artistic
high level drawing and painting ability, but available to anyone
skills could be gained through prepared to put in the practice,
Cindys comprehensive and easy to together with good teaching. She
understand course materials, guidance believes creativity is within all of us,
and mentoring. Lyn was tutored by just waiting for an opportune time to
Cindy for two years and found she was be unlocked. When it is we find an
quickly doing high quality art once she exciting and rewarding satisfaction,
was shown how to refine the natural an important part of the everyday
gifts we are all born with, and used in balance for life, body and soul.
a specific way to create art. Lyn says, Lyn has never forgotten those
Cindy has been a huge inspiration to early years of learning, and now
me as an artist and later an art teacher provides an accredited CPD Certified
and mentor.After a firm foundation, Complete Drawing and Painting
Lyn ventured into full time tertiary Certificate Course in a live classroom
study obtaining her Diploma of Visual on the Sunshine Coast or via the
Arts, exhibiting in group Internet with one-on-one learning.
exhibitions and solo exhibitions, The unique course is designed
winning various awards. for building a solid foundation
Her love of painting and drawing in drawing, and painting for the
intensified when living in remote absolute beginner or experienced
areas of the Pilbara and Uluru artist wishing to grow their current skill
working as a National Park Ranger. levels. The course is also ideal for
Every day was a changing feast students preparing for formal creative

44 Artists Back to Basics


Daisy Graphite Georgianna's Bouquet

art studies or higher education. also teaches mini workshops, open


The curriculum is a combination of days, fairs, weekend group workshops.
traditional methods and contemporary These days she devotes her
knowledge, presented in an easy to life to art. Lyn tells me My long
understand, well planned, fun and term ambition and desire is to
fascinating format. Lyn says, The be the best possible artist in my
objective of the course is for the life time, and to use my skills to
participant to develop into a more encourage and inspire others. Will I
confident, creative and independent die famous? Probably not, but I will
artist producing a high standard of definitely die happy and fulfilled.
original artwork upon completion. The
course is helping hundreds of people Contact details:
to draw and paint who never before Email: lyndonaldart@westnet.com.au
thought this was possible for them. Lyn Web: http://lyndonaldart.comQ

Magnolia Graphite Sunflower Judy Graphite

Artists Back to Basics 45


Back to Basics

oburn Abbeys
Fiery Passion
By Lyn Donald

This painted image captures Mother Nature at her perfect best.

Step One colour choice to create mood. I take the


Establish the composition: Its important opportunity of any features that make
to me that I catch and retain the my flower unique. I dont always include
viewers eye in my paintings with a all I see and often have to sacrifice
strong composition. I must consider the what I really see for the sake of a strong
importance of my focal point, my clear composition. This is also an opportunity
and concise light source, directional lines, to reform or change anything that Mother
depth, contrast and values, and later my Nature may have got less perfect.

t"UFMJFS*OUFSBDUJWF
"SUJTUT"DSZMJD
Burnt Sienna
Light Red
Oxide Red
Gold Orange
Vermillion
White
Cadmium Yellow
Mid Cadmium Yellow
Light Transparent Yellow
Diox Purple
Purple
Napthol Red Light
Touch of Cadmium Red
Medium, Burnt
Umber, Black
t4RVBSF4USFUDIFE
Canvas 80 x 80
t'MBU4RVBSFCSVTIFTBCPVU
2cm, 1cm and a round No. 4
Final t$MFBSHMB[FNFEJVN
Step one Step two (A)

*ESBXNZPVUMJOFPOUP"DPNQVUFS This technique has been passed down by


paper reasonably detailed showing our Great Masters. It also gives me time
shadow areas, some veins, creases, to establish a general description of the
folds, and turn backs. Once Im satisfied flower, petals, folds, stems, leaves and any
with the drawing, I use this to draw onto DIBOHFT*NBZMJLFUPNBLF"UUIJTTUBHF*
the canvas with a 2B graphite pencil. felt my composition was a little unbalanced
I replicate everything onto my canvas, on the right hand side so took the
even the veins, shadows et cetera. I opportunity to enlarge the small tucked-in
know these details will be covered up petal. I usually aim for about 1/3 dark to
on my first application of paint but it 2/3rds light or vice-versa. I also establish
helps me take them into consideration my background tonally at this stage, as
and feel each petal as I paint. I used a its too hard to butt the background up
simple grid method to transfer this line to the outside edges of my flower later.
drawing onto my canvas by dividing my
drawing and canvas into halves vertically Step Three
BOEIPSJ[POUBMMZ UIFOJOUPRVBSUFST Your first paint through: My first layer
of colour will establish large areas of
Step Two colour and replicate the direction of
Blocking in underpainting of values: Next I veins, creases, folds, and turn backs.
block in monochromatic tones of grey as Develop your colours, shades, and tones
an underpainting without too much detail, as close to actual and be guided by
referring to my grey scale photograph your monochromatic values already in
printed out earlier. This will help me build place, but remember this a blocking-in
shape, form, and depth. Think about what layer and not a finished layer, so will not
the petals are actually doing e.g. which show tiny detail. Because the colours are
petals would be throwing shadow onto transparent you will still see some of the
other petals and the shape of the shadow. monochromatic underpainting in places.
I work on a value scale of 1-10. Im very I want my flower colours to remain bright
aware that tone is the most important and vibrant and not pastelled, so I try
element in my painting, and colour and to avoid adding white, except in some
line alone cannot give me a good painting. pale yellows, so this makes getting a

Artists Back to Basics 47


Back to Basics

Step two (B) Step three

good solid coverage on this layer more layers of colour will add interest and
challenging. Subsequent layers will refine. variety. We are not just trying to duplicate
"MUIPVHINPTUPGNZNJYJOHJTEPOF what is already there but enhance
spontaneously on the palette as desire what we see in a painterly fashion.
takes me, I mix myself a puddle of yellow Second paint through: This time you will
orange (Orange yellowed with Cadmium start to get better coverage and can make
Yellow Medium), and a Red Orange BCFUUFSKVEHFNFOUPGDPMPVS'PMMPXUIF
(Orange mixed with Napthol Crimson). tonal values, shape and form of each
You can also either brush mix or make petal, and start to establish more detail
small areas of orange mixed with the (turn backs, creases et cetera). Once
other yellows for smaller touches. again take note and replicate individual
In the creamy light areas, add a touch of characteristics of petals, overlapping,
white to the various yellows (yellow mid, thrown shadows, direction of veins and
ZFMMPXMJHIU BOEUSBOTQBSFOUZFMMPX
"EE creases, otherwise your flower will look
a touch of Diox Purple to Burnt Sienna flat. Remember every petal (including
for the dark areas and or a touch of the veins) would eventually end at the
purple for an even darker mix for the very base where the stem joins the flower if
darkest areas in the crown. I try to avoid long enough. Because the colours are
black as much as possible in my flower transparent and semi-transparent you may
paintings as its too harsh and deadening, need to add another layer to some areas
and I darken my colours where possible if you have applied your paint too thin.
by using their complementary colour.
Dont be tempted to just go over whats Step Four
already there. Remember to seek out "EEJOHDPOUSBTU CBMBODF EFQUI4UBOE
every little nook and cranny on your back and view your painting overall. You
reference material and the live exhibit. will notice that the bright yellow/orange
These are the little things that will lift shape that appears in the photograph on
ZPVSQBJOUJOHUPUIFOFYUMFWFM"EEJOH the lower petal has now been removed.
layers of transparent colours over other I felt this area was claiming too much
status and distracting from the main
focal area of the warm bright yellow/
gold areas of the top half of the painting.
I felt however, it needed a reflection of
yellow glow into this area to lead the eye
around and tie the elements together,
TP*DIBOHFEJUUPBTPGUHMB[F/PXJT
the time to bring in any dry brushing or
HMB[JOHUPFOIBODFZPVSBSUXPSL QFSIBQT
some Napthol Crimson, Yellow/Orange
or Transparent Yellow onto your most
prominent petals. Enhance depth where
OFDFTTBSZCZHMB[JOHJOUPBOZBSFBTXJUI
Diox Purple. Being transparent its a great
HMB[JOHDPMPVSGPSLOPDLJOHVOEFSMZJOH
areas back. Transparent Yellow is a great
HMB[JOHDPMPVSGPSCSJOHJOHBSFBTGPSXBSE

Step Five
Background: In this case I opted not
to add leaves as I wanted the flower
to remain the powerful hero. You will
also notice that I chose to leave out the
previously planned hint of a bud. I felt
that this also took away from my main
focus rather than supporting it. I chose
complementaries, with mid to dark purples
against the orange, red/orange, yellow
orange areas of the top section, and
dark green and blue green against the
more red areas of the lower petals, taking Steps four, five and six
note of the darkest and the lightest areas
in my photo. I chose loose crisscross
brushstrokes, bringing in variation in tones, pull in a few storks in a few of the more
and keeping the darkest areas roughly open areas while the comma strokes
against the flower. I applied a layer of clear are still wet. I also like to pull in a few
HMB[FNFEJVNUPUIFCBDLHSPVOECFGPSF subtle green comma strokes to bounce
painting to extend drying time and sprayed the eye to and fro the background.
sparingly with water from time to time to (MB[FTPNFEBSLCSPXOHMB[F #VSOU
keep the area moist until I was happy. Sienna and touch of Diox Purple) around
the outer edge of the stamens to dull
Step Six back and push the outer edges slightly
Centre area: Paint in your centre area deeper and more round ball shaped.
with a very dark mix of Burnt Sienna and
Purple to mix a very dark brown. Dab Final Step
this into the very centre. Check that all Strengthen any areas or soften back
your petals continue down to this very others until you are happy with the
centre area and if not extend them. SFTVMU'JOBMMZ *WBSOJTIUIFDBOWBTXJUI
Paint in the stamens using a heavily a spirit based gloss varnish to enhance
loaded round brush and pull in the comma and add extra glow to the painting.
strokes. Here I have pulled in some yellow,
orange, red, Red God et cetera. In some Contact details:
places I have double loaded for more Email: lyndonaldart@westnet.
variation by loading say orange and then com.au
a tip load of yellow. With a fine brush, Web: http://lyndonaldart.com Q

Artists Back to Basics 49


Which Colours Should I Use
By Leonie Norton

A simple approach to colours

I work with a basic limited


palette of primary colours, three
warms and three cools.
COOL
Cadmium Lemon
Permanent Rose
Cerulean Blue

WARM The six colours will make a minimum of


Cadmium Yellow 450 colours. Painting a colour chart is an
Cadmium Red excellent way to learn about paint, water
French Ultramarine and brush control. If there is any secret
to using watercolour it is all about the
amount of water used. Colour charts
use a two colour mix to immediately
identify the colours required.
Other colours I use frequently are
Burnt Umber, Burnt Sienna and Sepia.
While it is possible to match almost any
colour, it is sometimes easier to use
a tube colour. I do not use premixed
greens from the tube as they tend to
be opaque and the colour can have
an unnatural appearance. The colours
will also require a touch of another
colour such as yellow, lemon or blue to
match correctly to a leaf (for example).
So using premixed greens is not
necessarily any quicker or easier.
Magenta colours and purples
are very hard to colour match with
two colours and tend to become
a muddy mix. I always use this
range of colours from tubes and my
favourites are Quinacridone Magenta
Permanent Magenta and Purple
Madder as well as Winsor Violet.
I like to use a brighter red on
occasion, which would be Scarlet Lake,
Winsor Red or Quinacridone Red and
Quinacridone Gold is a beautiful rich
colour. There are also other colours
you may want to experiment with,
but try to keep the mixes to two only.
Any more and the colours not only
become muddy but are difficult to
rematch in the correct proportions.
Colour match green chart When mixing colours always begin
with the lightest colour and gradually

50 Artists Back to Basics


Test paper with
colours recorded

add the darkest. If you were to begin to the painting. If painting a leaf
with the darkest colour you could end or petal hold them directly up to
up using half a tube of the lighter colour the colour you have matched.
to achieve the colour. My personal
choice of brand is Winsor and Newton If this is not possible, put your colour
but on occasion I have also used match on the edge of your test paper
other brands, but always come back and you can take that up to the subject
to the Winsor and Newton colours. you are matching. Always record
the colours you are using. If you are
Making your own colour chart experimenting with different colours, it
It is very important that you know what is imperative to record these as if you
the colours are in your collection of come back the following day and see
paints and what they look like. Every a test piece with multiple colours, it can
colour you have should be recorded, be difficult to remember what you used.
not only in its strongest form, but
also with two dilutions. Each dilution Consider the permanency and
is a separate colour and you will use lightfastness of the pigments in paints.
these for colour matching as well. These are displayed on tubes and
A good size brush to use is a Kolinsky further information is available on the
round sable No.5 and also No.3. All web. Translucency is also important
brushes should have a very fine point. and this is the choice of botanical
The larger the area you are going to artists, to allow the colours to glow
paint, the larger the brush. The smaller through the white paper. This glow is
the area the smaller and finer the brush. also achieved by applying translucent
washes of one colour over another.
Test the colours
To ensure the colours you are mixing Master colours
are correct, when you feel you are When mixing larger quantities of colour,
close, put the colour on a separate use a No.5 nylon or synthetic brush.
small piece of watercolour paper The idea of making a large amount
to test the colour before applying of one colour, which is usually the

Artists Back to Basics 51


washes ready to apply and use a
pale diluted green colour for leaves
(for example), brown for the stems
and the appropriate colour for the
various components. This allows you
to step back after applying the first
pale wash and to visualise how the
finished painting will look. It allows you
to look for colour harmony and tonal
and colour balance which can all be
adjusted with subsequent washes.
Each wash will have more
pigment and less water, otherwise
if you keep using the very diluted
wash it will take a long time to
achieve the necessary colour.
My paint consistency for the
remainder of washes is like a thin
Colour match cream. It definitely should not be
of Agave leaf thin enough to slosh around in the
palette. If an excessive amount of
water is used the paper will buckle.
predominant colour in the subject, Remember that each artist and
is that you do not have to keep tutor has their own methods and their
remixing the colour if you run out. own favourite colours. What I have
Having a master colour allows described is what works for me. So
you to alter the basic colour without do not be afraid to experiment, and
contaminating the master mix. If you if you test your colours first you will
want a lighter wash, or want to add not make any mistakes. If it does
some yellow or red to the mix, just not look right, it probably isnt.
take some of the master colour from Each colour has its own personality
the container and put this on your as various binders and preservatives
palette. This is where you adjust the are used. Some colours blend easier,
colour, not in the original master mix. some are staining and some can
Green is a very useful colour and granulate. Find your favourite
it can be used on many paintings selection of basic colours and
if you have made enough. Just work with them. You will find just
remember to cover the dish with cling how far you can push the colours
wrap so no dust can get in the paint. and how they can work for you.
Good luck and remember it is all about
Paint consistency Practice, Patience and Perseverance.
Always begin with a very pale wash
over all the areas in the painting. Use www.botanicalart.com.au
your premixed colours. I have my www.naturalhistory.com.au Q

Example of
first wash

52 Artists Back to Basics


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)D[WR (02) 4733 8583

Presented by
Palette
Profile

Its the
Interpretation that
makes it work
with Wayne Malkin

Starting to draw and paint early in life sets you on a journey


of discovery. Travel with Wayne as he finds his path.
Rapids in Dappled Sunlight

Turbulence Eucalypt

M any people I speak to tell


me they really enjoy painting
but dont get the time to
do it. My answer is, I paint (almost
every day) and sometimes dont
get the time to do other things.
As a young man I had the need
to draw, and I enjoyed art at
school. When I first discovered the
impressionist movement, I found that
the use of colour and atmosphere
was where my interests really lay.
I progressed through watercolour,
finally finding the versatility of oil
as my perfect medium. My subject
matter apart from portraiture is
landscape/seascape but not just
the subject the atmosphere that
the subject generates. By that I
mean the effect of light and how it
makes the scene come alive. As
a young painter I complained to
an older experienced artist that I
seemed to spend hours searching
for the perfect scene. His answer The Steps
was, it doesnt exist. Subjects are
Profile

Lighthouse

The Inlet, Late Afternoon Early Morning Snapper Rocks

everywhere, around every corner


and in every direction. It is the
interpretation that makes the subject
work. In other words, my advice is to
pick out and emphasise composition,
colour and light effects to create
subject matter from everyday places.
All artists are affected by natural
beauty but are also influenced by
other artists. It is why painting styles
can be grouped into chronological
periods. The impressionists
were my first influence but since
then the compositions of Gustav
Klimt, the colour use of Joaqun
Sorolla y Bastida, the brushwork
of Jeremy Lipking and the palette
knife techniques of Fred McCubbin
have all played a part along with
many other artists. Although I
love a wide variety of styles, if I
were asked for a favourite artist I
would find it impossible to choose.
Wherever possible I go to see the
The Glade blockbuster exhibitions, and visit
the big art galleries. The Musee

56 Artists Back to Basics


Afternoon Colour

DOrsay in Paris is a particular experience, but exploring the art


favourite. Seeing paintings in world by the internet can have
the flesh is an enlightening wonderful consequences. Q

Out of the shade Rapids in Dappled Sunlight

Artists Back to Basics 57


Back to Basics

Where the Waters Flow


By Wayne Malkin

I choose an image with a personal appeal. In this case I took a photo a


few years ago on a visit to the South Island,
New Zealand. I like the way the water twists and swerves around the rocks.

Step one
I choose an image with a personal
appeal. In this case I took a photo
a few years ago on a visit to the
South Island, New Zealand. I
like the way the water twists and
swerves around the rocks. I start
with a mixture of Raw Umber and
Prussian Blue slightly thinned with
Art Spectrum No.1 Medium using
a large, flat #8 Rosemary & Co
Ivory brush. At this stage, Im only
interested in breaking down the
subject into darks and lights. Im

t0JMT"SU4QFDUSVN
Raw Umber
Prussian Blue
Art Spectrum No.1 Medium
Viridian
Permanent Mauve
Archival Classic Medium
Ultramarine Blue
Burnt Sienna
Raw Sienna
Titanium White
Cobalt Blue
t#SVTIFT
#4 flat Rosemary & Co Ivory
brush.
#8 flat Rosemary &
Co Ivory brush.
Final step

58 Artists Back to Basics


Step one

Step one Step two

making sure that the composition Step four


flows, and even at this stage Continue to define more detail
Im making subtle changes to the using a #4 flat brush. I also use
scene. I hold the brush from the rags to wipe out any alterations
very end and stand as far away I think will help the composition.
from the work as possible. Apart Using a mixture of Ultramarine
from planning the work in my Blue and Umber I mark in the
head, I have taken 4 minutes. darker areas of rocks and
continue to develop the water.
Step two
I have painted the undercolour for the Step five
water with a mixture of Prussian Blue, Im now working over dry paint after
a touch of Viridian and Raw Umber. leaving the paint to dry for 24 hours.
I use a mixture of Burnt Sienna, Raw
Step three Sienna and Viridian to continue to
I introduce a new layer of dark, define the rocks. I then mark the
picking out a little more detail, still rough areas of water with a Viridian
with a number 8 brush. A mixture of and Ultramarine Blue mix. It is only
Art Spectrum Permanent Mauve and now that I squeeze some Titanium
Raw Umber. I have now changed the White onto my palette and after
mixing medium to Archival Classic lightening the dark water colour with
Medium which is slightly thicker. a touch of white scumbling in the

Artists Back to Basics 59


Back to Basics

Step three Step four Step five

lighter areas of water. TIP: Keep the tone of the rest of the water. It
lightest colours still relatively dark would be easy to paint the rest
the highlights will be applied later. of the water too light but that
t 1BJOU POMZ JO EBZMJHIU PS would mean very little contrast
FYUFOE ZPVS QBJOUJOH UJNF Final step between it and the sunlit spots.
CZ CVZJOH B AGVMM TQFDUSVN Continue to strengthen shapes, Now if the final work is compared
DSBGU MJHIU XIJDI EPFTOU building up the water using Cobalt to the source photo its clear that
DIBOHF UIF MPPL PG DPMPVST Blue mixed with Ultramarine Blue and I have changed the atmosphere
t 1BJOU GSFFMZ XJUI MBSHF CSVTIFT white as a sky reflection element. conditions to enhance the scene
BOE QBJOU POMZ CSPBE BSFBT Its at this point I place a highlight and changed the rock features to
GJSTU MFBWJOH IJHIMJHIUT (sunlit spots on the water). allow for a stronger composition.
BOE EFUBJM VOUJM MBUFS This gives me the full spectrum I have also altered perspective a
of tones and double checks the little to give more of a 3D effect. Q
t 4UBSU XJUI TNBMM QBJOUJOHT
FH  Y DN
QBJOUFEXJUI
MBSHF CSVTIFT VOUJM DPOGJEFODF
JODSFBTFT 5IJT BMTP TBWFT
NPOFZ PO NBUFSJBMT
t * USZ BOE XPSL JO UIF SFMBUJPOTIJQ
PG TIBQFT BOE EBSLTMJHIUToB
IJHI QSJPSJUZ 0JM QBJOU IBTUIF
XPOEFSGVM BCJMJUZ UP QBJOUPWFS
JUTFMG BOE HJWFT UIF BCJMJUZUP
DIBOHF XIBU IBT HPOFCFGPSF
t #Z UIF UJNF * HFU UP UIF
NBSL NZ SFMJBODF PO UIFSFBM
MJGF TVCKFDU IBT EJNJOJTIFE5IF
QBJOUJOH JT DPOTUBOUMZ BEKVTUFE
BOE DIBOHFE VOUJM * SFBDIB Step five - close up
QPJOU XIFSF * BN IBQQZ

60 Artists Back to Basics


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Pe n c i l s D o w n

In the Frame- part 2


by Brett A. Jones

Fig 1: After a decade or so this is what inevitably Multi Tasking at all. Everything in this world has got
grows on the inside of even a professionally Another thing the matte is designed a percentage of water and bacteria
framed fine art original, not to mention the vapours to do is maintain a space between in it by default. Paper most certainly
and wax bloom emanating from ALL art mediums the drawing and the glass. This is has. In a properly framed drawing
which cast a shadow of the artwork on the inside absolutely essential to avoid mould and the only thing in there with your piece
of the glass. Its all but invisible when hanging on fungus appearing (and growing) on both of paper between the glass and the
the wall and is very hard to get a good photo of, the paper and the inside of the glass core-board backing is the matte and
but the visual aesthetic difference once youve in very short order. Even though you some air (apart from all the moisture
disassembled, cleaned, and re-assembled is truly would think that once safely framed, your and bacteria of course). Matte very
astonishing. Let alone the fact you have stopped drawing is in its own clean, moisture effectively acts as a humidity equaliser
the developing ecosystem dead in its tracks. free world, this is actually not the case as the paper gives off and takes up
its moisture content as time passes.
For an instant demonstration of the
worst case scenario you have only
to let bright, direct sunlight hit your
framed drawing for a few minutes.
Drops of condensation quickly form
under the glass once the temperature
in there starts to rise. Once the
work is moved back into the lower
temperature of the shade, the drops
of water are slowly re-absorbed by
the matte board. Also by the paper
and wooden moulding as more time
passes and the moisture content
becomes equal throughout the various
materials again, but its the matte that
saves any damage in the short term.
Without the gap between artwork and
glass provided by the matte/s any and
all condensation and micro-organisms
just turn into ever growing mould spots
and/or discolouration on the paper
surface and the glass in no time at all.
Its certainly never a sterile vacuum in
there even when professionally framed.
While it looks nice and clean, even with
the proper space between paper and
glass a rainforest starts to grow, but
in ten or fifteen years instead of a few
Fig 1 short weeks with no space and the art
touching the glass (figures 1 & 2).

62 Artists Back to Basics


Fig 2 Fig 3

Protective Aesthetics combination lock (figures 6 & 7). Take your framers input, he/she sees this
Quite apart from all this essential your time and always carefully consider stuff every day. Everyone has different
hard work the matte is doing protecting
your art is its aesthetic side. It comes
in a huge range of colours, textures, Fig 2: This is a very small section inside the show the extremely subtle tints available.
and finishes and can be either white glass near the edge of the frame (where the A very powerful creative tool for lending
or black cored (figure 3). As with the matte board is in contact with the glass). Very an appropriate subtle colour caste to a
frame moulding itself, with monochrome much invisible to the naked eye until the framed monotone composition. Also a great feature
work in graphite, charcoal, pen and work is disassembled for a good cleaning when you consider that the various drawing
ink, etc, you have to be careful to avoid and you hold the glass up to the light. papers are all different shades of white.
bright colours which will only make a
monochrome drawing look washed Fig 3: A very small part of Alans stock of Fig 5: Same goes for the darker neutral
out, insipid and distant. In fact much various matte board offcuts showing some tones. These all just look plain old grey
more so with the matte as there is of the wide range of colours available. until you directly compare. Amazing
relatively much larger area covered by difference between right and wrong
matte than the thin moulding. There Fig 4: These mattes all look stark white choice when trying to present different
is a large-ish selection of mattes at the until you lay them alongside each other to subjects and compositions in graphite.
more suitably very subtle end of the
colour/tone spectrum, with a selection
of very subtly tinted warm and cool
greys and whites to choose from, so
subtle they just all look grey or white
until you compare them against each
other (figures 4 & 5). It can be a
great tool for suggesting to the viewer
what colour the subject matter is,
for example if the (black and white)
drawing is of a bowl of cherries you
could use a grey matte with a warm,
slightly reddish tinge to it, etc. This
principle also applies to the colour of
the moulding itself, subtlety is very much
the key with monochrome artwork.
Light, dark, cool, or warm moulding
and matte choices always need to
compliment each other as well as the
art. With some artwork the perfect
moulding/matte combination becomes
quickly obvious, and sometimes its Fig 4 Fig 5
like trying to randomly guess a rusty

Artists Back to Basics 63


Pe n c i l s D o w n

perceptions though and its your art


so can only be your call in the end.

So Many Choices
Pastels are a different sack of
pinecones altogether, and a lot more fun
to frame when it comes to picking matte
surrounds. As with the frame moulding,
there is a lot more room to move as far
as colour goes as well as the number
of layers. While monotone drawings
tend to look their best (but not always)
with one layer of matte, pastels usually
look better with two or even three layers
(figures 8 & 9), using colours out of the
composition itself (almost always less
bright than the art though) to make the
whole thing look much better as a whole
than the unframed pastel ever could
on its own. I think the artists choice of
Fig 6
framing is so important I wouldnt even
consider selling an unframed original
(figures 10 & 11). Decent framers will
always use what is called a pastel trap
when framing pastels. This is a hidden
layer of matte between the paper and
the matte board/s with a much larger
window cut in it, especially on the
bottom edge, creating a hidden recess
for any errant pastel dust to fall down
into as time goes by instead of building
up against the glass along the bottom.
This means you can potentially have up
to four layers of matte in a framed pastel
which can sometimes call for a deeper
frame moulding just to accommodate it
all. The inner visible edges of the matte
board are always cut very precisely on
a 45 degree bevel. This most common
method produces a crisp clean white
line between the pastel (or drawing) and
the matte. A white border might not
Fig 7 suit the subject or overall effect you are
after so the bevel can also be cut 45
degrees the other way which hides it.
This is called negative or reverse bevel.
Fig 6: This pastel Broken View was ripped their pocket off getting their You can also add one or several v-cuts
framed like this with moulding picking up wallet out to buy it. Clothes might to the surface of the matte (figure 12),
on the darker tones and textures and the very well maketh the man but frames to create thin white lines around the
reverse bevel cut matte picking up on most definitely maketh the art. work, some framers can even cut very
the lighter tones. It was like this for a few fancy corners and effects into matte with
years with no interest shown from buyers. Fig 8: Three layers of reverse bevel cut special computer controlled machines,
matte on a large pastel. You can see but this is more suitable for things like
Fig 7: All I did was change the matte theres a pastel trap matte layer as well wedding and baby photographs, it tends
colour to a much darker grey, the from the relative width of the shadow cast to look a bit overblown and pointless on
very next person that saw it almost on the pastel by the inner purple matte. a fine art original. The width of matte

64 Artists Back to Basics


Fig 9

Fig 8

is generally governed by the size of the lightly frosted glass. Its also more
work being framed, the width of the expensive than normal glass and gives
moulding chosen and the number of a lot more purchase for various bugs
matte layers used but no matter how to lay their eggs and other material to
small the work the minimum width for form and prosper on. UV (Ultraviolet)
matte between art and frame is about proof glass is also available as is a
40mm, any less runs the risk of rippling product called ultra-clear glass which
forming in the actual matte board itself. is all but invisible to human eyes. These
last two can be fairly (cough, choke)
Glass cost-prohibitive. If youre worried about
There are a few kinds of glass glass breaking there is also acrylic Fig 9: A different look altogether with
available when framing. The most (Perspex) and polycarbonate options two positive (visible) bevel cut layers
common choices are reflective and available, but its also more expensive of matte with two neat white lines
non-reflective. Some like to use non- than good old clear framing glass and separating the various colours.
reflective but I think its a mistake for is easily and irredeemably scratched
drawings, its really only suitable for (made worse by being electrostatic- i.e. Fig 10: Nice freehand pastel on a nice
photos and certificates/memorabilia, dust magnet) and tends to yellow with bit of colourfix but the full impact is never
etc. Its made non-reflective by lightly age. Oh, and it also gives off vapours realised until the perfect frame is added.
sandblasting the surface. This really over time which could only be bad
detracts from original artwork as it stops news for the artwork it is meant to be Fig 11: Complete freehand original fine
you from seeing the finest details. It protecting. The pigments used in all art piece. Without the right frame its
should more accurately be called very good quality pastels and coloured just a drawing with daggy edges.

Fig 10 Fig 11

Artists Back to Basics 65


Pe n c i l s D o w n

condition is what you want but if you


find a good suitable frame the size and
rectangular proportion you want with a
few nicks and scratches you can always
carefully disassemble it, clean and lightly
sand the moulding and spray paint it,
being extremely careful not to stretch/
stress the corners while handing it
without its glass, especially the thinner
mouldings. Just paint the front and
sides of the frame, you dont want to
get paint in the recess on the back as
aerosol spray paint is generally acidic.
It might be fine as it is and just require
cleaning and wiping over with a bit of
lemon oil or furniture polish to bring it up
like new or even add to existing patina
by intentionally distressing it further (only
suitable for certain artworks). Most
framers are happy to work in with you
Fig 12 and supply you with things like suitable
matte board/s, new acid free core-board
pencils are lightfast already, graphite backing, brown acid free framing tape
Fig 12: One neutral coloured layer of positive bevel and charcoal never change so in my and things like D rings and sash cord
cut matte including three v-cuts and the thin/plain opinion normal glass is definitely the one if you do feel like having a go at a bit of
frame moulding most suitable for works in graphite. to go with for original drawings, with the hunter/gathering round the op shops.
added benefit of allowing more baked
Fig 13: My fitty dollar Chinese air stapler in action. beans and dog bones to be purchased Buy a Gun
Nowhere near as good as a professional quality once the framing bill has been paid. Your framer can put the special
one but with a bit of fiddling and gentle surgery staples in for you to hold the backboard
with a four inch grinder its more than adequate Have a Go in the frame, or if you find yourself
for proficiently re-assembling framed artworks. While on the subject of the bill, dealing with frames fairly regularly and
Being able to properly open and close framing you really should go right out of your youve got access to a compressor,
when you need to is a mighty boon in any way to always frame your serious work buy your own pneumatic staple gun,
serious art studio. Note identifying backplate in properly and a dedicated framing the good industry standard guns are
middle of coreboard, another essential element shop will always provide the best result quite expensive (many hundreds of
of any exhibition grade framed fine art original. possible but theres nothing stopping dollars) but you can buy exact (to look
you minimising the ongoing costs by at anyway) Chinese versions of them
Fig 14: Studio framing tools. Tape in red finding second hand frames from dump off ebay for fifty bucks (to suit a 12mm
dispenser isnt sticky tape but rather very recycling shops, garage sales, Vinnies, wide- 9mm deep staple). It really is a
specifically designed hanging tape for curtain Lifeline etc and re-utilising them yourself. case of getting what you pay for with
hanging the artwork off the top edge of the matte. For an extremely reasonable price you air staplers though, I went with the
The big rolls of brown tape are non-acidic archival get frame, glass, backing board, cord, $50 job and found I had to completely
framing tape for sealing the back of the frame. and sometimes even a useable matte re-acquaint myself with what I could
The black bulb with blue nozzle is a camera lens board. Only buy examples obviously expect it to do after getting used to
puffer, essential kit for getting every last speck of originating from actual framing shops Alans professional quality stapler he had
dust out as you re-assemble, its very bad ju-ju (you can always tell by the perfect lent me for awhile, two quite different
to be blowing on it with your mouth, your breath corners, brown framing tape sealing the animals. Alans was not only much more
being chock full of greeblies and all, unless you back board and the identifying sticker precise in its operation but also much
WANT to grow a rainforest in there. I reckon the on the back from the framing business more consistent once it was set despite
hardest trick of all is getting the framed artwork it came from. There is a humungous the huge amount of work it had done.
back together with no specks of dust or debris difference between professional framing I had to grind a good few millimetres
inside. Anyone reading this thats ever tried is and mass produced dross which is off the Chinese gun to get the slot the
already nodding their head in agreement Im generally quite lacking in any kind of staples come out of low enough to work
sure. Not unusual to have a dozen or more goes quality and finish, and stand a very as a framing gun at all (theyre sold as
at getting it pristine enough to even think about good chance of being made out of furniture upholstery guns) but once I had
picking up the staple gun and brown tape. non-archival materials. Obviously mint done that and got used to its variable

66 Artists Back to Basics


habits Im not at all sorry I bought it, it what you want to do and then gives
does a great job for what I use it for. The good advice about how to achieve
staple guns I am talking about arent this result, without bulldozing you into
for stapling the actual frame mouldings doing it a way you didnt really want
together, they are solely for holding the to. Listen carefully when professional
core-board backing board in against advice is offered though, framers do
the frame nice and firm (figure 13). it for a living day in and day out and
Having the ability to professionally thoroughly understand the finer points of
disassemble and reassemble an aesthetic balance between artwork and
existing framed original is a far more frame. Theres so much more I could
useful skill set for a practicing artist than say about frames and framing from an
actually building picture frames, which artists point of view but this will have
as Ive already said is really something to do for now, Ive run out of roo...... Q
much better left to the pros, if for no
other reason than the time, expense,
storage, space, and commitment it Fig 13
takes to get good enough at it for it
to be of any practical use to you, like
any craft. If youre an artist you should
really be doing your art, it can and
should be taking up the vast majority
of your available time anyway. They
say you should completely rejuvenate
framed originals every 10-15 years but
Ive been around this stuff long enough
now to know that in practice it can be
much sooner than that depending on
a wide range of factors so if cleaning
(inside and out) and maintaining your
existing framed fine art originals is as
important to you as it should be, having
enough effective framing kit to allow you
to professionally remove and replace
work in frames as part of your basic
studio set up is not something youll Fig 14
ever find cause to regret (figure 14).

Behind Every Artist.........


While theres no doubt exhibition
grade framing can be expensive
most good professional framers are
sympathetic to the occupationally
permanently embedded financial plight
of the vast majority of practicing fine
artists and are understanding of the
need to save as much money when
framing as possible. Like everything
else about the artistic journey it all
comes down to available time and how
you choose to spend it. Any time and
effort you spent saving money having
a hand in the framing could have been
spent in your studio. A good framer
in a well equipped framing shop is a
beautiful thing. Its an art in itself that
takes many years to master. The best
kind of framer is one that listens to

Artists Back to Basics 67


Galler y

Art Gallery of
Ballarat
The fabulous Art Gallery of Ballarat, Victoria, was founded in 1884 by a
group of local citizens passionate about the need for an art gallery to
improve the culture of Ballarat, a rough, working
city during the goldfields era.

he wealth generated by gold young colony. This was the decade


and a burgeoning agricultural when Tom Roberts, Fred McCubbin
hinterland, coupled with and Louis Abrahams founded what
a general sense of optimism that would in time be perceived as
permeated the colony of Victoria during Australias first national school of
the 1880s were the main factors behind painting - the Heidelberg School.
the timing of the Gallerys founding. Within five years, they had not only
This boom-time ethos caused started building up a great collection
the arts to flourish throughout the of art, but had erected a purpose-
built art gallery on a site in the centre
of Ballarat. Ballarat was not the only
gallery to have been founded in regional
Victoria in the late nineteenth century,
but it was one of a select few that
did not fall into a state of torpor after
the first generation of supporters and
organisers passed away around the
time of the outbreak of the Great War.
The Gallerys collection continued
to grow, through purchases, gifts and
bequests, and it is now undoubtedly
the finest collection of Australian art
outside the state galleries in the capital
cities. It is an exceptional collection,
built up lovingly, intelligently and often
with inspiration over 130 years.
The Art Gallery of Ballarat maintains
the specialty established by its founders
as a fine art gallery, the strengths of
the collection are paintings and works
on papers, with an excellent selection
of sculpture, furniture and decorative
arts. The permanent display features
works by major artists from all periods
of Australian art including von Guerard
and Chevalier, Tom Roberts, Arthur

68 Artists Back to Basics


Streeton, Fred McCubbin, Rupert Bunny, with drawing and other classes, artist
Phillips Fox, Russell Drysdale, William talks and conversations, musical
Dobell, John Brack, Charles Blackman, concerts and other performances.
Brett Whiteley and many more.
The Gallery also has a focus on Art Gallery of Ballarat
showing how Ballarat evolved, 40 Lydiard St North,
from early representations of Indigenous Ballarat, Vic, 3350
people in the area, and its evolution Web: artgalleryofballarat.com.au Q
from rough working class town to
sophisticated modern city. Another
collecting focus is the story of the
Eureka Stockade, and the Gallery
regularly shows works which both
record the events of December 1854,
and their continuing place in the
history of Australian democracy.
Actively supported by the Ballarat
community, as well as being a major
tourism drawcard, the Gallery draws
many thousands of visitors to the
city each year, and its Membership
scheme is one of the largest
social organisations in Ballarat.
The Gallery has a very busy
education program, servicing local,
regional and visiting schools, and also
offers other learning opportunities,

Artists Back to Basics 69


Te a c h e r s Pe t

Making a good
impression
With artist Derek. L. Newton A.M.S.A

Watercolours have a life of


their own, so let them flow
Keep a wooden ruler next to your
easel to rap yourself over the
knuckles with, if you have any
thoughts about overworking an
impressionistic painting. Its whole
appeal is in its freshness. Here
I have used this impressionistic
watercolour painting Dustbins by
English artist Judi Whitton. It really
speaks for itself - in fact, it shouts,
leave me alone, let me go my own
way! and no attempt has been
made by Judi to control the paint as
it moves and fuses together, giving
it a wonderful loose freshness.
Painted on damp paper then left to
find its own way, a dull uninteresting
subject has been transformed into a
lively interesting work that grabs your
attention. A very simple composition
that most of us would not take a
second look at, is now a delightful
statement and very easy on the eye.

So leave well alone


Just hang on to that thought,
Leave me alone Leave me
alone and enjoy it for what it is,
a spontaneous fusion of colour, a
fresh honest statement that lets the
eye fill in the detail. Indeed there
was a group of artists from the last
century, collectively known as the
impressionists, who for at least some

70 Artists Back to Basics


of their working life, produced work Down the road a-ways
very successfully following similar Look at this impressionistic
principals and still today, many artists watercolour, all very slap dash
work using this method. We featured and created by dipping your
artist Catherine Kelleys studio brush into two or three colours
in a My Space article in Creative and then just dabbing the brush
Artist Magazine recently, and here onto pre- wetted paper and letting
I have borrowed one of Catherines the colours mix, as they will,
impressionistic paintings. The making a good impression.
Labrador below is an example of a
talented artist using this approach. Again below, two old English
She has first covered the watercolour cottages in Berkeley, again by Judi
paper with a wash of two or three Whitton, all very loose but at the
colours before loosely drawing or same time hold together very well
painting the Labrador, and yes, you as an impression, an interpretation
could go on with endless detail, but only possible through an artistic
ask yourself what would this achieve? eye. You could stand in the same
Your eyes fill in the detail anyway, spot as Judi did while painting
and you wont get any more points and take as many photos as you
with endless detail; better to leave it like, but each would seem a little
fresh and alive, as an Impressionist. boring in comparison. Thats the
beauty of impressionistic painting,
Watercolour Labrador by almost child-like in its application,
Catherine Kelley yet fresh and alive and well worth
Catherine could have continued a try. Now dont forget that ruler!
and spent hours with endless detail
trying to paint the dogs coat and Cottage on the Hill, Berkeley
features as a photo likeness, but In summary, making a good
what would this achieve? Just impression let the watercolour feel
by using a loose three-colour its own way across your paper.
background of mauve, red and 90% of watercolour paintings end
orange and later perhaps still using up overworked. Help the paint flow
the same background suggested by tilting your painting if required,
the dogs face, collar and form, but keep any extra brush work to a
resulting in a fresh lively painting, minimum. They may not all work, but
needing nothing else but a frame. its fun and when they do work - and

Artists Back to Basics 71


Te a c h e r s Pe t

you have made a good impression


- you will be very pleased you

Left it alone

Art clubs and societies


Just another day Watercolours W. A.
In this section, Im looking back to
a recent monthly meeting of the
Watercolour Society of Western
Australia. Just a normal monthly
meeting, however, after the
formalities we are often asked to
vote on any new application we
have received for membership.
Artists are requested to submit five
works and obtain a three quarters
majority vote to be elected. Quite
an effort to have five, well presented
and framed works displayed, to
be judged by secret ballot. I know
when I first joined some years
ago, I was hanging out for the
phone call with news of my results.
Below, Sailing close to the wind,
(my title) was one of five submitted
by artist Verena Marmion. How do
you think she went? Do you think
she was accepted into the society
or not? I will tell you at the end of
this article. It also fits in well with
my main article Making a good
Impression. Its loose, lively and
energetic, and very impressionistic,
I think you can guess how I voted!

Sailing close to the wind


Its quite a challenge submitting work
for jury selection like this, but also
quite an endorsement of your work
if youre admitted. On this day, we
had one elected artist, Verena, and
another one rejected but encouraged
to re-submit at a later date.

The Show and Tell


If youre a member of an art group or
society, you will probably have seen,
or been a contributor to, a show
and tell where members bring
along their artwork and describe
their painting and the location, or the
circumstances it was painted under

72 Artists Back to Basics


i.e studio, plein air etc, and invite
other member comments. Sounds
a bit scary, I know, especially with
my group the Watercolour Society of
Western Australia, with so many very
good artists looking at your work.

Here, Lucy Papalia is going through


this months contributions to show
and tell and asking the artist about
the painting. Most are happy to
describe the motivation and reason
they found to make the painting.
The two shown here were not
selected, they just happened to
be near where I was sitting with
my Ipad and I grabbed a photo.
The rest were just as good and
representative of the club.

Artist Sandy Robertson.


Indian Ocean
This is not perhaps impressionistic
but still very loose and alive.
Your waiting for the waves
to crash and dissipate while
others waves form behind.

Artist Penny Madison -


Henderson boat yard

High and Dry


Penny is one of our leading
watercolour members and an artist
I have featured in sister magazine
Creative Artist. When I visited her
studio in the Perth hills she painted
this ageing boat high and dry in one
of the boat yards at Henderson just
south of Fremantle. You need to
be an experienced artist to attempt
this as a composition, with its rusty
red hull taking up almost half of the
paper; yet as a composition it works
very well and the naval boat in the
background helps to set the scene.
Show and tell is a good way to test
the waters and get a little feeling
from the other members about your
work, and whether you should pay
for framing or exhibition fees.
So a little more for you to think about
on your own artistic journey. I hope

Artists Back to Basics 73


Te a c h e r s Pe t

which I painted many years ago while


attending an art weekend with a
professional artist. We were all told to
go outside and paint something but
be back in fifteen minutes. No time
to fuss and fiddle, Ive drawn and
painted this old cottage many times
since with all the time in the world,
but could not say any were better
than this fifteen minute impression!

Please think about that ruler


in your head when you are out
painting, and everytime you
think, Ill just fiddle with that
you enjoyed the work of some of our rap yourself over the knuckles,
WA watercolourists, and the workings go for a walk or call it a day.
of an Art Society. I will the finish this
article with one of my own loose Regards to all,
impressionistic watercolour paintings, Derek Q

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