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Wei

Feng Jonathan Yeo s3548537

Assessment Task 2 Lesson Sequence Chemistry Method


Unit Summary/Overview
Lesson Learning Success Criteria Teaching & Learning Assessment Resources Literacy/PoLT
Objective Activities Tasks

1 Introduction Able to differentiate Make a table on the board Table of Prior Paper 1.1 Builds positive
to triglycerides, with headings: Carbohydrates, Knowledge relationships through
White board
Triglycerides, carbohydrates, and Fats & Oils, and Protein. Get knowing and valuing
Concept map
Carbohydrates proteins based on their students to fill in the table. Projector each student.
and Proteins structure and
Watch 3-minute video giving a Youtube Video: 1.2 Promotes a culture
composing elements.
brief history of the founding of https://www.yo of value and respect for
Students can give real the importance of lipids, utube.com/watc individuals and their
life examples of carbohydrates and proteins. h?v=H8WJ2KENl communities.
carbohydrates , proteins K0
Small lecture going over the 2.1 Encourages and
and triglycerides.
structural components of supports students to
Students know the carbohydrates, triglycerides, take responsibility for
common structural and proteins. their learning.
components of
Students to make a concept 3.2 Uses a range of
carbohydrates,
map with a partner about strategies that support
triglycerides and
what they know regarding the different ways of
proteins.
triglycerides (fats and oils), thinking and learning.
carbohydrates and proteins.
3.3 Builds on students
Students then contribute to a prior experiences,
concept map on the board knowledge and skills.
regarding what their

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partnership came up with. 4.1 Plans sequences to


Break down any promote sustained
misconceptions students learning that builds over
might have. time and emphasises
connections between
ideas.

5.2 Ensures that


students receive
frequent constructive
feedback that supports
further learning.

Literacy: Students
formulate definitions
and links to concepts
through mind maps and
discussion.

2 Carbohydrates Can make a generalised Revise carbohydrates from Observe Paper 2.1 Encourages and
formula for the number previous lesson students and ask supports students to
White board
of C, H, O atoms in a a number of take responsibility for
Watch 3-minute video talking
carbohydrate molecule. them for the Projector their learning.
about carbohydrates.
formula for
Understand the process Youtube Video: 3.2 Uses a range of
Have a few models of various carbohydrates.
and mechanisms of https://youtu.be strategies that support
carbohydrates. Then get them
condensation Get students to /H8WJ2KENlK0? the different ways of
to find a rule for the
polymerisation. talk through t=214 thinking and learning.
composition of carbon,
condensation
Know how to form hydrogen and oxygen in 3.3 Builds on students
reactions.
disaccharides from carbohydrates. prior experiences,

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monosaccharides, and of Revise condensation reactions Get students to knowledge and skills.
complex carbohydrates. on the board by getting talk through
4.1 Plans sequences to
students to talk through the their answers for
Able to explain the promote sustained
mechanism. the condensation
process by which excess learning that builds over
reactions
glucose is stored in the Then have examples on the time and emphasises
body as glycogen. board of monosaccharides Carbohydrate connections between
that they are to show the concept map ideas.
Able to differentiate
result of condensation
glucose, sucrose, 5.1 Designs assessment
reactions occurring between.
fructose and artificial practices that reflect the

sweeteners through Small lecture on how glucose full range of learning
structure and energy is stored as glycogen and the program objectives.
content. different monosaccharides,
Literacy: Students
disaccharides and
formulate definitions
polysaccharides.
and links to concepts
Construct a concept map for through mind maps and
carbohydrates linking discussion.
concepts covered in this

lesson.

3 Triglycerides Students can recognize Watch 3-minute video Spectrum Paper 2.1 Encourages and
the common structural explaining fats & oils. supports students to
Observe White board
feature of triglycerides. take responsibility for
Lecture explaining the fatty students in pairs,
Projector their learning.
Able to differentiate acid and glycerol components listen to their
between fats and oils of triglycerides. answers and Youtube Video: 3.2 Uses a range of
based on their structure explanations https://youtu.be strategies that support
Demonstrate using physical
and resulting about the /H8WJ2KENlK0? the different ways of
molecular models of fatty
intermolecular forces. saturation of t=424 thinking and learning.
acids, the difference between

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Can identify types of fats and oils. Explain fats. 3.3 Builds on students
fats: saturated, mono- saturation. prior experiences,
Examples given
unsaturated, and knowledge and skills.
Make a spectrum on the board, for the different
polyunsaturated.
spectrum goes from increases saturated fats 4.1 Plans sequences to
Students should be melting point to decreases and fatty acids. promote sustained
capable of explaining the melting point, then get learning that builds over
Triglyceride
different properties of students to add to the time and emphasises
Concept Map
triglycerides (eg. spectrum (ie. What affects connections between
melting point) based on melting point, dispersion ideas.
structure. forces, etc).
4.2 Promotes
Knowledgeable about Students give examples real substantive discussion
the structural life saturated, unsaturated and of ideas.
differences between polyunsaturated fats.
4.6 Uses strategies to
omega-3 and omega-6
Students identify the saturated develop investigating
fatty acids.
state of various examples on a and problem solving
Can distinguish between sheet in pairs. They then skills.
essential and non- report their answers to the
Literacy: Students
essential fatty acids. class.
articulate and discuss
Lecture talking about omega- the different between
3, omega-6, non-essential, and the states and structures
essential fatty acids. of triglycerides.

Get students to provide Literacy: Students


examples of sources of these formulate definitions
fatty acids. and links to concepts
through mind maps and
Construct a concept map for
discussion.
triglycerides linking concepts

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covered in this lesson.

4 Issue of Fat Vs Should develop a view Introduce the topic of sugar vs Explaining their Computers/Lapt 1.2 Promotes a culture
Sugar (Which on whether fat or sugar fat that has been in the media opinions ops/SmartPhone of value and respect for
is more is a larger contributor to lately, bringing up an article s/Tablets individuals and their
Observing the
unhealthy?) obesity/health relating to health concerns. communities.
ways they find
problems.
Ask students: Which is worse information 2.1 Encourages and
Students should be able for you: sugar or fat? Get online and work supports students to
to research and then students to split stand in a in pairs. take responsibility for
provide evidence for line, with one end being sugar their learning.
The change in
their opinions through is worse and the other being
articulation 3.2 Uses a range of
their findings. fat is worse, with anything in
regarding their strategies that support
between being varying levels
opinions, using the different ways of
of either.
research. thinking and learning.
Get students to discuss the
3.3 Builds on students
reasoning behind their
prior experiences,
decisions.
knowledge and skills.
From here, split them into
5.4 Uses assessment
groups of two, trying to get
practices that encourage
one person from each side to
reflection and self
be in the same group. They are
assessment.
to do research online
regarding the effects excess 6.1 Supports students to

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sugar/fat might have on the engage with


body. contemporary
knowledge and practice.
They then split up and pair up
with someone not doing the 6.3 Uses technologies in
same topic and share their ways that reflect
findings. professional and
community practices.
Each group is to then come up
with an opinion, that may or Literacy: Students need
may not be different to what to look at websites and
they originally said. literature to find
evidence and research
to affect their opinions.
They then need to
present to the class,
having to formulate
their explanation.
Literacy: Students
formulate definitions
and links to concepts
through mind maps and
discussion.

5 Proteins Students can recognize Watch 3-minute video talking Worksheet Paper 2.1 Encourages and
the common structural about proteins. supports students to
Class Discussion White board
feature of proteins. take responsibility for
Bring up condensation
Concept Map Projector their learning.
Should understand the

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mechanisms of reaction again. Worksheet 3.2 Uses a range of


condensation of strategies that support
Worksheet: Using prior Youtube Video:
polymers to form the different ways of
knowledge of OH groups and https://youtu.be
dipeptides and thinking and learning.
N in organic compounds they /H8WJ2KENlK0?
polypeptides.
are to think how the name t=645 3.3 Builds on students
Students know how a amino acid came about. Get prior experiences,
peptide bond is formed. students to link two amino knowledge and skills.
acids together through
Able to identify primary, 4.1 Plans sequences to
condensation reaction
secondary, tertiary, promote sustained
worksheet.
quaternary structures learning that builds over
and bonding. Short lecture on primary, time and emphasises
secondary, tertiary, connections between
Can tell the difference
quaternary structures. ideas.
between essential and
non-essential amino From previous triglycerides Literacy: Using
acids. class, get them to get guess previous knowledge
what are essential and non- students deduce the
essential amino acids. naming of amino acids.

Construct a concept map for Literacy: Students


proteins linking concepts formulate definitions
covered in this lesson. and links to concepts
through mind maps and

discussion.

6 Vitamins & Know the different Have a chart for polar and Chart Chart 1.2 Promotes a culture
Summary between fat-soluble, and non-polar. Get students to of value and respect for
Observing notes Paper
water-soluble vitamins. contribute with what makes individuals and their
and discussions

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Able to explain what something polar/non-polar. in pairs White board communities.


makes a vitamin
Go over polarity of water and Class discussion Projector 2.1 Encourages and
water/fat-soluble?
fat. Provide examples of supports students to
Concept Map Computers/Lapt
Know the essential vitamins then get students to take responsibility for
ops/SmartPhone
vitamins for humans. guess the solubility of their learning.
s/Tablets
vitamins based on what they
Can discuss the 3.2 Uses a range of
previously knew about
importance of Vitamin C strategies that support
polarity.
and Vitamin D for the different ways of
human health. Have them name vitamins thinking and learning.
they know and write down the
Students should be able 3.3 Builds on students
structures.
to research and identify prior experiences,
components of the food Single out Vitamins C and D knowledge and skills.
they eat. and have students in pairs.
5.5 Uses evidence from
Then have each partner
assessment to inform
research either Vitamin C or D
planning and teaching.
then get them to report to
their partner. Discuss findings 6.1 Supports students to
with the class. engage with
contemporary
Discuss essential vitamins.
knowledge and practice.
On their own, get students to
6.3 Uses technologies in
write down all that they ate
ways that reflect
yesterday. Then have them
professional and
research the composition of
community practices.
their foods and find a total
amount of each food molecule Literacy: Students need
that they consumed. Then to look at websites and

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compare that to normal daily literature to find


intake for someone of his or information regarding
her body type. their particular Vitamin,
food composition and
Construct a concept map for
nutrition.
carbohydrates, trigylcerides,
proteins and vitamins linking Literacy: Forming their
concepts covered in this unit. food intake in a clean
and thought out manner.

Literacy: Students
formulate definitions
and links to concepts
through mind maps and
discussion.

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Lesson Plan Number: 1

Subject: Chemistry

Topic: Food Molecules - Introduction to Triglycerides, Carbohydrates and Proteins

Link to VCE:

Outcome - Key Food Molecules: Structures of Carbohydrates, Fats, Oils and Proteins

Key Science Skill Communicate and Explain Scientific Ideas: Discuss relevant chemical information, ideas, concepts, theories and models and the
connections between them.

Prior Knowledge of Students: Alkanes, alkenes and functional groups. Physical properties related to structure and bonding, such as: organic
reactions and synthesis pathways.

Background Information about the Class: A co-ed class of 24 students all with access to the Internet via laptop or tablet.

Success Criteria:

Able to differentiate triglycerides, carbohydrates, and proteins based on their structure and composing elements.

Students can give real life examples of carbohydrates , proteins and triglycerides.

Students know the common structural components of carbohydrates, triglycerides and proteins.

Resources:

Paper

White board

Projector

Youtube Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H8WJ2KENlK0

Concept Map

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Example:(Novak, 1984)


Contingency Plan: If groups complete their concept maps early, they will be asked to write clear links between components they have already done.
There is no contingency for students that may be struggling in this class as this is a more general class to introduce the topic and the concept maps
are merely to grasp prior knowledge.
Assessment of Student Learning: Using the table to see what associations they have with carbohydrates, proteins, fats and oils. Seeing how in-
depth their knowledge is regarding the more scientific nature of these molecules. Group concept map to gauge students ability to make connections
to the concepts covered in class.

Time Key Instructions/Questions Activity


(mins)

15 Form table on the board with headings: Carbohydrates, Students to contribute what they associate with those headings to
Fats & Oils, and Protein. table.

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3 Ensure students are watching video. Get them to think Watch 3-minute video introducing the food molecules.
about the terms that come up relating to food molecules.

8 Short lecture about the structural differences between the Students taking notes, making conceptual connections.
food molecules.

14 Pair students up to form a concept map surround food Students think of things related to food molecules the might know
molecules in general. about.

10 Pairs contribute to a class concept map. Students to do condensation reaction for examples on the board.

Lesson 1 Rationale:

A variety of teaching strategies were used in this lesson: video, lecturing, and small group discussion, which allow a more catered plan for
student learning. (Nelson, 2003) The varied perspectives through the video and their own class discussions benefit the students as the way of
teaching becomes varied and can be beneficial to a larger range of people as a result. When given choice of a lot of differentiated tasks students
become more invested and stay engaged. (Vanderhye & Zmijewski Demers, 2008) Subsequently, auditory and visual learners benefit most from
these activities as there is a lot of discussion and visual representation of their thoughts, but kinesthetic learners also benefit from the forming of
actual concept map.

While there is a slight lecture component (allowing student questioning of course) the emphasis on forming a concept map gets students to
materialize links while the rote knowledge is still fresh turning it into meaningful learning. Supplementing lectures with periods of time where
students have to work to form connections for new knowledge allows them to pursue additional information and take ownership of their learning.
(Bussema & Nemec, 2006) This linkage of terms in turn improves the literacy skills of students through being better able to articulate the
relationships of concepts in this area of chemistry.
The need for there to be explicit bridges between prior knowledge and new content, is why this is a general introduction building on their
previous knowledge of organic compounds. These explicit links are made through the table but most importantly the concept map. This lesson acts
as a bridge for their prior knowledge into new territory. Acquiring new knowledge is easier when using previous knowledge in a different setting.
Concept maps for an introductory class allow for misconceptions to be identified and then address in later lessons. (Pendley, Bretz, & Novak, 1994)

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Lesson Plan Number: 2

Subject: Chemistry

Topic: Food Molecules - Carbohydrates

Link to VCE:

Area of Study 2 - Outcome 2- Key Food Molecules: Carbohydrates: formation of disaccharides from monosaccharides, and of complex carbohydrates
(specifically starch and cellulose) as condensation polymers of monosaccharides; glycosidic links; storage of excess glucose in the body as glycogen;
comparison of glucose, fructose, sucrose and the artificial sweetener aspartame with references to their structures and energy content.

Key Science Skill Communicate and Explain Scientific Ideas: Discuss relevant chemical information, ideas, concepts, theories and models and the
connections between them.

Prior Knowledge of Students: Condensation Reactions, alkanes, alkenes, function groups, molecular formulas.

Background Information about the Class: A co-ed class of 24 students all with access to the Internet via laptop or tablet.

Success Criteria:

Students can make a generalised formula for the number of C, H, O atoms in a carbohydrate molecule.

Students understand the process and mechanisms of condensation polymerisation.

Students know how to form disaccharides from monosaccharides, and of complex carbohydrates.

Students are able to explain the process by which excess glucose is stored in the body as glycogen.

Students are able to differentiate glucose, sucrose, fructose and artificial sweeteners through structure and energy content.

Resources:

Paper

White board

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Projector

Youtube Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H8WJ2KENlK0

Contingency Plan: If students are able to quickly find the general formula for carbohydrates, they can be given a formula for a carbohydrate and be
asked to draw its structure or find out how many monomers of a monosaccharide there may be. Struggle students can be given the fact that H20 can
be grouped together in the formula.

Assessment of Student Learning: Observing the work students are doing to find the formula is the best method for discerning the progressing and
understanding of students. Getting each student to talk through the steps of a condensation reaction should allow for a wider viewing of the amount
of students that understand.

Concept map to gauge the conceptual connections a student has made in class.

Time Key Instructions/Questions Activity


(mins)

5 Ask students what they remember, from last class. Look back at carbohydrate examples from previous lesson.

What elements make up a carbohydrate? (Carbo-


hydrate)

3 Make sure students are paying attention. Ask them to Watch video on carbohydrates
think about what makes a carbohydrate, and what kinds
of carbohydrates are there?

15 Teacher to present each group with a model of a few Students to count number of each element in each carbohydrate
carbohydrates. then find a general formula linking all carbohydrates and their C, H,
O compositions.

8 Talk through condensation reactions ask students to Students to provide input as to what is needed for condensation
fill in components. reaction.

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What function groups are involved?

5 Write down reactions for students to do. Students to do condensation reaction for examples on the board.

Get students to talk you through the process.

9 Explain how glycogen is stored and the names of various Students taking notes
sugars.

Ask questions such as, from poly what can you guess
polysaccharide means?

5 Circulate to see the progress of students. Students to make concept maps linking concepts related to
carbohydrates.

Lesson 2 Rationale:

Visual learners and auditory learners are benefitted similarly to before: through the video, class discussions and concept map. The use of a concept
map again is to cement the idea of constantly needing to have firm connections to the concepts seen in class it also allows a view of the progress a
student has made. The model aspect for calculating the general formula for carbohydrates is a more kinesthetic approach and also provides students
with a more appropriate visualization of the structures. Continuing on from Lesson 1, the effect of a variety of activities and focus on class
discussions promotes a more risk taking classroom and appeals to a wide audience of learners.

Following on from the formula calculation activity, students are given the opportunity to work on their numeracy capabilities by having to find a key
pattern between all the different carbohydrates. They are also forced to take this area of understanding into their own hands, which provides a
larger incentive to not only remain engaged but to create a connection to the ideas at hand. Students are working towards a tangible end goal that
will be useful and significant to their progress. Having their own method forms a better understanding of the underlying aspects as they worked
towards it on their own, formulating their own unique process. (Nelson, 2003)

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Asking questions while presenting information in lecture form still allows students to participate. By allowing a comfortable amount of time for
students to respond to questions posed, more students can think through it and thus participate. (Chapin & OConnor, 2003 cited in (Vanderhye &
Zmijewski Demers, 2008))

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Lesson Plan Number: 4

Subject: Chemistry

Topic: Food Molecules - Issue of Fat Vs Sugar (Which is more unhealthy?)

Link to VCE:

Outcome - Key Food Molecules: Fats, Oils and Carbohydrates

Key Science Skill Communicate and Explain Scientific Ideas:

Discuss relevant chemical information, ideas, concepts, theories and models and the connections between them.

Acknowledge sources of information and use standard scientific referencing conventions

Identify and explain formal chemical terminology about investigations and concepts.

Conduct investigations to collect and record data:

Work independently and collaboratively as appropriate and within identified research constraints.

Draw evidence-based conclusions:

Critically evaluate various types of information related to chemistry from journal articles, mass media and opinions presented in the public domain.

Discuss the implications of research findings and proposals.

Prior Knowledge of Students: Students will have an understanding of what a triglyceride and carbohydrate is and the purposes of both molecules.

Background Information about the Class: A co-ed class of 24 students all with access to the internet via laptop or tablet.

Success Criteria:

Students should develop a view on whether fat or sugar is a larger contributor to obesity/health problems.

Students should be able to research and then provide evidence for their opinions through their findings.

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Resources:

Paper

White board

Projector

Youtube Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H8WJ2KENlK0

Computers/Laptops/SmartPhones/Tablets


Contingency Plan: If groups have trouble finding information, link them to possible sources of information such as news websites and journals.
Groups that are finding a lot of information should be asked to find more quantitative research and interpret that data themselves.

Assessment of Student Learning: Assessing the articulation and evidence behind students opinions and how they work in groups using technology.
The change from the start of the class to the end of the class should show evidence.

Time Key Instructions/Questions Activity


(mins)

3 Introduce the topic of Sugar vs Fat Debate

5 Asks students: Which is worse for you: sugar or fat? Students to stand somewhere in the line that corresponds to
their opinion.
Ask them to stand in a line with one end being sugar is
worse the other being fat is worse and anything in
between being a spectrum.

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10 Pick a few students from different ends of the spectrum. They then voice their opinions and the reasoning behind them.

20 Split students into groups, with a group either Students to do research in pairs on the health effects of sugar or
researching the effects of sugar or fat on health. fat.

Facilitate the research by asking questions such as: what


does sugar do to your arteries/heart?

5 Split groups up and pair them with someone doing New partners are to explain their results to each other and
another topic. come to a conclusion on which they think is more harmful to a
persons health.

7 Pick one person from each group to present their findings Students to present to the rest of the class regarding their
and opinions. findings, opinions and if they have changed or not.

Lesson 4 Rationale:

Once more students are put into groups to work on their social capabilities and thought expression. But this time, a more personal touch is added, as
their own opinions are put to the test. Having controversial debates can engage students more fully and prepare them to participate in further
scientific or even general discussions. Content-driven approaches lack any personal connection to most students, so providing a modern topic
relevant to everyones circumstances makes them more reflective and therefore more engaged. (Marks, 2009) From Marks: To close the gap for
students between school science and their critical evaluation is to include societal issues and discussion involving science and technology, relevance
promotes critical thinking and consequently higher cognitive thinking by association. Its as a result necessary for science and in this instance
chemistry education to be routed to the interest of students to increase the relevancy of what they are learning at the same time making sure to not
disregard the underlying concepts. (Albe, 2008; Holbrook, 1998; Ratcliffe, 1998 cited in (Marks, 2009)) This intense discussion leads to an
improvement in the scientific literacy and critical thinking skills of those involved. (Marks, 2009). The use of technology for research is an added
bonus: utilizing and working on students ability to confidently and efficiently use technology.

A student driven research task places an even greater emphasis on a student to take control of his or her learning. Not only are they
responsible for forming links in theory, they are obtaining knowledge on their own, with the teacher acting as a facilitator. Assessing a students
process in this task provides an intimate look into their progress outside of traditional rote learning assessment. (Nelson, 2003)

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A research activity also serves the purpose of superordinate learning using higher complexity topics to try and make sense of what they
have learnt but not yet clarified with links. (Novak, 1984)

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Lesson Plan Number: 6

Subject: Chemistry

Topic: Food Molecules Vitamins and Summary of Food Molecules

Link to VCE:

Outcome - Key Food Molecules: Vitamins: inability of humans to synthesise most vitamins (except Vitamin D) making them essential dietary
requirements; comparison of structural features of Vitamin C (illustrative of a water-soluble vitamin) and Vitamin D (illustrative of a fat-soluble
vitamin) that determine their solubility in water or oil.

Key Science Skill Communicate and Explain Scientific Ideas:

Discuss relevant chemical information, ideas, concepts, theories and models and the connections between them.

Acknowledge sources of information and use standard scientific referencing conventions

Identify and explain formal chemical terminology about investigations and concepts.

Conduct investigations to collect and record data:

Work independently and collaboratively as appropriate and within identified research constraints.

Critically evaluate various types of information related to chemistry from journal articles, mass media and opinions presented in the public domain.

Discuss the implications of research findings and proposals.


Prior Knowledge of Students: Students should have an understanding of the different food molecules: functional groups, common structures,
qualities, and synthesis. Students should understand polar and non-polar and have knowledge of corresponding molecules with those properties.

Background Information about the Class: A co-ed class of 24 students all with access to the Internet via laptop or tablet.

Success Criteria:

Students should know the different between fat-soluble, and water-soluble vitamins.

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Students should be able to explain what makes a vitamin water/fat-soluble?

Students would know the essential vitamins for humans.

Students can discuss the importance of Vitamin C and Vitamin D for human health.

Students should be able to research and identify components of the food they eat.

Resources:

Paper

White board

Projector

Youtube Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H8WJ2KENlK0

Computers/Laptops/SmartPhones/Tablets

Contingency Plan: If students cant remember what is polar/non-polar get them to think about magnets and the attraction. Provide examples of
vitamins or get them to think of food theyve eaten that might advertise a certain vitamin.

Assessment of Student Learning: Ability of students to correlate polarity of water and fat to the solubility of vitamins. How they are able to use
resources to find the nutrition content of the food they eat. Compare the concept map they made at the end of the unit to the ones they made at the
start as a class to see progress.

Time Key Instructions/Questions Activity


(mins)

5 Make a chart for polar and non-polar Students to contribute polar and non-polar
substances/properties

7 Draw a variety of vitamins but leave them unnamed. Students to discuss the solubility of the draw vitamins based
on the structure and functional groups and resulting

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Get students to discuss the solubility of the vitamins. polarity.

3 Get students to name vitamins they know. They then voice their opinions and the reasoning behind
them.

5 Split students into pairs to have one partner research Students to do research on Vitamins C and D then report to
vitamin D and one research vitamin C. their partners.

2 Get students to remember essential fatty acids and Discuss what essential vitamins might mean.
amino acids to correlate.

20 Facilitate students memory about what they ate the Students to research then cleanly and methodically write the
day before. details regarding their food intake. And then make
comparisons to standards of food intake.

8 Get students to make a concept map for ALL food Students to form a concept map of all food molecules to
molecules detail connections to concepts theyve made through the
unit.

Lesson 6 Rationale:
Once again, more personal topics with regards to food intake in the first and second are introduced to incite more reflective and intense engagement
in the taste. All students have an experience to bring to the table, so they are all able to contribute. These differentiated tasks; ones that are different
for each student due to their own different experiences open up the students for greater investment. (Vanderhye & Zmijewski Demers, 2008) Theres
also a sense of play involved, the lack of pressure, the non-threatening aspects have a intrinsic motivational factor and create the basis for high level
problem solving, but still allows for assessment of student development. (Bennet, Wood & Rogers, 1997; Whitebread, 2000 cited in (Nelson, 2003)

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Similarly, literacy and technology usage skills are addressed once more through the discussion and research components of this lesson. With regards
to learning styles: visual learners will benefit from the chart and concept maps, helping to reinforce what theyve learnt throughout the unit.
Auditory learners are helped by the partner discussion and short lecture. Kinesthetic learners get to be active through the research component.

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Overall Rationale:
For clarification, lecture components of the lesson plans include times to ask questions of students to incite deeper thinking regarding the
specific topics. This questioning is in order to develop High-Order Cognitive Skills, through an environment that forces students to actively
participate, with a necessary focus on conceptual understanding. (Zoller, 1999) The emphasis across the board on student discussion and student
research means that students are very much in charge of their learning and are able to make links to concepts on their own taking ownership of
that knowledge. The formation of concept maps can lead to students finding familiarity with link ideas and thus allow them to form a better logical
understanding of the concepts. (Novak, 1984) A constant use of concept maps therefore prepares students mentally to make connections to previous
knowledge to aid their understanding of unknown topics. The activeness of students in their learning then contributes to a teacher taking a more
assistant/facilitator role to provide scaffolding. (Nelson, 2003)

Vanderhye (Vanderhye & Zmijewski Demers, 2008) states: By planning activities where children must collaborate, teachers can require
students to verbalize their thinking, creating opportunities for teachers to listen. In essence, the purpose of having a largely verbal classroom allows
for assessing a larger range of students understanding without the need for formal assessment. It also allows for immediate feedback, correcting
misconceptions one student might have, but quite possibly helping other students that might have the same problem. By making a largely oral
assessment the norm in the classroom, students are likely to develop a sense of respect towards their peers and become more likely to take risks in
voicing their opinions and thoughts. Similarly, the idea of pairing students up for activities mean that they have time to practice and articulate their
thoughts before present to the rest of the class. (Vanderhye & Zmijewski Demers, 2008)

An open-ended design in the activities allow for students to be at various levels of understanding while still participating equally (Nelson,
2003) which allows for a large amount of inclusivity. Giving students opportunities to express their thoughts in a pair before a large group lets them
practice what they say. (Vanderhye & Zmijewski Demers, 2008)This culture of oral assessment would improve the confidence and ability for
students to process their thoughts.

Students develop personal and social capability through all the partner work they do. Having to think deeply to formulate their own thoughts
develops their own personal skills and self-awareness. While at the same time, they have to be able to take in and understand the opinions and
knowledge of others and work to build effective communication techniques. Thus they become more capable of working alone or collaboratively.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2975/29.2006.315.317
Marks, R. E., Ingo. (2009). Promoting Scientific Literacy Using a Sociocritical and Problem-Oriented Approach to Chemistry Teaching: Concepts,
Examples, Experiences. International Journal of Environmental and Science Education, 4(3), 231-245.
Nelson, K. (2003). Work Samples as an Assessment Strategy. Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom, 8(3), 29.
Novak, J. D. (1984). Application of advances in learning theory and philosophy of science to the improvement of chemistry teaching. Journal of
Chemical Education, 61(7), 607. doi: 10.1021/ed061p607
Pendley, B. D., Bretz, R. L., & Novak, J. D. (1994). Concept Maps as a Tool To Assess Learning in Chemistry. Journal of Chemical Education, 71(1), 9. doi:
10.1021/ed071p9
Vanderhye, C. M., & Zmijewski Demers, C. M. (2008). Assessing Students' Understanding through Conversations. Teaching Children Mathematics,
14(5), 260-264.
Zoller, U. (1999). Scaling-up of higher-order cognitive skills-oriented college chemistry teaching: An action-oriented research. Journal of Research in
Science Teaching, 36(5), 583-596. doi: 10.1002/(SICI)1098-2736(199905)36:5<583::AID-TEA5>3.0.CO;2-M

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