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SITI NOOR BAIZURA BINTI AND RAHIM

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PISMP PEMULIHAN SEMESTER 2

Fire and Ice by Robert Frost

Some say the world will end in fire,


Some say in ice.
From what I've tasted of desire
I hold with those who favor fire.
But if it had to perish twice,
I think I know enough of hate
To know that for destruction ice
Is also great
And would suffice.

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SITI NOOR BAIZURA BINTI AND RAHIM

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GRAPHIC ORGANIZER

THEME

WRITER’S
TONE
MOOD

Sonnet 130 FIRE AND


ICE
by William Shakespeare

My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun;

Coral is far more red than her lips' red; LITERARY


MESSAGE
DEVICES
If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun;

If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head.

I have seen roses damasked, red and white,

But no such roses see I in her cheeks;

And in some perfumes is there more delight

Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks.

I love to hear her speak, yet well I know

That music hath a far more pleasing sound;


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I grant I never saw a goddess go;

My mistress when she walks treads on the ground.

And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare


As any she belied with false compare.

SITI NOOR BAIZURA BINTI AND RAHIM

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GRAPHIC ORGANIZER

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SITI NOOR BAIZURA BINTI AND RAHIM

890521-02-5172

PISMP PEMULIHAN SEMESTER 2

THEME

WRITER’S
TONE
MOOD

SONNET 130

LITERARY
MESSAGE
DEVICES

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SITI NOOR BAIZURA BINTI
FireAND
and RAHIM
Ice
Sonnet 130 Poem
890521-02-5172

PISMP PEMULIHAN SEMESTER 2


"Appearances" is a major Theme the dangers of extremism.
theme in Sonnet 130

romantic Tone satirical

loving and caring Writer’s mood happy

Praise and point all her Message captivates


beloved is the best people's opinions

1. Imagery : eyes, lips Literary devices 1. Symbolism : Fire also


2. Simile: like the sun stands for "passion" and
and my love as "the warmth of love".
rare Whereas,"ice" connotes
3. Repetitions: if, be "indifference" and "cold-
and rosses in line 3, bloodedness" While the
4,5 and 6 poet may wish for the
4. Metaphor: mistress earth to end in love in the
reeks and music former section
hath 2. The poem is an imperfect
5. Alliteration . r : rhyme that brings out the
Coral is far more affect
red than her lips'
red

6. Asonancion , e= I
have seen roses 3. Robert Frost uses:
damasked, red and alliteration , t = But if it
white had to perish twice
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4. Repetition: some say in
line one and two
5. Hyperboles= world will
end in fire
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Personal response sonnet 130

Towards the end of the sixteenth century, sonnets were the most popular
form of circulating poetry, and thus William Shakespeare (1564-1616)
composes his own lengthy sonnet cycle, concentrating only on a handful of
themes. With the traditional, or Italian, style dominating the poetic forum,
Shakespeare composes Sonnet 130 a completely novel sonnet, altering the
Italian form. Moreover in Sonnet 130, "My mistresses eyes are nothing like the
sun", Shakespeare mocks the traditional expression of love, yet successfully
expresses his own love. Shakespeare modifies the Italian sonnet, with four
quatrains and an ending couplet, into what has become known as his own
distinctive style of Shakespearean sonnets. But even that is deviated from with
Sonnet 130. To begin, the sonnet instantly goes into comparisons of " his
mistress" to various natural items of the world, none of which she matches. Her
attributes, hair, eyes, lips, breasts, are all made with brutal comparison to a
physical, or even more accurately, tangible aspect of the world, and the
evaluation is less than promising. The opening line introduces the harsh reality
that the woman's "eyes are nothing like the sun," immediately asserting the
inferiority of the woman. TheSonnet 130 is not a typical sonnet of love and
praise. Full of similes as the honest speaker compares his mistress to things
that are more beautiful. Obviously his mistress is not the “ideal” person because
her hairs are like “black wires,” “breath reeks,” [an offensive odor, “music
sounds better [than her speaking], and her breasts are not fair but tan. Ironically
it concludes with his statement that he has made false and deceptive
comparisons because his love for her is “rare” love regardless of her flaws. A
sonneteer, like Shakespeare, describes women who meet all the standard
criteria of beauty but in each case his own mistress falls short. Interaction with
the woman is further elucidated, and the possibility of this sonnet being about a
mistress of his mind is put at rest with the ending lines of the quatrain, "And in
some perfumes is there more delight / Than in the breath that from my mistress
reeks. " Here lies the ironic finale of the poem, leading into the reason, true love,

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and the underlying sentiment for this piece of writing. The next quatrain
progresses from simple comparisons revealing her faults the author's first-hand
experiences of beauty, making the assessments even more personal. " The line
reads like a confession of Shakespeare's inexperience with beautiful, supple
women. Gaining credibility once again, Shakespeare refers to "by heaven," in
coordination with the corresponding conjunctions "And yet," to mark the change
in tone and theme. Instead, simply knowing her faults and loving her despite
them is the message that Shakespeare expresses. In his mockery of the
traditional blazon, however, he concludes the poem with his love more rare than
any false comparisons to women unworthy of such praise. supple, shapely,
snow-white image of the female bosom is also completely torn away with the
rhetorical, "why then her breasts are dun," even gathering credibility with the
known truth of "snow [being] white. In order to profess your love, you need not
lionize a woman's attributes. The theme of the sonnet, consistent with most,
embraces love, but love with a twist. The fluidity of the poem, in part the
deflation of his own mistress through the elevated and idealistic comparisons,
Shakespeare can convey his deep and confiding love more faithfully and
honestly than poets who use hyperbole. Traditional English verse is most
accurately represented by iambic pentameter, and so by making this the
metrical scheme, not only are the comparisons mundane, but also the speech
pattern represents vernacular talk. " Uncharacteristic of the poem so far where
the author describes tangible thing, he now refers to a goddess in that he has
never witnessed " a goddess striding upon the ground. Women in
Shakespeare's Sonnet 130 Shakespeare is expressing, though not in the first
person, that he knows women are not the perfect beauties they are portrayed to
be and that we should love them anyway. He uses two types of descriptions,
one of their physical beauty and the other of their characteristics to make fun.
One common mistake is to read Shakespeare's poetry as autobiographical. It is
important to understand the contexts from which his work was bore out of, the
thematic nature of it, coupled with the fact that Shakespeare was an expert at
inventing speaking voices seamlessly able to embody both murderer and victim.

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To interpret his work at face value as an autobiographical statement is a
fundamental misstep. To fully understand Shakespeare's sonnets it is necessary
to understand something of the background of the sonnet and the popular
culture of Shakespeare's day. Petrarch was an Italian poet whose sonnets were
hugely influential. In the 1590's there were a wealth of imitators utilizing the style
and imagery of Petrarch, these sonnets are known as petrarchan sonnets. The
fair blonde damsel was a stock image and these petrarchan poems were largely
concerned with spiritual love, ideal love.

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SITI NOOR BAIZURA BINTI AND RAHIM

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BIBLIOGRAPHY

1. Retrieved on 23 September 2009 at www.shakespeare-


online.com/sonnets

2. Retrieved on 23 September 2009 at www.shakespeare-


online.com/sonnets/130detail.html

3. Retrieved on 24 September 2009 at www.william-


shakespeare.info/william-shakespeare-sonnet-130.htm

4. Retrieved on 24 September 2009 at www.love-


poems.me.uk/shakespeare_sonnet_130_mistress_eyes.htm

5. Retrieved on 25 September 2009 at www.sonnets.org/shakespeare.htm

6. Retrieved on 25 September 2009 at www.poemhunter.com/poem/fire-


and-ice/

7. Retrieved on 26 September 2009 at www.poetry-


online.org/frost_fire_and_ice.htm

8. Retrieved on 26 September 2009 at


http://famouspoetsandpoems.com/poets/robert_frost/

9. Retrieved on 26 September 2009 at www.love-


poems.me.uk/frost_fire_and_ice.htm

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