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NO

NOVEMBER 13, 2017

MUSLIM

BAN

EVER

HOW TO BE A PROGRESSIVE ALLY

NO NOVEMBER 13, 2017 MUSLIM BAN EVER HOW TO BE A PROGRESSIVE ALLY

Contents

Purpose

2

In​​Your​​Messaging,​​Do​​

4

In​​Your​​Messaging,​​Don’t​​

7

In​​Your​​Messaging,​​You​​Could​​Also​​

9

Appendix

11

Purpose

This​​guidebook​​is​​here​​to​​help​​progressive​​organizations,​​leaders,​​members​​of

Congress,​​and​​other​​allies​​speak​​out​​against​​the​​Muslim​​Ban​​to​​their​​progressive

constituents​​and​​members​​with​​messaging​​that

1)

effectively​​pushes​​back​​against​​the​​Muslim​​Ban,

2)

provides​ ​clear​ ​​do’s​ ​and​ ​don’ts​ ​​to​ ​avoid​ ​anti-Muslim​ ​framing,​ ​and

3)

does​​not​​harm​​Muslim​​communities.

Letter​​to​​the​​reader

Dear​​reader,

As​ ​you​ ​know,​ ​Islamophobia​ ​and​ ​anti-Muslim​ ​racism​ ​in​ ​this​ ​country​ ​predate​ ​the​ ​rise​ ​of​ ​Donald​ ​Trump. However,​​the​​Trump​​administration's​​official​​sanctioning​​of​​blatant​​Islamophobic​​and​​anti-Muslim speech​​and​​policies​​has​​led​​to​​a​​drastic​​increase​​in​​individual​​hate​​crimes​​and​​terrifying​​displays​​of mob​​violence.

At​​the​​same​​time,​​the​​election​​of​​Trump​​has​​forced​​a​​significant​​shift​​in​​the​​way​​progressive​​activists, elected​ ​officials,​ ​organizations,​ ​and​ ​other​ ​allies​ ​approach​ ​and​ ​interact​ ​with​ ​Muslim​ ​communities.​ ​The outpouring​​of​​support​​from​​diverse​​communities​​at​​airports​​across​​the​​country​​after​​Trump's​​initial Muslim​ ​Ban​ ​was​ ​a​ ​visual​ ​representation​ ​of​ ​that​ ​shift.​ ​It​ ​was​ ​a​ ​mass​ ​national​ ​action—where​ ​people​ ​came out​​in​​the​​thousands—to​​specifically​​stand​​in​​solidarity​​with​​Muslim​​communities.

And​​yet,​​in​​standing​​against​​the​​Muslim​​Ban,​​some​​progressive​​allies​​have​​at​​times​​continued​​to perpetuate​​Republican​​and​​anti-Muslim​​messaging​​and​​rhetorical​​frameworks​​that​​are​​not​​only unhelpful​ ​but​ ​are​ ​actively​ ​harmful​ ​to​ ​Muslim​ ​communities.​ ​That's​ ​why,​ ​as​ ​part​ ​of​ ​its​ ​work​ ​to​ ​uproot Islamophobia,​​MoveOn​​created​​an​​ally​​guide​​meant​​to​​help​​address​​and​​transform​​this reality—providing​​clear,​​positive​​talking​​points​​and​​narrative​​framing,​​as​​well​​as​​pitfalls​​to​​avoid​​when speaking​ ​about​ ​the​ ​Muslim​ ​Ban.​ ​Many​ ​of​ ​these​ ​recommendations​ ​can​ ​be​ ​applied​ ​more​ ​broadly​ ​to speaking​​or​​writing​​about​​issues​​relating​​to​​Muslim​​communities.

The​ ​time​ ​is​ ​now​ ​for​ ​creating​ ​our​ ​own​ ​language,​ ​and​ ​this​ ​guidebook​ ​is​ ​an​ ​attempt​ ​to​ ​take​ ​that​ ​step forward.​ ​We​ ​simply​ ​can't​ ​fight​ ​fear​ ​and​ ​hate​ ​with​ ​language​ ​that​ ​reinforces​ ​fear​ ​and​ ​hate,​ ​but​ ​we​ ​can make​​progress​​by​​being​​intentional​​in​​our​​language​​as​​well​​as​​our​​policies.​​Our​​hope​​is​​that​​you​​find the​ ​guidebook​ ​helpful​ ​and​ ​join​ ​us​ ​on​ ​this​ ​next​ ​step​ ​of​ ​a​ ​very​ ​long​ ​journey​ ​to​ ​uproot​ ​Islamophobia​ ​and anti-Muslim​​bigotry​​from​​within​​progressive​​circles​​as​​well​​as​​American​​politics.

Sincere​ ​thanks​ ​to​ ​national​ ​allies,​ ​including​ ​those​ ​from​ ​the​ ​following​ ​organizations,​ ​who​ ​took​ ​the​ ​time​ ​to offer​ ​feedback​ ​which​ ​made​ ​this​ ​guide​ ​stronger:​ ​MPower​ ​Change,​ ​the​ ​National​ ​Iranian​ ​American Council,​ ​ReThink​ ​Media,​ ​Muslim​ ​Advocates,​ ​and​ ​the​ ​ACLU,​ ​among​ ​others.​ ​Any​ ​errors​ ​in​ ​the​ ​guide​ ​are my​​own.

We​ ​welcome​ ​your​ ​questions​ ​and​ ​feedback.​ ​Please​ ​reach​ ​out​ ​directly​ ​to​ ​me​ ​at​ ​​iram@moveon.org.

Sincerely,

me ​ ​ at ​ ​​ iram@moveon.org ​ . Sincerely, Iram ​​ Ali Author Campaign ​​

Iram​​Ali

Author

Campaign​​Director,​​MoveOn.org

In​​Your​​Messaging,​​Do​​

Do​ ​emphasize​ ​Trump’s​ ​original​ ​intent​ ​​for​ ​a​ ​“total​ ​and​ ​complete​ ​shutdown​ ​of

 

Muslims​​from​​entering​​the​​country”​​that​​remains​​immoral​​and​​discriminatory,

 

regardless​​of​​superficial​​changes​​to​​future​​versions​​of​​the​​ban. 1

 

SAMPLE​​LANGUAGE:

 

Donald​​Trump​​has​​made​​it​​explicitly​​clear​​that​​he​​wants​​a​​Muslim​​Ban,​​making​​this​​policy

 
 

discriminatory.​​This​​hasn’t​​changed​​since​​Muslim​​Ban​​1.0.

 
 

Despite​​new​​changes​​to​​the​​ban,​​Trump’s​​original​​intent​​remains​​the​​same:​​he​​wants​​to​​ban

 
 

Muslims​​from​​entering​​the​​country.​​It​​remains​​discriminatory​​and​​immoral.

 
 

The​​intent,​​target,​​and​​most-impacted​​communities​​of​​every​​version​​of​​the​​ban​​remain​​the​​same:

 

Muslims.​​This​​is​​unacceptable.

Do​ ​​mention​ ​that​ ​​cosmetic​ ​changes​ ​to​ ​the​ ​Muslim​ ​Ban​ ​don’t​ ​change​ ​its​ ​impact​ ​or

intent.​​Despite​​the​​addition​​of​​North​​Korea​​and​​Venezuela​​to​​Muslim​​Ban​​3.0,

 

over​​98%​​of​​immigrants​​who​​may​​be​​impacted​​by​​the​​ban​​will​​be​​from​​the​​six

 

majority-Muslim​​countries.

 

SAMPLE​​LANGUAGE:

The​​addition​​of​​North​​Korea​​and​​Venezuela​​to​​Muslim​​Ban​​3.0​​doesn’t​​change​​the​​intent​​of​​the

 

Muslim​​Ban.​​The​​ban​​will​​still​​disproportionately​​impact​​immigrants​​from​​the​​six​​targeted majority-Muslim​​countries.

 
 

Over​​98%​​of​​immigrants​​who​​may​​be​​impacted​​by​​the​​ban​​will​​be​​from​​the​​six​​majority-Muslim

 
 

countries:​​Yemen,​​Syria,​​Iran,​​Somalia,​​Chad,​​and​​Libya.

 

Do​ ​​talk​ ​about​ ​values​ ​that​ ​people​ ​hold​ ​dear.​ ​We​ ​should​ ​be​ ​building​ ​a​ ​nation​ ​based

on​ ​​dignity,​ ​fairness,​ ​and​ ​respect.​ ​The​ ​Muslim​ ​Ban​ ​pushes​ ​us​ ​further​ ​away​ ​from

that​​goal.

SAMPLE​​LANGUAGE:

We​​should​​be​​building​​a​​nation​​of​​dignity,​​fairness,​​and​​respect.​​The​​Muslim​​Ban​​pushes​​us

further​​away​​from​​that​​goal.

Our​​goals​​as​​progressives​​should​​be​​supporting​​equity​​for​​all​​people​​and​​protecting​​multicultural

societies​​where​​everyone​​can​​thrive.​​A​​ban​​against​​people​​for​​the​​way​​they​​practice​​their​​faith​​or

the​​way​​they​​pray​​isn’t​​acceptable​​for​​the​​future​​we​​want​​to​​build.​​The​​Muslim​​Ban​​has​​no​​place

in​​our​​society—not​​now,​​not​​ever.

Do​ ​​mention​ ​the​ ​​unified​ ​response​ ​of​ ​communities​ ​who​ ​continue​ ​to​ ​rise​ ​up

2

against​​the​​Muslim​​Ban—from​​airports ​​to​​marches,​​the​​public​​is​​clear​​where​​it

stands.
stands.

SAMPLE​​LANGUAGE:

When​​the​​initial​​Muslim​​Ban​​was​​implemented,​​we​​saw​​an​​outpouring​​of​​diverse​​communities

who​​came​​together​​at​​airports​​across​​the​​country,​​chanting,​​“Let​​Muslims​​in”​​and​​“No​​Muslim

Ban.”​​The​​show​​of​​solidarity​​was​​clear:​​the​​Muslim​​Ban​​has​​no​​place​​in​​our​​society.

When​​the​​first​​Muslim​​Ban​​was​​implemented,​​people​​clearly​​saw​​their​​values​​under​​attack​​and

people​​being​​blocked​​from​​entering​​the​​country.​​They​​didn’t​​wait,​​and​​diverse​​communities​​acted

immediately.​​They​​showed​​up​​at​​airports,​​they​​printed​​posters,​​and​​they​​signed​​petitions​​by​​the

hundreds​​of​​thousands​​to​​say​​they​​stand​​against​​this​​immoral​​policy.

Do​ ​​emphasize​ ​that​ ​​the​ ​ban​ ​is​ ​discriminatory​ ​and​ ​that​ ​Trump​ ​continues​ ​to​ ​enact

racist​​and​​discriminatory​​policies.

SAMPLE​​LANGUAGE:

The​​Muslim​​Ban​​is​​a​​prime​​example​​of​​Trump’s​​discriminatory​​policies.​​His​​harmful​​policies

against​​people​​who​​are​​immigrants​​and/or​​Muslims​​are​​a​​clear​​part​​of​​his​​agenda,​​as​​he​​has

stated​​time​​and​​again.

3

Do​ ​​mention​ ​that​ ​​the​ ​ban,​ ​including​ ​the​ ​most​ ​recent​ ​version,​ ​is​ ​illegal ​ ​and

countless​​courts​​have​​already​​ruled​​various​​versions​​as​​being​​unconstitutional.4

SAMPLE​​LANGUAGE:

Countless​​courts​​have​​now​​blocked​​the​​ban​​from​​being​​implemented​​in​​its​​first,​​second,​​and​​third

iterations.​​As​​the​​4th​​Circuit​​said​​about​​one​​version​​of​​the​​ban,​​it​​“drips​​with​​religious​​intolerance,

animus,​​and​​discrimination.” 5

The​​Immigration​​and​​Nationality​​Act​​of​​1965​​made​​banning​​immigrants​​on​​the​​basis​​of​​nationality

illegal.

Do​ ​​speak​ ​about​ ​the​ ​​humanitarian​ ​crises​ ​in​ ​Syria,​ ​Yemen,​ ​and​ ​Somalia,​ ​which

make​​the​​ban​​cruel,​​heartless,​​and​​immoral.

SAMPLE​​LANGUAGE:

The​​humanitarian​​crisis​​in​​Yemen​​is​​considered​​to​​be​​the​​“worst​​humanitarian​​crisis​​since​​World War​​II.” ​​The​​banning​​of​​Yemeni​​immigrants​​and​​visitors​​is​​a​​cruel​​and​​unnecessary​​decision​​that is​​directly​​putting​​people​​in​​harm’s​​way.

The​​people​​being​​banned​​from​​entering​​the​​country​​are​​also​​suffering​​from​​humanitarian​​crises of​​unseen​​proportions.​​The​​people​​of​​Yemen,​​Syria,​​and​​Somalia​​should​​not​​be​​paying​​for​​the harms​​being​​inflicted​​on​​them​​by​​government​​and​​non-government​​actors.

Discriminating​​against​​people​​or​​closing​​our​​doors​​on​​those​​seeking​​refuge​​or​​in​​need​​is​​not​​what we​​stand​​for.

6

Do​ ​​mention​ ​that​ ​there​ ​has​ ​been​ ​​an​ ​increase​ ​in​ ​hate​ ​crimes​ ​against​ ​Muslims

following​​Trump’s​​Muslim​​Ban​​proposal.​​Anti-Muslim​​speech​​and​​policies​​are

leading​​to​​violence​​against​​Muslim​​houses​​of​​worship​​and​​against​​Muslims​​and

those​​perceived​​to​​be​​Muslims.

SAMPLE​​LANGUAGE:

There​​was​​an​​estimated​​87.5%​​increase​​in​​hate​​crimes​​against​​people​​who​​are​​Muslim​​in​​the

days​​following​​Trump’s​​Muslim​​Ban​​proposal. 7

Trump’s​​policies,​​such​​as​​the​​Muslim​​Ban,​​are​​leading​​to​​increased​​hate​​crimes​​against​​our Muslim​​neighbors.​​This​​is​​unacceptable.

6

In​​Your​​Messaging,​​Don’t​​

Don’t​ ​​mention​ ​how​ ​the​ ​Muslim​ ​Ban​ ​makes​ ​the​ ​country​ ​“less​ ​safe.”​ ​Research

already​ ​shows​ ​that​ ​this​ ​talking​ ​point​ ​does​ ​​not​ ​​work​ ​on​ ​persuadable​ ​audiences.

ACTUAL​​BAD​​EXAMPLE:

“And​​we​​must​​rally​​Americans​​who​​think​​that​​keeping​​Muslims​​out​​keeps​​us​​safe​​to​​understand

that​​this​​policy​​does​​exactly​​the​​opposite.”

8

REASONING​​(from​​research​​on​​immigration​​policy ):

“In​ ​particular,​ ​​the​ ​tendency​ ​to​ ​talk​ ​about​ ​how​ ​these​ ​new​ ​policies​ ​make​ ​us​ ​unsafe​ ​or​ ​less​ ​safe call​​(sic)​​to​​mind​​the​​very​​concerns​​that​​leave​​persuadable​​audiences​​unsure​​about​​the​​right course​​of​​action.

“Reporting​ ​on​ ​various​ ​strains​ ​of​ ​research,​ ​​The​ ​​Washington​ ​Post’s​ ​David​ ​Ignatius​ ​concludes, ‘Trump’s​​campaign​​pushes​​buttons​​that​​social​​scientists​​understand.​​When​​the​​GOP​​nominee paints​​a​​dark​​picture​​of​​a​​violent,​​frightening​​America,​​he​​triggers​​the​​“fight-or-flight”​​response that’s​​hardwired​​in​​our​​brains.​​For​​the​​body​​politic,​​it​​can​​produce​​a​​kind​​of​​panic​​attack.’”

Don’t​ ​​mention​ ​“national​ ​security”—including,​ ​but​ ​not​ ​limited​ ​to,​ ​mentioning​ ​ISIS

or​​any​​other​​violent​​group.​​This​​goes​​back​​to​​the​​previous​​point:​​any​​mention​​of

fear​​will​​only​​reproduce​​the​​“fight-or-flight”​​response​​and​​will​​not​​work​​to

persuade​​audiences.​​Additionally,​​this​​response​​paints​​the​​image​​of​​Muslims​​as

predisposed​​or​​teetering​​on​​the​​edge​​of​​becoming​​“terrorists,”​​which​​is​​both

untrue​ ​​and​ ​perpetuates​ ​a​ ​stereotype​ ​that​ ​contributes​ ​to​ ​bigotry​ ​and​ ​hate.

ACTUAL​​BAD​​EXAMPLE:

“Just​​like​​the​​first​​and​​second​​versions​​of​​the​​Muslim​​ban,​​this​​one​​is​​still​​illegal,​​discriminatory,

and​​harmful​​to​​our​​nation's​​security.​​This​​ban​​plays​​right​​into​​the​​hands​​of​​ISIS​​and​​terrorist

organizations​​around​​the​​world.”

Don’t​ ​​mention​ ​which​ ​countries​ ​should​ ​be​ ​banned​ ​or​ ​make​ ​more​ ​sense​ ​to​ ​ban

than​​the​​already-banned​​countries.

ACTUAL​​BAD​​EXAMPLES:

“Donald​​Trump’s​​new​​‘Muslim​​ban’​​still​​does​​not​​include​​countries​​that​​have​​produced​​terrorists.”

“For​​example,​​Tashfeen​​Malik,​​the​​San​​Bernardino​​shooter,​​was​​from​​Saudi​​Arabia/Pakistan.

Neither​​one​​of​​those​​two​​countries​​is​​on​​the​​Trump​​administration​​list​​of​​restricted​​countries.”

REASONING:

Mentioning​​countries​​that​​are​​not​​being​​banned​​will​​reinforce​​the​​notion​​that​​more​​countries

should​​be​​added​​to​​the​​ban—and​​that​​a​​ban​​on​​those​​countries​​would​​make​​sense.​​Adding​​other

countries​​to​​the​​ban​​is​​holding​​their​​citizens​​responsible​​for​​the​​actions​​of​​a​​few​​and​​would​​be

equally​​discriminatory​​and​​illegal.

In​​Your​​Messaging,​​You​​Could​​Also​​

Messaging, ​​ You ​​ Could ​​ Also ​​ … ● You ​ ​ could ​ ​

You​ ​could​ ​​mention​ ​that​ ​​the​ ​ban​ ​reinforces​ ​white​ ​supremacy.

SAMPLE​​LANGUAGE:

The​​Trump​​administration​​is​​consistently​​enacting​​white​​supremacist​​policies—from​​revoking

DACA​​to​​the​​Muslim​​Ban,​​the​​precedent​​is​​clear.​​Like​​other​​immigration​​policies,​​the​​Muslim​​Ban

is​​a​​fascist​​policy​​that​​seeks​​to​​make​​it​​impossible​​for​​Muslims​​to​​enter,​​remain,​​and​​prosper​​in​​the

United​​States.​​We​​should​​be​​building​​a​​nation​​of​​fairness.​​The​​Muslim​​Ban​​pushes​​us​​further

away​​from​​that​​goal.

us ​​ further away ​​ from ​​ that ​​ goal. ● You ​ ​ could ​

You​ ​could​ ​​emphasize​ ​the​ ​hand​ ​of​ ​U.S.​ ​covert​ ​and​ ​overt​ ​military​ ​operations​ ​or

sanctions​​in​​leaving​​many​​of​​the​​countries​​destabilized​​and​​in​​their​​current

conditions,​​with​​the​​ban​​leaving​​no​​recourse​​for​​escape​​by​​those​​impacted​​by​​our

own​​detrimental​​policies.

SOME​​EXAMPLES:

Yemen:​​Though​​a​​war​​has​​never​​been​​authorized​​by​​Congress,​​there​​have​​been​​approximately

258​​confirmed​​U.S.​​drone​​strikes​​in​​Yemen. ​​Since​​2008,​​the​​U.S.​​also​​sold​​$110​​billion​​worth​​of weapons​​to​​Saudi​​Arabia​​during​​the​​Obama​​administration,​​and​​Congress​​recently​​approved​​a

deal​​worth​​$350​​billion​​over​​10​​years.

blockading​​and​​bombing​​Yemen,​​causing​​a​​massive​​humanitarian​​crisis.

9

10 11

,

​​Saudi​​Arabia​​is​​currently​​leading​​a​​coalition​​that​​is

Somalia:​​The​​U.S.​​has​​been​​carrying​​out​​covert​​operations​​in​​Somalia​​since​​2001​​that​​have​​led​​to

at​​least​​584​​people​​killed. 12

Libya:​​In​​2016​​alone,​​the​​U.S.​​launched​​496​​bombs​​on​​Libyan​​territory. 13

Iran:​​A​​democratically​​elected​​prime​​minister​​was​​ousted​​by​​a​​CIA-led​​coup​​coordinated​​with

British​​intelligence​​in​​1953.​​In​​1995,​​the​​US​​imposed​​a​​near-total​​economic​​embargo​​on​​Iran​​that

remains​​in​​place​​to​​this​​day. 14

9

10

11

13

● You ​ ​ could ​ ​​ speak ​ ​ about ​ ​ Muslims ​

You​ ​could​ ​​speak​ ​about​ ​Muslims​ ​who​ ​are​ ​your​ ​constituents​ ​or​ ​members—including

their​​resilience​​during​​these​​times.

SAMPLE​​LANGUAGE:

Despite​​the​​Muslim​​Ban​​and​​hateful​​anti-Muslim​​speech,​​Muslims​​are​​showing​​that​​they’re​​not

going​​anywhere—including​​by​​remaining​​committed​​to​​humanitarian​​and​​racial​​justice​​work.​​As

an​​incredibly​​diverse​​faith​​community,​​Muslims​​in​​the​​United​​States​​remain​​the​​most​​likely​​faith

group​​to​​support​​the​​Black​​Lives​​Matter​​(BLM)​​movement.

Muslim​​communities​​continue​​to​​be​​actively​​committed​​to​​humanitarian​​work​​and​​racial​​justice.

Muslims​​are​​the​​most​​likely​​faith​​group​​(66%)​​to​​support​​the​​Black​​Lives​​Matter​​(BLM)

movement.

Muslims​​volunteer​​at​​equal​​numbers​​as​​members​​of​​other​​faith​​communities​​(44%).

Instead​​of​​hiding,​​Muslim​​women​​responded​​to​​a​​Trump​​win​​with​​greater​​giving.​​Nearly

30%​​of​​Muslim​​women​​and​​19%​​of​​Muslim​​men​​have​​increased​​their​​donations​​to​​an

organization​​associated​​with​​their​​faith​​community. 15

with ​​ their ​​ faith ​​ community. 1 5 ● You ​ ​ could ​ ​

You​ ​could​ ​​mention​ ​that​ ​the​ ​Muslim​ ​Ban​ ​is​ ​a​ ​continuation​ ​of​ ​bigoted​ ​anti-Muslim

policies​ ​and​ ​​the​ ​fight​ ​against​ ​anti-Muslim​ ​bigotry​ ​doesn’t​ ​stop​ ​at​ ​​only​ ​​blocking

Trump’s​​Muslim​​Ban.

SAMPLE​​LANGUAGE:

Trump’s​​Muslim​​Ban​​is​​one​​example​​of​​countless​​anti-Muslim​​policies​​that​​have​​been​​heightened

in​​the​​past​​decade​​by​​both​​Republicans​​and​​Democrats​​alike:​​Guantanamo​​Bay​​is​​still​​open,​​our

wars​​and​​drone​​strikes​​are​​targeting​​multiple​​majority-Muslim​​nations,​​state​​surveillance​​of

Muslim​​communities​​in​​the​​United​​States​​continues,​​and​​more.​​As​​we​​fight​​the​​Muslim​​Ban,​​we

must​​ensure​​that​​other​​U.S.​​policies​​detrimentally​​impacting​​people​​who​​are​​Muslim​​are​​also

taken​​down.

Appendix

Terms​​to​​use​​and​​those​​to​​avoid:

Use

Avoid

Explanation

Muslim​​Ban

Travel​​ban

It’s​​important​​to​​be​​consistent​​in

the​​way​​we​​speak​​about​​the

intent​​of​​this​​policy.​​It’s​​a​​Muslim

Ban​​through​​and​​through.

People​​who​​are​​Muslim

American​​Muslims

The​​terms​​“American​​Muslim”​​or

Muslims

Muslim​​Americans

“Muslim​​American”​​are

Muslims​​in​​the​​U.S.

exclusionary​​to​​the​​diversity​​of

Muslim​​experiences​​in​​the

United​​States.​​There​​are

undocumented​​Muslims,

immigrant​​Muslims,

dual-national​​Muslims,​​those

descended​​from​​slave

ancestors,​​those​​who​​are

indigenous,​​and​​many

overlapping​​identities​​in

between.​​We​​don’t​​want​​to​​set

ourselves​​in​​a​​bind​​where​​we

are​​advocating​​only​​for​​a

particular​​group​​of​​Muslims​​in

the​​United​​States​​and​​excluding

many,​​many​​other​​Muslims​​who

are​​also​​a​​part​​of​​our

communities.

Muslim​​communities

Muslim​​community

Muslims​​are​​one​​of​​the​​most

diverse​​faith​​groups​​in​​the

United​​States​​in​​terms​​of​​race

and​​national​​origin.​​This​​means

Muslim​​communities​​are​​not​​a

monolith—there​​is​​no​​one

“Muslim​​community”​​we​​can

point​​to​​that​​is​​representative​​of

all​​Muslims​​in​​the​​United​​States.