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Last updated 1/2/2013 2:51 PM Dominican University | Graduate School of Library and Information Science LIS 773-01 - School

Libraries | Spring 2013 | Mondays 6:00p - 9:00p in Crown 320 | January 14 - April 29 Don Hamerly, Instructor | dhamerly@dom.edu | 708-524-6598 oPhone | 512-426-0433 iPhone Office Hours: Mondays, 4:30 P.M. to 5:30 P.M., Crown 311, or at other times and locales by appointment. Course Description This course introduces you to the history, purpose, function, structure, and management of school libraries; provides practice for broad planning in curriculum, personnel, facilities, finance, acquisitions, and public relations; and examines contemporary issues, legislation, technologies, and service to the exceptional child. Learning Objectives Examine the history, purpose, function, and structure of school libraries within the scope of education reform. o (Match to GSLIS Learning Goals and Outcomes: 1a, 1b, 1c, 5f) Realize the instructional, administrative, and leadership roles of school librarians. o (Match to GSLIS Learning Goals and Outcomes: 2a, 2b, 3b, 3c, 4d, 5d, 5e, 5f, 5g) See strategic planning as a means to manage human, financial, and physical resources in a school library. o (Match to GSLIS Learning Goals and Outcomes: 2c, 2d, 3a, 5c, 5d, 5e, 5f, 5g) Explore the professional literature to answer essential questions about school libraries. o (Match to GSLIS Learning Goals and Outcomes: 1e, 3d, 5e, 5g) Practice means for assessing and advocating for school libraries. o (Match to GSLIS Learning Goals and Outcomes: 4a, 4b, 4c, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 5e, 5f, 5g) Analyze school libraries in action through field observations and interviews. o (Match to GSLIS Learning Goals and Outcomes: 5f, 5g) Articulate a personal vision of a quality school library. o (Match to GSLIS Learning Goals and Outcomes: 1d, 5e ) Required Texts American Association of School Librarians. (2009). Empowering learners: Guidelines for school library media programs. Chicago: AASL. st American Association of School Librarians. (2007). Standards for the 21 -century learner. Chicago: AASL. (provided in class) st American Association of School Librarians. (2009). Standards for the 21 -century learner in action. Chicago: AASL. rd Illinois School Library Media Association. (2010). Linking for Learning. 3 edition. Canton, Illinois: ISLMA. Suggested Texts American Association of School Librarians/Association for Educational Communications and Technology. (1998). Information power: Building partnerships for learning. Chicago: ALA. nd Crowley, J. D. (2011). Developing a vision: Strategic planning for the school librarian in the 21st century. 2 edition. Santa Barbara, CA: Libraries Unlimited. Dickinson, G. K. (2003). Empty pockets and full plates: Effective budget administration for library media specialists. Worthington OH: Linworth. nd Donham, J. (2008). Enhancing teaching and learning: A leadership guide for school library media specialists. 2 edition. New York: Neal-Schuman.
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Derived from Empowering Learners: Guidelines for School Library Media Programs; from Program Administration Principles of School Library Media Programs, outlined in Information Power: Building Partnerships for Learning, p. 100; and from the GSLIS Mission, Goals, and Objectives, http://www.dom.edu/academics/gslis/home/mission.html. 1

Last updated 1/2/2013 2:51 PM Dominican University | Graduate School of Library and Information Science OVERVIEW OF COURSE REQUIREMENTS List of Graded Assignments/Requirements (Explicit instructions for each will be available on the class site.) Participation Personal Reflections (5) Vision/Mission Statements Special Interest Lesson Standards In Action Staff Development Library Assessment Presentation Visitation Report/Action Plan Portfolio Review 15% 15% 5% 10% 15% 15% 20% 5% 100% Participation I hope that you will be involved, creative, and vigorous in class discussions and in the overall conduct of the class, but I expect, at least, that you will show up and engage yourself in whatever we are doing in class. In order to meet the expectations for participation, you should strive to do the following: Attend all class sessions. If you miss a class, it is your responsibility to arrange with another student to obtain all notes, handouts, and assignment sheets. I understand that situations arise that may prevent you from attending class, but you should avoid missing more than one session, if possible. I and your peers will rely on you to be here. Read all material prior to class. You should use the course readings to inform your classroom participation and your writing. You must integrate what you read with what you say and write. This last imperative is essential to the development of professional expertise and to the development of a collegial professional persona. Educate yourself and your peers. Successful completion of graduate programs and participation in professional life depend upon a willingness to demonstrate initiative and creativity. Participation in the professional and personal growth of colleagues is essential to ones own success as well as theirs. Such collegiality is at the heart of scholarship, so some assignments will encourage collaboration. Spend at least 3-4 hours in preparation for each hour in the classroom; therefore, a 3-credit hour graduate course requires a minimum of 9-12 hours per week of work outside the classroom. Participate in all class discussions. Speaking openly and freely is much easier and more acceptable to some than to others. I do not want you to feel pressured to say something every time we hold discussion, but I do expect that you will be attentive in discussions and contribute when you feel comfortable to do so. Complete all assignments on time. Late assignments are unacceptable unless you and I make an agreement at least 24 hours in advance of class time on the due date. I will consider emergency situations if and when they arise. Be responsible with shared resources, such as books and other material, library resources, and equipment. Ask for help from me, either in class, during office hours, on the telephone, through email, or in any other appropriate way, whenever you have the slightest question, issue, or concern. Personal Reflections Students will individually complete five (5) personal reflections of approximately 500 words each. Three (3) of the reflections will respond to some aspect(s) of a particular journal, blog, or other information resource related to school library practice and/or research. One (1) reflection will address an international issue related to school librarianship abroad. One (1) reflection may be a free response to any of the readings, class discussions, or topics of interest to the student. 2 ongoing due 1/28, 2/11, 2/25, 3/25, 4/22 due 2/4 (in-class draft); 2/7 (blog post) due 1/28 (topic) & throughout the semester due 3/18 due 4/15 due 4/29 due 4/29

Last updated 1/2/2013 2:51 PM Dominican University | Graduate School of Library and Information Science Vision/Mission Statements Based on reviews of state and national standards, benchmarks, and core competencies for school libraries/librarians, each student will articulate personal vision and mission statements for a school library. Special Interest Lesson Each student will choose a current and relevant topic of special interest to school librarians and prepare a lesson for the class on the chosen topic. The lesson will highlight the topic and provide an annotated bibliography of resources. Staff Development Session Working in teams, students will organize staff development sessions to help their learning communities understand what st the Standards for the 21 -Century Learner look like in action. Library Assessment Presentation Working in teams, students will give brief presentations assessing school library components per Linking for Learning or the AASL Planning Guide for Empowering Learners. Visitations Report/Action Plan Each student will visit two school libraries to interview professional librarians, observe them in action, and collaborate to develop an action plan to address an area of need in a school library. Portfolio Review The Illinois State Board of Education requires a professional portfolio for all prospective educators. You will begin to fulfill the portfolio requirement in LIS 773 in preparation for your required MLIS e-portfolio and for your exit interview from the SLMP program. The 773 SLMP portfolio will contain aspects from your work completed for the course.

Expectations for Written Work Writing shall be appropriate to the task, clearly expressed, and concise. If writing is difficult for you (and for whom is it not, really?), find someone whose skills you trust to proofread your written work, or go to the Academic Resource Center (Lower Level, Parmer Hall, 708/524-6682) for assistance. Use but do not trust your spell checker. Expectations for Technology Competence All students should have at least minimal competence in with the following technology: word processing; presenting to a group using presentation software (e.g, PowerPoint) and/or applications (e.g, Prezi); searching for and evaluating information using the open Web and proprietary databases; and creating web pages using software (e.g., Dreamweaver) and/or applications (e.g., Weebly or Google Sites). Comfort with WordPress is helpful, but the instructor will offer tutorials on how to use the WordPress-based class site. Expectations for Academic Honesty and Integrity "All students of the GSLIS are expected to observe high standards of academic honesty and integrity. Any student whose conduct violates such standards may be subject to disciplinary action as determined by due process." (GSLIS Bulletin, p. 18) The greatest threat to academic integrity is plagiarism. If you are not sure what constitutes plagiarism, see either or both of the following resources or any of a number of others like them on the Web: Purdues "Avoiding Plagiarism, http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/research/r_plagiar.html Indianas How to Recognize Plagiarism," http://www.indiana.edu/~istd/definition.html.

Last updated 1/2/2013 2:51 PM Dominican University | Graduate School of Library and Information Science GSLIS GRADING POLICY (GSLIS Bulletin, p. 18) Grade A Numeric Equivalent 4.0 Definition Outstanding achievement. Student performance demonstrates full command of the course materials and evinces a high level of originality and/or creativity [emphasis mine] that far surpasses course expectations; nearly flawless work. Excellent achievement. Student performance demonstrates thorough knowledge of the course materials and exceeds course expectations [emphasis mine] by completing all requirements in a superior manner. Good solid work. Student demonstrates strong comprehension of the course materials and exceeds course expectations on all tasks as defined in the course syllabus. Satisfactory acceptable work. Student performance meets designated course expectations, demonstrates understanding of the course materials and performs at an acceptable level. Marginal work. Student performance demonstrates incomplete, substandard understanding of course materials, or absence of required work; indicates danger of falling below acceptable grading standard. Unsatisfactory work. Student performance demonstrates unsatisfactory understanding of course materials and inability to meet course requirements. Unacceptable work. Student performance demonstrates incomplete and inadequate understanding of course materials. Poor work. Failing grade.

A-

3.67

B+ B B-

3.33 3.0 2.67

C+ C CF

2.33 2.0 1.67 0.0

MY GRADING PRACTICE When I evaluate assignments, I assign points, not letter grades. I base the points I assign on rubrics, which I provide for all assignments. I often include peer assessments when I evaluate assignments, primarily to judge the consensus about the quality of work presented. If you ever have a question or concern about why you received a score on a particular assignment, please ask. I welcome questions about grades as opportunities to think critically about the work were doing. If your semester point total 90 (is equal to or greater than 90), then you will have earned an A of some kind. If your semester point total 80, then you will have earned at least a B of some kind. Whether these are A, A-, B+, B, or B- depends upon the comparison of point totals for all students. For example, if a student earns a total of 90 points and the highest point total in the class is 98, the student may earn an A-. If, on the other hand, a student earns 90 points and the highest point total in the class is 91, then the student may earn an A.

Last updated 1/2/2013 2:51 PM Dominican University | Graduate School of Library and Information Science COURSE SCHEDULE The following schedule is tentative and may change as we progress through the semester. I will make readings other than those in the required texts available via the class site: http://773.donhamerly.info.

DATE

TOPICS, REQUIRED READING, ACTIVITIES

JAN 14

Overview of Course & SLMP Review course requirements and expectations; review SLMP requirements (including e-portfolio); discuss how to learn to be a highly-qualified, professional school librarian; assign personal reflections & special interest choice READ: Course syllabus Guiding Principles for Teaching and Learning Illinois State Board of Education Standards for Library Information Specialist Sample Job Description from Learning4Life Empowering Learners, Appendices A, B, C, & D

**Last day to drop/add classes is Thursday, January 24

JAN 21

No meeting MLK Day

JAN 28

Vision, Mission, Collaboration Discuss scope of the learning community and ways to build collaborative partnerships; introduce strategic planning as a means for developing a school librarys vision and mission; assign vision/mission READ: Empowering Learners, Section I, Developing Visions for Learning, pp. 7-18; Appendices F & G Empowering Learners, Section II, Teaching for Learning, pp. 19-21, through Building Collaborative Partnerships Linking for Learning, p. 5, 19-23 Levels of Collaboration: Where Does Your Work Fit In? Strength in Numbers: Data-driven Collaboration May Not Sound Sexy, But It Could Save Your Job Other readings as assigned Personal Reflection 1 Special Interest Topic

DUE:

Last updated 1/2/2013 2:51 PM Dominican University | Graduate School of Library and Information Science FEB 4 School Library Standards Then and Now Discuss history of school libraries, school library standards, and school library associations in terms of education reform; explore role of the school library/librarian in resources-based and inquiry-based instruction and assessment READ: Empowering Learners, Section II, Teaching for Learning, pp. 21-28, Appendix E st Standards for the 21 -Century Learner Linking for Learning, pp. 7-13 Standards Our Earliest History Development of a Professional School Library Association: AASL History of School Library Standards- A Timeline Frances Henne and the Development of School Library Standards Other readings as assigned

Guest: Don Adcock, retired Illinois library leader DUE: Vision/Mission Draft (final version to be posted to class blog by end-of-day THU, FEB 7)

FEB 11

Standards In Action: Skills Continue to explore role of the school library/librarian in instruction and assessment; assign staff development proposal READ: Standards In Action, pp. 1-39 Linking for Learning, pp. 24-29, 76-77 Deep Learning Through Concept-Based Inquiry Enduring Understandings Where Are They in the Librarys Curriculum? Evidence-Based Practice: Evolution or Revolution? Inquiry Unpacked: An Introduction to Inquiry-Based Learning Other readings as assigned

EXPLORE: Instructional Design Information Literacy Resources Mind Map DUE: Personal Reflection 2 Special Interest Lessons 1 & 2

Last updated 1/2/2013 2:51 PM Dominican University | Graduate School of Library and Information Science FEB 18 Standards In Action: Dispositions, Responsibilities, Self-Assessment Continue to explore role of the school library/librarian in instruction and assessment; work on staff development proposals READ: Standards In Action, pp. 40-67 Evidence = Assessment = Advocacy Research in School Library Media for the Next Decade: Polishing the Diamond st Questions for the 21 -Century Learner Other readings as assigned

WATCH: What Does it Mean to be Literate in the 21st Century? Chart Wars: The Political Power of Data Visualization EXPLORE: A Periodic Table of Visualization Methods DUE: Special Interest Lessons 3 & 4

FEB 25

The Learning Environment: Staffing Discuss the school librarians role in developing and maintaining library support staff; work on staff development proposals; assign visitations report/action plan READ: Empowering Learners, Section 3, Building the Learning Environment, p. 29-32 Linking for Learning, pp. 44-45; 64-65 Other readings as assigned Personal Reflection 3 Special Interest Lessons 5 & 6

DUE:

MAR 4

No meeting Mid Semester Vacation

Last updated 1/2/2013 2:51 PM Dominican University | Graduate School of Library and Information Science MAR 11 Learning Space Examine the school librarys physical and virtual space; visit a model junior high school library NOTE: READ: The class will meet at Aptasik Junior High School in Buffalo Grove Empowering Learners, Section 3, Building the Learning Environment, pp. 33-34 Linking for Learning, pp. 31-35 Designing a Facility: Making It a Place Where Every Student Succeeds Facilities planning survey Library design: community access visual control traffic patterns multiple activities aesthetics flexibility and the future Yesterdays libraries, tomorrows libraries 12 differences Way Beyond Fuddy-Duddy: New Libraries Bring Out the Best in Students Philosophy in bricks and mortar Other readings as assigned

MAR 18

Budget Examine strategic planning as a means for developing and maintaining an outcomes-based budget for the school library; assign library program assessment READ: Empowering Learners, Section 3, Building the Learning Environment, pp. 35-36 Linking for Learning, pp. 36-37 Budgeting for Lean, Mean Times Other readings as assigned

EXPLORE: School Library Journals Spending Survey Library Financial Resources from the Texas State Library and Archives AASL Planning Guide for Empowering Learners Illinois State Library School District Library Grant Program Illinois Study from ISLMA Creating a Commitment for School Libraries: Developing a Motivating Message for Your Audience DUE: Staff Development Proposal

Last updated 1/2/2013 2:51 PM Dominican University | Graduate School of Library and Information Science MAR 25 Policies Discuss the importance of policies to the success of the school library program; team plan for library program assessment READ: Empowering Learners, Section 3, Building the Learning Environment, pp. 37-38 Linking for Learning, pp. 92-93 The Arrival of Our New Kindles and Procedures for Cataloging the Kindles and Kindle eBooks AUP Driven by Vision Not Protection AUPs in a Web 2.0 World Acceptable Use Policies Should Your Library Have a Social Media Policy? Other readings as assigned Personal Reflection 4 Special Interest Lessons 7 & 8

DUE:

Happy Easter!

APR 1

Collection Discuss selection and de-selection policies and practices for developing and maintaining school library collections; team plan for library program assessment READ: Empowering Learners, Section 3, Building the Learning Environment, pp. 38-40 Linking for Learning, p. 80 Collection Development Policy (University Laboratory HS) New Collection Development Policy for School Libraries (CPS) Digital School Library Leaves Books Behind Other readings as assigned Special Interest Lessons 9 & 10

DUE:

APR 8

Outreach | Advocacy | Professional Development Discuss the importance of outreach, advocacy, and professional development for building and maintaining a school library program; team plan for library program assessment READ: Empowering Learners, Section 3, Building the Learning Environment, pp. 41-44 Linking for Learning, pp. 42-43; 48-55; 72-75 Standards in Action, pp. 17-62 Ten Reasons to Hug Your School Librarian Other readings as assigned Special Interest Lessons 11 & 12

DUE:

Last updated 1/2/2013 2:51 PM Dominican University | Graduate School of Library and Information Science APR 15 Leadership Discuss the importance of the school librarians taking on a leadership role in the learning community; present library program assessments READ: Empowering Learners, Section 4, Empowering Learning Through Leadership, pp. 45-48 Funding Opportunities promoted by Americas Promise Alliance Straight from the DOE: Dispelling Myths About Blocked Sites Other readings as assigned Library Program Assessment

Due:

APR 22

Librarian Evaluation/Assessment Discuss evolving nature of school librarian evaluation; discuss finalizing the visitations report/action plan, e-portfolio READ: Principals' Evaluation of School Librarians: A Study of Strategic and Nonstrategic Evidence-based Approaches AASLs L4L Sample School Librarian Performance and Evaluation System

EXPLORE: REACH for Librarians (CPS Framework for Teacher-Librarians NBPTS Library Media Standards DUE: Personal Reflection 5 Special Interest Lessons 13 & 14

APR 29

Story Time Present visitations reports/action plans DUE: Visitations Report/ Action Plan Portfolio for Review

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