Sunteți pe pagina 1din 25

ANSI/AMCA

Standard 204-05
(R2012)
Balance Quality and
Vibration Levels for Fans

An American National Standard


Approved by ANSI on March 28, 2012

AIR MOVEMENT AND CONTROL


ASSOCIATION INTERNATIONAL, INC.

The International Authority on Air System Components

Licensed to ESS Customer. ANSI store order # 123. Downloaded 11/13/2014 12:18 PM. Single user license only. Copying and networking prohibited.
ANSI/AMCA Standard 204-05
(R2012)

Balance Quality and Vibration Levels for Fans

Air Movement and Control Association International


30 W. University Drive
Arlington Heights, Illinois
60004

Licensed to ESS Customer. ANSI store order # 123. Downloaded 11/13/2014 12:18 PM. Single user license only. Copying and networking prohibited.
AMCA Publications

Authority This edition of ANSI/AMCA Standard 204 was adopted by the membership of the Air Movement and Control
Association International, Inc., on 03 August 2003. It was reaffirmed by the Air Movement Division and
approved as an American National Standard on March 28, 2012.

This standard addresses the need of both the users and manufacturers of fans for technically accurate but
uncomplicated information of the subjects of fan balance precision and vibration levels. The data presented
herein is referenced to applicable national and international standards and is in harmony with these stan-
dards, including ISO 14694:2003, Industrial fans - Specification for balance quality and vibration levels.
Information from the reference standards is supplemented by years of experience on the part of committee
members and from other contributors in the industry.

Copyright 2012 by Air Movement and Control Association International, Inc.

All rights reserved. Reproduction or translation of any part of this work beyond that permitted by Sections
107 and 108 of the United States Copyright Act without the permission of the copyright owner is unlawful.
Requests for permission or further information should be addressed to the Executive Director, Air Movement
and Control Association International, Inc. at 30 West University Drive, Arlington Heights, IL 60004-1893
U.S.A.

Objections Air Movement and Control Association International, Inc. will consider and decide all written complaints
regarding its standards, certification programs, or interpretations thereof. For information on procedures for
submitting and handling complaints, write to:

Air Movement and Control Association International


30 West University Drive
Arlington Heights, IL 60004-1893 U.S.A.

AMCA International, Incorporated


c/o Federation of Environmental Trade Associations
2 Waltham Court, Milley Lane, Hare Hatch
Reading, Berkshire, United Kingdom
RG10 9TH

Disclaimer AMCA uses its best efforts to produce standards for the benefit of the industry and the public in light of avail-
able information and accepted industry practices. However, AMCA does not guarantee, certify or assure
the safety or performance of any products, components or systems tested, designed, installed or operated
in accordance with AMCA standards or that any tests conducted under its standards will be non-hazardous
or free from risk.

Licensed to ESS Customer. ANSI store order # 123. Downloaded 11/13/2014 12:18 PM. Single user license only. Copying and networking prohibited.
Review Committee

Dr. John Cermak Acme Engineering & Manufacturing Corporation


Committee Chair

Dick Williamson Twin City Fan Companies, Ltd.


Vice Chair

Enrique Hernandez Flakt Woods Mexico Fans, S.A. de C.V.

Dr. Vasanthi Iyer Air Movement Solutions, LLC

Ralph Jackson Cincinnati Fan & Ventilator Company

Tim Kuski Greenheck Fan Corporation

Robert W. Lipke RWL Technical Services, Inc.

David Marshall Howden Buffalo, Inc.

Scott Phillips The New York Blower Company

Bradley F. Skidmore. P.E. Loren Cook Company

Tan Tin Tin Kruger Ventilation Industries Pte. Ltd.

Paul R. Saxon (ret.) AMCA International Staff

Joe Brooks AMCA International Staff

Licensed to ESS Customer. ANSI store order # 123. Downloaded 11/13/2014 12:18 PM. Single user license only. Copying and networking prohibited.
Related AMCA Documents

Related AMCA Publication 11 Certified Ratings Program - Operating Manual


Publications
AMCA Publication 111 Laboratory Accreditation Program

AMCA Publication 211 Certified Ratings Program - Air Performance

Related ANSI/AMCA Standard 210 Laboratory Methods of Testing Fans for Aerodynamic Performance Rating
Standards

Licensed to ESS Customer. ANSI store order # 123. Downloaded 11/13/2014 12:18 PM. Single user license only. Copying and networking prohibited.
Contents

1. Purpose and Scope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

1.1 Purpose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

1.2 Scope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

2. Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

3. Definitions / Units of Measure / Symbols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

3.1 Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

3.2 Units of measure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

3.3 Symbols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

4. Application Categories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

5. Balancing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

5.1 Balance quality grade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

5.2 Permissible residual unbalance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

6. Vibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

6.1 Measurement requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

6.2 Fan support system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

6.3 Factory tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

6.4 Vibration limits for operation in-situ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

7. Other Rotating Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

8. Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

8.1 Balance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

8.2 Vibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

Annex A SI / I-P Conversion Table (Informative) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

Annex B Relationships (Informative) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Annex C Maximum Permissible Residual Imbalance (Informative) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Annex D Instruments and Calibration (Informative) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

D.1 Instruments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

D.2 Calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Annex E References (Informative) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

Licensed to ESS Customer. ANSI store order # 123. Downloaded 11/13/2014 12:18 PM. Single user license only. Copying and networking prohibited.
Licensed to ESS Customer. ANSI store order # 123. Downloaded 11/13/2014 12:18 PM. Single user license only. Copying and networking prohibited.
Balance Quality and Vibration Levels for Fans

1. Purpose and Scope 2. Normative References

This standard addresses the subjects of fan balance and The following standards contain provisions that, through
vibration. It is part of a series of standards and publications specific reference in this text, constitute provisions of this
listed in Annex E that cover important aspects related to the American National Standard. At the time of publication of
design, manufacture and use of fans. this standard the editions indicated were valid.

Other standards exist that deal with the vibration of machines All standards are subject to revision, and parties to agree-
in general. This standard considers only fans. Vibration ments based on this American National Standard are
is recognized to be an important parameter regarding the encouraged to investigate the possibility of applying the
mechanical operation of fans. Balance quality is a precondi- most recent editions of the standards listed below.
tion to satisfactory mechanical operation.
[1] ANSI S2.7-1982 (R1997)
1.1 Purpose Balancing Terminology
American National Standards Institute
The purpose of this standard is to define appropriate fan 11 West 42nd Street, New York, NY 10035 U.S.A
balance quality and operating vibration levels to individuals
who specify, manufacture, use, and maintain fans. [2] ISO 1925:2001
Mechanical Vibration Balancing Vocabulary
1.2 Scope International Organization for Standardization
1 Rue de Varembe, Case Oistake 56, Ch-1211, Geneve
This standard covers fans with rigid rotors, generally found in 20, SWITZERLAND
commercial heating, ventilating and air conditioning; indus-
trial process applications; mine/tunnel ventilation applica- [3] ANSI S2.19-1989 (R1997)
tions, and power generation applications. Other applications Balance Quality of Rigid Rotating Bodies (ISO 1940)
are not specifically excluded, except as follows: American National Standards Institute,
11 West 42nd Street, New York, NY 10035 U.S.A.
Excluded are installations that involve severe forces,
impacts, or extreme temperature acting on the fan. 3. Definitions / Units of Measure / Symbols

Fan foundations and installation practices are beyond the 3.1 Definitions
scope of this standard. Foundation design and fan installa-
tion are not normally the responsibilities of the fan manufac- 3.1.1 Balancing
turer. It is fully expected that the foundation upon which the The process of adding or removing mass in a plane or planes
fan is mounted will provide the support and stability neces- on a rotor in order to move the center of gravity towards the
sary to meet the vibration criteria of the fan as it is delivered axis of rotation.
from the factory.
3.1.2 Balance quality grade
Other factors such as impeller cleanliness, aerodynamic The recommended limits for residual unbalance of a rotor
conditions, background vibration, operation at rotational based upon the intended application. (Note: Commonly
speeds other than those agreed upon, and maintenance of used balance quality grades in ANSI S2.19 refer to the vibra-
the fan affect fan vibration level but are beyond the scope of tion that would result if the rotor operated in free space, i.e.,
this standard. Balance Quality Grade G6.3 corresponds to a shaft vibra-
tion of 6.3 mm/s velocity, at the operating rotational speed
This standard is intended to cover only the balance or vibra- of the rotor). The value represents the product of the unbal-
tion of the fan and does not take into account the effect of ance multiplied by the angular velocity and divided by the
fan vibration on personnel, equipment, or processes. weight of the rotor.

Any or all portions of this standard, or modifications thereof, 3.1.3 Displacement


are subject to agreement between the concerned parties. The distance that a body moves from a stationary or neutral
position.

ANSI/AMCA 204-05 (R2012) | 1


Licensed to ESS Customer. ANSI store order # 123. Downloaded 11/13/2014 12:18 PM. Single user license only. Copying and networking prohibited.
3.1.4 Electrical run-out provides the necessary support. A fan foundation must have
The total measured variation in the apparent location of a sufficient mass and rigidity to avoid vibration amplification.
ferrous shaft surface during a complete slow rotation of that
shaft as determined by an eddy current probe system. This 3.1.14 Frequency
measurement may be affected by variations in the electrical/ In cyclical motion, the number of cycles that occur per
magnetic properties of the shaft material as well as varia- second (Hz) or cycles occurring per minute (CPM).
tions in the shaft surface.
3.1.15 Mechanical run-out
3.1.5 Fan application category The total actual variation in the location of a shaft surface
A grouping used to describe fan applications, their appropri- during a complete slow rotation of the shaft as determined
ate Balance Quality Grades, and Recommended Vibration by a stationary measurement device such as a dial indicator.
Levels.
3.1.16 Journal
3.1.6 Fan assembly The part of a rotor which is in contact with or supported by a
The fan assembly consists of those items typically packaged bearing in which it revolves. [ISO 1925]
together as a complete fan, including, as applicable: rotor,
bearings, belts, housing, motor, sheaves, and mounting 3.1.17 Mils
base/structure. In the case of a cooling tower application, A unit of measure that describes displacement. One mil
the fan assembly is considered to consist of the rotor alone. equals one-thousandth of an inch (1 mil = 0.001 inch)

3.1.7 Fan rotor 3.1.18 Overall fan vibration


An assembly consisting of a fan impeller mounted on its See Filter-out; broad pass.
shaft. (AMCA 99-0066)
3.1.19 Peak (pk)
3.1.8 Fan vibration level A displacement, velocity, or acceleration value occurring at
The vibration amplitude measured at a fan bearing and the maximum deviation from a zero or stationary value. See
expressed in units of Figure 3.1 and see also: RMS.
displacement or velocity.
3.1.20 Peak-to-peak (pk-pk)
3.1.9 Filter The total range traversed in one cycle. Peak-to-peak read-
A device used to separate vibration on the basis of its ings apply to displacement only.
frequency. Vibration meters normally have adjustable filters
to allow measurements at a frequency range of interest. 3.1.21 Residual unbalance
Unbalance of any kind that remains after balancing. [ANSI
3.1.10 Filter-in; sharp S2.7-1982 (R1986)]
Vibration measured only at a frequency of interest.
3.1.22 Rigid support
3.1.11 Filter-out; broad pass A fan support system designed so that the first natural
Vibration measured over a wide frequency range; some- frequency of the system is well above the frequency corre-
times called overall vibration. sponding to the operating rotational speed of the fan. Note:
The rigidity of a foundation is a relative quantity. It must be
3.1.12 Flexible support considered in conjunction with the rigidity of the machine
A fan support system designed so that the first natural bearing system. The ratio of bearing housing vibration
frequency of the support is well below the frequency corre- to foundation vibration is a characteristic quantity for the
sponding to the operating rotational speed of the fan. Often evaluation of foundation flexibility influences. A foundation
this involves compliant elastic elements between the fan may be considered massive if the vibration amplitude of the
and the support structure. This condition is achieved by foundation (in any direction) near the machines feet or base
suspending the machine on a spring or by mounting on an frame are less than 25% of the maximum amplitude that is
elastic support (springs, rubber, etc.). The natural oscilla- measured at the adjacent bearing housing in any direction.
tion frequencies of the suspension and machine is typically -NEMA MG1-1993, Rev. 1, Part 7, Section 7.06.2.
less than 25% of the frequency corresponding to the lowest
speed of the machine under test-NEMA MG 1-1993, Rev. 3.1.23 Rigid rotor
1, Part 7, Section 7.06.1. A rotor is considered to be rigid when its unbalance can
be corrected in any two arbitrarily selected planes (of rota-
3.1.13 Foundation tion). After the correction, its residual unbalance does not
Refers to the component to which the fan is mounted that change significantly relative to the shaft axis at any (rota-

2 | ANSI/AMCA 204-05 (R2012)


Licensed to ESS Customer. ANSI store order # 123. Downloaded 11/13/2014 12:18 PM. Single user license only. Copying and networking prohibited.
tional) speed up to the maximum service (rotational) speed. 3.1.32 Velocity
[Adapted from ANSI S2.7-1982(R1986)] In cyclic motion, the time rate of change in displacement.

3.1.24 RMS 3.1.33 Vibration


The root-mean-square value. For true sinusoidal motion the The alternating mechanical motion of an elastic system, the
RMS value is equal to 2/2 times the peak value. components of which are amplitude, frequency and phase.
In general practice, vibration values are reported as:
3.1.25 Rotor
A body, capable of rotation, generally with journals which are displacement, peak-to-peak, in mm (mils)
supported by bearings. [ANSI S2.7] See also: Fan Rotor. velocity, peak, in mm/s (in./s)
acceleration, peak, in gs, or m/s2 (in./s2)
3.1.26 Speed, balancing
That rotational speed, expressed in revolutions per minute Standard gravitational acceleration (1g) = 9.80665 m/s2
(rpm), at which a (fan) rotor is balanced. [ANSI S2.7] (386.09 in./s2)

3.1.27 Speed, design 3.1.34 Vibration spectrum


The maximum rotational speed, measured in revolutions per A graphical representation of vibration amplitude versus
minute (rpm), for which the fan is designed to operate. frequency.

3.1.28 Speed, service 3.1.35 Vibration transducer


Rotational speed, measured in revolutions per minute A device designed to be attached to a mechanical system
(rpm), at which a rotor operates in its final installation or for measurement of vibration. It produces an electronic
environment. signal that can be displayed or otherwise processed, that is
proportional to the vibration of the system.
3.1.29 Tri-axial set
A set of three measurements taken in three mutually perpen- 3.2 Units of measure
dicular directions, normally: horizontal, vertical, and axial.
Units of measure shall be as given in the definitions found
3.1.30 Trim balance in Section 3.1. In the text and examples, SI (metric) units
The balance process that makes minor unbalance correc- of measure are given as primary units followed by IP (inch-
tions which may become necessary as a result of the fan pound) units of measure.
assembly or installation process.
3.3 Symbols
3.1.31 Unbalance
A condition of a rotor in which its rotation results in centrifu-
Symbols used in this standard are identified/defined where
gal forces being applied to the rotors supporting bearings.
they are presented in pertinent equations.
Unbalance is usually measured by the product of the mass
of the rotor times the distance between its center of gravity
and its center of rotation in a plane.

Figure 3.1
Vibration Cycle

ANSI/AMCA 204-05 (R2012) | 3


Licensed to ESS Customer. ANSI store order # 123. Downloaded 11/13/2014 12:18 PM. Single user license only. Copying and networking prohibited.
4. Application Categories balance quality grade and vibration limits must be agreed
upon as part of the contract for the fan. In the event that no
The design/structure of a fan and its intended application such agreement exists, fans purchased as being required to
are important criteria for categorizing the many types of comply with this standard shall meet the Table 6.2 vibration
fans in terms of applicable and meaningful balance quality limits (assembled fan) or the Table 5.1 residual unbalance
grades and vibration levels. requirements (unassembled fan or rotor assembly only).

Table 4.1 categorizes fans by their application and driver The purchaser may contract for a particular mounting
power to arrive at appropriate Balance and Vibration (BV) arrangement to be used for factory testing of an assembled
application categories. fan in order to match (as nearly as possible) the planned
in-situ mounting at the job site. If no specific contract on
A fan manufacturer will typically identify the appropriate balance/vibration exists, the fan may be mounted either
application category based on the type of fan and power. rigidly or flexibly for the test, regardless of the in-situ
A purchaser of a complete fan assembly may be interested mounting.
in one or more of the following: the Balance Grade (Table
5.1), vibration as tested in the factory (Table 6.2), or vibra- 5. Balancing
tion in-situ (Table 6.3). Typically, one Balance and Vibration
category will cover both the application and the driver The fan manufacturer is responsible for balancing the fan
power considerations. However, a purchaser may request a impeller to acceptable commercial standards. This stan-
Balance and Vibration category different from the one listed dard is based on ANSI S2.19 (ISO 1940). Balancing done
for the application and driver power considerations. Some in conformance with this standard shall be performed on a
may desire a more precise balance quality grade or lower highly sensitive, purpose-built balance machine that permits
vibration level than is typical for the application. accurate assessment of residual unbalance.
In most cases, the Balance and Vibration category, the

Table 4.1
Fan Application Categories for Balance and Vibration

Application Examples Driver Power kW (hp) Fan Application


Limits Category, BV
Residential Ceiling fans, attic fans, window 0.15 (0.2) BV-1
AC > 0.15 (0.2) BV-2

HVAC & Agricultural Building ventilation and air- 3.7 (5.0) BV-2
conditioning; commercial systems > 3.7 (5.0) BV-3

Industrial Process & Baghouse, scrubber, mine, 298 (400) BV-3


Power Generation, Etc. conveying, boilers, combustion > 298 (400) BV-4
air, pollution control, wind tunnels
Transportation & Marine Locomotives, trucks, automobiles 15 (20) BV-3
> 15 (20) BV-4

Transit/Tunnel Subway emergency ventilation, 75 (100) BV-3


tunnel fans, garage ventilation > 75 (100) BV-4

Tunnel Jet Fans ALL BV-4


Petrochemical Process Hazardous gases, process fans 37 (50) BV-3
> 37 (50) BV-4

Computer Chip Clean room ALL BV-5


Manufacturer

4 | ANSI/AMCA 204-05 (R2012)


Licensed to ESS Customer. ANSI store order # 123. Downloaded 11/13/2014 12:18 PM. Single user license only. Copying and networking prohibited.
5.1 Balance quality grade I-P Units:

The following Balance Quality Grades apply to fan impel- eper = (G/25.4)
lers. A fan manufacturer may include other rotating compo-
nents (shaft, coupling, sheave/pulley, etc.) in the rotating Uper = W eper = (30/[25.4])G W/N for Uper in (lb in.)
assembly being balanced. In addition, balance of individual
components may be required. See Annex E for balance = 2N/60
requirements for couplings and pulleys.
Where:
Table 5.1 eper = Specific unbalance, in. or (lb in.)/lb
BV Categories and Balance Quality Grades Uper = Permissible residual unbalance (moment), (lb in.)
= Angular velocity, rad/s
Balance Quality N = Rotor rotational speed, rpm
Fan Application
Grade for Rigid W = Rotor weight, lbm
Category
Rotors/Impeller
In most applications, the permissible residual unbalance
BV-1* G 16
Uper in each of two correction planes can be set at Uper/2.
Whenever possible during balancing, a fan impeller should
BV-2 G 16
be mounted on the shaft that will be used for the final assem-
BV-3 G 6.3 bly. If a mandrel is used during balancing, care should be
taken to avoid eccentricity due to a loose hub-to-mandrel fit.
BV-4 G 2.5
Refer to Annex C for graph of eper vs. service speed.
BV-5 G 1.0
Measurement of the residual unbalance shall be made in
* Note: In Fan Application Category BV-1 there may be accordance with ANSI S2.19, Section 8.
some extremely small fan rotors weighing less than 227
grams (8 ounces). In such cases, residual unbalance may 6. Vibration
be difficult to determine accurately. The fabrication process
must ensure reasonably equal weight distribution about the 6.1 Measurement requirements
axis of rotation.
Figures 6.1, 6.2, 6.3 and 6.4 illustrate some of the possible
5.2 Permissible residual unbalance locations and directions for taking vibration measurements
at each fan bearing. The number and location of measure-
G grades as given in Table 5.1 and Balance Quality Grades ments to be made during factory or in-situ operation is at the
are constants derived from the product of the relationship discretion of the fan manufacturer or by agreement with the
eper, expressed in mm/s, where eper is the permissible purchaser. It is recommended that measurements be made
residual specific unbalance, and is the angular velocity of at the impeller shaft bearings. Where this is not possible, the
the impeller. pick-up shall be mounted in the shortest direct mechanical
path between the transducer and the bearing. A transducer
Thus: shall not be mounted on an unsupported panel, guard, or
elsewhere on the fan where a solid signal path cannot be
SI Units:
obtained. A transducer may be mounted on a fan housing
and or flange where a solid signal path is obtained between
eper = 1,000(G/)
a bearing and the measurement point.
Uper = M eper = (30,000/)G M/N
A horizontal measurement shall always be made in a radial
direction and perpendicular to the axis of rotation. A vertical
= 2N/60
measurement reading shall always be made perpendicular
to the axis of rotation and perpendicular to a horizontal read-
Where:
ing. An axial measurement shall always be made parallel to
eper = Specific unbalance, m or (g mm)/kg
the shaft (rotor) axis of rotation.
Uper = Permissible residual unbalance, (g mm)
= Angular velocity, rad/s
N = Rotor rotational speed, rpm
M = Rotor mass, kg

ANSI/AMCA 204-05 (R2012) | 5


Licensed to ESS Customer. ANSI store order # 123. Downloaded 11/13/2014 12:18 PM. Single user license only. Copying and networking prohibited.
Figure 6.1
Transducer Mounting Locations Axial Fan, Horizontal Airflow

Figure 6.2
Transducer Mounting Locations Single Width Centrifugal Fan

6 | ANSI/AMCA 204-05 (R2012)


Licensed to ESS Customer. ANSI store order # 123. Downloaded 11/13/2014 12:18 PM. Single user license only. Copying and networking prohibited.
Figure 6.3
Transducer Mounting Locations Double Width Centrifugal Fan

Figure 6.4
Transducer Mounting Locations Axial Fan, Vertical Airflow

ANSI/AMCA 204-05 (R2012) | 7


Licensed to ESS Customer. ANSI store order # 123. Downloaded 11/13/2014 12:18 PM. Single user license only. Copying and networking prohibited.
6.1.1 Seismic measurements probe support and the fan shaft to move in phase such that
All vibration values in this standard are seismic measure- no relative motion is measured even though high vibration
ments that represent motion of the fan bearing housing. levels relative to a fixed frame of reference exist. Because
of this, when proximity probes are used, seismic vibration
Observations shall include measurements made with accel- pickups are also recommended.
erometer or velocity-type instruments. Particular attention
should be given to ensure that the vibration-sensing trans- This measurement involves the apparent motion of the shaft
ducer is correctly mounted without looseness, rocking, or surface. Measurements are affected not only by vibration
resonance. of the shaft but also by any mechanical run-out of the shaft
if the shaft is bent or out-of-round. The magnetic/electrical
The size and weight of the transducer and its mounting properties of the shaft material at the point of measurement
system should not be so large that its presence signifi- also affect the electrical run-out of the shaft as measured
cantly affects the vibration response characteristics of the by a proximity probe. The combined mechanical and elec-
fan. Variables associated with transducer mounting and trical probe-track run-out of the shaft material at the point
variations in instrument calibration can lead to varia- of measurement should not exceed 0.0127mm (0.0005
tions in measurements of 10%. in.) peak-to-peak, or 25% of the start-up/satisfactory vibra-
tion displacement value, whichever is greater. This run-out
6.1.2 Displacement measurements should be determined during a slow-roll speed test (100 to
The following discussion applies to measurement of shaft 400 rpm), where the unbalance forces on the rotor are negli-
displacement within a sleeve bearing oil film by means of gible. Special shaft preparation may be required to achieve
proximity probe systems. satisfactory run-out measurement. Proximity probes should
be mounted directly in the bearing housing whenever
Such systems measure the relative motion between the possible.
surface of the rotating shaft and the bearing housing. Clearly,
the allowable displacement amplitude must be limited to EXAMPLE: Recommended guidelines for normal 152 mm
a value less than the diametric clearance of the bearing. (6 in.) diameter sleeve bearing having a horizontal internal
This internal clearance varies as a function of the bearing clearance of 0.33 mm (0.013 in.):
size, the radial/axial loading, the bearing type, and the axis
of interest (i.e., some designs have an elliptical bore with LIMITS OF RELATIVE SHAFT VIBRATION
larger clearance in the horizontal axis than in the vertical
axis). Therefore, it is not the intent of this standard to estab- Start-up / = (0.25 0.33 mm) = 0.0825 mm,
lish discrete shaft displacement limits for all bearings and satisfactory pk-pk (SI)
fan applications. However, the following guideline is recom- = (0.25 0.013 in.) = 0.0033 in.
mended for shaft displacement limits. The values shown in or 3.3 mils, pk-pk (I-P)
Table 6.1 are percentages of the total available clearance
within the bearing in each axis. Alarm = (0.50 0.33 mm) = 0.165 mm,
pk-pk (SI)
Table 6.1 = (0.50 0.013 in.) = 0.0065 in.
Maximum Recommended Displacements or 6.5 mils, pk-pk (I-P)

Condition Maximum recommended Shut-down = (0.70 0.33 mm) = 0.231 mm,


Displacement as a percent of pk-pk (SI)
available diametral clearance (any = (0.70 0.013 in.) = 0.0091 in.
axis) or 9 mils, pk-pk (I-P)
Start-up / < +25% Combined mechanical and electrical run-out of the shaft at
Satisfactory Note: Contact bearing supplier to the point of vibration measurement:
obtain the available diametral and
axial clearances within the particular a. 0.0127 mm (0.0005 in.)
sleeve bearings being used.

Alarm Level 50% b. 0.25 0.0825 mm = 0.0206 mm (SI)


0.25 0.0033 in. = 0.0008 in., or 0.8 mils (I-P)
Shut-Down Level 70%
Choose the greater of the two values (a or b), 0.0206 mm
Caution should be used when relying solely on proximity (0.8 mils)
probes for vibration alarming. It is possible for the proximity

8 | ANSI/AMCA 204-05 (R2012)


Licensed to ESS Customer. ANSI store order # 123. Downloaded 11/13/2014 12:18 PM. Single user license only. Copying and networking prohibited.
6.2 Fan support system ments taken at the bearing housings as shown in Figures
6.1 through 6.4.
Fan installations are classified for vibration severity accord-
ing to their support flexibility. To be classified as rigidly The vibration velocity of a newly commissioned fan should
supported, the fan and support system should have a funda- be at or below the START-UP level. As operation of the fan
mental (lowest) natural frequency above the running speed. increases with time, it is expected that fan vibration level
To be classified as flexibly supported, the fan and support will increase due to wear and other accumulated effects. In
system should have a fundamental frequency below the general, an increase in vibration is reasonable as long as
running speed. Generally, a large, well-designed concrete the level does not reach the ALARM value for the category.
foundation will result in a rigid support, whereas a fan
mounted on vibration isolators will be classified as flexibly If the severity of vibration velocity increases to the ALARM
supported. level, action should be initiated immediately to determine the
cause of the increase, and action taken to correct the condi-
Fans mounted on steelwork can be in either category, tion. Operation at this condition should be carefully moni-
depending on the structural design. In case of doubt, analy- tored and limited to the minimum time required to develop a
sis or tests should be performed to determine the funda- program of corrective action.
mental natural frequency. Note that in some cases a fan
could be classified as rigidly supported in one measurement If the vibration velocity increases to the SHUTDOWN level,
direction and flexibly supported in another. (From AMCA corrective action should be taken immediately or the fan
801-01, Section 5.3.3, p.19) should be shut down.

6.3 Factory tests Failure to reduce the SHUT-DOWN level vibration velocity
to the acceptable recommended level could lead to bear-
The following vibration limit values apply to an assembled ing failure, cracking of rotor parts and fan housing structural
fan tested in the manufacturers factory. welds, and ultimately, a catastrophic failure.

Table 6.2 Historical data is an important factor when considering the


Seismic Vibration Limits for Tests Conducted at the vibration severity of any fan installation. A sudden increase
Factory in vibration velocity level may indicate the need for prompt
inspection or maintenance. Transitory changes in vibration
Fan Application Rigidly Mounted Flexibly Mounted level that result from re-lubrication, maintenance, or process
Category mm/s (in./s) mm/s (in./s) upsets should not be used for evaluating the condition of the
equipment.
BV-1 12.7 (0.50) 15.2 (0.60)
BV-2 5.1 (0.20) 7.6 (0.30)
7. Other Rotating Components
BV-3 3.8 (0.15) 5.1 (0.20)
BV-4 2.5 (0.10) 3.8 (0.15)
Accessory rotating components that may affect fan vibra-
BV-5 2.0 (0.08) 2.5 (0.10)
tion levels include drive sheaves, belts, coupling, and motor/
driver device. When a fan is ordered from the fan manufac-
Values shown are peak velocity values, filter-in, at the fan turer bare, (i.e., no drive or motor supplied or installed by
rotational speed during the factory test. fan manufacturer), it is not always practical or possible for
the fan manufacturer to perform a final assembly test run, or
6.4 Vibration limits for operation in-situ factory test, to check vibration level. Therefore, though the
impeller may have been balanced by the fan manufacturer,
The in-situ vibration level of a fan is not solely dependent the customer is not assured of a smooth running assembled
upon the Balance Quality Grade. Installation factors and the fan until the drive and/or driver are connected to the fan
mass and stiffness of the supporting system will influence shaft and the unit is run and tested to determine the start-up
the in-situ vibration level (Refer to AMCA Publication 202 vibration levels. It is common for assembled fans to require
Troubleshooting). Therefore, in-situ fan vibration level is not trim balancing to reduce vibration to acceptable START-UP
the responsibility of the fan manufacturer unless specified in vibration levels. The final assembly test run is recommended
the purchase contract. for all new BV-3, BV-4 and BV-5 fan installations BEFORE
commissioning for service. This will establish a baseline for
The vibration velocity levels in Table 6.3 provide guidelines future predictive maintenance efforts.
for acceptable operation of fans in various application cate-
gories. The velocity values shown are for filter-out measure- The fan manufacturer cannot be responsible for the effects

ANSI/AMCA 204-05 (R2012) | 9


Licensed to ESS Customer. ANSI store order # 123. Downloaded 11/13/2014 12:18 PM. Single user license only. Copying and networking prohibited.
Table 6.3
Seismic Vibration Velocity Limits for Operation In-Situ

Fan Application Rigidly Mounted Flexibly Mounted


Condition
Category mm/s (in./s) mm/s (in./s)
Start-up BV-1 14.0 (0.55) 15.2 (0.60)
BV-2 7.6 (0.30) 12.7 (0.50)
BV-3 6.4 (0.25) 8.8 (0.35)
BV-4 4.1 (0.16) 6.4 (0.25)
BV-5 2.5 (0.10) 4.1 (0.16)
Alarm BV-1 15.2 (0.60) 19.1 (0.75)
BV-2 12.7 (0.50) 19.1 (0.75)
BV-3 10.2 (0.40) 16.5 (0.65)
BV-4 6.4 (0.25) 10.2 (0.40)
BV-5 5.7 (0.20) 7.6 (0.30)
Shut-down BV-1 NOTE 1 NOTE 1
BV-2 NOTE 1 NOTE 1
BV-3 12.7 (0.50) 17.8 (0.70)
BV-4 10.2 (0.40) 15.2 (0.60)
BV-5 7.6 (0.30) 10.2 (0.40)
Note 1 - Shutdown levels for fans in Fan Application Grades BV-1 and BV-2 must be established
based on historical data
Note 2 - Values shown are peak velocity, mm/s (in./s), filter out.

of vibration of drive components added after the factory test records or standard operating procedures shall be sufficient
run. evidence of achievement of balance.

Additional information on the balance quality or vibration of 8.2 Vibration


components may be found in the references given in Annex E.
Written certification of the vibration velocity level achieved
8. Documentation for a fan shall be provided upon request when negotiated.
In such cases, it is recommended that the following informa-
8.1 Balance tion be included in the vibration certification report:

Written certification of the balance achieved for an individual Vibration instrumentation used: manufacturer and model
rotor shall be provided upon request when negotiated. In number
such cases, it is recommended that the following informa- Fan operating point
tion be included in the balance certification report: Fan rotational speed
Note: whether fan was flexibly or rigidly mounted
Balance machine manufacturer and model number Description of measurements:
Specify whether rotor was overhung or between centers a. method of transducer attachment to measurement
Specify whether balance method was single or two-plane location; position and axis
Specify mass of rotating assembly b. units of measure used and reference levels
Note the residual unbalance in EACH correction plane c. frequency, bandwidth, and whether vibration
Note the allowable residual unbalance in each correction analyzer was tuned Filter-In or Filter-Out
plane for the Balance Quality Grade Allowable vibration velocity levels
Note the applicable Balance Quality Grade Measured vibration velocity levels
Acceptance criteria: Note whether rotor balance passed Acceptance criteria: Note whether rotor balance passed
or failed or failed
Supply a Certificate of Balance if required. Supply a Certificate of Vibration Velocity if required.

In some cases, keeping a written record of an individual In some cases, keeping a written record of an individual
rotor is impractical. In such cases, the fan manufacturers rotor is impractical. In such cases, the fan manufacturers
records or standard operating procedures shall be sufficient
evidence of achievement of balance.

10 | ANSI/AMCA 204-05 (R2012)


Licensed to ESS Customer. ANSI store order # 123. Downloaded 11/13/2014 12:18 PM. Single user license only. Copying and networking prohibited.
Annex A
SI / I-P Conversion Table (Informative)

Conversion factors between SI and IP systems

Quantity IP to SI SI to IP

Length (ft) 0.3048 = m (m) 3.2808 = ft

Mass (weight) (lbs) 0.4536 = kg (kg) 2.2046 = lbs.

Time The unit of time is the second in both systems

Velocity (ft-s) 0.3048 = ms (ms) 3.2808 = fts


(ft/min) 0.00508 = ms (ms) 196.85 = ft/min

Acceleration (in./s2) 0.0254 = m/s2 (m/s2) 39.370 = in.s/2

Area (ft2) 0.09290 = m2 (m2) 10.764 = ft2

Volume Flow Rate (cfm) 0.000471948 = m3/s (m3/s) 2118.88 = cfm

Density (lb/ft3) 16.01846 = kg/m3 (kg/m3) 0.06243 = lb/ft3


Pressure (in. wg) 248.36 = Pa (Pa) 0.004026 = in. wg
(in. wg) 0.24836 = kPa (kPa) 4.0264 = in. wg
(in. wg) 3.3864 = kPa (kPa) 0.2953 = in. Hg
Viscosity
Absolute (lbm/ft-s) 1.4882 = Pa s (Pa s) 0.6719 = (lbm/ft-s)
Kinematic (ft2/s) 0.0929 = m2/s (m2/s) 10.7639 = ft2/s
Gas Constant (ft lb/lbm-R) 5.3803 = J-kg/K (j-kg/K) 0.1858 = (ft lb/lbm-R)

Temperature (F - 32) / 1.8 = C (1.8 C) + 32 = F

Power (BHP) 746 = W (W)/746 = BHP


(BHP) 0.746 = kW (kW)/0.746 = BHP

ANSI/AMCA 204-05 (R2012) | 11


Licensed to ESS Customer. ANSI store order # 123. Downloaded 11/13/2014 12:18 PM. Single user license only. Copying and networking prohibited.
Annex B
Relationships (Informative)

Figure B.1
Relationships of Vibration Displacement, Velocity and Acceleration for Sinusoidal Motion

Generally, there is no simple relationship between broad-band acceleration, velocity and displacement; nor is there one between
peak (pk), peak-to-peak (pk-pk), root-mean-square (rms) and average values of vibration. However, where the vibration is
totally or predominantly at a single frequency (e.g., due to residual unbalance) or it is measured Filter-In then the following
relationships exist, independent of the system of the units involved:

Apk
Arms =
2

Vpk
Vrms =
2

The following relationships exist and are dependent upon the units of measure used:

For SI Units of Measure:

Displacement Dpkpk mm
Velocity Vpk mm/s
Acceleration Apk gs (1 g = 9.80665 m/s2)
Frequency F Hz

Relationship Equations Example: Dpkpk = 0.10 mm at N = 1800 rpm

F = N / 60 F = 1800/60 = 30 Hz

Vpk = pFDpkpk Vpk = p(30)(0.10) = 9.42 mm/s

2(pF )2 Dpkpk F 2Dpkpk (30)2 (0.10)


Apk = = Apk = = 0.181 g's
(9.80665)(1000) 496.8 496.8

12 | ANSI/AMCA 204-05 (R2012)


Licensed to ESS Customer. ANSI store order # 123. Downloaded 11/13/2014 12:18 PM. Single user license only. Copying and networking prohibited.
Vpk 9.42
Dpkpk = Dpkpk = = 0.10 mm
pF p(30)

(1000)(9.80665)Apk 496.8 Apk ( 496.8)(0.181)


Dpkpk = = Dpkpk = = 0.10 mm
2 2
2(pF ) F 302

(1000)(9.80665)Apk 1561Apk (1561)(0.181)


Vpk = = Vpk = = 9.42 mm/s
2pF F 30

2pFVpk FVpk (30)(9.42)


Apk = = Apk = = 0.181 g's
(1000)(9.80665) 1561 1561

For filter-in readings, the following relationships exist which are dependent upon the units of measure used:

For I-P Units of Measure:

Displacement Dpkpk mils (1 mil = 0.001 in.)


Velocity Vpk in./s
Acceleration Apk gs (1 g = 386.09 in./s2)
Frequency N rev/min (rpm)

Relationship Equations Example: Dpkpk = 2.4 mils at N = 1780 rpm

pNDpkpk NDpkpk (1780)(2.4)


Vpk = = Vpk = = 0.224 in./s
(60)(1000) (19,100) (19,100)

2(pN )2 Dpkpk
Apk = = (1.42 108 )N 2Dpkpk
2
(60) (1000)(386.09) Apk = (1.42 108 )(1780)2 (2.4) = 0.108 g's

(60)(1000)Vpk (19,100)Vpk (19,100)(0.224)


Dpkpk = = Dpkpk = = 2.4 mils
pN N (1780)

(60)(1000)(386.09)Apk Apk 0.108


Dpkpk = = Apk = = 2.4 mils
2 8 2
2(pN ) (1.4210 )N (1.42108 )(1780)2

(60)(386.09)Apk (3687)Apk (3687)(0.108)


Vpk = = Vpk = = 0.224 in./s
2pN N (1780)

2pFVpk NVpk (1780)(0.224)


Apk = = Apk = = 0.108 g's
(60)(386.09) (3687) 3687

ANSI/AMCA 204-05 (R2012) | 13


Licensed to ESS Customer. ANSI store order # 123. Downloaded 11/13/2014 12:18 PM. Single user license only. Copying and networking prohibited.
Annex C
Maximum Permissible Residual Imbalance (Informative)

10,000

1,000

1,000 10,000

Figure C.1
Maximum Permissible Residual Unbalance (SI)

14 | ANSI/AMCA 204-05 (R2012)


Licensed to ESS Customer. ANSI store order # 123. Downloaded 11/13/2014 12:18 PM. Single user license only. Copying and networking prohibited.
Figure C.2
Maximum Permissible Residual Unbalance (I-P)

ANSI/AMCA 204-05 (R2012) | 15


Licensed to ESS Customer. ANSI store order # 123. Downloaded 11/13/2014 12:18 PM. Single user license only. Copying and networking prohibited.
Annex D
Instruments and Calibration (Informative)

D.1 Instruments

Instruments and balancing machines used shall meet the


requirements of the task and be within current calibration.
See ANSI S2.19-1989, Section 8. The calibration period for
an instrument shall be that recommended by the instrument
manufacturer. Instruments shall be in good condition and
suitable for the intended function for the complete duration
of the test. A portable instrument shall not require a battery
change during a test.

Personnel operating instruments shall be familiar with the


instruments and shall possess enough experience to detect
a possible malfunction or degradation of instrument perfor-
mance. When an instrument requires corrective measures
or calibration, it shall be removed from service until correc-
tive action is taken.

D.2 Calibration

All instruments shall have a calibration against a known


standard. The complexity of the calibration may vary from
a physical inspection to a complete calibration traceable to
the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Use of a
calibrated weight to determine residual unbalance such as
described in ANSI S2.19-1989, Section 8.3 is one accepted
method of calibrating instrumentation.

16 | ANSI/AMCA 204-05 (R2012)


Licensed to ESS Customer. ANSI store order # 123. Downloaded 11/13/2014 12:18 PM. Single user license only. Copying and networking prohibited.
Annex E
References (Informative)

(1) ISO 254:1998 Belt Drives pulleys Quality, finish and (11) AMCA Publication 203, Field Performance Measurement
balance, International Organzation for Standardization, of Fan Systems, Air Movement and Control Association
1 Rue de Varembe, Case Oistake 56, Ch-1211, Geneve International, Inc., 30 West University Drive, Arlington
20, SWITZERLAND. Heights, IL 60004-1893 U.S.A.

(2) NEMA MG 1-1993 Part 7 Mechanical Vibration (12) ANSI/AMCA 210, Laboratory Methods of Testing Fans
Measurement, Evaluation and Limits, National for Aerodynamic Performance Rating, Air Movement
Electrical Manufacturers Association, 1300 North 17th and Control Association International, Inc., 30 West
Street, Rosslyn, VA 22209 U.S.A. University Drive, Arlington Heights, IL 60004-1893
U.S.A.
(3) IEC 34-14:1998 Rotating Electrical Machines
(for general information on motors), International (13) AMCA Publication 211, Certified Ratings Program
Electrotechnical Commission, 1 Rue de Varembe, Case Product Rating Manual for Fan Air Performance, Air
Oistake 56, Ch-1211, Geneve 20, SWITZERLAND Movement and Control Association International, Inc.,
30 West University Drive, Arlington Heights, IL 60004-
(4) MPTA SPB 86, Sheaves and Belts, Mechanical Power 1893 U.S.A.
Transmission Association, 932 Hungerford Drive #36,
Rockville, MD 20850 U.S.A. (14) ANSI/AMCA 300, Reverberant Room Method of Sound
Testing of Fans, Air Movement and Control Association
(5) ANSI S2.41-1985 (R1997) Mechanical Vibration of International, Inc., 30 West University Drive, Arlington
Large Rotating machines with Speed Range from 10 to Heights, IL 60004-1893 U.S.A.
200 rev/s Measurement and Evaluation of Vibration
Severity in situ (ISO 3945), American National (15) AMCA Publication 311, Certified Ratings Program
Standards Institute, 11 West 42nd Street, New York, Product Rating Manual for Fan Sound Performance,
NY 10035 U.S.A. Air Movement and Control Association International,
Inc., 30 West University Drive, Arlington Heights, IL
(6) ANSI/AGMA 9000 C90 (R1996) Flexible Couplings 60004-1893 U.S.A.
Potential Unbalance Classifications, American
Gear Manufacturers Association, 1500 King Street, AMCA Publication 801, Industrial Process / Power
(16)
Alexandria, VA 22314 U.S.A. Generation Fans: Specification Guidelines, Air
Movement and Control Association International, Inc.,
(7) ANSI/AMCA 99, Standards Handbook, Air Movement 30 West University Drive, Arlington Heights, IL 60004-
and Control Association International, Inc., 30 West 1893 U.S.A.
University Drive, Arlington Heights, IL 60004-1893
U.S.A. AMCA Publication 802, Industrial Process / Power
(17)
Generation Fans: Establishing Performance Using
(8) AMCA Publication 200, Air Systems, Air Movement Laboratory Models, Air Movement and Control
and Control Association International, Inc., 30 West Association International, Inc., 30 West University
University Drive, Arlington Heights, IL 60004-1893 Drive, Arlington Heights, IL 60004-1893 U.S.A.
U.S.A.
AMCA Standard 803, Industrial Process / Power
(18)
(9) AMCA Publication 201, Fans and Systems, Air Generation Fans: Site Performance Test Standard, Air
Movement and Control Association International, Inc., Movement and Control Association International, Inc.,
30 West University Drive, Arlington Heights, IL 60004- 30 West University Drive, Arlington Heights, IL 60004-
1893 U.S.A. 1893 U.S.A.

(10) AMCA Publication 202, Troubleshooting, Air Movement


and Control Association International, Inc., 30 West
University Drive, Arlington Heights, IL 60004-1893
U.S.A.

ANSI/AMCA 204-05 (R2012) | 17


Licensed to ESS Customer. ANSI store order # 123. Downloaded 11/13/2014 12:18 PM. Single user license only. Copying and networking prohibited.
AIR MOVEMENT AND CONTROL
ASSOCIATION INTERNATIONAL, INC.
30 West University Drive
Arlington Heights, IL 60004-1893 U.S.A.
Tel: (847) 394-0150 Fax: (847) 253-0088
E-Mail : info@amca.org Web: www.amca.org

The Air Movement and control Association International, Inc. is a not-for-profit international association of the
worlds manufacturers of related air system equipment primarily, but limited to: fans, louvers, dampers, air
curtains, airflow measurement stations, acoustic attenuators, and other air system components for the industrial,
commercial and residential markets.

Licensed to ESS Customer. ANSI store order # 123. Downloaded 11/13/2014 12:18 PM. Single user license only. Copying and networking prohibited.