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Observation 1.

Focus Question: How does the teacher implement formative assessment and how does it influence
student learning?
Class/Teacher Year 11 History, Mrs Ashby

Period 5 (Thursday 26 October)


Topic Easter Rising, Passchendaele (P)/Gallipoli (G) Revision

Timeframe 2:30 – 3:30 pm (period 5), core practice enacted during second half of the lesson 30 mins.

Core Practice Formative Assessment


Description/information of observations
- In a previous lesson students had been given a practice test on two of the papers they would be sitting in the end of year exams. Mrs
Ashby provided both written feedback on the papers and a grade. Students are given back their papers and are directed to fill in a self-
review sheet based on their feedback. The self-review sheet included a checklist that asked students questions such as “My answer had
some factual errors – yes/no” and “I provided a detailed description of G/P […]”. Mrs Ashby moved around the classroom to speak with
individual students about their feedback and next steps for improving their learning and understanding. 30 mins An effective way of
directing students’ attention to the written feedback rather than just the grade. Encourages students to become self-regulated learners
and involves students in the assessment process. Enabled the teacher to offer differentiated feedback according to students’ needs. Most
students took an active role in their self-review activity. Some students did not respond well. For example, one student who had received
a NA disengaged and disregarded her feedback comment. – Perhaps an improvement would be to give students their grade after paying
attention to the feedback.
Observation 2.

Focus Question: How does the teacher implement formative assessment and how does it influence
student learning?
Class/Teacher Year 10 Social Studies, Miss Hayward

Period 5 (Thursday 28 September)


Topic Revision of aspects of the ‘Who’s the Boss’ (government) unit

Timeframe 2:30 – 3:30 pm (period 5), core practice implemented at beginning of the lesson – 15-20 mins

Core Practice Formative Assessment


Description/information of observations
- At the beginning of the lesson, Miss Hayward sets up a ‘bus stop’ activity to check students’ understanding of the different systems of
government that were learned throughout the unit. At different stations around the classroom there is an A3 sheet of paper with a different
picture depicting a certain type of government, e.g. democracy and anarchy. In small groups of four, students spend two minutes at each
station writing down any ideas they have learned about the particular government. The activity stops after all groups have visited each
station. Students generate good ideas about the different systems e.g. “dictatorship” “fascism” “one ruler” “no voting” “totalitarianism”.
The task becomes increasingly challenging as ideas begin to get slim in the last few rotations - most students stay engaged and attempt to
find more words to add. 12 - 15 mins Clear objectives set for students. Non-threatening activity (group work, open question), whole-class
contribution, peer-learning within groups and by reading the previous contributions of other groups.

- After completing their last rotation Miss Hayward asks each group to share the three most important ideas from the station they are seated
at. 5 – 7 mins Checks students’ understanding, non-threatening, provides an opportunity to correct any misconceptions e.g. a
misunderstanding of theocracy was corrected by the teacher’s provision of a definition. Follow-up questions were asked to ensure
understanding. Following this Miss Hayward was content students had a thorough understanding of the different systems of government
and proceeded with a new topic.
Observation 3.

Focus Question: How does the teacher implement formative assessment and how does it influence
student learning?
Class/Teacher Year 9 Social Studies, Miss Hayward

Period 4 (1:30 – 2:30 pm)


Topic Beginning a new topic: The Treaty of Waitangi

Timeframe 15 minutes at the beginning of the lesson

Core Practice Formative Assessment


Description/information of observations
At the beginning of the lesson as a ‘do now’ students were put into small groups (3-4 students) and were asked to record any ideas and
prior knowledge that they had of the Treaty of Waitangi (their new topic) on an A3 sheet of paper. Students were prompted to provide
ideas relating to the five W’s (what, when, who, why and what were its impacts). 10 mins Activated students’ schema on new topic.
Non-threatening activity (group-work). Majority of students participated by contributing ideas and keeping group discussions on topic.
Teacher knew students would have covered the Treaty at intermediate – checking their current knowledge
Following the ‘do now’ students were asked to share their ideas and the teacher provided feedback according to their responses.
Students raised ideas including: “two understandings of the treaty” “Waitangi Day” etc. Some students had only little knowledge.
Checks students’ prior knowledge and understanding. Provides opportunities to correct misconceptions e.g. some students were
unaware that there was both an English and Māori version of the Treaty. Gave teacher an idea of what areas of the Treaty students
would require more knowledge of and those areas which were already clear.