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41. What is a triumvirate? d. He takes poison.

a. A group of three who leads. 50. How do Antony and Octavius react to Brutus’s
b. A three pronged spear death?
c. A group of three priests. a. They celebrate their victory with a parade.
d. Three cities close to each other. b. They celebrate their victory with speeches
42. Who was in the triumvirate at the beginning of Act to commemorate the glory.
IV? c. They are sad that Brutus did not die on their
a. Crassus, Brutus, Cassius sword.
b. Mark Antony, Lepidus, Octavius d. They are sad that Brutus died.
c. Trombonius, Phidias, Augustus
d. Casca, Brutus, Mark Antony
43. What plans are being made at the beginning of Act
IV?
a. Where to eat
b. Who to eat with
c. Who should be killed
d. Where to attack
44. How will Antony make sure that he will not take
the blame for unpopular decisions?
a. He will blame Caesar.
b. He will blame Octavius.
c. He will blame Lepidus.
d. He will blame Brutus.
45. How does Portia die?
a. She throws herself from a cliff.
b. She eats fire (coals).
c. She catches the flu.
d. She is attacked by wild baboons.
46. What does Brutus wish for at the end of Act V,
Scene 1?
a. To be able to fly.
b. To take back killing Caesar.
c. To see what will happen before it does.
d. To escape with his life.
47. As the battle is waged, both sides achieve mixed
results. Who triumphs over whom?
a. Brutus defeats Octavius; Mark Antony
defeats Cassius
b. Octavius defeats Brutus; Mark Antony
defeats Cassius
c. Brutus defeats Mark Antony; Cassius
defeats Octavius
d. Octavius defeats Mark Antony; Cassius
defeats Brutus
48. Why does Lucilius behave strangely in scene
4?
a. He hopes to protect Brutus by
pretending to be him.
b. He has gone mad from all of the killing.
c. He is drunk.
d. He saw a ghost and has gone mad.
49. How does Brutus die?
a. He cuts his throat.
b. He runs onto a sword held by his
servant.
c. He is killed in battle.
Identify the Speaker:

51. “Let me have men about me that are fat;


Sleek-headed men and such as sleep o' nights(…)”
a. Brutus
b. Cassius
c. Antony
d. Caesar
52. “Cowards die many times before their deaths;
The valiant never taste of death but once.”
a. Brutus
b. Cassius
c. Antony
d. Caesar
53. “Let's carve him as a dish fit for the gods,
Not hew him as a carcass fit for hounds.”
a. Brutus
b. Cassius
c. Antony
d. Caesar
54. “Danger knows full well
That Caesar is more dangerous than he”
a. Brutus
b. Cassius
c. Antony
d. Caesar
55. “Et tu, Brute? Then fall, Caesar!”
a. Brutus
b. Cassius
c. Antony
d. Caesar
56. “Cry, 'Havoc!' and let slip the dogs of war.”
a. Brutus
b. Cassius
c. Antony
d. Caesar
57. “As he was valiant, I honour him: but, as he was
ambitious, I slew him.”
a. Brutus
b. Cassius
c. Antony
d. Caesar
58. “The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars,
But in ourselves, that we are underlings.”
a. Brutus
b. Cassius
c. Antony
d. Caesar
59. “I have made strong proof of my constancy,
Giving myself a voluntary wound
Here, in the thigh: can I bear that with patience.
And not my husband's secrets?”
a. Calpurnia
b. Portia
c. Cassius
d. Brutus
60. “I have a man's mind, but a woman's might.
How hard it is for women to keep counsel!”
a. Calpurnia
b. Portia
c. Cassius
d. Brutus