Sunteți pe pagina 1din 50

FREE GUIDE

TO THE

GIFTED AND
TALENTED
EXAM
+
50-QUESTION
PRACTICE TEST
Written and Published by Sharon Skobeleva and Altiora Inc.

Copyright © 2016 by Altiora Inc.

All of the questions in the booklet were created by Altiora Inc.

The OLSAT® (Otis Lennon School Ability Test®) and NNAT2®


(Naglieri Nonverbal Ability Test®) are registered trademarks of
NCS Pearson Inc.

Altiora Inc. is not affiliated in any way with NCS Pearson Inc.
This content was created without the support or endorsement
of NCS Pearson Inc.

The trademarks referring to specific tests are used for


nominative purposes only, to identify the source of the tests
discussed.

All rights reserved. No part of this book may be altered, sold,


made available on any other websites or stores, reproduced or
transmitted in any form or by any means without the written
permission of the author.
Introduction
Thanks for taking a look at Altiora Tutoring’s free Gifted and Talented practice set. We
decided to release the largest free practice set on the market, because we want all kids
to have the opportunity for success. We believe that effective test prep materials should
be a right, not a privilege. We noticed in our years working in this industry that many
parents desire to take a more active role in their children’s test prep journey, but find
themselves frustrated at the lack of resources available. At Altiora, we’re all about
empowering people to take ownership over their education.

We designed this practice test based on official NYC resources, as well as through heavy
consultation with G&T test administrators and early educational consultants. Our
materials deliver the most accurate reflection of the actual exam that is legally possible,
and our success rate with our students reflects this.

You may have noticed in your quest for prep materials that there is very little
information available for prospective gifted students and parents. There is a short,
14-question official practice test from the NYC Department of Education, but there isn’t
much else out there. Many tutoring companies try to capitalize on this lack of
information, and charge anywhere from $1-$2 per question they release!

In addition to releasing the largest available free practice test, we also developed
several practice sets available on our website. As a small company, we were able to keep
the price much lower than other companies by releasing them as printable e-books
rather than printed hard copies.

What follows this introduction is a brief description of the Gifted and Talented
application process, the actual exam, and tips for getting the most out of whatever
resources you use. Finally, we have 50 free practice questions: 30 OLSAT questions and
20 NNAT2 Questions.

We at Altiora wish you all the best in your application journey, and we sincerely hope
you find this set helpful in your test preparation. Feel free to call us or email us with any
questions about the exam or our methods, and don’t forget to visit our website at
www.Altiora.nyc.

1
Types of Gifted Programs
The Gifted and Talented Exam is a 78-question exam that is required for a child to be
admitted into a NYC Gifted and Talented class. G&T classrooms are desirable because
they group talented students together for the bulk of their education, allowing for
delivery of teaching techniques and resources that are catered to gifted children.

Gifted programs begin in Kindergarten, and the test is required to place children in
programs from K-3rd grade. For 4th and 5th grade G&T programs, a different selec-
tion criterion is used.

The practice test enclosed is for both Kindergarten and 1st grade entry. For entry into
2nd and 3rd grade, the test will examine the same concepts. However, the verbal
prompts will be longer and more detailed, and the nonverbal puzzles will be more
complex.

There are two types of gifted programs: District and Citywide G&T programs. District
G&T programs only accept children within the actual geographic district, and City-
wide G&T programs can accept children from all over the NYC area. To be eligible for
placement in a District G&T program, your child must score in the 90th percentile.
Citywide programs are more competitive, and your child must score in the 97th
percentile to be eligible for placement.

The Exam
The exam has two sections: first, the Nonverbal (NNAT2) and then the Verbal (OLSAT).
There are 48 non-verbal puzzles, followed by 30 verbal prompts. Your child will not be
timed, and will be able to work through the prompts at his or her own pace, as long as
the proctor deems that the child is actively focused on the material. Prompts will be
read once without repeating, and the proctor isn’t allowed to deviate from the script to
further explain things. However, if there is an external distraction such as a door slam-
ming or a passing siren, the proctor may be allowed to repeat the prompt.

Kindergarten entry students will point to their answers. For 1st-3rd grade entry,
students will bubble in the correct answer with a pencil, and will be allowed to take
short notes on the prompts.

2
NNAT2
The NNAT2 (Naglieri Nonverbal Ability Test) is composed of various
nonverbal puzzles, designed to measure problem-solving abilities. As
your child takes the NNAT section of the exam, they will be allowed to go
through each of the 48 questions at his or her own pace, pointing to the
answers as they find them (children applying for entry to 1st grade and
up will bubble in their choices.) The NNAT2 divides these puzzles into 4
categories. According to the NYC.GOV website, they are sorted as follows:

Pattern Completion

Measures the ability to visually perceive design patterns and iden-


tify the correct missing portions.

The best way to teach your child pattern completion is to


encourage them to recognize all of the shapes, colors, and lines
that are surrounding the empty box. If they can recognize that
the answer choice in the above problem will likely have white on
top, black lines entering on the sides, and blue on the bottom,
then they have already narrowed it down to two answer choices.

Recognizing the symmetry surrounding the box will help them


find the final answer. It is often helpful for children to see the
correct answer sketched into the missing box as well.

3
Reasoning by Analogy

Measures the ability to recognize relationships among geometric


shapes.

Reasoning by Analogy is all about recognizing the “rule” for the


top row and applying it to the bottom row. The rule might
include up to three changes across each row. In the example
above, there are two things that change. The child should recog-
nize that the top square is changing not only in size, but also in
color. They should be able to reason that the circle on the bottom
row will also change in size and color in the same way that the
square did.

Encourage your child to verbalize the changes they see. "The big,
green square changes into a little, blue square." Ask them to
describe what they think will happen to the big, green circle. If
they don’t see one or more of the changes, gently guide them to
notice all the relevant details.

4
Serial Reasoning

Measures the ability to recognize sequences among shapes.

In a lot of ways, Serial Reasoning is very similar to Reasoning by


Analogy. But, instead of a 2x2 matrix, the matrices can be 2x3 or
3x3. While these problems often look more complex, it also
provides more examples from which to derive a rule.

The example above is of a 3x3 matrix. There are multiple ways of


solving this problem: The child can recognize that each circle is
followed by a triangle, and each triangle is followed by a pentagon.
After each pentagon, it starts over with a circle again. Just recogniz-
ing this eliminates three answer choices. If your child also recogniz-
es that all circles are blue with a red background, then they have
found their answer.

Your child could also solve it by recognizing that each shape is


represented once per row, and each is represented a total of three
times in the total matrix. We already have three red triangles with
yellow backgrounds, and three yellow pentagons with blue back-
grounds, so the only one missing is the blue circle with the red
background.

However, many children will find that the easiest way to solve this
problem is to recognize the pattern on the diagonal axis. There are
identical blue circles running from top left to bottom right. If they
learn to look for the pattern on the diagonal, it will be very easy for
them to match the remaining blue circle to complete the line. As
most 3x3 matrixes will follow this rule, the most efficient way to
solve these puzzles is to learn to look for diagonal patterns.

5
Spatial Visualization

Measures the ability to recognize how two or more objects would


look if combined.

Spatial visualization tests the ability to track spatial changes in


objects. Problems can ask your child to correctly put two shapes
together, to rotate shapes, or to fold them. As being able to track
these changes comes with a developmental milestone, these are
often the most difficult questions for young kids. However, there
are only a few of these questions on the actual exam, so don't
worry about focusing all your efforts on this area if your child isn't
ready to learn it yet.

The best way to teach this is by using hands-on activities. Cut out
shapes, tape them together, and practice folding them with your
child. Describe how things point in the opposite direction when
folded over. Cut out puzzle pieces and help your child combine
them. Encourage them to describe how the same shapes that
made up the outline of the puzzle pieces are now present inside
the combined shape.

The above example focuses on recognizing a folded object. As the


semicircle folds inwards, it stays the same color. It also stays
attached at the hinge, even though it’s now “pointing” a different
way. The triangle will also stay attached at the hinge, and it will
also “point” in the opposite direction.

6
OLSAT
The OLSAT (Otis-Lennon School Ability Test) is composed of a series of
verbal prompts, designed to assess your child’s school-readiness and verbal
comprehension. The 30 questions on the verbal exam will be read once and
only once, and directions won’t be explained any more than what the script
allows. However, your child will be allowed to work at his or her own pace,
and can take as much time as they need as long as they are actively focused.

The OLSAT covers topics such as awareness of everyday tasks and protocols
(aural reasoning), ability to critically respond to a verbal prompt, and basic
arithmetic ability.

The NYC.GOV website categorizes the sections as follows:

Verbal Reasoning
Measures the ability to manipulate or respond to information
through listening to language; e.g., following directions
Example:

Mark under the picture that shows this: there is a small square inside of
a circle, and there is a triangle next to the circle.

Verbal Reasoning is designed to assess your child’s ability to listen


to and critically evaluate a prompt. Questions tend to test aware-
ness of spatial terms, such as “above” and “below,” and age-appropri-
ate synonyms such as “on top of” and “beneath.”

Children might be asked to visualize how it would look if items


switched places, or if part of an item were removed. They are
expected to have an understanding of the order of items, and
directionality. They should understand the difference between
numbers and letters, and understand the difference between
capital and lower-case letters. They should also be able to identify
names and relative sizes of different shapes, such as knowing that a
specific rectangle might be larger than a certain square.

A useful way to practice may be to arrange your child’s toys in


different ways, and ask them to describe the arrangement. “Is your
teddy bear above the doll house, or beneath it?”

7
Verbal Comprehension
Measures the ability to discover patterns or relationships and to
solve problems through the use of language such as aural
reasoning and arithmetic reasoning.

Example: Aural Reasoning

As part of John’s weekly chores, he is asked to help to clean the leaves


off of the front porch. What should he use to clean the leaves off of
the porch?

Aural reasoning is designed to assess your child’s understanding


of everyday objects, tasks, and protocols.

They might be asked which animal likes to play with balls of yarn,
or which animal likes to play fetch. They should know the objects
involved in household chores, the appropriate clothing for a
snowstorm, and be familiar with the equipment needed for
different sports and extracurricular activities.

Your child should be able to listen to a short description, and


recall relevant details. They might also be asked to remember a
logical order of events, such as remembering whether a character
brushed their teeth before or after getting into bed.

The best way to prepare your child for the aural reasoning section
is to regularly read to them, talk with them, and describe the
world around them. Watch online videos with them about experi-
ences they wouldn’t normally encounter, such as what life is like
on a farm. Involve them in tasks like making dinner and fixing
things around the house, and describe to them the names and
purposes of all the materials involved.

8
Example: Aritmetic Reasoning

Sarah brought the 10 cupcakes at the beginning of the row to school


to celebrate her birthday! Her classmates ended up eating half of her
cupcakes. In the next part of the row, mark the picture that shows
how many cupcakes Sarah has left.

For the arithmetic reasoning section, students are expected to


have a solid understanding of quantity comparisons (lesser vs
greater), as well as be comfortable with the addition and subtrac-
tion of the numbers 1-10.

They should also be able to identify what half of a quantity looks


like, and understand the concept of equal quantities.

The best way to teach Arithmetic Reasoning will vary from child
to child. Helping them cross out or cover objects with their
fingers that are being subtracted can help them visualize the loss
of an object.

Using their fingers to add extra items (then counting them


together with the objects on the paper) can help them visualize
addition. Other children might benefit from drawing extra items
in, or adding physical objects to the paper, such as bingo chips.
However, there is no guarantee that the child will have a pencil
for the actual exam if they are entering kindergarten, so it's a
good idea to slowly transition him or her to using only fingers.

It’s essential that your child can count slowly and methodically,
and doesn’t get impatient or start guessing. Many children who
can accurately add and subtract will get tired halfway through a
problem and start guessing at the answers that "look right," rather
than actually counting them.

9
Getting the Most out of Your Problem Sets
The GT exam uses a fairly predictable method of asking questions for each section. For
example, with the Aural reasoning section, questions usually create a story involving a
character and a verbal description of a noun. With this in mind, you can easily create new
questions using the same answer set, and often get 4 or more practice questions out of a
single set of answers. You can get even more practice with each image set by changing
the way you describe the answers, and exposing your child to new descriptive vocabulary.

For example, here are a set of questions of varying difficulty that can be used with the
following set of answer choices. These are by no means inclusive of all the possibilities,
and you should modify the difficulty and content of the questions according to your
child’s needs. If your child is having trouble getting questions right consistently, simplify
the question style so they can build confidence at a lower level before moving up again. If
your child is finding themselves bored with the level of questions you’re asking, make up
slightly more challenging questions to keep them engaged in the material.

To create simple questions, focus on one or two details at a time with simple sentence
structure. These types of questions are especially useful for students who are still getting
introduced to the exam style, students who are still building up a higher attention span,
younger students, and for students who are still learning English.

Which animal has a curly tail?

Which animal lives in the water?

Which animal says “baaaaa?”

The following questions are of the approximate difficulty level that will be most common
on the exam. They focus on integrating about two or three details to describe the answer
within a story setting.

John is visiting a farm. He sees his favorite animal, which is soft, white, and curly!
Which animal is John’s favorite?

Sally is entering her pet in a county fair. Her pet is pink with a curly tail, and likes to play
in the mud. Which animal is Sally entering in the county fair?

10
Dani is visiting her grandmother’s farm. Her grandmother points out the animal
that lays the eggs they eat for breakfast every morning. Which animal is her grand
mother talking about?

Samuel is sitting by the lake with his father. They are shocked when this animal
jumps out of the water and splashes back in. Which animal did they see?

Carla just got a new sweater for Christmas. Her mother explains that this sweater is
so warm because it’s made from the wool of an animal! Which animal helped
provide the wool to make Carla’s sweater?

Tammy and her brother, Kyle, are sitting on a boat. They are holding long sticks over
the edge of the boat, with thin strings dangling into the water. At the end of each
string is a hook and a worm. What animal are they trying to catch?

Sarah’s favorite animal lives on a farm. It’s covered in feathers, and sits on its eggs
until they hatch. What animal is Sarah’s favorite?

Occasionally, the exam will have longer questions that track a child’s ability to remem-
ber lists and/or multiple descriptions. There aren’t too many of them on the exam, and
they are mostly intended for the older and 1st grade entry students to get right. The
level of the third question is an example of something appropriate for older students
who are even entering 2nd grade.

Sarah and Mike are telling each other about their favorite animals. Sarah’s
favorite animal lives underwater, and is covered in shiny scales. Mike’s favorite
animal is covered in feathers, and can fly. Which is Sarah’s favorite animal?

Joanna is visiting the petting zoo. First, she gets to pet a chicken. After that, she visits
the pig pen and plays with the pigs. Finally, she visits a pasture and pets the sheep
as they eat some grass. Which was the first animal she pet?

Amber is on a class field trip to a farm. First, they see the animal that lays eggs
that people like to have for breakfast. After, they visit a giant mud puddle, where
these animals are splashing around and playing. Next, they visit a grassy pasture
where some white, curly animals are eating grass. Finally, they visit a pond and
watch these scaly animals jump out of the water. What was the first animal that
Amber and her class saw?

11
Similar adjustments can be made for the other questions on the OLSAT. For Arithmetic
Reasoning, it’s easy to adjust the question to have a different answer. One can ususally
create at least three extra questions per answer set. Some examples for the following
answer choice set are below.

Karen has the six tomatoes shown at the beginning of the row. Her cousin has an
equal number of tomatoes. How many tomatoes does Karen’s cousin have?

Sally is growing tomatoes in her garden. She had the six tomatoes shown at the
beginning of the row, but a racoon ate one of them during the night. How many
tomatoes are left on Sally’s plant?

John bought the six tomatoes shown at the beginning of the row. He used five of
them in a salad. How many does he have left?

Michael has the six tomatoes at the beginning of the row. He realized that he didn’t
have enough to make the salad he wants, so he went to the store and bought four
more. How many tomatoes does he have now?

Joan has the six tomatoes shown at the beginning of the row. She found one more in
her refrigerator, but she gave it away to her friend. How many does she have now?

It’s also usually easy to modify questions in the Verbal Comprehension Section.
Examples are below.

Which is the letter inside both circles?

Which is the number inside both circles?

Which is the letter inside only the right circle?

Note that I didn’t ask which letter/number is only inside the left circle as it’s ambiguous as to
Answer 4 is representing the letter “I” or the number “1.” It’s best to steer away from ambigu-
ous answers.

12
Exam Day
On exam day, it’s important that your child is well rested and has had a solid meal
beforehand. As mentioned earlier, they will be allowed to work at their own pace, as
long as the proctor deems that the child is actively working on the material. They will
first complete the nonverbal puzzles, and then move on to the verbal when they are
ready.

It’s a good idea to make sure that your child is comfortable around strangers, so that
there isn’t any reduced performance due to anxiety. Many children who are quite
gifted can perform poorly in a formal test setting, due to anxiety about being away
from parents, or unfamiliarity with a testing environment. We would recommend that
you have an adult your child doesn’t know (perhaps a colleague or a friend) adminis-
ter at least one practice test to your child, so you can gauge how they perform with
adults they aren’t familiar with. Likewise, this formal practice test should take place in
an unfamiliar environment, such as a new classroom or a library they don’t regularly
go to. We also offer formal proctored Altiora Practice Exams, which can be arranged
at our website (www.Altiora.NYC/mocktest), or over the phone by calling
(646) 847-9329.

What follows is a free 50-question practice test, the largest free set currently available
for this exam! Use it to practice with your child, to diagnose their current skill level, or
to teach yourself about the exam!

Instructions for Practice Test


At this point, you must decide if you want this to be an accurate gauge of your child’s
testing ability, or if you would rather use it for general practice as a teaching tool. If you
want this to be a formal practice test (to see how they would perform if they took the
actual G&T test today), don't help them with any test answers, and follow the direc-
tions below for the “Formal Practice Test”. If you are using this as a general teaching
tool, then give your child as much help as is necessary for them to understand the
concepts tested. Instructions and tips for “General Practice” are also below.

How to Assemble the Packets


Print the following pages, using the PDF available on
www.altiora.nyc/publications.

There are two sections, each preceded by a cover sheet. First,


there is the Question Bookley and Scoring Guide which has
headings in Green. Following the question booklet is your
child’s Answer Booklet, with headings in Blue.

13
After you print them, separate and staple the Answer Booklet
and the Question Booklet into two packets.

Read through the directions on your Question Booklet at


least once before giving your child their Answer Booklet and
beginning the test.

Question Booklet: 13 Green pages

Answer Booklet: 17 Blue Pages


Question Booklet and Scoring Guide Student Answer Booklet

Staple the following green-headed pages together. Staple the following blue-headed pages into a packet.

This is your question booklet and scoring guide. This is your child’s Answer Booklet.

When you are ready to begin, read the directions first to After you are finished reading through the directions on your
yourself, and then give your child the stapled Question Booklet and Scoring Guide, and are ready to begin
Student Answer Booklet. administering the exam, direct your child to turn to the first
page of this answer booklet, and begin reading the
Read the bolded prompts to your child, and take note of appropriate prompts to them.
which questions your child scores answers correctly.

Directions for General Practice Usage


If you are using this practice set for the purpose of teaching strategy, you
should give your child as much help as they need. Work through the
questions with them, and help them with the answers if necessary.

Encourage them to verbalize their thought process, and help them to


describe the patterns they notice. Encourage them to apply a “rule” to
each matrix: if we see a certain change happening on the upper part of
the matrix, they should assume that the same change will happen on the
lower part.

If they are unfamiliar with objects in the Aural reasoning section, take the
time to show them the objects as they are used in your house, or show
them a picture/video of the object's use. For example: if you don't own a
vacuum cleaner, show them a video of somebody vacuuming, and
describe the process to them. Your child will be expected to be familiar
with many objects that might not be present in your particular home.

Use this test as a metric to direct future practice. If they score very well on
one section, don’t stop practicing it completely, but still focus your efforts
on the areas that need more work. It’s not uncommon for children to excel
in some sections but need lots of practice on others. For your conve-
nience, we have practice sets available for all levels: if your child excels at
Aural Reasoning but needs some extra help with Pattern Completion, you
should practice with the “Difficult” level sets for Aural Reasoning while
using the “Beginner” sets for Pattern Completion.

14
For Use as a Formal Practice Test
To use this as a formal practice test, don’t help your child with the answers.
Make sure your child is looking at the appropriate question on his or her
answer booklet as you read the corresponding prompt out loud. If your
child is entering kindergarten, he or she will point to the answer. If your
child is entering first grade or higher, he or she should bubble answers in
with a pencil.

Then, mark whether your child answered correctly or incorrectly on the


prompt. No partial points are given for “mostly correct” answers. On test day,
each prompt will be read once and only once, and your child won’t be able
to ask for help. However, if there is a distraction (say, a door slamming), the
question will be re-read.

For your convenience in assessing your child, we grouped the questions of


each category together. For example, all Arithmetic Reasoning questions
are together, as are all Aural Reasoning. This way, you can easily assess the
areas that require more focus. On the actual G&T test, the only two catego-
ry divisions will be NNAT2 and OLSAT. Within the NNAT2 and OLSAT, all the
question types will be mixed together.

Keep in mind: even if this is used as a formal practice test, you can still
re-use the questions (or variations of them as seen in “making the most out
of your questions”) to practice.

Tips for Effective Teaching


It’s very important that you maintain a positive atmosphere when teaching your children.
Even if your child is incredibly gifted, they might not be emotionally ready to sit through a
nearly 80-question exam that will help determine their educational future. This can trans-
late to a lot of stress and pressure for parents. After all, what parent doesn’t want their
child in the best possible school environment?

However, children often easily pick up on their parent’s stress and anxiety, which will harm
their ability to learn and focus. This stress and tension is not productive, and will harm
their test performance. It’s important that you try to treat test prep as a fun activity: doing
puzzles with mom/dad isn’t any different than building a train set or having a tea party.
Teaching your child how to answer the questions on the Arithmetic Reasoning section
shouldn’t feel any different to your child than when Grandma teaches them how to use
the cookie cutter for the holiday cookies.

Learning should be a positive, fun experience. When they get a question wrong or don’t
understand a concept, use positive language with them and have a lot of patience. For an
incorrect “Reasoning by Analogy” problem, you might say “Wow, great job! But we can’t
forget that that while the circle does get smaller, it also has to change color! So help me
find the one that changes color too. Great job, now you have it! Now lets look at the next
one.”

15
If your child is having trouble staying focused on the problems, don’t yell at them or
punish them. Just use positive reinforcement when they do complete a problem. Praise
them, and give them rewards (such as a small sticker) when they complete a set. I’ve had
students that initially couldn’t focus on 5 problems in an hour. But through the use of
positive reinforcement, the same students were able to focus on an entire practice test
after a few months. I would start by giving praise and a sticker after every single problem
completed, and then slowly wean off the stickers to one sticker per page completed. Over
time, I would maintain a positive environment while scaling back the physical rewards
until the child could sit through a testing environment without needing stickers or
constant praise to keep answering questions.

In observing how parents practice with their students at home, I noticed that students
who were trained in a positive manner significantly out-performed the students who faced
harsh parental criticism for incorrect answers and lack of focus. So, even if you are very
frustrated, it’s important to remember that your stress reactions will likely harm overall
test performance.

Other Practice Resources


If you want more G&T practice, check out the following eBooks available at
www.Altiora.nyc/publications. We’ve worked to create inexpensive downloadable
practice resources for every difficulty level.
Our Beginner Practice Book is designed to introduce students to
the basic rules and logic for each question type. It can also be used
Gifted to coach students who have trouble focusing on questions that
& require more analysis, by providing them with quick, correct results
Talented
For Kindergarten and
1st Grade Entry
that can be quickly rewarded with praise. There will likely be a few
questions on the actual exam that are of the same level as our
Beginner
Practice Book Beginner set, but most will likely be of the level of the Intermediate
Contains 40 NNAT2 and 50 OLSAT
questions for beginners set.

Our Intermediate Practice Book is designed to mimic the bulk of


Gifted
the questions found on the actual exam. Many students need
& extensive coaching at the Beginner level before they can consistent-
Talented ly perform well at the Intermediate level.
For Kindergarten and
1st Grade Entry

Intermediate Our Expert Practice Book is designed to challenge students who


Practice Book can consistently perform well at the Intermediate level. There will
Contains 40 NNAT2 and 50 OLSAT
questions for the intermediate level
likely be a few questions on the exam that meet the Expert level
criteria, specifically questions geared towards the 1st grade entry
students. If your child is testing for 1st grade entry or higher, they
Gifted should be comfortable with the Expert level questions.
&
Talented As we mentioned in the introduction, we were able to keep these
For Kindergarten and

inexpensive by releasing them as eBooks rather than as printed


1st Grade Entry

Expert
Practice Book copies. Feel free to print them out at home, and to practice as much
Contains 40 NNAT2 and 50 OLSAT
questions for experts
as necessary! And, as always, feel free to contact us for more info
about Altiora's personalized G&T coaching for both kids and
parents.
16
Question Booklet and Scoring Guide

Staple the following 13 green-headed pages together to form


your Question Booklet and Scoring Guide.

After you have assembled the Question Booklet and Scoring


Guide with this cover page on top, staple the 17 blue pages
into the Student Answer Booklet, with the appropriate cover
page on top.

When you are ready to begin, read the directions on the


following page to yourself. Then, give your child the
Student Answer Booklet.

When your child is settled in, begin to read the bolded


prompts to your child and take note of which questions your
child answers correctly.
NNAT2
We have provided 20 questions for the NNAT2 practice test, which provide an accurate
representation of the range of questions found on the actual G&T exam. The actual
NNAT2 will have 38 questions. Students, especially those entering kindergarten, are
not expected to get all of the questions correct. As this test is also used for first grade
admission, some questions are geared towards older students. Students entering
Kindergarten will not need to use a pencil (despite the directions), and should point to
their answers. Students entering 1st grade should mark their answers with a pencil.

When you are ready to begin, read the bolded excerpt below (paraphrased from the
official NYC.GOV website) to your child. The italicized sections are directions for you,
and should not be read aloud. Turn the page, and read the bolded prompts to your
child. Mark the answers your child gets correct as "1 point," and the answers that he or
she gets incorrect as "0 points."

There will be a short break after the NNAT2, denoted by a “Stop” sign on their answer
booklet. Give your child 5 minutes to rest before starting the OLSAT.

Read the Following to Your Child


"Look at the first page of your test booklet. In this packet, there
are some questions to answer. Look at each one, and find the
missing piece that belongs in the box with the question mark.
Don't spend too much time on any one picture, and do as many as
you can. You can change your answer by erasing the mark you
made and circling your new answer. Or, you can tell me your new
answer. When you come to the "Stop" sign at the end, don't go
any further. Do you have any questions?"

At this point, answer any questions and then prompt your child to begin
the exam. Turn to the next page and begin to read the bolded prompts to
your child.

At the end of each page, if your child doesn’t automatically turn the page,
you may help them turn the page or prompt them to do so on their own.

1
Reasoning by Analogy
1. Look at this picture. There is a box with a question mark. Find the piece that
goes in the box with the question mark.

Correct Answer: 3

Points: 0 / 1

2. Look at this picture. There is a box with a question mark. Find the piece that
goes in the box with the question mark.

Correct Answer: 5

Points: 0 / 1

3. Look at this picture. There is a box with a question mark. Find the piece that
goes in the box with the question mark.

Correct Answer: 5

Points: 0 / 1

4. Look at this picture. There is a box with a question mark. Find the piece that
goes in the box with the question mark.

Correct Answer: 1

Points: 0 / 1

5. Look at this picture. There is a box with a question mark. Find the piece that
goes in the box with the question mark.

Correct Answer: 2

Points: 0 / 1

2
Serial Reasoning
1. Look at this picture. There is a box with a question mark. Find the piece that
goes in the box with the question mark.

Correct Answer: 2

Points: 0 / 1

2. Look at this picture. There is a box with a question mark. Find the piece that
goes in the box with the question mark.

Correct Answer: 1

Points: 0 / 1

3. Look at this picture. There is a box with a question mark. Find the piece that
goes in the box with the question mark.

Correct Answer: 4

Points: 0 / 1

4. Look at this picture. There is a box with a question mark. Find the piece that
goes in the box with the question mark.

Correct Answer: 3

Points: 0 / 1

5. Look at this picture. There is a box with a question mark. Find the piece that
goes in the box with the question mark.

Correct Answer: 1

Points: 0 / 1

3
Pattern Completion
1. Look at this picture. There is a box with a question mark. Find the piece that
goes in the box with the question mark.

Correct Answer: 1

Points: 0 / 1

2. Look at this picture. There is a box with a question mark. Find the piece that
goes in the box with the question mark.

Correct Answer: 1

Points: 0 / 1

3. Look at this picture. There is a box with a question mark. Find the piece that
goes in the box with the question mark.

Correct Answer: 2

Points: 0 / 1

4. Look at this picture. There is a box with a question mark. Find the piece that
goes in the box with the question mark.

Correct Answer: 4

Points: 0 / 1

5. Look at this picture. There is a box with a question mark. Find the piece that
goes in the box with the question mark.

Correct Answer: 3

Points: 0 / 1

4
6. Look at this picture. There is a box with a question mark. Find the missing piece
that goes in the box with the question mark.

Correct Answer: 1

Points: 0 / 1

7. Look at this picture. There is a box with a question mark. Find the missing piece
that goes in the box with the question mark.

Correct Answer: 5

Points: 0 / 1

Spatial Visualization
1. Look at this picture. There is a box with a question mark. Find the piece that
goes in the box with the question mark.

Correct Answer: 1

Points: 0 / 1

2. Look at this picture. There is a box with a question mark. Find the piece that
goes in the box with the question mark.

Correct Answer: 3

Points: 0 / 1

3. Look at this picture. There is a box with a question mark. Find the piece that
goes in the box with the question mark.

Correct Answer: 4

Points: 0 / 1

You may now take a short break. In a few minutes we will do some more puzzles.

5
OLSAT
This is the verbal section of the exam. We have provided 30 questions, which is a
full-length OLSAT practice test. Students, especially those entering kindergarten, are
not expected to get all of the questions correct. As this test is also used for first grade
admission, some questions are geared towards older students.

Read the following bolded excerpt (paraphrased from the official NYC.GOV website)
to your child. The italicized sections are directions for you, and should not be read
aloud. Read the bolded questions to your child, and take note of their answers. Mark
the answers your child gets correct as "1 point," and the answers that he or she gets
incorrect as "0 points."

If you are using this for a formal practice test, do not tell your child their score or the
correct answers until they are finished with the exam.

Read the Following to Your Child


We are going to do some interesting activities that are like
puzzles. Look at the first page of your booklet. When the pictures
go across the page, like this, we say they are in a row.

Draw your finger across the top row to demonstrate.

Now place your finger on the first row.

At this point, turn to the next page of this booklet and begin to read the
bolded prompts to your child.

6
Verbal Comprehension: Arithmetic Reasoning
1. Kelly had 2 oranges, as shown at the beginning of the row. She then picked 3
more off of her tree. In the next part of the row, mark the picture that shows how
many oranges she has now.

Correct Answer: 3

Points: 0 / 1

2. Slide your finger down to the next row. Kyle has 7 bananas, as shown at the
beginning of the row. His brother, Tom, has an equal number of bananas. Mark
under the box that shows how many bananas Tom has.

Correct Answer: 4

Points: 0 / 1

3. Move your finger to the next row. Sarah brought 10 cupcakes to school to
celebrate her birthday! Her classmates ended up eating half of her cupcakes. In
the next part of the row, mark the picture that shows how many cupcakes Sarah
has left.

Correct Answer: 1

Points: 0 / 1

4. Move your finger to the next row. Dinesh has the 6 tomatoes in the beginning
of the row. If he decides to use 5 of them in a salad, mark under the box that
shows how many tomatoes he has left.

Correct Answer: 2

Points: 0 / 1

5. Slide your finger down to the next row. Elias was helping his mother fold the
laundry. He folded the 8 shirts at the beginning of the row. He then folded one
more. In the next part of the row, mark the picture that shows how many shirts
he folded all together.

Correct Answer: 3

Points: 0 / 1

7
6. Move your finger to the next row. Gabriella is collecting eggs from her family’s
chickens. She collects three eggs, but then finds 1 more. How many eggs has she
collected all together?

Correct Answer: 1

Points: 0 / 1

7. Slide your finger down to the next row. Gideon brought some candy to school
for his friends. He started the day with 7 pieces, but gave 3 pieces to his friends,
and 1 to his teacher. In the next part of the row, mark under the picture that
shows how many pieces of candy he has left?

Correct Answer: 4

Points: 0 / 1

8. Slide your finger down to the next row. Sarah and Josiah are assigned to bring
cookies to school for a class party. Sarah brings 8 cookies, and Josiah brings half
as many cookies as Sarah. How many cookies did Josiah bring?

Correct Answer: 2

Points: 0 / 1

9. Move your finger to the next row. Adrian has 4 tennis balls. His sister, Eliana,
has an equal number of tennis balls! How many tennis balls does Eliana have?

Correct Answer: 4

Points: 0 / 1

10. Slide your finger down to the next row. Kelsey picked 8 chili peppers from her
garden, as shown at the beginning of the row. She used 6 of them to make tacos.
In the next part of the row, point to the picture that shows how many chili pep-
pers Kelsey has now.

Correct Answer: 3

Points: 0 / 1

8
Verbal Comprehension: Aural Reasoning
1. Jamie and her grandmother are making cookies! Once they have all their
ingredients in a bowl, they have to mix them together. Mark the picture that
shows what they should use to help them mix their ingredients!

Correct Answer: 1

Points: 0 / 1

2. Move your finger to the next row. Karen is feeling sick, and she has to stay
home from school today. Her mom is worried, so she wants to take Karen to
somebody who can help her feel better. Who should Karen’s mom take her to
see?

Correct Answer: 2

Points: 0 / 1

3. Move your finger to the next row. As part of John’s weekly chores, he is asked
to help to clean the leaves off of the front porch. What should he use to clean the
leaves off of the porch?

Correct Answer: 3

Points: 0 / 1

4. Move your finger to the next row. Igor is going to a petting zoo. He is most
excited to meet an animal that is covered in curly, white wool! When this animal
gets trimmed, they use its wool to make clothes for people. What animal is Igor
most excited to see?

Correct Answer: 1

Points: 0 / 1

9
5. Slide your finger down to the next row. Jayden and his cousin are going to
surprise their grandmother with a beautiful garden on their porch. They first had
to go out and buy pots for their plants. Then, they had to plant the flowers in
each pot. Finally, they had to water the plants. Mark the picture that shows the
last thing they did.

Correct Answer: 4

Points: 0 / 1

6. Move your finger to the next row. Jose wants to go on his class field trip to a
farm! When he was there, Jose saw a large, green machine that the farmers use to
help them pull equipment across the farm. What did Jose see on the farm?

Correct Answer: 2

Points: 0 / 1

7. Slide your finger down to the next row. Jane has been working on an art proj-
ect, and her hands are all covered in paint. What should she use to clean up after
she finishes her painting?

Correct Answer: 3

Points: 0 / 1

8. Slide your finger down to the next row. Ryder is making a scrapbook with his
grandma. Before they start, his grandma goes to get something to cut the paper
with. She tells Ryder to be careful, as this object can be dangerous if used incor-
rectly. In the next part of the row, mark the picture that shows what Ryder’s
grandma will use to cut the paper.

Correct Answer: 1

Points: 0 / 1

9. Slide your finger down to the next row. It’s a beautiful spring day outside, and
the sun is shining brightly. The flowers are starting to grow, and it’s nice and
warm. When Raymond wants to play outside, what should he wear?

Correct Answer: 4

Points: 0 / 1

10
10. Move your finger to the next row. Danielle is very excited to learn her first
musical instrument. This instrument doesn’t have any strings. Instead, it makes a
sound when she blows through one end, and she can make different notes by
covering tiny holes with her fingers. What instrument is Danielle going to learn?

Correct Answer: 3

Points: 0 / 1

Verbal Reasoning
1. Place your finger by the building blocks at the beginning of the row. Look at
the building blocks. Find the number that is next to a star. In the next part of the
row, point under that number.

Correct Answer: 4

Points: 0 / 1

2. Slide your finger down to the next row. Mark the picture that shows a bird on
top of her cage.

Correct Answer: 3

Points: 0 / 1

3. Slide your finger down to the next row. Look at the box that shows the circles
and numbers. Mark the number that appears inside both of the circles.

Correct Answer: 2

Points: 0 / 1

4. Move your finger to the next row. Mark under the picture that shows a square
inside a circle. There is a triangle next to the circle.

Correct Answer: 1

Points: 0 / 1

11
5. Move your finger to the next row. Mark the picture that shows this: some
animals are in line to get food. A cat is first in line, a dog is second in line, and a
sheep is last in line.

Correct Answer: 4

Points: 0 / 1

6. Slide your finger down to the next row. Look at the shapes at the beginning of
the row. Mark the picture that shows what would happen if the star and the
rectangle switched places.

Correct Answer: 2

Points: 0 / 1

7. Move your finger to the next row. Mark the space under a picture that shows
this: A man is standing in between a cat and a dog. There is a tree behind him.

Correct Answer: 1

Points: 0 / 1

8. Slide your finger down to the next row. Mark the picture that shows two things
to eat, and one thing to wear.

Correct Answer: 1

Points: 0 / 1

9. Move your finger to the next row. Mark the picture that shows this: A woman is
standing at the table with an apple in front of her. There is a window open
behind her, and it is sunny outside.

Correct Answer: 3

Points: 0 / 1

10. Move your finger to the next row. Look at the triangle at the beginning of the
row. Mark the picture that shows what would happen if the light half of the
triangle were taken away.

Correct Answer: 2

Points: 0 / 1

We are now finished doing puzzles for the day. Soon, we will do some more
puzzles that are just like these. Close your booklet so the cover is on top. Great
job!

12
Scoring Guide
Use the scoring guide below to total your child’s correct answers for each section.
You can use the information as a guide to direct the focus of future practice.

NNAT2
Reasoning by Analogy

______/5

Serial Reasoning

______/5

Pattern Completion

______/7

Spatial Visualization

______/3

Total NNAT2

______/20

OLSAT
Verbal Comprehension: Arithmetic Reasoning

______/10

Verbal Comprehension: Aural Reasoning

______/10

Verbal Reasoning

______/10

Total OLSAT

______/30

13
Student Answer Booklet

After you have separated out and stapled the


Question Booklet and Scoring Guide, staple the following 17
blue-headed pages into a packet.

This is your child’s Student Answer Booklet.

Read through the directions on your Question Booklet and


Scoring Guide. When you are ready to begin administering the
exam, direct your child to turn to the first page
of this answer booklet and
begin reading the appropriate prompts to them.
Reasoning by Analogy

1
3

2
5

Serial Reasoning

3
2

4
4

5
Pattern Completion

6
3

7
5
?

8
7

Spatial Visualization

9
2

10
Great Job!

You may now take a 5-minute break


before we begin the next section.

11
Verbal Comprehension: Arithmetic Reasoning

12
6

10

13
Verbal Comprehension: Aural Reasoning

14
6

10

15
Verbal Reasoning

1 2 3 4

16
6

10

17