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Extreme Calculating

All you need is a kid and a calculator

Brought to you by the editors of

© Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved.


Contents

198 – A Really Wild Number! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2


Very Weird Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
The Coolness of 6174 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Betcha You Can’t Do This! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Extreme Palindromes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
More Weird Numbers—11 and 9091! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
13—An Especially Annoying and Unlucky Number! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Calculating Codes! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Stuck-in-a-Rut Weirdness! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Goof-a-Rama! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Your Calculator Writes! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Presto! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
17! 11! 13! 100! 999! Cool! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Gray Elephant from Denmark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Random Goofiness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Calculator Wow! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Calculator Magic! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
37,037—One Really Boffo Number! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Flip-Floppers! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Answers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

© Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved. familyeducation.com


Got a key pad on your calculator that looks like this?

7 8 9
4 5 6
1 2 3
0

You do? Great! You’re set!

And hey, have fun!

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198 – A Really Wild Number!

Enter the numbers on the buttons across the bottom row of your calculator,
from right to left, like this: 321.
Then subtract the numbers in that row from left to right: 321 - 123.
Did you get 198?

OK, now do the same for the numbers in the middle row,
again from right to left: 654.
Now reverse the numbers in the middle row and subtract: 654 - 456.
What did you get? 198? Right! Same number. Wild, eh?

Try the top row. Punch the buttons from right to life: 987
Reverse and subtract: 987 - 789
198!

Experiment! Go for it!


What if you go up and down, entering 963 - 369 or 852 - 258?
What if you even go diagonally, like this: 753-357?
What number keeps showing up when you subtract?
Is it still 198, or is it a new number?
If it's a new number, can you simply divide it by 2 or 3 to get 198?
Wild! 198! Really Wild!

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Very Weird Numbers

All products of 9 have digits that, when added together, equal 9. Really.

Like 9 x 6 = 54 and 5 + 4 = 9

Or 3 x 9 = 27 and 2 + 7 = 9

Or even really big-time multiplication problems like 9 x 201 = 1,809 and


1 + 8 + 0 + 9 = 27 and 2 + 7 = 9

Weird. Especially weird.

37

Think of any three-digit number in which all digits are the same.
For example, 333. Add the digits (3 + 3 + 3 = 9).

Divide the original number by the sum of its digits (333 ÷ 9 = 37).
There’s that weird number: 37.

Let’s try some others.


111 ÷ 3 = 37
222 ÷ 6 = 37
999 ÷ 27 = 37

Weird. Especially weird.

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The Coolness of 6174

I’m like a kid. I’m special. There’s no other number like me. I’m 6,174, and
I’m the only number that can do the cool thing that follows. Get set…GO!

® Pick four different numbers from 0 to 9, like: 4, 5, 6, 1


® Arrange them to make the largest number possible, like: 6,541
® Now arrange them to make the smallest number possible, like: 1,456
® Subtract the small number from the large one.
6,541
-1,456
5,085
® Now, take the answer and arrange those numbers to make the largest
number possible; like: 8,550
® Now make the smallest number and subtract as you did above:
8,550
-0,558
7,992
® Continue to repeat these steps.
9,972
-2,799
7,173 7,731
-1,377
6,354 6,543
-3,456
3,087 8,730
-0,378
8,352 8,532
-2,358
6,174
THERE I AM!

® If you keep doing this high/low/subtract/rearrange/do-it-again thing, I


always show up! Cool, huh?! Now try your own four different numbers
between 0 and 9.

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Betcha You Can’t Do This!

(The first one is done for you.


The other answers are on this book’s last page.)

Arrange eight 8s so that the result is 1,000.

(answer: 888 + 88 + 8 + 8 + 8 = 1,000)

® ® ®

Arrange seven 4s so that the result is 100.

® ® ®

Fill in the question marks with either a plus sign or a multiplication sign:

9 ? 8 ? 7 ? 6 ? 5 ? 4 ? 3 ? 2 ? 1 = 100

(Hint: Aim for a pretty big number early in the calculation.)

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Extreme Palindromes

A palindrome is a word or phrase that reads the same backward as forward.


Like these—

Step on no pets.

***

Neil, an alien.

***

Madam, I’m Adam.

***

Never odd or even.

***

Yo! Bozo boy!

***

Sit on a potato pan, Otis.

***

Dennis, Nell, Edna, Leon, Nedra, Anita, Rolf, Nora, Alice, Carol,
Leo, Jane, Reed, Dena, Dale, Basil, Rae, Penny, Lana, Dave, Denny,
Lena, Ida, Bernadette, Ben, Ray, Lila, Nina, Jo, Ira, Mara, Sara,
Mario, Jan, Ina, Lily, Arne, Bette, Dan, Reba, Diane, Lynn, Ed,
Eva, Dana, Lynne, Pearl, Isabel, Ada, Ned, Dee, Rena, Joel, Lora,
Cecil, Aaron, Flora, Tina, Arden, Noel, and Ellen sinned.

But words are a bit of a bore.


So how about numbers? Now that would be extreme.

(continued on next page)

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Extreme Palindromes (continued)

Here’s the cool thing about a calculator: With a calculator, you can create
an infinite number of palindrome numbers. Really! Try this:
® Enter a three-digit number; for example, 236.
® Reverse the number and add it to the first number: 236 + 632 = 868.
® See the 868? That’s your palindrome.
If you don’t get a palindrome, keep trying. Keep reversing the answer and
adding, so on and so on. Like this:
165
+561
726 726
+627
1,353 1,353
+3,531
4,884 — Palindrome! It’s the same
backward as forward!
Let’s try some two-digit numbers:
24
+42
66 — Palindrome! It’s the same
backward as forward!

87
+78
165 165
+561
726 726
+627
1,353 1,353
+ 3,531
4,884 — Palindrome! It’s the same
backward as forward!

(Hint: Sometimes the number will get really long, and it won't fit on your calculator screen
anymore. You might then want to pick a new, smaller number to try.)

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More Weird Numbers—11 and 9091!

11

Think of any five-digit number that does not begin with 0 . . .


like 15658 or 22222 or 31772 and multiply it by 11.

Now multiply that answer by 9091.

And holy smokers! Look at that answer!


It’s that original five-digit number—twice!

(Warning: Because some calculators don’t have enough slots for ten digits,
you may need a pretty fancy calculator for this weird thing to work perfectly.)

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13—An Especially Annoying and Unlucky Number!

OK, here’s a way to always come up with the unlucky number known as “13.”

(Why would somebody want to do that? We don’t know.


This is a calculator book, not a behavior-of-knuckleheads book.)

Pick any three-digit number between 100 and 999.

Enter that number into your calculator twice.


So if you picked 146, the calculator will read: 146,146.

Divide by 7.
Divide the answer by 11.
Then divide that answer by the original three-digit number.

Get a load of that! The final answer is 13!

For example, back to the example:

146,146 ÷ 7 = 20,878
20878 ÷ 11 = 1,898
1,898 ÷ 146 = 13

13!
Unluckily weird!

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Calculating Codes!

Check out this very simple calculator/number/letter code:


A=1 G=7 M = 13 S = 19 Y = 25
B=2 H=8 N = 14 T = 20 Z = 26
C=3 I=9 O = 15 U = 21
D=4 J = 10 P = 16 V = 22
E=5 K = 11 Q = 17 W = 23
F=6 L = 12 R = 18 X = 24

Using this code, you can write any word in numbers. Like CREEP would be:

3/18/5/5/16
(because: C = 3, R = 18, E = 5, and P = 16)

To play Calculating Codes, you’ll need your calculator to multiply out a word.
For example, to multiply out CREEP, you would enter 3 x 18 x 5 x 5 x 16. The
answer is 21,600. So for purposes of this game, the value of CREEP is
21,600. The value of DOG is 420 (4 x 15 x 7 = 420). And the value of
UNDERWEAR is 219,088,800.

Now here’s the challenge: Find the word with the highest possible
total—99,999,999—but without overloading your calculator!

So CREEP’s not so good, because it totals only 21,600.


And UNDERWEAR’s no good, because it gives too big a number.
Try Octopus. That gets you 86,184,000, which is OK.
How about DRUDGERY? Wow—that’s 95,256,000.

(A major helpful hint: When you’re looking for these “almost 99,999,999” words,
keep a dictionary handy and look for words that are seven, eight, or nine letters long.)

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Stuck-in-a-Rut Weirdness!

Enjoy the challenge of using just the function keys (– , + , ÷, x , =)


and
only one number key to come up with a requested number.

For example, obtain 15 on your calculator by using


no number keys other than the 2.
Give up?
Try this: 22 ÷ 2 + 2 + 2.

Get it? Great! Now try these:

Get to 4 by using 3 four times.

Get to 30 by using 6 three times.

Get to 37 by using 3 five times.

Get to 100 by using 9 six times.

Get to 111 by using 2 four times.

Get to 1,000 by using 8 eight times.

(Answers are on book’s last page.)

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Goof-a-Rama!

Enter a number between 1 and 10. (Remember what it is!)


Multiply by 8.
Add 12.
Divide by 4.
Subtract 3.
Divide by 2.

There it is! The number you started with! Whoa!

Let’s try it with “8”--


8
8 x 8 = 64
64 + 12 = 76
76 ÷ 4 = 19
19 – 3 = 16
16 ÷ 2 = 8

Wow-a-rama!

Whoa-a-rama!

______-a-rama!
(Enter word of your choice.)

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Your Calculator Writes!

Just type in certain numbers, and when you look at them


upside down, they look like letters of the alphabet.

Seriously!

For example, enter 4.


Turn your calculator upside down.
Says “h,” right?

Or enter 3 and turn your calculator upside down.


Says “E,” right?

There aren't that many letters that you can make with your calculator,
so you have to choose your words carefully and use some imagination when
you're reading them. Ignore the decimal points, for instance, and consider
that some of the upside-down numbers make capital letters and some make
lowercase letters. Just cut the poor calculator some slack, and it will
serve you well as a secret communication tool. Try these—

Ghosts say this.


8 ÷ 100

Another word for a fibber’s tall tales.


(2,660 X 2) - 3

My brother is such a pig.


He ____ the whole couch when we play Nintendo.
(2,500 X 2) + 452 + 452

(continued on next page)

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Your Calculator Writes! (continued)

What you're supposed to say when you pick up the phone: "_____?"
(7,000 + 17 + 17 + 700) ÷10,000

A verb,
My brother _____ loud.
My room _____ cool.
My dinner _____ gross.
(25 X 2) + 1

Sticky stuff.
9 ÷ 100

You couldn’t stop laughing.


You had a serious case of the _______ .
900 + 18 + 1 + 379,000 + 5,000,000

The lion represents this astrological sign.


(40 – 3) ÷ 100

Hens lay ‘em.


(1,000 – 7) + 5,000

You’re kind of tired, kind of bored.


You let out a long breath called a _______ .
(2,500 x 2) – 85

Santa’s belly laugh.


(20,202 x 2) ÷ 100,000
(continued on next page)

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Your Calculator Writes! (continued)

You can usually find a knee in the middle of one.


(310 x 3) + 7

Baby talk.
9,009 ÷ 100,000

Your sister can’t tell you what to do.


She’s not the _______ .
(11,000 ÷ 2) + 2 +2 +2 +2

This is what they call the bathroom in England.


In number form, it’s James Bond’s code number.
(10 – 3) ÷ 100

These are totally gross and slimy, and some are even deadly, so beware.
(And lots of people eat them! Yuck!)
(3 x 11) + 700 + 5,000

What you dig when you want to bury something.


1,500 + 1,500 + 350 + 350 + 2 +2

Candy suckers on sticks, without the pop.


(1,063,540 x 5) + 7

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Presto!
Grab a deck of playing cards. Now ask a friend to pick any card. Be sure you
do NOT see the card--because your challenge is to use the calculator to
identify that mystery card. Really!

Give your friend a calculator; and direct him to do the following:


1) Enter the card number. Note: ace = 1, jack = 11, queen = 12, king = 13
2) Multiply that number by 2.
3) Add 1.
4) Multiply by 5.
5) Add a “suit number”: clubs = 6, diamonds = 7, hearts = 8, spades = 9.
6) Ask to see the calculator and look at the answer.

Subtract 5 from the answer. Now…


® The “tens” place tells the number of the card. For the king, queen,
jack, and 10, the “tens” AND “hundreds” place will tell the number of
the card.
® The “ones” place tells the suit (clubs = 6, diamonds = 7, hearts = 8,
spades = 9).

Try it! Suppose your friend picks the 7 of clubs:


1) Enter 7.
2) Multiply that number by 2. 7 x 2 = 14
3) Add 1. 14 + 1 = 15
4) Multiply by 5. 15 x 5 = 75
5) Add a “suit number”: in this case it’s clubs. 75 + 6 = 81

Now, subtract 5 from the answer. 81 – 5 = 76


7 is in the “tens” column and 6 is in the “ones” column. That means the
card was a 7 of clubs.

PRESTO!!
PRESTO!!

PRESTO!!

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17! 11! 13! 100! 999! Cool!

Pick any three-digit number from 100 to 999 and


enter it twice into a calculator to make a six-digit number.

For example, enter 175; then enter 175 again.


Your calculator will read 175,175.

Next, divide by 7.
Divide again by 11.
And divide by 13.

And thar she blows! The original three-digit number! Cool!

Back to the example:

175,175 ÷ 7 = 25,025

25,025 ÷ 11 = 2,275

2,275 ÷ 13 = 175

!!!!

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The Gray Elephant from Denmark

Ask a friend—let’s call the friend “Fred”—to think of a number between 1


and 10 (but make sure Fred does not tell you the number!). Then ask Fred to
multiply that number by 9.

Next, instruct Fred to add the two digits of the answer together. (Say, for
example, that Fred originally picked 8. After multiplying by 9, he’s at the
number 72. Add the 7 and 2 together to get 9.)

At this point, Fred will be thinking of the number 9. He has to be. Because,
remember, when anybody multiplies any number between 1 and 10 by 9, the
sum of the answer’s digits always totals 9. Think about it: 9, 18 (1 + 8 = 9),
27 (2 + 7 = 9), 36 (etc.), 45, 54, 63, 72, 81, 90. Neat, eh? Now you’ve got
Fred just where you want him.

Tell Fred to subtract 5 from the number. (You know the answer is 4 because
9 - 5 = 4.)

Tell Fred to assign a letter, according to the alphabet, to the number they
end up with: a=1, b=2, c=3, d=4, e=5, and so on. (You know that the assigned
letter has to be “d,” right?)

Now ask Fred to think of a country in Europe that starts with that letter.
(Fred will have to think of Denmark, because that’s the only country in
Europe that starts with “d.”)

Now ask Fred to think of an animal that starts with the second letter of the
country he’s thinking of. (He’s thinking of “e,” right? And he’ll most likely
think of “elephant”—almost everybody does.)

We’re almost there. Ask Fred to think of the color of that animal. (Most
people think of elephants as being gray.) Now you’re set to stun Fred. Ask
him if he’s thinking of a “gray elephant from Denmark.”

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Random Goofiness
Step #1
Enter any three-of-the-same-digits number, like 444.

Step #2
Add the three digits (4 + 4 + 4 = 12).

Step #3
Divide the number in Step #1 by the number in Step #2 (444 ÷ 12 = 37).
Try other numbers. Always get the same answer?

® ® ®

To determine approximately how many quarts of blood are in your body,

divide your weight by 6

® ® ®

Enter a number between 1 and 10. Multiply by 8. Add 12. Divide by 4.

Subtract 3. Divide by 2. Press the = button. Did you get the number you

started with?

® ® ®

Check out the sequence of digits in the answer when you do this:

111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = ?

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Calculator Wow!

Randomly pick out a number and see if you can find consecutive numbers

whose sum is that number. Take the number 315, for example. Grab your

calculator, work at it, and you might discover that:

50 + 51 + 52 + 53 + 54 + 55 = 315.

Now, here’s the easy “wow” way. Let’s say you want to try to add six

consecutive numbers to get 315. Divide 315 by 6 and you’ll get 52.5*. Go

down three numbers from 52.5 (52, 51, 50) and up three numbers from 52.5

(53, 54, 55), for a total of six numbers. And you’ll get:

50 + 51 + 52 + 53 + 54 + 55 = 315.

Wow!

What if you want to try to add five consecutive numbers to get 315. Divide

315 by 5 and you’ll get 63*. Count down two from 63 (62, 61) and up from 63

(64, 65); and add together all five numbers:

61 + 62 + 63 + 64 + 65 = 315

Wow! Double wow!

Try some on your own! Wow ‘em!

*WARNING: This will not work unless you get a whole number (like 63) or a .5 number (like 52.5)

after you divide.

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Calculator Magic!

Ask a friend to pick any three numbers, from one to six. Like: 2, 5, and 6.

BUT—the friend can’t tell you what the numbers are. BECAUSE—you’re
going to tell your friend what numbers she secretly picked. REALLY!

First, give your friend a calculator. Then tell her to:

1) Multiply one of the numbers by 2.


2) Add 5.
3) Multiply that result by 5.
4) Add one of the other numbers she chose.
5) Multiply that result by 10.
6) Add the third number.
7) Give you the calculator.

Now, you subtract 250. And her three numbers will be there! Whoa!

Let’s do a sample, using the numbers 2, 5, and 6.

1) Multiply one of the numbers by 2. (2 x 5 = 10)


2) Add 5. (10 + 5 = 15)
3) Multiply that result by 5. (15 x 5 = 75)
4) Add one of the other numbers she chose. (75 + 6 = 81)
5) Multiply that result by 10. (81 x 10 = 810)
6) Add the third number. (810 + 2 = 812)

812 – 250 = 562 Whoa!

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37,037—One Really Boffo Number!

Give a friend a calculator and


ask him to punch in the number thirty-seven thousand thirty-seven.
Just to be careful, check the calculator to be sure it reads 37,037.

Now ask your friend to pick his favorite number between 1 and 9.

Whichever number you’re given, multiply it by 3 in your head and


tell your friend to multiply 37,037 by the answer in your head.

For example, if your friend says 4 is his favorite number,


you ask your friend to multiply 37,037 by 12.”
If your friend’s favorite number is 7,
you ask him to multiply 37,037 by 21.

Now get a load of this—


the answer will be a row of your friend’s favorite number.

Really! Try it! Boffo!

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Flip-Floppers!

Hand a friend your calculator and ask her to punch in the number 32,967.

Now, announce that you will flip-flop that number:

“I will flip-flop that number!”

Tell your friend to multiply 32,967 by the number’s last digit (7), and then
divide by its first digit (3). The number will flip-flop. It’ll become 76,923.
Now you can say:

“I have flip-flopped that number!”

Try it with 1,089.


1,089 x 9 = 9,801 ÷ 1 = 9,801.
See that?
1,089 flip-flopped to 9801.

But BEWARE! Not all number are flip-floppers. But the following are!

2,178 10,989 219,978


3,267 21,978 329,967
4,356 32,967 439,956
6,534 43,956 659,934
7,623 65,934 769,923
8,712 76,923 989,901
9,801 87,912 109,989
98,901

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Answers

Betcha You Can’t Do This!


44 + 44 + 4 + 4 + 4 = 100
9 x 8 + 7 + 6 + 5 + 4 + 3 + 2 + 1 = 100

® ® ®

Stuck-in-a-Rut Weirdness!
Note: for each of these, there may be more than one answer. Here are ours!

Get to 4 by using 3 four times. 3x3+3÷3

Get to 30 by using 6 three times. 6x6-6

Get to 37 by using 3 five times. 333 ÷ 3 ÷ 3

Get to 100 by using 9 six times. 99 ÷ 99 + 99

Get to 111 by using 2 four times. 222 ÷ 2

Get to 1,000 by using 8 eight times. 888 + 88 + 8 + 8 + 8 … or … 8888 – 888 ÷ 8

Bye!

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Chapter 34Adding Whole Numbers and Money4Lesson 15
Adding Money
n this lesson, your child has been taught to add money amounts. It’s pretty easy to keep
most kids’ attention when there’s a dollar sign involved. Here’s how you can make sure
your child understands the basic concepts.

Cover the Basics


Adding money is a lot like adding whole
numbers, but with two extra things to
remember: the dollar sign and the decimal.

Tell your child that you’re buying a small cheese pizza for
$7.19 and a large pepperoni for $8.19. You want to find out
how much the two pizzas will cost.

Point out that he can add the two numbers in three steps,
then estimate to see if he’s right:

step one step two step three


Line up the Add the dollar
decimal Add.. sign and the
points. decimal.
1
7.19 7.19 7.19
+ 8.19 + 8.19 + 8.19
15 38 $15.38

$7.19 + $8.19 = $15.38


To estimate, your child can round $7.19 down to $7,
and round $8.19 down to 8.

7 + 8 = 15, so the answer above, 15.38, looks good!

The pizzas together cost $15.38.

www.HomeworkReliefCenter.com © Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Lesson 15, page 1
Chapter 34Adding Whole Numbers and Money4Lesson 154Adding Money

Troubleshooting Tips
Make sure your child lines up the
decimal points when adding money amounts!

Make Sure Your Child Gets It


Tell your child that a soda costs $1.50 and a
pizza costs $7.19. Ask him if ten dollars is enough to buy
a small pizza and a soda. (Yes, it’s enough. The total cost
would be $7.19 + $1.50 = $8.69.)

And By the Way...


The work in this lesson builds on:

❑ Recognizing the value of coins


❑ Finding equivalent values in dollars and cents
❑ Using basic addition facts
❑ Regrouping (15 ones = 1 ten, 5 ones)

When to Call the Teacher


If you think your child isn’t getting it,
contact the teacher. Most math concepts
are based on previously learned skills.
And when your child falls behind, it can be a real
struggle to catch up.

www.HomeworkReliefCenter.com © Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Lesson 15, page 2
Name _________________________________________________

Adding Money
Add. Estimate to check.
1. $3 . 1 6 2. $8 . 7 9 3. $0 . 5 1 4. $1 . 1 1
1 4.38 1 3.15 1 6.93 1 4.44

5. $4 . 7 5 6. $1 . 0 5 7. $9 . 2 0 8. $6 . 7 2
1 3.14 1 7.24 1 3.63 1 1.98

9. $2.35 1 $1.73 5 10. $7.59 1 $6.82 5

11. $2.25 1 $2.84 5 12. $5.63 1 $2.81 5

13. Find the sum of $2.31 and $4.55.

14. Add $7.12 1 $9.59.

15. Will $12.00 be enough to buy a Athletic Equipment


softball and a baseball bat? Explain.
baseball bat $8.07
basketball $7.49
16. Which two pieces of equipment together volleyball $3.34
will cost about $16.00? softball $3.98
soccer ball $4.63

17. Which two items together would cost


less than $8.00? How much would they cost?
Answer Key

Adding Money
Add. Estimate to check.
1. $3 . 1 6 2. $8 . 7 9 3. $0 . 5 1 4. $1 . 1 1
1 4.38 1 3.15 1 6.93 1 4.44
$7.54 $11.94 $7.44 $5.55

5. $4 . 7 5 6. $1 . 0 5 7. $9 . 2 0 8. $6 . 7 2
1 3.14 1 7.24 1 3.63 1 1.98
$7.89 $8.29 $12.83 $8.70

9. $2.35 1 $1.73 5 $4.08 10. $7.59 1 $6.82 5 $14.41

11. $2.25 1 $2.84 5 $5.09 12. $5.63 1 $2.81 5 $8.44

13. Find the sum of $2.31 and $4.55. $6.86

14. Add $7.12 1 $9.59. $16.71

15. Will $12.00 be enough to buy a Athletic Equipment


softball and a baseball bat? Explain.
baseball bat $8.07
No; $3.98 1 $8.07 5 $12.05 basketball $7.49
16. Which two pieces of equipment together volleyball $3.34
will cost about $16.00? softball $3.98
The baseball bat and the basketball soccer ball $4.63

17. Which two items together would cost


less than $8.00? How much would they cost?
Volleyball and softball; $7.32