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an element of art

Texture is the surface quality of an


object that we sense through
touch.
an element of art

All objects have a texture.

The texture can be bumpy,


smooth, slick, scratchy, rough,
soft, fuzzy, prickly, silky, etc.
an element of art

•Tactile texture

•Visual texture

•How texture can create the


illusion of space.
an element of art
Works of art
have a variety
of actual or
TACTILE
textures
created by the
artist's choice
of materials and
how they are
handled
an element of art
Jud Nelson Hefty 2-Ply 1979-1981 Walker Art Center

an element of art
Jud Nelson
Hefty 2-Ply
1979-1981
Marble

This sculpture
actually feels hard
and cold because
it is carved from
MARBLE!
an element of art
Raffaelo Monti
Veiled Lady
c. 1860
Marble
an element of
art

Martin Puryear
Ampersand
1987-1988
Granite
Walker Art Center
an element of art

Eric Serritella
Ceramic Pots & Vases
an element of art

All of the examples this far


have been Tactile TEXTURE.

Tactile texture is the texture


that you can actually feel by
touching .
an element of art

There are also VISUAL


textures.

These are simulated, implied


or fake textures.
an element of art

Visual textures are textures


you can see with your eyes,
but you cannot feel with your
hands.

Example: Magazine Photos


an element of art

Janet Fish is an artist that


very frequently uses visual
texture in her artwork.

She is able to replicate


realistic looking textures
on a 2D surface.
an element of art

Chuck Close is another artist that


is skilled at making realistic looking
textures. He creates portraits.
Here is a very famous example of
his artwork. It is a self-portrait.
Keep in mind this is a PAINTING,
not a photograph.
an element of art

Texture can also be used by an artist to create


an illusion of space.

Because our eyes see more texture on things


that are close to us. Things further away have
much less texture.
an element of art
This image has
about the same
amount of detail
in the foreground
as in the
background.

The artist wasn’t


concerned with
creating a sense
of depth in this
painting.
Thomas Cole
American Painter
Early 1800’s
He uses more
texture in the
foreground
and less
texture in the
distance.