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Teacher's Book
Premium *ack
Tim Bowen
Mickey Rogers
Joanne Taylore-Knowles
Steve Taylore-Knowles
Concept development:
MACMILLAN Mariela Gil Vienna
is part of the ground-breaking Mind series, a general

openMind Level 1
English course for adults that targets their language
needs and provides them with the professional,
academic, and personal skills they need for success in
the 21st century. The key features of the series are:

• Life Skills: Higher-order skills such as critical thinking, organizational,


and learning skills that students need in order to be successful in their
professional, academic, and everyday lives.
• Language sub-skills with tips to support the development of the four
language skills.
• Step-by-step approach to grammar with grammar sections that provide a
clear focus on the meaning, form, and function of the language.
• Focus on functional language that helps learners improve their fluency and
speaking skills.
• Independent learning features throughout the course such as Notice!,
Reflect and How are you doing? boxes that encourage learners to analyze
their own progress.
• A range of video material and related worksheets that support the themes
and key language from the Student's Book.

S tu d e n t's C o m p o n e n ts
• Student's Book Pack: Print Student's Book; webcode access to Student's
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with video; webcode access to Teacher's Resource Center, Online Workbook
and Presentation Kit

Resource C enters
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self-study video worksheets; Downloadable wordlists; and more...!
• Teacher's Resource Center: includes everything from the Student's Resource
Center, plus: Downloadable class video worksheets; Extra Life Skills lesson
plans; Unit, Mid-course, End-of course and Placement tests
CO M M O N E U R O P E A N FR A M E W O R K

A l A2 Bl
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MACMILLAN
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2nd edition

Teacher's Book
Tim Bowen ■ ¡I

Mickey Rogers
Joanne Taylore-Knowles
Steve Taylore-Knowles
& Concept development:
MACMILLAN Mariela Gil Vierma Level 1
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INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE page iv

KAGAN STRUCTURES: A MIRACLE OF ACTIVE ENGAGEMENT page xviii

n ■
_ _... 'V.C STUDENT'S BOOK SCOPE AND SEQUENCE page xxii

n
h GRAMMAR REVIEW page T6

r ° NICE TO MEET YOU! page T9

t n
2 ~
WHAT DO YOU DO? page T19

3 ~
DOWN TIME page T29

4 O
DAY IN, DAY OUT page T39

«% r i
HERE, THERE, AND EVERYWHERE! page T49

6 *0
: DIFFERENT STROKES page T59

* J«!
_ _ _ _ d W J t ... 1 YOU HAVE TALENT! page T69

T ' r%
n ^
___ JÈÈê ÊL^ SHOPPING AROUND page T79

T'
y ~
LET'S EAT! page T89

10 u
SPEAKING OF THE PAST page T99
m,r
11 °
GREAT LIVES page T109

12 IN THE NEAR FUTURE page T119

O
_ j n y COMMUNICATIVE WRAP-UPS page T129

o
M GRAMMAR REFERENCE ANSWER KEY page T141

o
W ORKBOOK ANSWER KEY p a ge T143
INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE
Welcome to the openMind Teacher's Book!
Course philosophy dology and u
The philosophy that underlies the openMind series is
that language is a life skill—a skill for communicating
and connecting with others in our everyday lives. As with The creation of openMind has been a rigorous and
other life skills, competence in a foreign language opens carefully researched process. Starting with the overall t
concept and then underpinning it with specific decisions
up possibilities and enables us constantly to expand our
potential and our ability to function effectively within the has ensured that we are presenting you with a course
wider social, cultural, and economic worlds. that is meticulously thought-through, market-informed,
and theoretically solid, and that it works pedagogically to
This course is designed to enable students to interact achieve high learning outcomes in a demanding classroom (
effectively with others in English in a wide variety of environment.
communicative situations; in their learning environment, Each unit in openMind is written and designed in
at work, when traveling, online, and so on. The authors sections. The sections reinforce each other, but are not
recognize that the majority of students studying English interdependent. This adds unrivaled flexibility and allows
in their countries will never live or work in an English- for variety in the lesson structure. The unit sections can
speaking country. Instead, they will be using English in the be taught sequentially, or they can be arranged to meet
context of their jobs or studies in their own country. For program requirements, e.g., number of hours per term. Of
example, they will probably not need to speak English to course, you can decide to use any other parameters you
a doctor; however, they may have to help a foreign visitor deem relevant.
to their country talk to a doctor. The activities in openMind
are designed to reflect the reality of how the majority of
students will actually use English in their everyday lives. Approaches to teaching
The authors are fully appreciative and aware that students
language
do not come to the classroom as blank slates. Instead, A Grammar
they bring ideas, opinions, feelings, and experiences,
Most students embarking on a language course expect to
all of which enrich the learning process. The course is
find grammar; they see it as the basis of the language they
designed in such a way that the students are given as
are learning. The teaching of grammar has traditionally
many opportunities as possible to share these ideas and
involved a deductive approach in which a grammar rule is
experiences through pair and group work, and in their
presented first (either by the teacher or by the textbook)
writing and communicative work. All this ensures that
and then practice exercises are given that allow students
the students relate to the material and make it their own.
to apply the rule. In contrast, throughout openMind an
They are no longer mere users, but active participants,
inductive approach is applied, in which the target grammar
expressing their own points of view. The progression of
is first presented in context, thus raising awareness of the
tasks in each unit allows the students to relate what they
structure in use. Students are then encouraged to observe,
have learned to their own experiences and to express
compare, and analyze in order to identify the principles or
their ideas and opinions in English confidently. Specifically
rules of the new structure. Finally, students are presented
devised unit features ensure this smooth transition.
with exercises that ensure comprehension of the grammar
The course title, openMind, is a direct reflection of this form in contexts that elicit the target language. To this
underlying philosophy. It refers to the way in which end, each Grammar section in openMind follows a
learning a new language opens the students' minds, dynamic five-step structure approach that activates the
helping them become acutely aware of the social, students' learning potential, as shown opposite.
cultural, and economic activities that take place in that In each unit, there are two Grammar sections. The
new language. It also reflects the way in which acquiring grammar has been selected to 1) reflect the needs of the
communicative competence opens the students' minds to students at their present level of English and 2) be relevant
the possibilities inherent in engaging with those activities, to the topic of the unit, ensuring that the practice is natural
and it opens doors, both personal and professional, that and meaningful. After completing a Grammar section, the
may otherwise have remained closed. Finally, the title students will encounter that grammar again as they work
resonates with the fact that learning a new language opens through the remainder of the unit, which reinforces the
a new channel for meaningful communication, allowing the point and aids retention.
students to express themselves accurately, creatively, and
effectively, while maintaining an open mind toward other
people's opinions and ideas.
Step 1 - Language in context
This stage introduces students to the target
grammar in a realistic reading or listening
present progressive context. A simple comprehension activity
A B fl3 4 LANGUAGE IN C O NTEXT Listen to p art o f a conversation.
ensures that the students have understood
D o Jonathan an d M artin a k n o w each other w ell? H o w do yo u know?
Jonathan: It's nice to m eet you in person, Martina, and not just on the dating website.
the main idea of the text/audio material.
Martina: It's «ice to m eet you, too. Often this takes the form of general
Jonathan: So ... are you m eeting a lot o f people on the New Friends website?
Martina: N ot really. You're the first, so I'm a little nervous! comprehension questions or a matching
Jonathan: Yeah, m e, too. W ell, tell me about yourself. You're in dental task. At this stage, students are not
school, right?
Martina: Yes, but I'm just studying part tim e this semester. I'm also expected to produce the target language,
working as a receptionist at a dental clinic. W hat about you?
Jonathan: I'm in school, too. I'm studying robotics. O h , you're not eating
but they are made aware of the structure in
your hamburger. Do you want something different? a real-life context.
Martina: O h, no. It's fine! I'm ju st not very hungry. Uh ... are you working, too,
or just studying?
Jonathan: I'm ju st studying, but I want to work during the sum mer vacation.

B ANALYZE Read the conversation in Exercise A again. Step 2 - Notice!


Form C hoo se th e c o rrect option to com p lete the sen ten ce. Th en co This feature consists of one or two simple
W e form the present progressive with
a) b e + verb + -ing. b) b e + the base form of the verb.
questions to help the students notice
Negative Yes/No question
something simple about the form or
I'm working. ; I'm not (1) ______— - ; Yes, I (3)----------- function of the new structure as it appears
; No, I'm not.
in the text.
He/She/lt's working. ; He/She/lt isn't ; Is he/she/it working? j Yes, he/she/it is. No, j Where is he/she/m
: working. ; he/she/it isn't. : working?
We/They're working. ; We/They aren't . (2) --- ----- : Yes, we/they are. : Where (4) ......... ..
: working. : you/they working? : No, we/they aren't. ; you/they working?

Function C h oo se th e correct o ption to com p lete th e sen ten ce. Step 3 - Analyze
The present progressive is used with situations or events that
a) happen all the tim e and are perm anent routines. This stage focuses on a guided inductive
b) are happening at the m om ent o f speaking or during this period o f tim e in the person's life. presentation that uses examples from the
Spellin g rules text in the previous step. It usually consists
When the verb ends in -e. : drop the e before adding -ing: of two subsections, Form and Function.
e.g. take—taking, make—making, live— living.
When a one-syllable verb ends ii double the final consonant and then add -ing: Tasks elicit from the students the rules
consonant-vowel-consonant, e.g. plan—planning, get—getting, stop—stopping. about the new structure's form and also
C PRACTICE C om p lete th ese sentences w it h the p resen t pro gressive fo rm o f the verbs
about its function and purpose. Having
a in p aren theses. done the tasks, the students are left with
I 1 Right now, I ---------------------------------[make) a sandwich for lunch. a complete grammar presentation on the
2 --------------------- y o u ---------------------- (have) a good time?
page.
3 W h a t----------------------y o u ------------ -— ------- [do) these days?
4 Sally — — —----- L----------------- (not talk) to m e right now. I don't know why.
5 Com e on! W e ---------- ------- --— — — (wait) for you!
6 Right now, A d e le ........ ............... - -... _ _.... •. (live) in Montreal.
WATCHOUT!
D NOW YOU DO IT W o r k in s m a ll grou ps. Talk abo ut ^ Right now, I am studying. Watch out!
th ings that are h ap p e n in g at this tim e in yo u r life. (^5 Right now, I am study.
Right n ow I'm n o t working, s o I'm living with m y parents.
A feature that draws the
I'm looking fo r a n ew jo b . students' attention to
common learner errors in the
use of the new structure.

Step 4 - Practice
This stage is a written exercise that enables
Step 5 - Now you do it
the students to apply and confirm their
The final step of each Grammar section
inferences from the Analyze stage and gives
is a one-step communicative activity that
them controlled practice in the use of the
allows the students to practice the new
target grammar.
grammar in a personalized context. The
aim of this stage is to give the students the
opportunity to employ the new structure in
ways meaningful to them, thereby making it
both more relevant and more memorable.

Introduction to the course


B Vocabulary been sourced from the corpus work created for the
Macmillan English Dictionary. The underlying philosophy
11 Language students can make rapid progress in a foreign
to teaching vocabulary is that we should introduce
language if they are able to assimilate and use items of
students to the words and phrases that are most frequent
vocabulary quickly and effectively. Traditional methods
and useful in general standard English. To this end, each
of teaching vocabulary relied heavily on memorization
Vocabulary section focuses on lexical terms that the
of items, which were frequently presented in lists with an
students can use actively in everyday oral and written
accompanying translation. While generations of students
communication.
learned vocabulary with some degree of success in
this way, more recent approaches have focused on the Each unit has two Vocabulary sections. Typically, there are
communicative function of vocabulary, and particularly two to three steps in each Vocabulary section. The target
on the way words combine with other words to form vocabulary (in the form of both single words and multiword
chunks of meaningful language, as described in the phrases) is always clearly identifiable on the page.
Lexical Approach. The question of how people store and
To help your students at this level to boost their
recall items of vocabulary has also become relevant, and
vocabulary, you can employ pictures (e.g., a factory, a
the importance of associating words with a context, an
bridge, a subway station); make a quick board drawing
experience, an image, or indeed with other words, is seen
for items that are relatively simple to illustrate (e.g., a
by practitioners as central to this process. When creating a
square, a circle); use real classroom objects (e.g., a chair,
course, there is the inevitable question of what vocabulary
a desk); use real items you or the students have with you
to present and in what order. The seemingly random
(e.g., a bag, a shirt, a dictionary); use gestures (e.g., left,
approach adopted in the pgst has been quantified with the
right, over, under); provide a synonym that is less complex
latest corpus linguistics tools, which in turn has enabled us
than the word you are trying to explain; or use their first
to identify words that are used most frequently and words
language, if possible and appropriate in your context.
that are therefore most useful to students.
Suggest to the students that they keep a vocabulary
In openMind, the authors have adopted a corpus-
notebook to record new items of vocabulary and examples
based approach to selecting and presenting vocabulary.
of their use in context.
Information on frequency and collocation patterns has

Step 1 The students are presented with


the target vocabulary items and their
meanings. At this stage, the students
are not expected to use the items
7 VOCABULARY; a green lifestyle actively. Here the activities consist of
A A m y has a very green lifestyle. Match the words and phrases below
matching words to their meanings,
to the pictures. Use the red boxes.
matching words to pictures, sorting
words into groups, forming collocations,
choosing the correct words to complete
the sentences, and so on.

1 save water s buy organic food


2 turn off the lights 6 reuse bags
3 recycle 7 share a ride
4 ride a bike to school/work 8 clean up trash

B Do you have a green lifestyle? Check { / ) the things from Exercise A


that you do to help the environment. U se the blue boxes.

C W ork in groups. A s k your classmates questions to find out w ho


has a green lifestyle. M ake notes o f your classm ates’ answers. Step 2 This step gives the students the
A: Do you ride a bike to work? opportunity to use the new vocabulary
B: No, I don't, but I share a ride. What about you?
items in a controlled practice activity.
D Q Share the information with your classmates. Is anyone similar to Amy?
I think Irina has a green lifestyle. She rides a bike to school every day, and she buys organic
They are often asked to compare
fruit and vegetables. options, categorize, complete phrases
—----------------- and sentences, and so on.

Step 3 Some Vocabulary sections have a third step, in


which the students are encouraged to use the vocabulary
items actively in a speaking activity, such as a discussion or
role-play.

o
C Pronunciation Approaches to teaching the
Accurate pronunciation is a key element of successful
communication. Mastering pronunciation requires
four skills
awareness and practice at three key prosodic levels: The four language skills—listening, reading, speaking,
sound, word, and sentence—all of which are focused on in and writing—are informed by the two modes of
openM'md. communication: spoken and written language. Each of
those has a receptive and a productive aspect. To ensure
First of all, there are the individual sounds (phonemes) of fluency, it is essential that learners of a language get
English. Here it is important to focus on those sounds that practice in all four skills. However, mere practice alone
are different from those in the students' mother tongues is not enough. The four skills need to be developed in a
and that therefore cause the greatest difficulty, both in planned, coherent way, something that many textbooks
terms of recognition (listening and understanding) and in have neglected up to now.
terms of production (speaking and being understood).
Second, there’ is the area of word stress, where English, Each of the language skills consists of a number of
with its numerous word stress patterns, may differ different abilities, or "subskills." For example, the skill of
considerably from the students' mother tongues. Finally, reading consists of the meaningful use of subskills such
there is the question of rhythm and intonation, where as scanning, skimming, recognizing the main idea, etc.
English is characterized by a relatively high number of In actual use, we employ a variety of skills and subskills
falling tone patterns in comparison with many other simultaneously. Consequently, in order to develop the
languages. Level-appropriate aspects of these three areas students' skills, it is important to identify and focus on
of pronunciation are carefully developed and presented. subskills in turn. In openMind, we have devised a skills
syllabus that is methodically researched, carefully planned
Each Pronunciation section in openMind typically consists and balanced, and which focuses on subskills that are most
of two or three steps. The Pronunciation sections are likely to be of use to learners at their respective levels.
supported by audio—both for the presentation and the
All four skills are present in every unit in the openMind
practice steps.
series. However, in order to ensure a balanced
development of the four main language skills, we have
deployed an alternate pattern of "on" and "off" skills:
"on" skills are the ones that are developed through
subskills, and "off" skills are the ones that are practiced.
So every unit includes two types of skills sections: 1)
skills development sections for the "on" skills and 2)
skills practice sections for the "off" skills. Their pattern
is alternate; for example, the two "on" skills that are
developed in Unit 1 are then practiced in Unit 2 as "off"
skills, while the two "off" skills that are practiced in Unit 1
are developed in Unit 2 as "on" skills, and so on.
This alternate pattern of "on" and "off" skills sections is
clear in the layout of the contents pages, with the two
"on" skills sections in every unit highlighted.

Introduction to the course VII


1 Teaching subskills (skills development Speaking
sections— "on" skills) In openMind 1, training is given in the Speaking sections
Each skills development section starts with a skills panel, in the development of the following key subskills:
which informs the students in clear, direct terms what the • using polite language (Unit 1)
subskill is, why it is important, and how to apply it. The • asking for opinions (Unit 3)
subskill section builds on the information provided in this • checking understanding (Unit 5)
feature. The students are always given the opportunity to • showing interest (Unit 7)
apply the subskill at the end of the section. • using phone language (Unit 9)
• taking time to think (Unit 11)
"On" skill indicated by cog.
Apart from the skills development sections, which cover
speaking, there are constant opportunities for speaking
for numerical information throughout each unit of openMind: the students are
When you hear a number, think about the w ay it looks. This helps you understand
what it is (e.g. a date, a time, a year, or a phone number). To help you remember
encouraged to give their own opinions, to discuss their
a number, say it in your head when you are writing it down. own experiences, and to communicate with one another
on a variety of topics. A specific speaking stage can always
In each level of the course, three subskills are covered for
be found in the Grammar section (Now you do it), in the
reading, listening, and writing. Each of these is covered
Vocabulary section, and in the lifeSkills section.
twice, the second time in further detail or in a more
challenging context. There are six subskills for speaking
Writing
per level. Further practice of the subskills is provided in the
Workbook. In openMind 7, training is given in the Writing sections in
the development of the following key subskills:
Listening • understanding the mechanics (using correct
In openMind 1, training is given in the Listening sections in capitalization and punctuation, writing complete
the development of the following key subskills: sentences) (Units 2 and 4)
• listening for specific information (Units 2 and 4) • writing sentences (simple and compound) (Units 6
• listening for numerical information (Units 6 and 8) and 8)
• understanding the main idea (Units 10 and 12) • sequencing and connecting ideas (Units 10 and 12)
Effective L2 listening is the ability to understand an aural At this level, many students find writing a difficult skill,
message in another language and respond appropriately. so give them plenty of preparation time. The writing
Without the ability to listen effectively, the students exercises in openMind take a step-by-step approach and
will be unable to communicate successfully in the gradually build up the students' confidence. Don't expect
target language. Listening is an essential component the students to be able to produce long pieces of written
of openMind. For many students, listening can be the text at this level. Expand your students' writing practice by
most difficult of the four skills, and in the classroom it can encouraging them to work with the Listen and write / Read
often seem the most intimidating. Help your students and write pages in the Workbook.
to become better listeners by training them in effective
All skills strategies are practiced in the Workbook, and the
listening strategies.
Teacher's Book pinpoints sections where you can recycle
Reading any subskills previously taught.
In openMind 1, training is given in the Reading sections in 2 Integrating and practicing skills (skills
the development of the following key subskills: practice sections— "off" skills)
• recognizing cognates (Units 1 and 3)
These sections (two per unit) provide the students
• reading for the main idea (Units 5 and 7)
with opportunities to practice skills with a focus on the
• scanning for specific information (Units 9 and 11)
communicative outcome (e.g., writing an email in Unit 5;
listening to a life story in Unit 11). Each section comprises
two to three steps and integrates two or more language
skills. The sections allow students to focus more on the
end product, with fluency in mind, and less on the process
they go through in order to achieve it. In the activities
here, there is a strong emphasis on personalization—
relating the material to students' own experiences.
The first page of every openMind unit is the unit opener.
It features engaging pictures and provides a quick warm­
up to the unit, or it can be extended to a much longer
and enriching speaking activity. This activity never expects
the students to use any vocabulary or grammar in the
unit to come. Its key purpose is to create excitement and
boost motivation. It also provides a comprehensive list
of language objectives for the unit. The lifeSkills panel at
the bottom introduces the life skill of the unit and aims at
getting the students to start thinking about the nature of
the life skill.

CEF-oriented unit objectives.

GREAT LIVES
IN THIS UNIT YOU
O learn language to talk about
A How many of these people do you recognize?
people and events in the past
What were their professions?
read about the life of a famous
% person—scanning for specific
information
learn phrases when thinking about
% answers to a quiz—takinq time to
think

o listen to biographical information


about the life of a famous person

o write a short biography


watch a video about the lives of

famous people

Coco Chanel

B Work in pairs. Put the people in Exercise A in


different groups or pairs according to their similarities.
Think of as many combinations as possible.
A: What do Coco Chanel and Gianni Versace have in common?
B: They were both fashion designers.
Martin Luther King

LIFE Learn to use b rainsto rm ing in a


group to th in k o f id eas
SKILLS
STUDY &
LEARNING
U N IT 11 109

Introduction to the course


Communicative wrap-ups
For every two units, the course offers a Communicative
wrap-up. The Communicative wrap-ups can be found at
the end of the Student's Book, beginning on p. 130. With
a clear focus on fluency, the tasks require the students to
employ a range of communication strategies, using target
language items and skills acquired in the two units under
review.
The activities are student-centered and require
reciprocity—the students are not only encouraged to
produce language, they are also expected to be attentive
listeners. The activities are also designed to boost the
students' confidence and include a wide variety of activity
types, such as games, role-plays, and information gaps.
Having completed a communicative task that closely
mirrors a real-life task, the students should feel more
confident that they can deal with real-life situations in
English. They will also realize that the language they have
learned is applicable in practice and, equally important,
that they have mastered it. Each wrap-up ends with a
self-scoring section. Encourage the students to read the
can-do statements and rate their performance. This is an
essential part of developing autonomous learning.

Communicative wrap-up
Units 1 -2 B i W ork in pairs. Look at this fam ous person’s fam ily tree. Ask and answer questions
about the p eople and th eir connections to each other.

Anne Meara
A ¡ H W ork in pairs. Student A, you w a n t to register w ith an agency to help yo u find new
comedian
friends. Student B, you work at th e agency. In terview Student A and com plete th e form.
Then switch roles.

Friends EXPRESS Agency Amy Stiller


Christine Taylor actor/writer

mQ ?Q
Email address:

Telephone number: _

Country Nationality:

Date of birth: — — Ella Stiller Quinlin Stiller

Occupation:

Who is Anne Meara?


B 2 H W ork as a class. You are at a Friends Express m eeting. You m eet each person for She's Ella Stiller's grandmother.
tw o minutes and try to find out as much as you can about h im or her. Use th e ideas What does she do?
b elo w to h elp you. W h en you hear the signal, change partners. She's a comedian.

n a m e ? Family? | W ork in pairs. Student A , you are a fam ous person. You can on ly say yes or no.
Student B, ask questions to find out about the famous person. You can ask up to 20 questions.

Age? Then guess w h o Student A is.

Are you a singer?


Yes.
Are you American? Is your sister an acto

O ccupation? Yes.
Are you Beyoncé?

A: Tell me about your family.


B: My brother's name is Julian. T SCORE YOURSELF!
A: What does he do? Score 1-5 for the items below. Score 5 for things that ar
B: He's a mechanic. introduce myself,
A: And your parents? exchange personal information,
B: Their names are ... talk about occupations.
I can talk about family members.
If you give yourself 1 or 2 for any of the statements, look at the m il in Units 1 and 2 again.

o
The life skills in openMind feature as parts of three
Teaching life skills domains: Self and Society, Work and Career, Study and
One of the unique features of openMind is its focus Learning. It is important to understand that the use
on life skills. Each unit ends with an inspiring lifeSkills of these three domains is not meant to function as an
section. This is based on the notion that in today's highly organizing principle, but rather as a reflection of one of the
competitive global environment, students of English need many ways in which that particular skill can be applied. Life
other, higher-order skills besides language skills. Life skills skills are essential in every aspect of our lives and therefore
include information and research skills, critical thinking transferable. In every lifeSkills spread in the openMind
and problem-solving skills, self-direction and learning series, the particular life skill to be applied in one of the
skills, organization and planning skills, and collaboration three domains was carefully chosen. The Reflect box at the
skills. These skills are highly valued by employers arid end of the spread acts as a reminder to the students that
are essential to the students' continued success, and yet the life skill can also be applied in the other two domains.
rarely form a part of the students' formal education. The Each lifeSkills section is introduced by a three- or four-step
authors firmly believe that it is our responsibility to help summary of the approach that will be applied through
the students develop these life skills and, in particular, the different activities in the section. These steps are
to prepare them to employ those life skills in English- applicable to the skill in general and can be applied in
speaking situations. All the life skills covered in openMind other situations, beyond the English classroom.
require a certain amount of collaboration, so pair and
Each lifeSkills section is linked to the general unit topic in
group work is an essential component of this section.
which it appears, and the language and skills presented
in the previous pages of the unit help to prepare the
students for this section.

A three-step summary of the approach The chosen domain for the spread is highlighted,
that will be applied through the different but all three domains are mentioned as a
activities in the section. reminder of the transferability of the skill.

Self and Society

Study and Learning


B M ak e a lis t o f things to d o in the
Understand any problems you have with managing your time. com in g w eek. Estim ate th e tim e
Write a to-do list and categorize each task. yo u n ee d fo r each one. Look at the
exam p le.
Decide on the best order for the tasks.

Tasks:
A H o w w e ll d o yo u m a n a ge yo u r tim e? C om p lete this qu iz. 0 do the laundry 2 hours |
C om p are yo u r an sw ers in pairs. H o w accurate is th e quiz?
C 0 W ork in pairs. A sk and answer 0 go to the bank 1 hour
W h a t can y o u do to im p ro ve you r tim e m a n a gem en t? w
qu estion s about yo u r lists. Use the 0 go to the movies 3 hours
d iagram and m ark each task dep en d in g
o n h o w im p ortant and h o w urgen t it is.

© How do you feel about time? Key to diagram:


a) I never have enough time!
Very important and very urgent.
|i Now add up your score:
O
Ì
b) Sometimes I don't have time to do everything,
but usually it's OK. I 0 a b2 cl Very urgent, but not very important.
c) Time? I have a lot of it! I Q a l b2 c3 ° Very important, but not very urgent.
0 Do you arrive on time. for.things ? I 0 a 3 b2 cl Not very important and not very urgent.
a) Yes, always. 1 © a3 b l c 2
b) Sometimes, but not always. b3 c l
c) No, I'm always late! 1
8
0 a I
©a b l c3 O o
0 Do you often have nothing to do?
a) No, I ’m always busy.
b) Sometimes.
c) Yes, 1do.
D W rite yo u r things to do in order. For
© How often do you check the time? 6-10 You have a lot of time—L* Day
each d ay o f th e w eek, w r ite A things first,
a) I’m too busy to look at the clock! because you don’t do important Sunday
b) Never. I don’t have a watch. fo llo w ed b y B things, etc. T h in k about
things! Manage your time better
c) Often. I like to know what time it is. J and you can achieve more. th e tim e y o u have and con sider m o vin g
s om e things from on e day to another. Monday
© You have something important to do. 11-15 You have a good attitude
-té How do you feel?
a) I’m not worried because there’s a lot .:d j H
about time. With a little time
management, you can do even E 0 W o rk in pairs. C om p are yo u r daily Tuesday

b) Help! I have a thousand things to do more. to -d o lists. Can yo u do e ve ryth in g in the


today! 16-18 You need to manage tim e yo u have? Wednesday
c) Forget it. 1can do it tomorrow. your time and give yourself time
© How do you work or study? to relax! Thursday
a) 1just work undid finish.
b) I take a lot of breaks to watch TV and chat Prioritizing
online. Friday
c) It’s difficult! I never have time to finish my Is this urgent? '
work or study. How important is this?
Saturday
It's very important!
I don't really need t o ...
I suppose this isn't really urgent.
REFLECT
How can the skill of managing your
lime be useful to you in Work ond
Career ond Study ond learning?

Doy in, day out U N IT 4 47

The Reflect question gets students to think


about how the featured skill can be applied to
the other two domains.

Introduction to the course xi


Language wrap-up Teaching students at Level 1
Each unit concludes with a Language wrap-up that enables Teaching students at Level 1 presents the language teacher
the students to assess their grasp of the new vocabulary with a particular set of challenges, namely the students'
and grammar items presented in the unit. lack of vocabulary and the related difficulties in expressing
ideas in English. At this level, however, it is important for
The Language wrap-up exercises can be done in class
the students to become accustomed to English, and you
or assigned as homework. If given as homework, tell the
should therefore use English as the primary language of the
students not to look at the sections of the unit that are
classroom, as far as possible.
being tested in the wrap-up tasks before they do the
exercises. It is important to give brief, clear instructions in English; for
example, use Work in groups rather than I'd like to have
If you use the Language wrap-up in class, you might wish
you get together in groups. Where necessary, use gestures
to set a time limit of 10-15 minutes for each task. Again,
to support your instructions; for example, Listen (cup your
encourage the students to do the tasks without looking
hand to your ear), and Work in pairs (make an inward
back at the relevant sections of the unit. Motivate them
motion with both hands indicating that the students
to focus on the tasks individually, as pair or group work
should work together), as this will help the students to get
could lead to stronger students dominating and would not
used to these instructions. Early in the course, present and
give accurate feedback on what individual students have
start using key classroom language, such as What does
learned.
X mean? How do you spell X? and How do you say X in
It is a good idea to go over the answers with the whole English?, so that the students can use these expressions
class. This can lead to some discussion of the answers that when they need help. If possible, key classroom phrases
might be useful for students. such as these should be prominently displayed on a
wall for the students to refer to in the early stages of the
Make sure the students read the can-do statements in the
course.
score boxes and write their score out of 10 for both the
Vocabulary and Grammar sections. If they have a score Emphasize the advantages of using English for pair
lower than 8, encourage them to read the appropriate and group work activities. When students use their first
sections of the unit again for homework, and then do the language in a task, it often means they are interested and
exercise or exercises again at home. want to express their ideas about the topic, but feel that
they don't have the vocabulary or grammar necessary to
do so. The authors have anticipated these shortcomings
8-10 correct: I can ask useful questions and use ordinal numbers. and have provided the students with model conversations,
0-7 correct: Look again at Sections 3 and 7 on pages 11 and 14.
prompts, and phrases in the How to say it feature to
SCORE: /10
ensure that they have enough functional language at
hand to carry out a task confidently. Moreover, the course
To aid retention and ensure a long-lasting learning teaches a variety of useful skills to overcome any obstacles
outcome, it is crucial to recycle language points from and to promote interaction.
previous sections and units regularly. For example, to At this level, students need a lot of support and repetition.
recycle grammar, you can ask the students a few questions If the instruction in the Student's Book says listen and
at the beginning of each class, focusing on the grammar repeat, give the students plenty of opportunities to repeat.
content of the previous class (e.g., for simple past, begin Ask them to repeat chorally before you ask them to repeat
the class by asking What did you do last weekend? Where individually. This can help to build their confidence to use
did you go after class yesterday?). Integrated recycling English in class.
is also emphasized in the way vocabulary is used—the
target vocabulary from each section occurs again over the When presenting new vocabulary, ensure that the students
remainder of each unit, reinforcing use of the items and feel comfortable with the pronunciation of any new words
aiding retention. and phrases. Use the pictures in the Student's Book to help
convey and reinforce meaning by asking the students to
In addition, to help you plan subskills recycling, the find examples of particular words in the pictures. Give the
cog symbol is used in the unit plan and again in the students further practice with language items by assigning
appropriate heading within the teaching notes, along with homework tasks from the Workbook, or from the extra
a reference to where that subskill was previously practiced. homework ideas suggested in the Teacher's Book. Encourage
the students to keep a vocabulary notebook and focus on
establishing good learning practices.
Students at this level may feel that certain language
skills are less demanding or more accessible than other
language skills. This can mean that they may be more
motivated to engage with some tasks than they are with
others. Nevertheless, it is important that all four language
skills be developed and practiced in parallel. Covering
all the tasks in each unit of the Student's Book and the
Workbook will ensure that no aspect of your students'
development is neglected.
openMind Workbook
The openMind Workbook is an ideal source of additional
activities to engage the students in further practice of the
Student's Book material. The Workbook follows a format
similar to that of the Student's Book and reflects its section
organization. The dynamic and modern design makes the
book appealing and easy to navigate through.

UNIT7 YOU HAVETALENT!


1 VOCABULARY: personality adjectives 3 GRAMMAR: am/mn't—ability
A R ead th e sen ten ces and (^irclejth e correct option. A j||j22 Listen and Circle)can or can’t.
1 George always buys presents for his friends. He's very optim istic/ g enerous/ honest. 1 Elena can / can't play the piano.
2 Everyone likes Patricia. She knows a lot of people. She's very sm art/ patient / friendly. 2 Peter can / can't dance.
3 Yumi always makes a list before she goes shopping. She's very organized / generous / optimistic. 3 I can / can't sing.
4 Steve feels angry when he has to wait for a long time. He's not very reliable/ friendly/ patient 4 We can / can't drive.
s Fernanda always looks for problems in every situation. She's not very smart / optimistic / honest.
6 Elizabeth is a good friend. Her friends can depend on her for help. She's very patient / reliable / organized. B EH 23 Listen and check (/) the things that Ricky and WATCH OUT!
7 Denise always gets good grades in college. She's very sm art/ friendly/ honest. Bella can do. Cross ( / ) th e things th ey can’t do.
8 Stan is always truthful, and you can always believe him. He's very patien t/ hon est/ generous.

B C h oose o n e ad jective fro m Exercise A th a t describes yo u an d on e


ad jective th a t describes y o u r b es t frien d . E xplain why.
I am optimistic because I never feel sad.
speak another language

2 READING: for themainidea


C M ake sen ten ces about Bella and Ricky. Use can and can’t.
A L o o k qu ick ly a t th e text. W h a t kin d o f te x t is it?
1 Ricky / play tennis / .
a) a personality test b) an advice column
2 Bella / play a sport / .

LIBRA September 23-Octobet 22 3 Bella and Ricky / speak another language / ?


(1) ..you have no problems making friends this
month. Your conversation and humor charm everyone.
Bella / cook / ?
(2) ... Now is not the time to buy a new laptop.
Only buy the things you really need.
(3) Vnu're stressed and tired. Drink herbal teas t
s Ricky / cook spaghetti / ?
get more energy.
<4>~ „You ha
:o-worker. Be honest.
inimportant decision to make about 7**d®W**r
Yes, _

SCORPIO October 2 3 -N o vem ber 21 D Put th e wo rd s in th e correct ord er to fo rm sen ten ces and questions.
(5) ....Be patient with relatives. Don't argue with people S om etim es there is m o re th an on e correct answer.
close to you. 1 Marisa and Julia / speak / can / Italian / .
- (6) - ____ This month is a good time to start your new diet.
' Go to the gym, eat fresh fruit and vegetables, ride your bike to work.
WATCH OUT!
2 your brother / cook / Can / Indian food / ?
e ahead, but there are many
obstacles. Your boss knows that you are reliable, so don't worry. n / My best friend / sing / and / dance the tango / .
_ Don't be too generous this month. You shouldnt
I / read music / play the piano / but / I / c<

B R ead th e te x t in Exercise A again . W r ite th e h ea din gs in th e correct place.

Family Health (x 2) Money (x 2) Social life Work (x 2)

Introduction to the course


Each Workbook unit can be viewed as consisting of three
parts: the first four pages practice and consolidate the
unit's grammar, vocabulary, and the two target subskills;
the fifth page is a Listen and write or Read and write page
that consolidates the unit material and offers the student
further opportunity for guided, supported, and highly
personalized writing practice. The language in the Writing
tutor helps students get started and organize their writing,
and the last page of each Workbook unit is a Down time
page that offers fun and engaging activities in the form of
quizzes, crosswords, games, riddles, and more.
The Workbopk is accompanied by its own audio CD with
the tracks for the listening tasks. The listening activities
are signposted by an audio icon, and the audio scripts ;,7>'!“=onc
J rrKike p/Qn y s ’he
'SO-For ° ” S-301 »rots
appear at the end of the Workbook. The answer key for ‘^*eZyeirr
° se'°s/ud/( ll0n9ooy°!ree,'n
the Workbook activities (including possible answers) can ^ocohons,
°w°yanaVi
be found on pp. T143—151 of this Teacher's Book. *f'°v'nustlr:
ideas.

~-.(°rt efepJ

S sia»«

«CSS«»
L° o k a t t/j '"■ ¿S i
«**

ne*tten

!*•*• Wn
' “ "tebo o i
,g b short tex.

lis»»“

D O W N TIM E
A Read the text about Emma’s family. Answer the question and write
the names of the people next to the correct picture.
Hi! I'm Emma. I have two brothers and a sister. My mom's name is Brenda, and my dad's

B Find the jobs. Separate the words with a line and write them
underneath.

UseV °ut
'^nefightef^
al
C Match the two halves to make words,

well interesting salary -paid work

good hard job -working security

Who! do you do? UNIT 2 15

_____________________________________
circumstances, and program requirements. Along with the
procedural notes and audio scripts for the listening tasks
The Teacher's Book offers carefully planned, well­ in the Student's Book, the Teacher's Book also contains
paced, and Insightful procedural notes to help you interleaved Student's Book pages with answers to each
prepare, present, and follow up on the unit material exercise clearly marked for ease of reference.
in an appropriate way for the students, teaching
The course features exciting and authentic
phrases as unit titles. The unit title feature
offers an insight into the meaning of the
DOWNTIME phrases and serves as a mini culture note to
The expression dow n time (stress on down) means the same as free time o r leisure time—time
explain the collocation.
when you are not working or studying. Explain to the students that down time is time for fun a
relaxation (e.g. meeting your friends, reading books, watching TV, or going to the movies).

Listening: to a radio show


Ask the students if they often listen to the radio. What
shows do they listen to? Do they listen to discussion
Unit opener (p 29) 10 min. shows? The information in the unit plan outlines the
10 min. Writing: about yourself and your interests
• Optional downloadable unit opener
1 Grammar: simple present—statements <P-30) 40min.
Ask the students to work individually and think of three target language and objectives by section.
adjectives that describe them. Listen to their ideas with the
and yes/no questions
2 Pronunciation: thud person -s (p. 31) 15 min.
whole class. Then ask them to look through the unit and
find out what adjectives for describing people are
It also offers suggested timings.
3 Reading: recognizing cognates "Q (p. 31) 30 min.
4 Listening: to a radio show (p, 32) 30min. Refer the students to the HfeSkillg,
5 Vocabulary: free-time activities (p. 32) 25 min. the topic of this unj Ion is Understanding
6 Grammar: simple present— (p. 33) 40 min.
information questions
7 Speaking: asking for opinions ip. 34) 20 min.
iarn something new, such as a new sk
en to their ideas as a class.
The Common European Framework of
8 Vocabulary: personality adiectives
9 Writing about yourself and
(p. 34)
(p. 35)
25 min.
20 min.:
Reference for Languages (CEFR) is an
• Write on the board Today is ... Ask the students to tell
your interests
• Optional downloadable Writing 20 min. you which day of the week it is. Then write a day of the influential document produced by the
week on the board (e.g. Thursday). Ask the students to
workshop: a personal description
IlfeSkills: understanding your learning (p. 36) 45 min.
work In pairs and write the other days of the week. Ask Council of Europe. Since its publication,
students to come to the board one-by-one and each
style (Study and Learning)
• Optional downloadable unit opener 45 mm.
write another day of the week. Have the class check that it has had a major impact on the work of
the days are in the correct order and that they have the
(Work and Career)
» Optional downloadable unit opener 45 min.
correct spelling. Elicit the correct spelling of any words
spelled Incorrectly.
teachers, teacher trainers, examiners, and
(Self and Society) course designers, both within Europe and
Language wrap-up (p. 38) 15min.
Alternative
Video and downloadable video worksheet 45 min.
Produce anagrams to review the spelling of the days
in other parts of the world. It describes the
of the week (e.g. yomadn for Monday) Prepare these
beforehand, making sure you include all the letters, linguistic competences language learners
and ask the students to unscramble the letters to form
the words. possess at different levels of achievement. It
does this by describing the things a person
Direct the students' attention to the objectives in the unit
menu and go through the information with them. Explain
free.
• When the students finish, ask them to compare their with a given language level can do. It
that this unit focuses on howto talk about habits and schedules in pairs. Have them look at the example
conversation. Explain that they should use these covers six main levels of ability: A1, A2, B1,
help them do this: expressions as they compare their schedules. Have the
Reading skills: recognizing cognates
Elicit, or remind students of, some English words that may
students repeat the conversation after you before they B2, C1, C2. Students completing openMind
talk to their partners. Suggest that pairs find out if they
be the same in their language (e.g. taxi, hotel, computef).
Encourage them to look through the unit and find other
have the same periods of free time or if their free times
re different. On which day of the week do they have
1 should reach the level of ability described
English words that are the same in their language or
similar to words in their language.
the m
• Ask the students to name the :tivities the people in
by the A1 performance descriptors.
Speaking: asking for opinions
Ask the students whose opinion they listen to before they
the pictures do in their down ■ le. Elicit a few more
examples of down-time activil s (e.g. watch DVDs, play There is a CEFR unit map at the end of
buy a book or watch a movie. Elicit some possible answers soccer, read books).
(e.g. friends, parents, brothers, sisters, etc.). each unit in the Teacher's Book. This map
lists the sections in the unit and, for each
section, a can-do statement is provided.
These are based on the type of can-do
statements found in the CEFR and describe
the ability the students should acquire on
successfully completing the section. In the
Competence developed C EF Reference (A1 ) map, reference is provided to the relevant
1 Grammar can understand and use statements and questions in Table 1; Table 2; Sections 5.2.1.2; sections of the CEFR. These are either
the simple present 6 .4 .7 7; 6 .47.8
2 Pronunciation can hear and produce different third-person singular Section 5.2.1.4
the sections where the CEFR specifically
endings mentions the competence being developed
3 Reading can recognize cognates and use them to understand Table 1; Table 2; Section 4.4.2.2
a text in the Student's Book, or sections where
4 Listening can understand a radio discussion and respond to Table 1; Table 2; Section 4.4.2.1 the CEFR mentions competences that rely
the topic
5 Vocabulary can talk about free-time activities Table 1; Table 2; Section 4.4.1.1; on the competence being developed in
Section 4.4.3.1; Section 5.2.1.1
6 Grammar can understand and use information questions in Table 1; Table 2; Section 5.2.1.2
the Student's Book. The complete text of
the simple present the CEFR is available for download from
7 Speaking can ask for opinions Table 1; Table 2; Section 4.4.3.1 ;
the Council of Europe website (http://www.
s 8 Vocabulary can talk about personality
Section 5.2.3.2
Table 1; Table 2; Sections 4.4.1.1 ; coe.int/t/dg4/linguistic/source/framework_
4.4.3.1; 5.2.1.1
9 Writing can describe themselves and their interests Table 2; Section 4.4.1.2 en.pdf).

Features of the Teacher's Book Culture note Here you can find background information that
The Teacher's Book author has developed an array of may be of interest to your students and that will help you with
teacher-friendly features that support and build on and/or the presentation of the section material. It may provide more
extend the material in the Student's Book. information about a person, event, or place mentioned in
the Student's Book. It may also focus on what people in the
Lead-in This feature provides you with optional activities English-speaking world do or say in a particular situation.
that help you start your lesson or introduce a particular
section of the Student's Book. Typically, the Lead-in does Extra The optional Extra activities equip you with ideas
not require any additional preparation. for additional classroom practice and homework. The
activities always focus on and extend the language point
Alternative This instruction presents you with alternative of the section in which they appear. They are ideal for
approaches to the Student's Book material. It addresses fast finishers. Especially for Reading and Grammar, there
different learning styles, provides challenging alternatives are sometimes Extra reading comprehension or grammar
for high achievers, and facilitates the presentation of items provided in case you want to exploit a reading text
activities for students who may need more support. further or practice a grammar point more with your class.

> Introduction to the course xv


lesson plans will present this same skill through the two
openMind Digital other domains (for example, Self and Society and Work
and Career).
Flexible digital resources are a central part of the
openMind approach to language teaching. The range of Besides offering alternatives to the Student's Book
online and downloadable components and resources can material, the aim of these extra lifeSkills lessons is to
be tailored to each class's needs and facilities, allowing show learners how they can apply the same life skill from
for flipped and blended approaches as well as more the Student's Book to other contexts, thereby further
traditional teaching styles. developing these competencies and empowering the
students.
For students, the Online Workbook and self-study video
worksheets and video on the Student's Resource Center Speaking and Writing Workshops
consolidate classroom learning and promote autonomy The Speaking and Writing workshops are each a page
and awareness. long and can be used at the end of alternate units. Each
For teachers, open Mind's digital components provide workshop provides more in-depth analysis as well as extra
tools to save you time and add to the class experience, support of the respective skill when this is an "off" skill
together with testing that ranges from a placement test in the unit, and therefore the function in the workshop is
to customizable unit and midcourse tests and an end-of- always the same as the function of that skill in the core
course test. unit. The structure of both the speaking and writing
workshops is based on a common concept: the students
Teacher's and Student's Resource Centers are first presented with a model, next they analyze it,
The online Resource Centers for teachers and students then they work on their own production, and finally they
are bursting with materials to support the course, as well self- and peer-assess. For more independent writing
as audio and video. Some features are available to both consolidation practice, encourage the students to work
students and teachers, while others can only be accessed with the Listen and write and Read and write pages in the
through the Teacher's Resource Center. See the lists at the Workbook, which follow the same concept.
end of this page for a complete overview.
Tests
Video All the tests you need for placement, progress, and
Each Student's Book unit is accompanied by a new achievement purposes are on the Teacher's Resource
video (see screenshot below), linked to the unit's theme Center. These are available both in ready-to-print PDF
and target language. Videos feature authentic footage versions and customizable Word versions, and comprise:
and genres, such as reportage, travel shows, and • openMind course placement test, with instructions on
documentaries, to provide fascinating lead-ins or jumping- delivering this
off points for each unit of the course. • Unit tests: these test the grammar, vocabulary, and skills
covered in each unit of the Student's Book
• Midcourse tests: a ready-made review combining items
from the unit tests for the first half of the Student's Book
• End-of-course test: a ready-made end-of-book test with
completely new test items covering the full openMind i
language syllabus
Student's Resource Center—the complete
package
The following features are all accessible to your openMind
students:
• Student's Book and Workbook audio files and scripts
• openMind video
• openMind video self-study worksheets
All videos are accompanied by downloadable worksheets. • CEFR checklists
These worksheets offer a variety of tasks and activities • Word lists
that build on the students' prior knowledge, generate Teacher's Resource Center—the complete
interest in the topic, check the students' comprehension, package
and practice grammar and vocabulary. Each worksheet
The Teacher's Resource Center includes everything on the
presents tasks to be done before, during, and after
Student's Resource Center, as well as:
watching, and comes with teacher's notes and answer key.
• openMind video classroom worksheets
Extra lifeSkills support • openMind video teacher's notes and answer keys
The Teacher's Resource Center includes twenty-four • Extra unit opener lessons
lifeSkills lesson plans—two for every lifeSkills double-page • Extra lifeSkills lessons
spread in the Student's Book. Each lifeSkills section • Speaking and Writing workshops
in the Student's Book presents a skill (for example, • Tests
Understanding your learning style) through one domain • Placement test
(for example, Study and Learning), while the extra lifeSkills
T* Online Workbook
ré The Online Workbook provides extra skills, grammar,
and vocabulary practice to support the Student's Book. It

contains interactive activities, audio for listening practice,
video and supporting activities, and automatic marking—
so students can instantly check answers and try again as
many times as they want.
ré The Online Workbook is also linked to an LMS (learning
ré management system) gradebook, which means you
can see students' marks for each activity, as well as the
r* amount of time (and number of times) it has taken them
to complete each task. The Online Workbook is ideal
for self-study, but you may wish to consider using it for
reviewing students' work in open class via a projector or an
interactive whiteboard.

Presentation kit
The Presentation kit is a digital version of the Student's Access is easy. The Presentation kit can be downloaded
Book designed for enhanced classroom presentation. It onto your interactive whiteboard or laptop for use with a
features all the content of the print Student's Book with projector—no disks are required. It's ideal for work in open
embedded video, class audio, full answer keys, and simple class as an alternative to "eyes down" work, as well as for
interactive whiteboard tools. checking and reviewing students' work.

STUDY Learn ways to practice speaking


and pronunciation
SKILLS
SPEAKING &
PRONUNCIATION Example from openMind
Starter Presentation kit

» Introduction to the course XVII


Dr. Spencer Kagan and Miguel Kagan communicative context for natural language acquisition.
Kagan Publishing & Professional Development Cooperative learning offers a powerful alternative for
www.KaganOnline.com language teaching—interaction! Many teachers believe
they are doing cooperative learning by introducing pair
Kagan Structures are instructional strategies designed
and group work. Flowever, unstructured pair and group
to promote cooperation and communication in the
work lacks the basic principles of effective cooperative
classroom, bbost students' confidence, and retain their
learning and therefore does not produce the gains of true
interest in classroom interaction. The Structures work in
cooperative learning. There is a vast difference between
all teaching contexts—regardless of subject, age group,
Kagan Structures and conventional pair or group work.
and number of students in class—and are a particularly
Kagan Structures carefully engineer student interaction
powerful tool for teaching a foreign language.
to maximize cooperation, communication, and active
In this article, we contrast a conventional classroom engagement by all.
lesson and its environment with a classroom where Kagan
The teacher who is fluent with a number of Kagan
Structures are brought in. We discuss the benefits of the
Structures would teach the same lesson quite differently.
Structures and explain why this alternative approach to
She would likely still provide some direct instruction, but
classroom organization works much better and has a
skip the whole-class question-and-answer session and not
long-term learning effect. Then, we present three of our
do the individual exercise. Instead, she would choose a
favorite Kagan Structures that are particularly suitable for
Kagan Structure that will
the language-learning context, and we offer you an Kagan Structures carefully
involve everyone, and
overview and the support to apply them in your daily engineer student interaction
encourage sharing and
teaching routines. to maximize cooperation,
cooperation. On the
For an in-depth presentation of the Structures and our subject of directions, the communication, and active
approach to cooperative learning, you can read Kagan teacher might have the engagement by all.
Cooperative Learning (2009). students do a Flashcard
Game—students work in pairs with flashcards that have
an arrow or simple diagram on one side and a preposition
on the other. They go through three rounds, memorizing
the content. Match Mine would be another productive
structure for this lesson. In Match Mine, partners sit on
strategies vs. Kagan's opposite sides of a barrier. One partner, the Sender, places
cooperative structures items in an arrangement. The other student, the Receiver,
tries to match the Sender's arrangement, using only the
Let's compare a typical, traditional English lesson to an sender's verbal directions. Students use the direction
English lesson using Kagan Structures. For example, we vocabulary in a functional way: Place the square next to
might want to teach direction vocabulary with prepositions the triangle. Place the circle below the triangle.
of place and direction: next to, down, into, out, up, above, Choosing a cooperative learning structure over traditional
below. methods creates a dramatic positive difference in English
In a traditional classroom, the teacher may provide some language learning. We now know that there are many
direct instruction, then do a whole-class question-and- styles of learning and multiple intelligences. What works for
answer session. During the question-and-answer session, some may not work well for everyone. Therefore, we need
the teacher usually asks questions, then has students raise a variety of strategies to reach and teach our students with
their hands to volunteer answers. Alternatively, the teacher different learning styles and intelligences. If we always use
may ask a question and nominate a student to respond. lectures and independent exercises, we may inadvertently
Finally, the teacher may assign an activity for individual create barriers to English learning for many students.
work and have the students individually practice the new If, instead, we use a variety of structures as we teach, we
skill. Sound familiar? engage the different learning styles and students' multiple
intelligences. The variety creates greater novelty, increases
Traditional learning is either whole-class, with the teacher motivation, and maintains attention. Kagan Structures also
leading the class, or independent practice work. As create greater engagement, lower anxiety, and promote
we'll see below, traditional learning lacks a high level of natural language acquisition. Let's see how.
active engagement, creates a more intimidating learning
environment, and often fails to establish an effective*

*The Publishers would like to thank Dr. Spencer Kagan and Miguel Kagan of Kagan Publishing & Professional Development for
developing this article for the openMind series. Ownership of the copyright remains with the authors.
«ill

Learning and using a foreign language can be stressful.


In the traditional English classroom, the teacher quizzes
One attribute that sets cooperative structures apart from students in front of the entire class. Students may not know
traditional instruction is that structures don't call for the correct answer, may be apprehensive about speaking
voluntary participation. In the traditional classroom, the in public, or may be self-conscious about their accent. In
teacher asks students a question, and only those who global surveys, public speaking ranks as people's greatest
know the answer, or who are daring enough to respond, fear, beating fear of death, spiders, flying, and confined
raise their hands. The rest of the class can opt out. spaces. Whole-class settings for language learning are
often perceived as threatening situations. We know from
When students have the option of nonparticipation, many
both language learning theory and brain research that
don't participate. This is especially true for shy students,
stress negatively impacts on attitudes, learning, and
lower achievers, and early language learners. The result:
memory.
they don't learn as much or as quickly.
With Match Mine and Flashcard Game, students are
With Kagan Structures, participation is not voluntary.
working with just one other student. Most Structures
Participation is required by the Structure. In Flashcard
encourage pair work or work in teams of four.
Game, students
There is a direct connection take turns to play a Students who would experience anxiety in a whole-class
between student collaborative game. With setting feel more comfortable speaking English in a more
participation, engagement, Match Mine, students intimate setting. Cooperative groups are less intimidating
communication, and must communicate than whole-class settings. This is especially true in
subsequent language accurately to complete cooperative classrooms in which the teacher uses team
learning. the task. In the traditional building to establish trust and encourage support among
classroom, the structure teammates.
does not require participation from every student. It is the
same with Match Mine with pair work or group work. If pair
or group work is not structured properly, one student
can simply do the work, while the others watch or even
tune out. In contrast, the Structures hold every student
individually accountable for participating. There is a direct
connection between student participation, engagement,
communication, and subsequent language learning.
In the traditional classroom, when one student answers at There's a big difference between learning about a
a time, the ratio of active engagement is quite low. What's language and actually acquiring the language. Too many
more, the rest of the class sits quietly and there is very little language courses teach students about the language.
involvement. During our cooperative learning practice, Not enough courses allow students to actually use the
the class is divided into pairs, and at least half of the class language in a functional way. In our example of the
is generating language at any time and the other half is traditional classroom, students learn about directional
directly receiving comprehensible input and practicing vocabulary. They learn to correctly complete exercises. But
active listening. This radically increases the opportunity to are they really building fluency? Results say no.
decode and produce language. In the real world, we don't fill out exercises on the proper
use of language. But we often do need to give instructions
and follow directions.
When the situation of language acquisition (exercise work)
is too different from the situation of performance (giving
directions), a transference gap is created and fluency is
not acquired. Match Mine sidesteps the transference gap:
the situation of acquisition (giving and receiving verbal
directions) matches the future situation of performance
(giving and receiving verbal directions). Many Kagan
Structures naturally develop fluency by sidestepping the
transference gap.

Kagan structures XIX


Too often, language courses fail to build functional
fluency. Students learn how to conjugate verbs, memorize
vocabulary, and learn grammar rules, but too often miss
out on the opportunity to use language frequently in a
functional way. With the Structures, students not only
learn about language, but they actually implement it to
1 Match Mine
accomplish a goal. Natural language acquisition among Language functions:
infants is based on frequent social interaction. Cooperative Vocabulary builder, Functional communication, Oral
structures provide the social setting for language use language production
and offer students many more opportunities to receive Advantages:
input, interact in the target language, and practice oral • Develops target vocabulary based on the content of the
production of the language. game.
• Develops ability to give and follow instructions.
Structure summary:
Partners (Student A and Student B) on opposite sides of
a barrier communicate with precision in order for one to
match the other's arrangement of game pieces on a
game board.
Developing English fluency consists of four major
interrelated language objectives: we want to build oral Description:
comprehension skills, so students can understand what The instructor puts students into pairs. Each partner
they hear; we want to build oral fluency skills, so students receives an identical game board and game pieces.
can communicate with others; we want to build writing The game board and game pieces can be based on any
skills, so students can express themselves clearly and vocabulary topic, such as food, clothing, sports, careers,
correctly; we want to build reading skills, so students can verbs, and so on. For example, to practice human body
read with comprehension and accuracy. vocabulary, the game board is an illustration of a person.
The game pieces are numbered arrows.
To accomplish these four language goals—reading,
The pair sets up a file folder barrier between them so they
writing, speaking, and listening—we need an array of
can see each other's game boards. Student A (the Sender)
teaching tools. That's exactly what Kagan Structures
arranges the numbered arrows pointing to different body
are. Each Structure is a different language-teaching tool
parts. Then, the Sender describes the arrangement of
designed to develop different skills. Some Structures
arrows on the illustrated body and Student B, the Receiver,
are more suitable to build vocabulary skills (e.g., Match
attempts to match the Sender's arrangement exactly.
Mine). Others are ideal for practicing language skills,
Arrow number 1 is pointing to her left ear. When the pair
such as comprehension and fluency (e.g., Timed Pair
thinks they have correctly made a match, the Sender and
Share). Then, Structures
Receiver compare their arrangements to see how well
A wonderful feature o f the like Flashcard Game
they did.
Kagan Structures is that they are great for simply
are instructional strategies memorizing the breadth If the game pieces are arranged identically, the pair
that can be used repeatedly. of vocabulary terms and celebrates their success. If the game pieces don't match,
phrases students need they congratulate their efforts, then discuss how they
to learn. Many Structures simultaneously address multiple could have communicated better to make the match.
objectives that go beyond the four language objectives
Match Mine is terrific for developing communication
outlined above.
skills. Students must use the target vocabulary correctly to
We have developed over 200 Kagan Structures for achieve a successful match.
promoting interaction in the classroom. Because
2 Flashcard Game
cooperation and communication are two hallmarks of
the Kagan Structures, they are particularly well adapted Language functions:
to English learning. A wonderful feature of the Kagan Vocabulary, Grammar, Memorization
Structures is that they are instructional strategies that can Advantages:
be used repeatedly. They are not limited to one particular • Develops mastery through repetition and peer tutoring.
exercise, but are designed as shells so you can slot in • Students learn by quizzing and being quizzed.
any activities and target language. Once you learn some • Studerits receive immediate feedback.
basic Structures, you can integrate them easily into your
daily English lessons. For example, you may use Flashcard Structure summary:
Game today for directional words, but you can use it again Partners (Student A and Student B) proceed through three
tomorrow for proper use of correct tenses. rounds as they quiz each other with flashcards, master the
content, and win their cards.
Here are three sample Kagan Structures we encourage you
to experiment with. Description:
Flashcard Game facilitates mastery of English words,
phrases, and rules. Students need flashcards to play. If no
flashcards exist for the content, students can easily make
their own. The flashcards can take many different forms
depending on the content to be learned. For vocabulary
words, one side of the flashcard has a picture and the class probably doesn't add up to much, but when you
answer is on the back. For grammar, the card can have consider how often teachers ask questions every day,
simple present on one side and simple past on the other then multiply that by the number of days the course lasts,
side. Once the cards are made up, students proceed this simple little Structure has the power to dramatically
through three rounds in pairs to memorize the content. In improve language skills.
Round 1, Student A shows and reads the front and back of
Variation:
the flashcard. Then, Student A shows the front of the card
Progressive Timed Pair Share. In Progressive Timed Pair
and Student B gives the answer for the back. If Student
Share, students take turns sharing with different partners
B answers correctly, Student A offers praise and gives
on the same topic. Each time they share on the topic, the
Student B the card. If Student B answers incorrectly, he or
time limit is increased. This gives students the opportunity
she does not win the flashcard. Student A offers a. hint or
to start small and work their way up to more elaborate
shows the answer again. When they have gone through
sentences, phrases, and ideas. As they hear ideas and
all the cards4the partners switch roles and go through the
language from their partners, they can incorporate what
cards again.
they've heard into their own turn to speak.
For Round 2, fewer cues are given. Student A shows the
front of the card and Student B tries to win back the card
by giving a correct answer. When both students win back
all their cards, they move on to Round 3. In Round 3, even
fewer cues are given. Student A says what's on the front,
Dr. Spencer Kagan is an internationally acclaimed
this time without showing the card. Student B tries to win
researcher, public speaker, and author of over 100
back the cards with the correct answer.
books, chapters, and journal articles. He is a former
Flashcard Game is done in rounds to improve the clinical psychologist and full professor of psychology
likelihood of success at each round. As Student A and and education at the University of California. He is the
Student B, students get repeated practice and immediate principal author of the single most comprehensive book
feedback. for educators in each of four fields: cooperative learning,
multiple intelligences, classroom discipline, and classroom
3 Timed Pair Share
energizers. Dr. Kagan developed the concept of structures;
Language functions: his popular brain-based, cooperative learning and multiple
Fluency, Elaboration, Oral comprehension intelligences structures like Numbered Heads Together
Advantages: and Timed Pair Share are used in teacher-training institutes
• Half the class is actively producing language at any and classrooms worldwide. He has taught workshops
time, while the other half is actively listening. and given keynote speeches in over 20 countries, and his
• All students must participate. books are translated into many languages. Dr. Kagan has
• Students listen attentively so they can respond been featured in leading educational magazines, including
appropriately. Educational Leadership, Instructor, Learning Magazine,
• Students regularly practice producing language on and Video Journal.
various topics. Miguel Kagan is Executive Director of Kagan Publishing
Structure summary: & Professional Development, an educational organization
Partners take timed turns listening and sharing. that offers publications and workshops on cooperative
learning, language learning, and active engagement.
Description: Miguel, together with Dr. Kagan, coauthored a radical
Timed Pair Share is one of the simplest cooperative revision of the classic book, Kagan Cooperative Learning.
learning Structures—and one of the most powerful. The Miguel has also written, designed, and developed a
teacher states a discussion topic, how students are to pair, multitude of books, SmartCards, software programs,
how long students will have to share, and selects who will learning games, and electronic devices for Kagan
go first. It is perhaps the easiest way to infuse cooperative Publishing. He is the editor of Kagan Online Magazine,
interaction into just about any point of the lesson. For Kagan's webzine that offers articles, research, and tips for
example, What do you predict this text will be about? educators implementing Kagan Structures.
Work in pairs and share for thirty seconds each. Partners
with the darkest clothes begin. References
High, Julie (1993). Second Language Learning Through
When you compare Timed Pair Share to its traditional Cooperative Learning. San Clemente, CA: Kagan Publishing. This
counterpart—selecting one student to share with the book applies Kagan Cooperative Learning Structures to language
class—its true power is revealed. With Timed Pair Share, learning.
half the class is active at any one time, while the other half Kagan, Spencer & Kagan, Miguel (2009). Kagan Cooperative
listens attentively. Learning. San Clemente, CA: Kagan Publishing. This is a recent
revision of Dr Kagan's classic book on cooperative learning. It Is
In the traditional class, only a single student in the whole
the most popular and comprehensive book in the field.
class is active at any time; the rest of the class may easily
tune out. With Timed Pair Share, no students get left Kagan, Miguel (2009). Match Mine Language Builders. San
behind. Everyone must participate. Clemente, CA: Kagan Publishing. Based on the Structure Match
Mine, this book contains 30 ready-made cooperative learning
Students practice speaking and sharing their thinking and games covering common vocabulary words and concepts.
opinions in English. They practice listening attentively. A
single Timed Pair Share vs. selecting one student in the

Kagan structures XXI


STUDENT'S BOOK SCOPE AND SEQUENCE
-

/
«

READING | LISTENING SPEAKING WRITING


COMMUNICATION Completing an online 5
UNIT 1 RECOGNIZING COGNATES: Listening to a voicemail message
an online survey STRATEGY: using polite language registration form *
NICE TO FUNCTIONS «
MEET YOU! • understanding times and dates FUNCTION giving personal (
information «
• understanding personal
f
information 1
i
y

UNIT 2 Reading a celebrity biography USTEN1NG FOR SPECIFIC Talking about family UNDERSTANDING THE
INFORMATION: an informal MECHANICS: using correct i
WHAT DO FUNCTION understanding FUNCTION giving personal
conversation information capitalization and punctuation
YOU DO? personal information (
:
1
,

UNIT 3 © RECOGNIZING Listening to a radio show COMMUNICATION Writing about yourself and your ;
COGNATES: a magazine article STRATEGY: asking for opinions interests
DOWN TIME FUNCTION talking about
people's likes and dislikes FUNCTIONS !
• giving personal information 1
• describing your personality
1
• talking about bobbies and
interests 1
1

UNIT 4 Reading a magazine article © LISTENING FOR SPECIFIC Talking about interesting activities © UNDERSTANDING THE
DAY IN, FUNCTION describing routines INFORMATION: an interview FUNCTIONS MECHANICS: writing complete
sentences
DAY OUT and habits • describing routines and habits
• talking about hobbies

UNITS READING FOR THE M A IN Listening to a news report COMMUNICATION Writing an email to give directions
IDEA: descriptions of places STRATEGY: repeating directions
HERE, FUNCTION describing events FUNCTION giving and
to check understanding understanding directions
THERE, AND and festivals
EVERYWHERE!

UNIT 6 Reading personal profiles LISTENING FOR NUMERICAL Talking to an old friend SIMPLE SENTENCES: using
INFORMATION: online audio correct sentence structure (subject
DIFFERENT FUNCTIONS FUNCTION talking about
profiles present activities + verb + object)
STROKES • understanding personal
information
• describing likes and dislikes
VOCABULARY FESKILLS
~*SOUNDS: the alphabet BE-STATEMENTS A N D YES/NO QUESTIONS USEFUL QUESTIONS SELF A N D SOCIETY:
FUNCTION using he to give personal information such FUNCTION using questions to ask for help understanding forms
as name, age, and nationality in class FUNCTION identifying the
4 BE-WH- QUESTIONS ORDINAL NUMBERS correct personal information to
FUNCTION using ¿e to ask for personal information FUNCTION using ordinal numbers to talk complete a form
4 such as name, age, ond nationality about dates
■4
-

WORDS: two-syllable nouns ARTICLES OCCUPATIONS W ORK A N D CAREER:


-4 FUNCTION using articles to describe people and FUNCTION learning to talk about occupations categorizing
organizations FAMILY MEMBERS FUNCTION categorizing

4
POSSESSION FUNCTION learning to talk about families different jobs to find the most
4 FUNCTION using the apostrophe, whose, possessive suitable career
pronouns
■4
4

4
__SOUNDS: third person -s SIMPLE PRESENT-STATEMENTS AN D FREE-TIME ACTIVITIES STUDY A N D LEARNING:
YES/NO QUESTIONS FUNCTION learning to talk about hobbies understanding your learning style
4 FUNCTION using the simple present to talk about and free-time activities FUNCTION thinking about what
free-time activities PERSONALITY ADJECTIVES you like to do to find your learning
4
SIMPLE PRESENT-INFORMATION QUESTIONS FUNCTION using adjectives to describe style and improve how you learn
4 FUNCTION using the simple present to ask questions people and what they like doing English
about people's habits and hobbies
4
4

D W O R D S : days of the week FREQUENCY ADVERBS TELLING TIME SELF A N D SOCIETY: managing
A N D ADVERBIAL PHRASES FUNCTION learning how to say what time your time
4
FUNCTION using frequency adverbs and adverbial it is FUNCTION thinking about how
phrases to talk about bow often we do things PREPOSITIONS OF TIME you manage your time in order to
CLAUSES WITH UNTIL, BEFORE, AFTER FUNCTION talking about times of day, days prioritize different tasks
FUNCTION using until, before, and after to talk about of the week, and sequences of activities
sequences of events

WORDS: compound nouns THERE IS / THERE ARE WITH SOME, ANY, PLACES A N D ATTRACTIONS SELF A N D SOCIETY:
4 SEVERAL, A LOT OF, MANY IN A CITY establishing priorities
FUNCTION using there is/ there are and quantifiers to FUNCTION learning how to describe where FUNCTION thinking about
describe places and attractions you live specific criteria in order to plan a
THE IMPERATIVE LOCATIONS A N D DIRECTIONS short stay in your city for another
FUNCTION using the imperative to give instructions FUNCTION learning phrases to ask for and person
- and directions to places in a city give directions to places
4

4
^ SOUNDS: / r j / PRESENT PROGRESSIVE LIFESTYLE ADJECTIVES SELF A N D SOCIETY:
FUNCTION using the present progressive to talk about FUNCTION using adjectives to describe making personal change
- our lives different lifestyles FUNCTION thinking about
PRESENT PROGRESSIVE VS. SIMPLE PRESENT A GREEN LIFESTYLE changes you want to make in your
FUNCTION using the present progressive and the FUNCTION using verb collocations to lifestyle

- simple present to talk about our lifestyles describe a "green" lifestyle

^3

•% Stud ent's Book Scope and sequence XXIII


Æ
READING SPEAKING
UNIT 7 © READING FOR THE Listening to a review of a IV show COMMUNICATION Writing a personal reference
M A IN IDEA: a horoscope STRATEGY: showing interest
YOU HAVE FUNCTIONS FUNCTION describing abilities
TALENT! • describing talents and abilities and personal qualities Z-
• talking about likes and dislikes

UNIT 8 Reading and completing a survey © LISTENING Asking to try on clothes in a store © COMPOUND
SHOPPING FUNCTIONS FOR NUMERICAL FUNCTIONS SENTENCES: using conjunctions
INFORMATION: product to connect sentences [and, or, but)
AROUND • talking about shopping habits • asking for help in a store
advertisements
• talking about how much things • talking about how much things
cost cost -

UNIT 9 SCANNING FOR SPECIFIC Listening to and taking phone COMMUNICATION Writing a restaurant review
INFORMATION: restaurant messages STRATEGY: using phone
LET'S EAT! FUNCTIONS
advertisements language
FUNCTIONS • describing a restaurant
• understanding phone language • giving opinions and making a
• making plans to go out recommendation

UNDERSTANDING THE SEQUENCING A N D


*
UNIT 10 Reading a survey Talking about a past experience
M A IN IDEA: informal CONNECTING IDEAS: using
SPEAKING FUNCTION describing past FUNCTION describing feelings
conversations connectives like first, then, after
OF THE PAST experiences towards past experiences
that, and finally to sequence ideas
in a text

UNIT 11 © SCANNING FOR Listening to a life story COMMUNICATION Writing a short biography
SPECIFIC INFORMATION: STRATEGY: taking time to think
GREAT LIVES FUNCTIONS FUNCTIONS
a short biography • recounting biographical —
• understanding biographical
information information
• identifying key events in a • talking about famous people
person's life and events

UNIT 12 Reading a blog © U N D ER STAN D IN G THE Talking about plans and intentions © SEQUENCING AND C-
IN THE NEAR FUNCTION thinking about M A IN IDEA: an informal FUNCTION talking about CONNECTING IDEAS: using
intentions and resolutions conversation vacation plans connectives like first, then, next,
FUTURE after that, and finally to sequence 4P
ideas in a text
*

p
^ p r o n u n c ia t io n GRAMMAR VOCABULARY LIFESKILLS
WORDS: can/can't C A N /C A N T —ABILITY PERSONALITY ADJECTIVES W ORK A N D CAREER:
■*4 FUNCTION using can and can't to talk about abilities FUNCTION using adjectives to describe working as a group to do a task
ADVERBS OF MANNER people FUNCTION identifying
40
FUNCTION using adverbs of manner to talk about TALENTS A N D ABILITIES strengths and weaknesses of
-4 people's talents FUNCTION learning to talk about what each member of the group,
people are able to do to ensure that tasks are completed
-4 efficiently
-4

•4
JENTENCE RHYTHM: THIS, THAT, TH ESE, TH O SE CLOTHES W ORK A N D CAREER:
emphasis with this, that, these, FUNCTION using this, that, these, and those to identify FUNCTION learning to talk about what making choices
-Jiose items of clothing people wear FUNCTION comparing different
COMPARATIVE ADJECTIVES ADJECTIVES FOR DESCRIBING options to be able to make good
-4
FUNCTION using comparative adjectives to compare GADGETS choices
40 gadgets FUNCTION using adjectives to talk about
technology
~4

-4
'SENTENCE RHYTHM: weak to COUNT A N D N O N-C O U NT N O UN S WITH FOOD SELF A N D SOCIETY: making a
SO M E, A N Y, M UCH, M A N Y FUNCTION learning to talk about different plan
-4
FUNCTION using quantifiers to talk about different food and drink items and food groups FUNCTION making a list to be
40 amounts of food and drink items ORDERING IN A RESTAURANT able to host a group meal
VERB PHRASES FUNCTION learning how to interpret menus
-4 FUNCTION using phrases like I'd like to, let's, and and phrases to order food from a waiter
40 1 have to to make, accept, and refuse invitations and
suggestions and to express obligations
40

SOUNDS: -ed endings SIMPLE PAST-AFFIRMATIVE STATEMENTS ADJECTIVES WITH -ED A N D -IN G STUDY A N D LEARNING:
40 FUNCTION using the simple past to describe FUNCTION using adjectives to talk about taking notes on a text
a vacation feelings and states FUNCTION identifying the
4
SIMPLE PAST-QUESTIONS A N D MEMORABLE EXPERIENCES most important information in a
40 NEGATIVE STATEMENTS FUNCTION using verb collocations to talk description of historical events
FUNCTION using the simple past to ask about about past experiences
4 somebody's weekend

-SENTENCE RHYTHM: object SIMPLE PAST WITH W H EN CLAUSES LIFE EVENTS STUDY A N D LEARNING:
pronouns FUNCTION using the simple past with when to talk FUNCTION learning to talk about key events brainstorming in a group
about the order of events in the past in people's lives FUNCTION brainstorming to
DIRECT A N D INDIRECT OBJECTS HISTORICAL EVENTS come up with ideas for subjects for
4 a biography
FUNCTION using object pronouns to avoid repeating FUNCTION learning to talk about key events
nouns in a description of a person's life in history

-W O R D S: verbs ending in -y PRESENT PROGRESSIVE AS FUTURE PHRASES WITH GO STUDY A N D LEARNING:


L+ -ing FUNCTION using the present progressive to talk about FUNCTION using gerunds and the verb go to analyzing strengths and
4 future plans and arrangements talk about activities weaknesses
G O IN G TO INTENTIONS FUNCTION evaluating areas
4*
FUNCTION using going to to talk about future plans, FUNCTION using start and stop + gerund to for future improvement in learning
4 intentions, and resolutions talk about good and bad habits and intentions English
for the future

-Z i

5
/Wk Student's Book Scope and sequence xxv
y
GRAMMAR REVIEW
This Grammar review has been included to help you
establish what your students already know before they Answers
start open Mind 7. It is designed to be used in the first 1 is 2 is 3 are 4 are 5 are 6 are
lesson of the course and has a two-fold aim: first, as .
an introductory activity to help you get to know your 2 (possessive adjectives)
students, and second, as a way to establish the general • In item 3, check that the students understand that the
level of the class. It also provides a useful recap of rubrics subject is Colombia and not I. Make sure that they know
and classroom language. that Jason is a male name in item 5.
The Grammar review can be used in a variety of different
ways. It can be done individually, as a formal diagnostic
test, to check that students have been placed at the
correct level. A more interactive approach would be to
elicit the answer to the first question of each exercise as a
class and then have the students complete the rest of the 3 (there is / there are)
exercise individually. • Elicit the things in the picture before the students do
the exercise.
You can choose to check answers after each exercise or at
• Follow-up: have the students make sentences in pairs
the end of the review.
with the other things in the picture, e.g. There's a chair.
If you wish, the exercises can be exploited further, and
ideas for some of them are given below and on the
following pages.
1 (singular/plural of be)
• In item 4, check that the students understand that the
subject is your phone number.

Grammar review
1 (Circle)th e c orrec t op tio n to c o m p le te th e sen ten ces.
1 My name are / is Jake.
2 How old are / is he?
3 Erica and I are / is not late for class.
4 What is / are your phone number?
5 Mr. Richards and Miss Green is / are teachers at my school.
6 Where is / are your brothers?

2 C o m p le te th e sen te n ce s w ith th e correc t pos s e s s iv e a d jective.


1 They are Rachael and Daniel. brother's name is Tony.
2 I play three sports. _ favorite sport is tennis.
3 I'm from Colombia.................... capital city is Bogota.
4This is Suzanna...................................... last name is Martin.
5 This is Jason. ..................... cell phone number is (555) 896-5623.
6 "What's email address?" "My email address is ellieroisin@master.com".

3 L o o k at th e p ictu re an d c o m p le te th e sen te n ce s w it h is o r are.

1 There a cell phoni


2 There three pens.
3 There a camera.
4 There ..... .. . books.
5 There a key.
6 There........... a watch.

2
o
3
Grammar review T6
4 (articles)
• Check that the students remember that we sometimes
use no article (-) with plural nouns.
• Follow-up: have the students practice the conversation
in pairs. Monitor to make sure they pronounce the
correctly before vowel sounds and consonant sounds.

7 (can/can't)
• Check that the students understand the activities in the
table, and that a check means the person can do the
5 (information questions)
activity and a cross means they can't do it.
• Read the question words in the box and check the
students understand that they have to use What twice.
• Follow-up: have the students ask and answer the
questions in pairs.

Answers
1 Who 3 Where 5 What 8 (present simple yes/no questions)
2 How 4 What 6 When • Make sure the students understand there are two parts
to this activity: completing the questions, then matching
6 (word order in questions)
them to the answers.
• Remind the students that they need to write the first • Follow-up: have the students ask and answer the
word of the sentence with a capital letter. If students questions in pairs.
need more support here, elicit the first word in each
sentence before they start. Answers
• Follow-up: have the students ask and answer questions
1 Does—d 3 Is—f 5 Do—c
1,3, 4, and 5 in pairs.
2 Are—a 4 Does—b 6 Do—e

---------------------------------------------------------- •
4 C o m p lete th e s en te n ce s w it h a, an, the, o r - (n o article).
A: What's in the box?
B: I can see (1) ...... .............. DVD, (2) ________ ___ umbrella, and (3) ....... backpacks.
A: What color is (4) _ ____ umbrella?
B: It's blue. (5)...... backpacks are really cool. They're red and blue.
A: What's (6) DVD about?
B: It's about (7)_______ . artist from Spain.

5 C o m p lete th e q u es tio n s w it h th e c orrect qu e s tio n w o rd s in th e bo x .

How What (x2) When Where Who


1_ is your teacher?
2 ______________do you spell your name?
3 .................................................................... are you from?
4 ....... ........ . is your email address?
5 __________ languages do they speak?
6 do you do your homework?

6 P u t th e w o rd s in th e c orrec t o rd e r to fo r m q u estio n s.
1 you / how / your / do / last name / pronounce / ?
2 from / where / your / sister's / husband / is / ?
3 speak / you / can / Italian / ?
4 time / does / class / what / finish / your / ?
5 lunch / you / have / what / do / for / ?
6 like / does / Kelly / job / her / ?

7 L o o k a t th e table. C o m p lete th e sen te n ce s w ith can / can’t an d a verb fro m


th e table.

cook pasta ride a bike speak Spanish

Me X ✓ X

Chris ✓ ✓ ;x
Marion ✓ X *
1 Chris and I .... Spanish. 4 Marion-----
2 Chris and Marion
3 Chris and I ________ Spanish.

C o m p lete th e qu es tio n s 1-6. T h e n m a tch th e m to th e a n s w e rs a-f.


Margarita play the guitar? a) No, I'm not.
you a student? b) No, he doesn't.
... Jim busy? c) Yes, they do.
_ Henry drive a black car? d) Yes, she does.
David and Sara read Arabic? e) No, I don't
you have an email account? f) Yes, he is.

Grammar review 7

©
1
T*

¿É-

9 (present simple affirmative and negative) 11 (contractions)


• Make sure the students understand that verbs with not • Make sure the students understand that some of the
in the parentheses should be negative. Tell the students sentences can't be contracted (if they need more support,
to be careful with spelling in item 5. tell them that two sentences can't be contracted).
r4 • Follow-up: have the students read out the sentences in
pairs, focusing on pronouncing the contractions.

Answers
1 Hi! My nickname's Don.
10 (possessive apostrophe and possessive 2 They aren't / They're not expensive.
adjectives) 3 What time's your train?
• Make sure the students understand that they have to 4 Martin isn't / Martin's not busy.
find one mistake only in each sentence and that they 5 What are your favorite CDs?
have to write the correct sentence in full. 6 When's your class?
7 The umbrellas are under the desk.
Answers 8 There's a sale at the supermarket.
1 (He's)parents are engineers. (His parents are
12 (frequency adverbs)
engineers.)
2(Katya)favorite hobby is skiing. (Katya's favorite hobby • Make sure the students understand that there are
is skiing.) two parts to this activity: choosing the correct adverb
3 (Ours)names are Jessica and Ben. (Our names are according to the thermometer, then putting it in the
Jessica and Ben.) correct place. Check understanding by eliciting that the
4 My(parents friend's)are from Japan. (My parents' first thermometer represents usually.
friends are from Japan.) ________
5 They can watch a movie at(Michaels)house. (They can Answers
-4 watch a movie at Michael's house.) 1 Caroline's sister usually checks her email every day.
6 membrother's home is in Sydney, Australia. (Her 2 I rarely drink coffee in the afternoon.
brother's home is in Sydney, Australia.) 3 Joe always watches TV on Sunday morning.
4 Lindsey and Julia sometimes get up late during the week.
5 She often writes letters on weekends.
6 I never spend a lot of time on the phone.

9 Complete the sentences with the correct form of the verb in parentheses.
1 Silvia and her mom - ______ ___(not be) teachers.
2 Jack's wife .......... .... (not like) her job in the restaurant.
3 W e ............... ...... (work) from ten until nine.
..... .......... .......... (not have) a middle name.
5 The movie ________ _____ ____ . _.... .....(finish) at eight o'clock.
6 Mark's dad _ (go) to work every day.

10 C ir c le )th e m is ta k e and w r ite th e c orrec t sen te n ce o n th e lin e.


1 He's parents are engineers.
2 Katya favorite hobby is skiing.
3 Ours names are Jessica and Ben. - - ............ _ .........
4 My parents friend's are from Japan.
s They can watch a movie at Michaels house. ____ _____ -...
6 Hers brother's home is in Sydney, Australia. -------- ----------------------------------_

11 R e w rite th e s en ten ces, u s in g con tractio n s w h e r e possib le.


1 Hi! My nickname is Don.
2 They are not expensive.
3 What time is your train?
4 Martin is not busy. _ . _ _ .........
s What are your favorite C Ds? .... .
6 When is your class? ___ __________ _ _ . ___ __ ____ __ __ ___
7 The umbrellas are under the desk.
8 There is a sale at the supermarket. ___i _________________________________________

12 L o o k at th e fre q u e n c y a d v erb th e rm o m e te r o n th e rig h t an d p u t th e


w o rd s in th e b o x in th e c orrect p la c e in th e s en ten ces. C h a n g e th e verb
fo r m i f n ecessary.

always never often rarely sometimes usually

1 Caroline's sister / check / her email / every day. ,

2 I / drink / coffee / in / the / afternoon.

3 Joe / watch / TV / on / Sunday / morning.

4 Lindsey and Julia / get up / late / during the / week.

5 She / write / letters / on weekends.

6 I / spend / a lot / of / time / on the phone.


G ram m ar re v ie w T8
The expression Nice to meet you! is usually used when we meet someone for the first time,
especially when we are introduced to someone.

Listening: to a voicemail message


Ask the students why people leave voicemail messages.
Are voicemail messages short or long? What things do
Unit opener people usually say in voicemail messages? Elicit examples
(p.9) 10 min.
(e.g. name, telephone number, date, time, etc.).
• Optional downloadable unit opener 10 min.
Writing: completing an online registration form
1 Writing: completing an online (p. 10) 20 min. Elicit examples of the type of information people need to
registration form include when they complete an online registration form
• Optional downloadable Writing 20 min. (e.g. name, date of birth, nationality). Make a list on the
workshop: an online registration board.
2 Reading: recognizing cognates (p. 10) 30 min. Refer the students to the lifeSkills panel. Tell them that
3 Vocabulary: useful questions (p. 11) 25 min. the topic of this unit's lifeSkills section is understanding
4 Grammar: be—statements and yes/no (p. 12) 40 min. forms. Ask them to look through the unit and find as many
questions different kinds of forms as they can.
5 Pronunciation: the alphabet (p. 13) 15 min.
6 Speaking: using polite language (p. 13) 20 min.
A
7 Vocabulary: ordinal numbers (p. 14) 25 min. • Ask the students to look at the pictures. Ask who in
each picture is asking for information and who is giving
8 Grammar: be—wh- questions (p. 14) 40 min.
information. Ask the students to label the boxes using
9 Listening: to a voicemail (p. 15) 30 min.
A, B, or AJB if both are possible (e.g. in situation 1).
message • Elicit the kind of personal information we usually
lifeSkills: understanding forms (p. 16) 45 min. give (e.g. name, nationality, date of birth, job, etc.).
(Self and Society) Check that the students know how to ask for this basic
• Optional downloadable lifeSkills 45 min. information (e.g. What's your name? Where are you
lesson (Work and Career) from? How old are you?, etc.).
• Optional downloadable lifeSkills 45 min.
lesson (Study and Learning)
Language wrap-up 15 min. • Encourage the students to imagine they are at a party
(p. 18)
and are meeting someone for the first time.
Video and downloadable video worksheet 45 min.
• Write the following on the board and make sure the
students understand the expressions and how to use
them: My name is ..., I'm from ..., I'm ... years old. I'm
interested in ... Give an example for I’m interested in ...
Unit opener (e.g. I'm interested in music.).
• Put the students in pairs and ask them to role-play the
conversation.
Lead-in
• Listen to some pairs as a class.
Direct the students' attention to the objectives in the unit
menu and go through the information with them. Explain
that this unit focuses on how to give and ask for personal Extra: vocabulary
information, and on the following skills to help them talk
Elicit some of the vocabulary that could be used
about these topics:
Reading: recognizing cognates to talk about the three pictures (e.g. job interview,
interviewer, applicant, party, language institute/
Elicit some English words that are the same in their
language school, receptionist, language course).
language (e.g. taxi, hotel, computer). Encourage the
Check that the students understand all the words. Ask
students to look through the unit and find other English
them to repeat each word with the correct word stress.
words that are the same in their language or similar to
words in their language.
Speaking: using polite language
Write the word please on the board. Explain that in
English, people usually use please when making requests
because it is polite (e.g. A cup of coffee, please.). Ask the
students if they know any other polite words-in English.
Elicit examples and write them on the board (e.g. thank
you, you're welcome, how are you, excuse me).

o
UNIT1
IN THIS UNIT YOU
o learn language to give and ask for
personal information
read an online survey with
% information for a personal profile—
recognizing cognates
practice asking for personal
% information— using polite language
- listen to a voicemail message and
o
identify information

o complete an online registration


form with your personal details

► watch a video about giving


personal information

A Look at the pictures. W ho is


asking for personal information?
W ho is giving personal 1 a party
information? Label the boxes A, @ give personal information
B, or A/B if both are possible. 13 ask about personal information

2 a job interview 3 a language institute


s give personal information E l give personal information
0 ask about personal information 0 ask about personal information

B B I Work in pairs. Role-play a conversation at a party. You meet someone you don’t know.
Tell your partner about yourself and ask questions to find out about them.
A: Hello! My name's Anthony.
B: Oh, hello, Anthony. Nice to meet you. I'm Jenna.

4 LIFE Learn to identify different types of


z SKILLS forms and how to complete them

SELF &
SO CIETY
> Nice to meet you! H n E S IK I
1 WRITING; completing an online registration form
A Look at this webpage. W ho is it for?

M Y F R IE N D S
AN INTERNATIONAL SOCIAL SITE FOR STUDENTS OF ENGLISH
HOME ACCOUNT LOGIN
Contact people in other countries.
Communicate in English.
Complete the registration form below and join us!

First name Username

Last name Password

Country
Security question
Email address When is your birthday?
e.g. March 19,1991
Telephone number

Enter survey Enter text chat Enter video chat

...........«
B Complete the online registration with your personal information.
W h at’s your username? W h at’s your password?

2 R E A D I N G ; recognizing cognates
Many words are similar in different languages. Look for these words when you read.
Use them to help you understand the text.

A Read the survey on the next page.(^jrd|)the words you recognize.


How many words are similar in your language?
Lead-in Lead-in
Ask the class how many students belong to an online social • Read the information in the skills panel.
networking site like Facebook. Ask what basic information • Focus on the importance of recognizing cognates or
they needed to give in order to join the sites. Elicit basic loan words. There are words in English which may be
terms (e.g. name, email address, nationality, age, password, similar—or even the same—as words in the students'
etc.), and write them on the board. Tell the students that own language. Identifying these words is very useful,
this information is called personal information. especially when reading in English.
• Write some examples of cognates or loan words on
A the board (e.g. international, address, telephone,
• Before the students look at the registration form, go nationality, hotel, taxi, airport, police, television,
over the terms first name and last name. Write the full computer). Ask the students if they know any more
name of a famous person on the board (e.g. Johnny examples. Write any relevant suggestions on the board.
Depp). Elicit the person's last name. Then ask them for
the first name. Label each name accordingly. Then ask a
few students to tell you their first and last names. Read the instructions to the class and have the students
• Highlight that the terms given name and family or do this exercise individually.
surname are also sometimes used in place of first name • Explain the word survey (a group of questions you ask to
and last name, respectively. find out people's opinions).
• Put the students in pairs to answer the question in Ex. A. • Give the students time to circle the words they
Check the answer with the class. recognize. When they finish, ask them to compare
• Ask if the students know of any real social sites that are answers in pairs. Ask how many words they have circled,
intended especially for students of English. and how many of these are cognates. Did they circle the
same words or different words?
• Elicit the words the students circled, and write them
on the board. Have the students repeat the words
chorally, and then encourage them to ask questions
about any words they don't know on the list. This is a
B good opportunity to encourage peer teaching. Ask for
• Read the instructions to the class. Ask the students to volunteers from the class to help explain the meanings
invent a username and password for the form. of the words on the list.
• Give an example of a password and check that the
students understand when they need to use a password
(with an online account). Extra: word scramble game
• When the students finish completing the form, ask Think of six words that you know are cognates or
them to compare their usernames and passwords in loan words in your students' language(s). They can be
small groups. Then elicit some of the usernames and words already discussed, or other words you think the
passwords. How many students used their first name in students will be able to identify. Write the six words on
their username? How many used their last name in their the board in a scrambled order (e.g. theol (hotel)) and
username? How many have a combination of letters and then give the first letter of each word (e.g. h______). In
numbers in their password? pairs, have the students try to unscramble the words
and guess the cognates. The first pair to correctly
guess all six words wins.
Extra: personal information questions
Elicit the questions we ask to find out personal
information (e.g. What's your first name?; What's your
last name?; What's your (email) address?; When is your
birthday?). Ask the students to practice asking and
answering the questions in pairs.

Extra: homework
Ask the students to fill in the same form for a family
member or a friend.

Nice to meet you! u n it i HO


B
• There are a number of challenging words in this section.
Go over the pronunciation chorally and individually of
words that you think the students will find difficult.
Lead-in
• Ask the students to complete the survey individually. Elicit the classroom language questions in this section. For
Tell them they can check as many boxes as they want in example, ask What can you say when you don't know how
each section of the survey. to spell a word / when you need help / when you want
• When the students finish, ask them to compare answers someone to speak more slowly?
In pairs. Ask how many answers are the same and how
many are different.
• Take a class vote to find out which reason for studying 01 See the Student's Book for the audio script.
English is the most popular, which academic areas are Play the audio once, and have the students listen only.
popular, and which special interests the students have. Then play it again, and ask the students to repeat the
questions. Explain that these questions are very useful
Workbook p. 4, Section O '
and can help them understand more English. Make sure
the students understand their meaning.
Establish some classroom rules. Encourage the students
to use these questions when they ask you for help with
Culture note their English. Tell them that you will only respond to
In the U.S., a college refers to a place where people these questions if they ask them in English and if they
study for their bachelor's degree (= first degree), ask them correctly (e.g. What does that mean? not
whether the institution is a college, which offers only *What mean that?). Praise the students who make an
bachelor's degrees, or a university, which offers both effort to produce the correct language.
bachelor's degrees and advanced degrees. When If possible, make large copies of the questions and
British speakers use the word college, they usually display them on the walls of your classroom. It is helpful
mean a place where students over 18 are trained in a to refer to these questions during class time simply by
particular subject or skill, earning a qualification that pointing at them to help the students produce them.
is not usually an academic degree. Students in the
U.K. who are studying for an academic degree go to a B
university. • Read the instructions to the class. Ask the students to
work in pairs and say which questions are possible for
Note that at a college or university in the U.S., a
each of the four pictures.
student's field of study is called a major.
• Listen to some ideas from the class. Note that there is
more than one possible answer for all except Picture 3

Workbook p. 4, Section
B Complete the survey.

M Y F R IE N D S ¥ PERSONAL PROFILE SURVEY


HOME ACCOUNT LOGIN

Find friends similar to you. We have students from all over the world.
Complete the survey with information about yourself and click send.

I’m an English student in ... a school. a college. O a language Institute. O

Reason for studying English: academic studies O work O fun O

Academic or professional areas:


art o finance o management o
business o geography o mathematics o
economics o history o medicine o
education o languages o science o
-40 engineering o literature o other o
Special interests:

W
animals O dance o history O music o sports O
art O ecology o literature O politics o travel O

M0

3 V O C A B U L A R Y : useful questions
A E l 01 Listen and repeat the questions.
• Can you help me?
• Can you speak more slowly?
• How do you say that in English?
• Can you spell that?
• Can you repeat that?
• What does that mean?

B 0 Some of these phrases are also useful


outside the classroom. For pictures 1-4, say which
questions are possible. Check with a partner.

Nice to meet you! u n it l 11


A LANGUAGE IN CONTEXT Read this
conversation. Complete the statements.
Professor Brown: Hi, everyone. Welcome. I am
Professor Brown. Please say a few
words about yourself.
Paul: Hi. I'm Paul. I'm from New York,
and I'm 20 years old.
Ana: Hello, everyone. I'm Ana.
■ I'm 21, and I'm from Mexico.
Professor Brown: Are you from Mexico City, Ana?
Ana: No, I'm not. I'm from León.
Professor Brown: Is León a big city?
Ana: Yes, it is! It's very big.
Professor Brown: Thanks. Next?
. n ...i is tfrom
Paul ____ New York
2 Ana is years old.

NOTICE!
1 In statements, the verb be comes the subject,
a) before (b) after)
2 In questions, the verb be comes the subject.
(afbefore) b) after

B ANALYZE Read the conversation in Exercise A again.

Form Com plete the table.


Statements with be

Affirmative Negative
am (I'm) I am not (I'm not)
I ( 1)
from
You/We/They are (You're/We're/They're) [león You/We/They are not (You/We/They aren't) Mexico
.............. : City.
He/She/lt ( 2) (He's/She's/lt's) He/She/lt is not (He/She/lt isn't)

Y es/N o questions with be Short answers

(3) Are you/they from Mexico? Yes, I am. / No, I'm not.

Yes, we/they are. / No, we/they aren't.

Is he/she/it Yes, he/she/it is. / No, he/she/it isn't.

Function Choose the correct option to com plete the sentence.


We use the verb be to talk about ...______________________________________
(a) people and things and facts about them, such as age, name, etc.)
b) things we do every day.

C PRACTICE (^ircletjthe correct option. WATCHOUT!


1 Jack and Madison(are)/ am in Europe. 0 Yes, we are.
2 Is / ( A re) you a music student? (^) Yes, we're.
3 John^snYy a re n 't here.
4 W e (a re )/ is college students.
5(is)/ A m she 19 years old? WATCHOUT!
6 Ed and Isabelle isn't/(arenj^from the U.S.A. 0 i am 20 years old
7 I a r e /(a m )2 2 .
€ > | have 20 years.
s(/s)/ A r e Eva from Spain?
wm m m m m

0
Function
• Ask the students to look at the conversation in Ex. A
again and think about when we use the verb be.
• Have the students look at the sentence and check the
Lead-in correct option to complete it. Then check the answer
with the class.
Tell the class where you are from. Use the contracted form
I'm from . . . . Then ask the whole class Where are you
from?, and elicit the responses I'mAVe're from . . . . After
that, focus on one particular student and ask the class
Extra: age
Where is he/she from?, and elicit the response He's/She's Ask the students to look at the conversation in
from . . . . Remember that this is only an introduction, so Ex. A again and tell you how old Ana is. Write the
don't worry about error correction at this stage. question How old are you? on the board and have the
students repeat it chorally. Ask one or two students,
A and elicit simple answers (e.g. I'm 17, I'm 22, etc.).
Then ask the students to work in pairs and ask and
• Tell the students they will read a short conversation. Ask
answer how old they are. At the end, get feedback
the students to open their books. Draw their attention to
on people's ages from the class (e.g. Teacher: How
the two statements under the conversation. The students
old is Elena? Students: She's 20), so that the students
have to find the answers to fill in the blanks in the
produce and practice different pronouns.
conversation.
• Ask the students to read the text and find the answers.
• Elicit the answers from the class, and write them on the c
board.
• Ask the students to look at the error in the second
Watch out! box. Emphasize that we don't say / have
^ NOTICE! with age in English. Point out that we can say I am/l'm
20 years old, or simply, I am/l'm 20.
• Ask the students to read the two statements and • Read the instructions to the class. Ask the students to
the different possible answers carefully. circle the correct options individually, paying attention
• To reinforce the points in the statements, ask to the forms presented in the grammar table in Ex. B.
the students to underline 11 examples of the • When the students finish, have them compare answers
subject before the verb be in statements and the in pairs. Encourage them to discuss any differences
two examples of the subject after the verb be in in their answers and refer back to the grammar table
questions. before deciding which one is correct. Check the answers
with the class.

B
Extra: grammar practice
Form Write the following prompts on the board:
• Direct the students to the grammar table. Give them 1 They / English
time to look over the sentences in the table. Explain that 2 she / Chinese?
affirmative means yes and negative means no. 3 They / not / from Mexico
• Ask the students to work individually or in pairs to 4 He / not / a student
complete the grammar table. Tell them that all the 5 We / 19 years old
information needed to complete the table can be found 6 1/21
in the conversation in Ex. A. Ask the students to work in pairs and write full
• When the students finish, ask them to compare answers sentences from the prompts using the correct form
in pairs. Then check the answers with the class. of be. Invite individual students to come to the board
• Highlight the abbreviated forms (I'm, You're, He's, She's, and write their sentences.
It's, We're, and They're) and the fact that we usually use
these when speaking. Typically, we use the full forms when Answers ... .

writing. Explain that in a contraction, we use an apostrophe 1 They are English.


(') to replace a letter that is missing from the full form. 2 Is she Chinese?
• Explain that when giving a short answer with yes, we 3 They are. not from Mexico.
always use the full form of be, and that the abbreviated 4 He is not a student.
forms are used in speaking only for answers with no. 5 We are 19 years old.
• Draw the students' attention to the first Watch out! box, 6 I am 21.
which reinforces the fact that we need to use the full
form of be when giving a short answer with yes.

Nice to meet you! u n it i T12


D
• Put the students in pairs. Have them choose to be one of Extra: spelling race
the four people. Each partner chooses a different person. Divide the class into teams of five or six students. Say
• Give the students time to read the prompts. The a word from the unit, and have one person from each
statements and questions in Ex. A can act as a model for team write the word on the board. The first team to
this exercise. write the word correctly scores a point. Continue until
• Ask the students to practice the conversation in pairs. every member of the team has had at least one turn.
• When they have practiced the conversation at least
twice, listen to a few examples from the class.
• Correct any errors of the verb be with error-correction
techniques (e.g. using your fingers to show which word
is incorrect in the sentence and prompting the students
to self-correct).

Lead-in
Extra: homework • Ask the students to look at the words and expressions
Ask the students to choose two of the people in Ex. D in the skills panel. Make sure they understand the
and write a conversation like the one they practiced. meanings of the expressions.
• Highlight the importance of being polite. Briefly focus
on the pronunciation of each expression.
Workbook p. 5, Section 3

03 See the Student's Book for the audio script.


Read the instructions to the class.
Play the audio once.
Ask the students how many examples of polite
expressions they found in the conversation {six). Which
are they? Check the answers with the class.
02 See the Student's Book for the audio script. Ask the students what the difference between thanks
Play the audio, and ask the students to listen to the vowel and thank you is (thanks is informal, thank you is more
sound in each letter to complete the table. formal).
Encourage the students to discuss their answers in pairs.
Then check the answers with the class. Read aloud each
line of answers and ask the students to repeat after you. Extra: shadow reading
Highlight the pronunciation of certain letters of the
Use this conversation for shadow reading. Ask
alphabet in English. Draw the students' attention to
the students to listen to the audio and read the
the letters which cause the biggest problems (e.g. e,
conversation aloud with it, trying to imitate the speed
which may sound like i in their language). Some Arabic
and rhythm of the speakers on the audio.
speakers may have problems hearing the difference
between voiced and unvoiced consonants (e.g. b and
p). Speakers of some Asian languages might struggle B
differentiating between rand I. Spanish speakers may
• Read the instructions to the class. Then review the
have problems differentiating b and v, as well as with
questions they need to ask to do the group exercise
the pronunciation of the English t, g, and z.
(e.g. What's your first name? What's your email address?,
Play the audio again for the students to listen and repeat.
etc.).
• Draw the students' attention to the information in the
How to say it box, since they will need to know the
Culture note words at and dot to complete the exercise.
The last letter of the alphabet is pronounced /zi/ in • Put the students in groups to find out the information
the United States. In Canada, the U.K., and the rest of from their classmates and compile a class directory.
the English-speaking world, it is pronounced /zed/. • When the students finish, listen to an example from
each group.
• Highlight how phone numbers are pronounced in English:
B - The hyphen between numbers is never pronounced.
• Do one or two examples with the whole class first. Spell - Numbers are usually said individually.
one easy word (e.g. password) and one more difficult - The number zero is often said as oh (e.g.
word (e.g. language) aloud, and ask the students to (802) 254-7610 = eight-oh-two-two-five-four-seven-
write them down. six-one-oh.
• Check the answers by asking the students to spell the
words back to you. Write exactly what they say on the
board (e.g. if they mispronounce a letter or leave one

out). This will alert them to the problem and give them a
chance to self-correct.
D 0 NOW YOU DO IT Work in pairs. Choose two of the people below.
Role-play a conversation like the one in Exercise A.

Stefano, 19 Maria, 24 Devesh, 23 Isabela, 21


Rome, Italy Madrid, Spain New Delhi, India Sao Paulo, Brazil

5 the alphabet
A Ef]o2 Listen to the alphabet. Notice that some letters have similar
sounds. Write each letter in the correct category.
C D E ^ G H ^ J K L M N J& P J& J fr S T U V W X Y Z

-4» /ei/ : / il /e/ /ai/ /ou/ /ju/ la v i

•é A ; b : F i : o Q \ R

J H, J, K : c, d : L, m Y : U, W
; e, g , p ! N ,S ,X
J T, V, Z
-» B EH
Work in pairs. Choose a word from this unit, or another English
word you know. Spell it for your partner to guess the word.

6 SPEAKING: using polite language


Use excuse me, thank you, thanks, you're welcome, and please to be polite in English.

A |m 03 Listen to the
conversation below. Underline
the polite language.
Lucas: Excuse me. Can I get your
information, please? What's
your name?
David: It's David Whitfield.

Lucas: Can you spell your last name,
please?
David: It's W-H-l-T-F-l-E-L-D.
Lucas: Thanks. Now, what's your
email address?
David: It's davidw@mail.com.
Lucas: And your phone number?
David: It's (338) 414-2870.
Lucas: Thank you very much,
David: You're welcome.

B Qj§ Make a mini class directory in your notebook.


H O W TO SAY IT (
Work in groups. Ask your classmates for their
In email addresses:
information. Include their first name, last name, email
@ say at
address, and phone number. Use polite language.
say dot

Nice to meet you! U N IT I 13


7 V O C A B U L A R Y : ordinal numbers
A Write the correct ordinal number next to each word.
rr
r
f ir s t 1 st n in e t e e n t h
19th f if t h
5 th

s e v e n th
7 ,h
t h ir d
3rd t h ir t e e n t h
73 th
1 1 th <pth
e le v e n t h te n th 1 0 th n in t h

1 4 th 3 0 th 2 0 th
fo u r te e n th t h ir t ie t h tw e n t ie t h

6 th 2 5 th 8 th
s ix t h tw e n t y - f if t h e ig h t h

1 5 th 1 2 th '
f if t e e n t h tw e lf t h

4th H O W T O SAY IT Q Q
fo u r th s e co n d
Ordinal numbers:
We say: first, second, tenth, twentieth
We write: 1st, 2nd, 10th, 20th
B Complete the sentences with names of days, months, Dates:
and ordinal numbers. We say: The second of October, 2016.
1 Halloween is October 34 Tuesday is the second of October / October
2 Today Is (the) second.
3 Friday Is We write: 10/02/16, Tuesday is October 2nd/
4 Valentine's Day Is February . October 2
1st
5 New Year's Day is January In British English we write: 2/10/16,
Tuesday is 2nd October
6 My birthday is on

A ¡^ 0 4 LANGUAGE IN CONTEXT Listen


to the conversation. Complete the
sentences below.
Salesperson: I need to take some personal information
First of all, what's your name?
Jordan: Jordan Turner.
Salesperson: And where are you from?
Jordan: Washington, D.C.
Salesperson: How old are you, Jordan?
Jordan: I'm 34.
Salesperson: And when is your birthday?
Jordan: July 11th.
Salesperson: Thank you. Now, I need you to sign here ..

1 Jordan is 34 years old.


2 His birthday is in the month of 3.ul

1 Underline these words and phrases in the


conversation:

what where how old when

T ney come
'afbefore') b) after
. « H i


7 Vocabulary: ordinal
Extra: birthday line-ups
numbers Have the students stand, and tell them that they need
to line up according to their birthdays (e.g. those born
Lead-in in early January should be at the front of the line). The
Review the cardinal numbers 1 to 25. A fun way to do students need to circulate and ask their classmates
this is to go around the classroom and have the students for their birthdays so that they can determine where
count numbers up to the number of students in the class. they should stand in the line. Circulate and monitor,
Each student adds a number for his/her turn. If a student assisting where needed. Make sure the students
makes a mistake, that student starts counting again from 1. are saying the ordinal numbers correctly. When the
Continue until you have reached the number of students in students finish, start at the front of the line and have
the class (e.g. if you have 25 students, count up to 25). the students say their birthdays.

A
• Tell the students that this exercise introduces ordinal Workbook p. 7, Section 5
numbers. Write one and first on the board. Ask them
which one is the ordinal number (first).
• Highlight the use of -st in first, -nd in second, and -rd in
third, and tell the students that they can see this in the 8 Grammar: b e - w h -
spelling of the ordinal numbers. Point out that all other
ordinal numbers end in -th and that the short forms of questions
the numbers are written in this way: 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, etc.
Remind them that numbers starting at 21 (e.g. 21st, 22nd)
follow the same pattern. 04 See the Student's Book for the audio script.
• Ask the students to do the exercise individually and Have the students look at the picture, and ask some
then compare their answers in pairs. Check the answers questions about it (e.g. Where are the people?).
with the class. Establish the fact that they are in a store, and the man
(Jordan) is possibly buying a cell phone, etc.
Ask the students to read through items 1 and 2 about
Extra: -teen or -ty the conversation carefully before you play the audio.
Some learners find it difficult to distinguish between Play the audio once, and check progress. If necessary,
13th and 30th, 14th and 40th, 15th and 50th, etc. This is a play it again.
question of both hearing the difference and producing Ask the students to compare their answers in pairs. Then
the difference. Draw the students' attention to the check the answers with the class.
fact that the stress is on the last syllable in numbers
ending in -teen, and on the first syllable in numbers
ending in -ty. Have the students repeat several pairs of Alternative
numbers until they can produce the correct stress (e.g. After checking the answers, have the students practice
thirteenth and thirtieth, fourteenth and fortieth, etc.). the conversation in pairs, first with the original
information, and then adding their own information.
B
• Briefly review the months of the year. Write the first
letters on the board (e.g. J, F, M) and elicit the words NOTICE!
from the class. Ask the students to spell the words. • Ask the students to read the first instruction and
• Before you ask the students to do this exercise, draw underline examples of these words in the text.
their attention to the How to say it box. Remind them • Ask them to read the second statement and two
that we use ordinal numbers when we say dates (e.g. possible answers. Then they read the text and
January twenty-second, June twelfth). We use the choose the correct answer.
definite article the when we say the day of the month
only (e.g. Today is the twenty-second). When we write
dates, we usually use ordinal numbers, and digits rather
than words (e.g. January 22).
• Ask the students to do the exercise individually and then
to compare their answers in pairs. Check the answers
with the class.

Nice to meet you! U N IT I T14


• When thè students finish, elicit answers from a few
• Ask the students what question words (words that begin students (e.g. Adam has a birthday in August. Laura is
questions) they know in English. Elicit some examples from another town. She is from ...).
from the class. How and what are question words that
have already appeared earlier in the unit. If the students
have trouble, write____ is your name? and_____ old are
you? on the board to help them.
Form
• Ask the students to read the two statements. Then have
them read the conversation in Ex. A again and circle
options in the statements that make them correct.
Function • A
• Draw the students' attention to the grammar table, and . H 05 Read the instructions aloud. Check that
emphasize that we use what to ask about things. the students understand what voicemail is. Emphasize
• Ask them to look at the middle column of the grammar that it's a short message that people leave on your
table. Tell them they need to find the question words telephone when you are out or cannot answer. Ask
we use to ask about the other categories (places, dates, them what kind of information they normally hear in
age). Make sure the students know the meaning of each a voicemail message (e.g. name o f caller, who the
word. Refer them to the conversation in Ex. A to find message is for, a phone number to call back, an address
the underlined question words and complete the first where to meet, a brief message, etc.).
column of the grammar table. • Give the students time to read the questions and the
• Check the answers to items 2-4 with the class. Then ask possible answers.
the students to complete the examples items 5-8. • Play the audio once, and check progress. If necessary,
• Elicit the answers, and then have the students repeat play it again. Check the answers with the class.
the questions chorally.
• Highlight that in items 5 and 7 we can use either the Audio script_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
full form or the contracted form. Emphasize that the Hi. This is Carla. Where are you? Anyway, listen—it's my
contracted form is normally used in conversation. birthday soon! It's on August 18. Come to my party! It's at the
Clinton Club. That's C-L-l-N-T-O-N. It's downtown. The party is
at nine. Call me, OK? Bye.
• Have the students read the answers either silently or
aloud. Make sure they understand that they should think B
of questions that would precede the answers. • Read the instructions aloud. Make sure the students
• Have the students complete the exercise individually or understand the two roles.
in pairs. Then check the answers with the class. • Give the students two or three minutes to work
individually and make some notes. Remind them that
the three key facts they need to talk about are the date
Extra: grammar practice (their birthday), the time of the party, and the place
Write the following fill-in questions on the board. (which could be their home address or someplace
1 ______ she from? downtown).
2 ______ his birthday?
3 ______ her sister's name?
4 ______o ld _______ he? Alternative
5 ______o ld _______ your brother? Before the students do the role-play, give them one
Put the students in pairs and ask them to complete the or two examples of your own. Have them listen while
questions using the correct question words and the you role-play leaving a voicemail message about your
correct form of be. Check the answers with the class. own birthday party. Then ask them for the date, place,
and time.
Answers
1 Where is she from? 4 How old is he? • Put the students in pairs to complete the role-play.
2 When's his birthday? 5 How old is your brother? • After they have switched roles and done the exercise
3 What's her sister's name? a second time, invite a few pairs to present their
voicemails to the class. Correct any errors in dates
and times.
D
• Ask the students to look at the information in the left-
hand column of the table. Check that they know what
questions they need to use to complete the exercise.
• Prompt the students to circulate, asking and answering
Workbook
p. 8, Listen and write
p. 9, Down time
o5
the questions. When they find someone who meets the
requirements in the first column, the students should
write that student's name in the second column.
B ANALYZE Read the conversation in Exercise A again.

Form (Circleythe correct answers below.


Wh- question words and phrases come (i)(at the beginning)/ at the end of a question.
Then, we put (2{the verb be)/ the subject of the sentence.

Function Com plete the table with words from the conversation.
—* Question word Function Example

(1 ) what things (5) your name? What's

** (2) where places (6) you from? Where are

(3)
when dates (7) your birthday? When
how old someone's age (8) you? How old are
(4)
- 1
_ 1 c PRACTICE Read these answers. Write questions.
1 A What's'your last name? B: My last name is Alvarez.
How old are you 9
2 A B: I'm 21. And you?
When's your birthday 9
3 A B: September 8th.
Where are you from 9
4 A B: I'm from Argentina. What about you?
How old is your brother 9
B: My brother? He's 30 years old.
5 A
w What's his (your brother's) name 9
6 A B: His name is George.

D 33 NOW YOU DO IT Ask your classmates questions from Exercise C


and complete this table.
-h é Find someone ... Name

with a birthday in the same month as yours,

from another town or country.

with a last name beginning with the same letter as yours.

9 IS T E N IN C to a voicemail message
A fifl05 Listen to the voicemail
m essage.(^hd^the correct option
to complete the sentences.
1 The message is from . ______
a) Laura, b) Paula. (gTCarla^)
2 Her birthday is on A u g u st...
a) 8th. 0 28th.
3 Her party is at the ... Club.
(^ Clinton) b) Klinton c) Clintern
The,party u on
4 Her party is at ... o'clock,
I t ’s a t
a) five (b) n in e} c) seven
Be, there, at

B 31 Work in pairs. Follow the instructions below.


• Student A, it's your birthday! Think about the date, location,
and time of your party. Call your friend and leave a message.
• Student B, listen to the message and write the details.
• When you finish, switch roles.

Nice to meet you! UNIT 1 15


UNDERSTANDINGFORMS
• Identify the type of form.
• Complete the parts you understand.
• Ask for help with parts you don't understand.

A W here do you complete forms in English?


Match the phrases to the correct picture.
a) at a hotel [T] c) on a website [¿]
b) at the airport [4] d)at a language institute [7]

B B13o 6 Read these forms.(^irclg)the correct type of form.


Then listen and complete the missing information.

Adelphi Palace Tel: (858) 349-8629

1404 Park View Fax: (858) 202-9998

San Diego, California 93209-8568 Email: parkview@californianet.com

Full Name Y ou refM u ku a xl Smoking room

Date of Birth 5/1 2 /9 0 Nonsmoking room

Date of Arrival J m a 17 Single room

Date of Departure Jun e 21 Double room

This is a(hotel registration form)/ a library application form.

MAKE A PAYMENT
Full Name Card type
Yousef Mahuad VISA

Email address Card number


yousefml990@mymail.com 4972334333217174

Expiration date Security code


12/31/2018 624

2 This is a library registration form /(a credit card paym ent f o r r r r j


LifeSkills: understanding forms Audio script ____________________________
1
Step 1 Identify the type of form. (Ex. A, Ex. B)
H = Hotel clerk, Y = Yousef
Step 2 Complete the parts you understand. (Ex. C)
H: Thank you, Mr. Mahuad. Oh, what's your departure date?
Step 3 Ask for help with parts you don't understand. (Ex. D)
Y: Departure date?
Lead-in H: The day you leave the hotel.
Y: Oh, June 21.
M • Point out that this lifeSkills section has a Self and
H: That's fi ne. Thank you.
Society focus. Highlight the importance of being able
to understand and fill out forms. Ask the students how 2
often they do this in their everyday lives. Y = Yousef, W = Woman
Ask the students to look back through the unit and find Y: I'm sorry. Can you help me with this?
an example of an exercise where they filled out a form W: Sure. What's the problem?
(Writing: completing an online registration form). Y: What is the security code?
Elicit a variety of forms that we fill out (e.g. (online) W: It's a number on the back of your card. Here.
registration forms, application for a driver's license, Y: Oh, yes. 624. Thank you very much.
application for a new passport, etc.). W: You're welcome.
Motivate the students by telling them that they will learn
how to identify different kinds of forms and the personal
information they need to give.
Explain that they will practice completing the parts of
the form that they understand and will learn how to ask
for help with the sections they don't understand.

-4 A
• Have the students look at the four pictures and match
the phrases to them.
• Check the answers with the class.

B
• H 06 Have the students read the sentences below
the forms and choose the correct option.
• Have the students compare their answers in pairs. Then
■** check the answers with the class.
• Ask the students which words helped them to decide on
their answers. Ask if any of these words are cognates or
loan words in their language.
• Before you play the audio, ask the students to locate
the sections in the two forms that need to be completed
(item 1: Date of Departure; item 2: Security code).
• Play the audio. Check progress. If necessary, play it
again. Check the answers with the class.

Nice to meet you! UNIT 1 T16


c
• Before you ask the students to begin the exercise, Extra: homework
draw their attention to the expressions in the H o w
to sa y it box in Ex. D. Explain that put means write
If you have a copy of a simple internet form in English,
in this context. Tell the students that they should use make photocopies and ask the students to fill out a
the expressions if they need help filling out the form. copy of the form with their own information.
Encourage them to ask each other for help before
asking you.
• Explain that this is an immigration form for the U.K. R EFLECT
and that students don't need to complete all of this
information, only the items indicated in the rubric. • Ask the students to read the R e f le c t question.
• Give them some time to think about different situations
• Put the students in pairs, and encourage them to ask
in the domains of Work and Career and Study and
each other questions to check the information on their
Learning where the skill of Understanding forms would
partner's form. If necessary, demonstrate this exercise
be useful.
by taking a student's form and asking them to spell out
• Elicit the following ideas: applying for a job, completing
their family name (last name), their first name, etc.
a work experience form, filling in a payment form;
registering for a class, applying for a library card, filling
out online forms to access learning materials, etc.
• Put the students in pairs. Ask one person to role-play a
visitor and the other to role-play an immigration officer.
Remind them to use some of the questions they learned
earlier in this unit (e.g. What's your first name?, Where
are you from?, etc.) and to use the expressions in the
H o w to s a y it box.
• Model the exercise by asking a student the questions
and having them give you the answers. Circulate and
monitor, assisting where needed.
• Tell the students to ignore items 1.1,1.3, and 1.10. The
students may not know their passport number, so tell
them to invent one. They will also need to invent an
address in the U.K.—number, street, city, postcode (zip
code)—and a date when they moved there. Be prepared
to give help with this, if necessary.
• Check that the students were able to complete the
form, and explain any remaining unknown terms
before you move on. Encourage them to ask you for
clarification in English.
C Look at this United Kingdom immigration form.
Complete the information in items 1.4-1.6 and 1.11.

HomeOffice
UK Border
Agency
Section 1: Personal Information
1.1 Please give previous Immigration and Nationality Directorate or Border and < \
Immigration Agency or UK Border Agency reference numbers [______________________________j

1.2 Current passport/travel document number [ j


1.3 Please say when you were given indefinite leave to enter/remain in the UK (not necessary if you are a Commonwealth
I----1------------ 1-------------1----1----1---- 1 citizen with right of abode in the United Kingdom). If you are an EEA
| \ \ , E M j j | I national, a Swiss national or a family member of an EEA or Swiss
D D m m Y Y Y Y national you should read pages 8-10 of the Booklet AN.

1.4 ✓ T itle Mr □ Mrs Q Miss Q ] Ms Q ] Other Title >• [ ~~|


1.5 Surname/Family Name (Please note: The name you give here will be the name shown on your certificate so
please ensure it is spelt correctly and you have written it in the correct order.)
------ -——■
—■—*—■
—•—•—>—i—i—i—i—i—i—i—i—i—i—i—r
i I i i i i i i i i i i i .....................................................................................
6 Other names (Please note: Your name will be shown on your certificate so please ensure it is spelt correctly and you
have written it in the correct order. We would expect this to be the same as on your official documents. If this name is not
the name used on your current passport or travel document, or is spelt differently, you must explain why on page 13)
* ■ ■ ■ 1 1 ' ' i i— i i—i i— i— i—i— |— |—|— |—|— r
H
1.7 Name at birth if different from above. (If the names you have given are different or spelt differently from the name
shown on your passport, please explain why on page 13) ______ — .— .— ,— ,— ,— r

names apart from those mentioned above, please give details here.
1.8 If you are or have ever been known by any name or

1.10 National Insurance Number I | |

1.11 Date of birth r r w " n


D D M M
1.12 Village or town or city of birth Q

1.13 Country of birth I I I I I I


1.14 Sex (Please tick (✓ ) appropriate box) □ □
1.15 Current marital / civil partnership status (Please tick (✓ ) one box only)
Are you: Married? EE In a civil partnership? EE
Divorced? Q Widowed? Q Civil partnership dissolved? Q

Legally separated? E ll Single/Never married? EE


1.16 Present address You must give us any change of address in writing while we are considering this application.

Postcode [

Please state the date that you moved into this address

Work in pairs. Role-play D D M M Y Y Y Y

Contact Details
asking each other questions about D aytim e/m obile tele p h o n e n u m b e r , | | | || || | [ | [ | | | | | [ | | | | |] |

the other information on the form. E ven ing tele p h o n e n u m b e r | | | | | I l II I I I I I I l I I l I l I I I T 1


e-mai,address m i n i m i i 11 n i t r..n i i m m ii i
H O W T O SA Y IT
Asking for help with forms
Excuse me.
Can you help me, please?
R EFLECT...
What does ... mean?
What do I put here? How can the skill of understanding
forms be useful to you in Work and
Can you please tell me w hat... means?
Career and Study and Learning?

Nice to meet you! UNIT 1 17


Language wrap-up
1 VOCABULARY
A Complete these conversations with words in the box. (5 points)
help repeat say slowly spell

1 A: Can you me? This Is very difficult. B: Yes, of course.


2 A: How do you that in English? B: You say, "Excuse me."
3 A: Can you speak more slowly please? B: Yes, I'm sorry.
4 A: How do you spe^ your name? b =It's P-E-N-E-L-O-P-E.
5 A: Sorry, can you repeat that, please? B: Yes. P-E-N-E-L-O-P-E.

B Complete the sentences with the ordinal numbers for the words in parentheses. (5 points)
1 Today is August ^ rc^. (twenty-third)
2 Tomorrow is December . (fourteenth)
4 .L j

3 July In is American Independence Day. (fourth)


4 On January 1st , people in the U.S.A. celebrate New Year's Day. (first)
5 Wednesday is May 2ncl . (second)

8-10 correct: I can ask useful questions and use ordinal numbers.
0-7 correct: Look again at Sections 3 and 7 on pages 11 and 14.
SCORE: /10

2 GRAMMAR
Megan is from the U.S. She is introducing herself to a new friend in Argentina.
Read her email.(0irclg)the correct options. (10 points)

8-10 correct: I can use be in statements and ask wh- questions to get information about people.
0-7 correct: Look again at Sections 4 and 8 on pages 12 and 14.
SCORE: /10
Language wrap-up 1 Vocabulary
Students can do the Language wrap-up exercises in A
class or for homework. If you give them for homework, Encourage the students to read through both parts of the
remember to check the exercises at the beginning of the conversations before they choose the correct word for
next class, or collect a few to grade and identify any typical each one.
errors.
If you decide to do the exercises in class, you can B
approach the wrap-up as a two-step reviewing procedure. Remind the students that they need to write the digits,
First, ask the students to do the Vocabulary section not words, for the numbers in the blanks.
individually. When ready, encourage the students to check
their answers carefully, and then put them in pairs to
compare answers and discuss any differences. Self- and
peer-correction are two excellent ways of developing July 4th is an important date in the U.S.A. because it
learner independence and creating a cooperative learning marks the anniversary of the signing of the Declaration
environment. After completing the Vocabulary section, you of Independence by the colonists from Great Britain.
can apply the same procedure to the Grammar section. People usually celebrate this day with parades and
At the end of each section, make sure that the students fireworks displays in public places.
write their score out of ten. If they have a score lower
than eight, direct them to the appropriate sections of the 2 Grammar
unit, and encourage them to read those sections again for • Ask the students to read the entire email first.
homework. After that, ask the students to complete the • Point out that there may be a few cognates. Check that
exerdse(s) again at home. they understand the word friend.
• Have the students read the email again and circle the
correct options. Check answers with the class.

Common European Framework: unit map


-* Unit 1 Com petence developed C E F Reference (A1)

Sé 1 Writing can give basic personal information Table 1; Table 2; Section 4.4.1.2;
Section 5.2.1.6
2 Reading can recognize cognates and use them to give basic Table 1; Table 2; Section 4.4.2.2
Sè personal information
3 Vocabulary can request clarification and assistance Table 1; Table 2; Section 4.4.3.1;
Section 5.2.1.1
4 Grammar can use be in statements and questions Table 1; Table 2; Sections 5.2.1.2;
SS 6.4.77; 6.47.8
Sé 5 Pronunciation can understand and say the letters of the alphabet Section 5.2.1.4
6 Speaking can use polite language when requesting factual Table 1; Table 2; Section 4.4.3.1 ;

information Section 5.2.3.2
ss
7 Vocabulary can understand and use ordinal numbers Section 4.4.3.1
8 Grammar can understand and use information questions with be Table 1; Table 2; Sections 5.2.1.2;
ss 6.4.77; 6.47.8
9 Listening can listen for simple specific information Table 1; Table 2; Section 4.4.2.1;

Nice to meet you! U N IT I T18


The expression What do you do? is the question to ask what someone's job is. it is a short
version of What do you do for a living?

Reading: a celebrity biography


Unit plan ^ Ask the students if they are interested in the lives of
famous people (e.g. where and when they were born). Ask
Unit opener (p. 19) 10 min. them to look though the unit and find out which famous
people they will read about in this unit.
• OptionaJ downloadable unit opener 10 min.
Speaking: talking about family
1 Vocabulary: occupations (p. 20) 25 min.
Ask the students to stand up and walk around the class,
2 Pronunciation: two-syllable nouns (p. 21) 15 min. asking the question How many brothers and sisters do you
3 Grammar: articles (p. 21) 40 min. have? When they find someone who has the same number
4 Vocabulary: family members (p. 22) 25 min. of brothers and sisters as they do, they should ask how old
5 Listening: for specific information (p. 22) 30 min. the brothers and sisters are.
6 Reading: a celebrity biography (p. 23) 30 min. Refer the students to the HfeSkills panel. Tell them that
7 Writing: understanding the mechanics (p. 23) 30 min. the topic of this unit's lifeSkills section is Categorizing. Play
8 Grammar: possession (p. 24) 40 min. a game of Categories. One person names a category of
9 Speaking: talking about family (p. 25) 20 min. things (e.g. objects beginning with "c"; animals; countries).
• Optional downloadable Speaking 20 min. One by one, in order around the class, everyone then has
to name something in that category (e.g. chair, coffee). If a
workshop: talking about family
student can't think of a word in that category, they are out
lifeSkills: categorizing (Work and Career) (p. 26) 45 min.
of the game. The last person in the game is the winner.
• Optional downloadable lifeSkills 45 min.
lesson (Self and Society) A
• Optional downloadable lifeSkills 45 min. • Highlight the unit title question and the fact that we use
lesson (Study and Learning) this question to ask what someone's job is. We use the
Language wrap-up (p. 28) 15 min word occupation in official forms to ask this question.
Communicative wrap-up Units 1-2 (p. 130) 20 min. • Ask the students to identify the three famous people
Video and downloadable video worksheet 45 min. in the pictures (John Travolta, Beyonce, Woody Allen).
Write the celebrities' names on the board.
• Ask the students to work individually to match the
people to their main occupations. Note that the students
probably know Beyonce as both a singer and an actress.
Unit opener Remind them to choose each person's main occupation.
• Ask the students to compare their answers in pairs. Then
Lead-in check the answers with the class. Encourage the students
to make full sentences when giving their answers (e.g.
Direct the students' attention to the objectives in the unit
Beyonce is a singer; Woody Allen is a movie director.).
menu and go through the information with them. Explain
that this unit focuses on language to do with family and
occupations, and on the following skills to help them talk
B
about these topics: • Tell the students that all three of these people have
Listening: for specific information another occupation or activity that they do. Ask them
Ask the students what personal information people to guess what these occupations could be (e.g. Maybe
give when they give information about themselves. Beyonce is an artist.). Listen to their suggestions, and
Elicit examples such as name, date o f birth, nationality, write any new occupations on the board (e.g. doctor,
hometown, likes and dislikes, etc. teacher, writer).
Writing: understanding the mechanics • Put the students in pairs to do the exercise. You may
Write a capital "A" and a small "a" on the board. Elicit need to check the students' understanding of clothing
capital letter. Ask the students what words begin with designer. You could either use an explanation (someone
capital letters in their language. Elicit examples (e.g. who has ideas for new or different clothes) or give some
names, names o f countries, names o f cities). Highlight any famous examples of clothing designers (e.g. Yves Saint
differences between their language and English (e.g. In Laurent, Ralph Lauren, Tommy Hilfiger, etc.).
English, words for languages begin with a capital letter, for • When the students finish, check the answers with the class.
example, Spanish, Portuguese, Chinese.).
UNIT 2
IN THIS UNIT YOU
0 learn language to talk about your A Match these famous
family and occupations people 1-3 to their main
listen to a conversation about profession A-C.
! occupations— listening for specific
information
learn to use punctuation correctly
i in sentences— understanding the
mechanics
read about a famous person's
occupation and family
talk about your family and their
occupations
1 V O C A B U L A R Y : occupations
A Match the occupations to the pictures.
1 G taxi driver 6 A soldier
2 E teacher 7_ F doctor
3 I actor 8_ C engineer
4 ~H firefighter 9 _ ~J lawyer
5 D police officer 10 _ 6 writer

B Which of these occupations are dangerous?


Number the red boxes from 1 (very dangerous) to 10 (not dangerous).

C Q S Work in pairs. Compare your choices. Do you agree or disagree?


A: M y num ber one is ...
B: / agree.

D 0 N ow number the blue boxes from 1 (very interesting) to 10


(not interesting). Then work in pairs and compare your choices.
c
• Focus on the use of I agree when you have the same
opinion as another person and I disagree when you
Lead-in have a different opinion. Point out that the stress in
Elicit any occupations that the students already know agree is on the second syllable, while the stress in
and write them on the board. The students will probably disagree is on the first syllable: / agree. I disagree. Ask
know some cognates, such as student, doctor, computer the students to repeat each phrase chorally with the
programmer, as well as basic terms, such as teacher. correct stress. Encourage them to use these phrases
when comparing their choices.
• Ask one or two pairs of students to model the exercise
Culture note (e.g. A: My number four is a teacher. Being a teacher is
The English word professor is a false cognate in dangerous. B: I disagree. I don't think it's dangerous.).
-i* some languages—in English, a professor works in a • Ask the students to work in pairs. Circulate and monitor,
university or college department, and does not work assisting where needed. Remind them to use English
rrf
in a high school. People who work in schools are and the phrases / agree / / disagree.
called teachers. • When the students have compared their choices, elicit
some ideas from the class.
• Take a class vote to find out the students' opinions on
the top three most dangerous jobs.
• Draw the students' attention to the pictures and the list
of occupations. D
• Ask the students to work individually to match the • Tell the students that now they are going to give their
occupations to the correct picture. Make sure the opinions on the most (and least) interesting jobs. Make
students use the blanks next to the numbers, and not sure the students understand that this time they should
the check boxes. write the numbers in the blue boxes next to each
• Ask the students to compare their answers in pairs. Then picture.
check the answers with the class. • Give the students time to complete the exercise
• Do some choral repetition of the occupations. individually. Then put them in pairs to compare their
• Remind the students that some of the words might be answers again, practicing / agree / I disagree again.
r-* cognates or loan words, but emphasize that while they When they finish, elicit some of their ideas. Find out
may recognize the meaning of the word, they need to which occupations they think are very interesting (1) and
pay close attention to its pronunciation in English, as it which they think are not interesting at all (10).
is likely to be different. • Encourage the students to give reasons why they
think the jobs are interesting or not interesting (e.g. A
taxi driver meets lots of people.) To wrap up, ask the
• Check that the students understand the word , class to give their opinions of other jobs they think are
dangerous. Give an example of a dangerous activity interesting.
(e.g. driving very fast, touching electrical wires). Check
that they understand the idea of ranking items from 1
to 10 (in this case from 1 for very dangerous to 10 for Extra: occupations race
not dangerous) by asking them to name a profession Put the students in teams. Tell them that they will
they think is very dangerous (1) and one they think is not have two minutes to think of as many jobs in English
dangerous at all (10). as they can. After one minute, have the groups share
• Ask the students to do the exercise individually. Make their lists. Teams get one point for each original word
sure they write the numbers in the red boxes only. (a word not appearing on another team's list). The
• Circulate and monitor, assisting where needed. team with the most points wins.

Workbook p. 10, Section

What do you do? UNIT 2 T20


2 Pronunciation: two-syllable NOTICE!
nouns • Check that the students understand the terms
verb, adjective, and noun. Write an example of
Lead-in each on the board (e.g. speak, big, student). Ask
Write the words English and student on the board. Ask the the students to match the words to the correct
students how many syllables each word has (two). Ask the grammatical terms.
students to repeat the words chorally, and ask them whether • Ask them to circle examples of a, an, and the in
the stress is on the first or the second syllable in each word the text.
(first). • Ask them to read the question and choose the
correct answer.

07 See the Student's Book for the audio script.


Play the audio once, and ask the students to listen only, B
with their books closed. Then ask them to tell you which
Form
syllable is stressed in each word (the first).
Ask the students to open their books and draw their • Ask the students to look at the table and give you an
attention to the stressed (underlined) syllables. Then example of each type of article from the text in Ex. A
play the audio again, and ask the students to repeat the (zero: musicians; indefinite: a law firm; definite: the
words with the correct stress. Emphasize that the stress government).
is on the first syllable. Function
Note that many learners find the pronunciation of lawyer
• Ask the students to read the statements. Remind them
/'bjar/ challenging. You may need to ask the students to
that they can refer to the text in Ex. A to find the answers.
repeat this word several times.
• When checking answers, highlight that the indefinite
article a is usually pronounced with the schwa sound /a/.
B
. H 08 See the Student's Book for the audio script. c
• Before you ask the students to work in pairs, give them • Draw the students' attention to the Watch out! box
time to practice saying the words individually. and ask them to identify the error. Emphasize that with
• Put the students in pairs, and have them take turns occupations, we always use a or an in English.
saying the words. Encourage them to listen to their • Remind the students that when they see a noun in the
partner's pronunciation and make sure that the first plural form, it will never have the indefinite article a/an.
syllable is stressed. • Ask the students to do this exercise individually.
• When the students finish, play the audio, and ask them • Circulate and monitor, assisting where needed. When
to repeat the words chorally. the students finish, ask them to compare answers in
pairs.
• Go through the answers and encourage the students to
say which rule each sentence exemplifies.
3 Grammar: artic
D
Lead-in • Elicit the question we use to ask about someone's job
Ask the students What do I do? They may say *You What does he/she do?, and write it on the board.
are teacher. If they say this, say, I'm a teacher, without • Elicit the affirmative forms of the verb be, and
stressing a, and tell them that in English we use the encourage the students to use them correctly in this
indefinite article before occupations. Check articles by exercise. Remind them of the negative form if they
gesturing to a book and the board, and saying a book disagree with their partner.
(indefinite), and the board {definite). • Hold up the Student's Book and point to a picture on
p. 20 to use as an example. Ask individual students
A What does he/she do? Elicit the answers He's a/an ...;
• Give the students time to read the texts individually. She's a/an ...
Then elicit the people's jobs from the class. Ask What • Point to' the picture of the actors, and write on the board
does Ed do?, and ask the students to answer with full What____ do? Ask the students to tell you the missing
sentences (e.g. Ed's/He's a lawyer.). words in the question (do, they). Elicit the answer
• Ask individual students What do you do?, and ask them They're actors from the class.
to respond, making sure they use the indefinite article • Ask the students to ask and answer the questions about
(e.g. I'm a doctor, I'm a student, etc.). the remaining pictures in pairs. Circulate and monitor,
assisting where needed. Correct any errors with articles.
• Check the answers with the class.

Workbook pp. 10-11, Section


2 two-syllable nouns
A E^07 Listen to the words. Notice that the first syllable in each word
is stressed.
doctor teacher lawyer

B 0 H J 0 8 Work in pairs. Practice saying these words. Make sure you


stress the correct syllable. Listen and check.
singer driver writer actor soldier dancer

3 3RAMMAR: articles I'm John and this is Carol. W e're musicians. I'm a
pianist, and she's a singer. We're in a band called
White Nights. The band is fun, but hard work!
A LANGUAGE IN CONTEXT Read
Our next concert is at the Olympic® Park in Sydney!
these texts. W hat job or jobs does
each person do?

W h a t d o . Q
i y o u d o

Hi. I'm Ed. I'm a lawyer. I work for a law firm.


The law firm is called Accident Lawyers. When
someone has an accident, we help. We also do
a lot of work for the government. I love my job.

B ANALYZE Look at the texts in Exercise A again.


NOTICE!
Form (&irclg)the words a, an, or t h e in the
texts. What words come after them?
zero article (no article)
a) verbs b) adjectives
indefinite article a/an

definite article the

Function Choose the correct option to complete the sentences.

1 We use a before ... 4 We use a the first time we mention something,


r^^sTngular nounsj> b) plural nouns. and th en we use ...
2 W e use an before singular nouns that begin with ... a) an. ( b) th e?)

(^ayvowel so u n d s b) a consonant. 5 W e use ... before a thing, place, or organization


3 We use ... before plural nouns for general reference, when there is only one of them.
a) the CgTno (zero) articT^> a) a (b) The)

C PRACTICE Complete the sentences with a, an, the, or — (no article).


1 Jam es is a soldier. 6 Are you singer?
2 Wayne and Dave are _ .I_ teachers. 7 Richard works in a hospital. What's the
3 I want to be an artist. hospital called?
4 I'm in a band. band is called Love Hurts. 8 Harry's a doctor in t^ie army.
5 Lauren and I are ~ musicians.

D Q j NOW YOU DO IT Work in pairs. Ask and answer questions


WATCH OUT!
My mother is a teacher,
about the people in the pictures in Exercise A on page 20.
(g) My mother is teacher.
A: What d o e s he d o ? B: He's a . . .

W hat do you do? UNIT 2 2l


□ family members
A Look at this picture. Say what Joshua, Katy, Greg, Lisa, and Bob do.

Joshua Katy Greg Lisa Bob Martha Steve

1 boyfriend 2 brother 3 HWHV dad 6 grandma 7 grandpa


I___ __ I
4 parents

B §||09 Listen to Katy and write the correct word in the box under
each name in Exercise A.

boyfriend brother dad grandma grandpa mom parents

C Ü 10 Listen and match.


1 parents a) sister
2 brother b) girlfriend
3 mom and dad c) grandchildren
4 boyfriend d) children
5 grandparents e) husband
6 wife f) son and daughter

5 for specific information


o Read the task before you listen. Think about what information you need.
For example, is it a name or a place? Listen carefully for this information.

A Read these statements about Rachel.


(0 rcle)the correct type of missing information.
1 Rachel is a teacher . ___________
The missing information is(^eroccupatiop)/ her full name.
2 Her job is very difficult
The missing information is a noun /<|n~adjective^
3 Her day usually starts at eight cTHocfc
The missing information is name /(a^timeh
4 Her husband ¡s a fjrefighter.
The missing information is a place /(¡ffarriily member)

B Q^11 Listen and complete the sentences in


Exercise A with one word.

C 12 Listen to this conversation between


Rachel and a friend. Complete the sentences.
1 Rachel's friend is a lawyer
2 She works in an office
3 She thinks her job is very interesting
4 Her sister is a doctor
Lead-in
Ask the students what words they know for family Lead-in
members. Write the words on the board, and ask the Ask the students to read the information in the skills panel.
students to repeat them. Point out that the stress is on the Explain that it is important to know exactly what to listen
first syllable in these words. for and to predict the kind of information we will hear. This
skill is essential for effective listening.
A
• Ask the students to work individually and decide what A
jobs the five people do. • Ask the students to read the sentences and the options
• Encourage'them to compare their answers in pairs. Then in italics. Make sure that they understand the different
check the answers with the class. options for each item, particularly the difference
• Prompt the students to answer with full sentences, and between an adjective (a describing word) and a noun (a
make sure that they remember to use the indefinite naming word).
article before the job. • Ask the students to choose their options. Then check
each item with the class, asking the students how they
know what type of information is missing.

B
Ask the students to look at the picture and
try to guess the woman's occupation.
• Tell the students that they will hear the woman, Rachel,
talking about her job.
B • Play the audio once, and ask the students to fill in the
blanks.
• H 09 Ask the students to work in pairs and predict
• Check the students' progress, and, if necessary, play the
which words in the box could match to the people in the
audio again. Ask the students to compare answers in
picture.
pairs. Then check the answers with the class.
• Tell the students to listen to the audio and find out if their
guesses are correct. Play the audio once. Check progress,
and play the audio again if necessary.
Audio script
My name is Rachel Wiseman, and I'm a teacher. I work in a
Audio script large high school. My job is very difficult, but I love it. I work
, from Monday to Friday. My day usually starts at eight o'clock.
Hi. I'm Katy. I'm a doctor. Greg is my brother. He's a firefighter.
I leave school at three o'clock, and then I work at home. My
Here are my parents, Lisa and Bob. My mom, Lisa, is a teacher,
husband has a difficult job, too. He's a firefighter.
and my dad, Bob, is a taxi driver. His mom is Martha. She's my
grandma. And Steve is my grandpa. That's my family! And here
is my boyfriend, Joshua. He's a police officer.
12 Go over the questions, and check that the
C students know what they are listening for in each case,
(a job, a place, an adjective, and a job).
10 Before you play the audio, ask the students
• Play the audio once. Check progress, and, if necessary,
to work in pairs to match the words. Make sure the
play it again. Ask the students to compare answers in
students understand that they should match the family
pairs. Then check the answers with the class.
words that go together and not look for words that
mean the same thing. Point out the example: parents—
children.
Audio script_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
• Play the audio so that the students can check their R = Rachel, L = Lisa
predictions. Check the answers with the class. R Hi, Lisa! How are you?
L I'm great, Rachel. Good to see you!
Audio script R You, too! What do you do now?
L Well, I'm a lawyer.
1 Lisa and Bob are my parents. Greg and I are their children.
R Wow! Really?
2 Greg is my brother. I'm his sister.
L Yes. I work in an office. It's not far from here.
3 Lisa's my mom, and Bob is my dad. I am their daughter, and
R Do you like your job?
Greg is their son.
L It's very interesting.
4 Joshua is my boyfriend. I am his girlfriend.
R And what about your sister, Jane?
5 Martha and Steve are my grandparents. Greg and I are their
L Oh, she's fine. She's a doctor now.
grandchildren.
R: Fantastic! Let's meet for coffee some time.
6 Bob is my dad. Lisa is his wife. Bob is her husband.
L: Great idea!

Workboo
¡.• s a
What do you do? UNIT 2 T22
• Give the students time to read the question and think
about their answers individually.
• Put the students in groups to share their Ideas.
• When the groups finish their discussions, elicit some
A of their ideas. Find out if any students have parents,
• Read the instructions aloud. Ask the students if they grandparents, or other relatives who do the same job.
know any families of actors in their country (families • Draw the students' attention to the Watch out! box.
where father and son, mother and daughter, etc., are all Explain that although with most occupations the stress
actors, e.g. Henry Fonda and Jane Fonda, Kirk Douglas is on the first syllable, engineer is an exception, and the
and Michael Douglas). stress is on the last syllable.

Alternative
Ask the students if they know any other famous
families (not just acting families) or famous couples,
either in their country or around the world.
Lead-in
B • Ask the students to keep their books closed. Write your
name on the board with a small first letter instead of a
• Tell the students to read the questions carefully first. capital letter. Ask the class what the mistake is. Then ask
Check that they know the meaning of the word award—
them what other types of words need a capital letter.
there is a picture of one on p. 19, or you can simply give
Elicit examples from them, and write them on the board
the example of an Oscar®. (e.g. countries, days of the week, months).
• Highlight the word both in the text—tell the students we • Ask the students to read the information in the skills
use It to emphasize that two people do the same thing. panel. Although capitalization as a concept might be
• Give the students time to read the text individually, and familiar to your students, it might be used differently in
encourage them to ask questions about any unfamiliar their language (e.g. in some languages the days of the
vocabulary. week are not capitalized).

Alternative
• Check that the students understand that each sentence
Before the students answer the questions, elicit the type has one or more mistakes. There might be a capital
of information they are looking for in each question letter instead of a lower-case letter, or there might be a
(1 a place, 2 a job, 3 the names of awards). mistake with punctuation.
• Ask the students to do this exercise Individually and
• When the students have found the answers to the
then to compare answers in pairs.
questions, ask them to compare their answers in pairs.
• Ask them which category in the skills panel each
Check the answers with the class.
answer belongs to (e.g. Egypt—a country, English—a
language).
Extra: reading practice B
For extra reading practice, write these questions on
• Give the students time to read the questions.
the board: 1 What does Javier Bardem's mother do?
• Ask the students to do this exercise individually.
2 What's his uncle's name? 3 Where is Javier famous?
Explain that for item 4, they should give the person's
Answers relationship as well as his or her name. Circulate and
1 She's an actor. monitor, assisting where needed.
2 Juan Antonio Bardem • When they finish, elicit responses from several students.
3 In the Spanish-speaking world and the English-
speaking world
Extra: homework
Look at Ex. A again. Write five new sentences,
changing the country in item 1, the month in item 2,
Culture note the day in item 4, the language in item 5, and the
name in item 6.
The Oscars® are also known as the Academy Awards,
The first Oscar ceremony was held in 1929. The
movies Ben Hur, Titanic, and The Lord of the Rings:
The Return of the King hold the record for the most
Oscar awards— 11.
The Golden Globes® started in 1944. Meryl Streep
holds the record for the most Golden Globe awards.
She has won eight Golden Globes.
6 a celebrity biography
A Many actors come from acting families. Is this true in your country?
B Read this biography. Answer the questions.

SPANISH STAR IN
HOLLYWOOD
Javier Bardem is an actor from Spain. He com es
from an acting family. Some of his relatives are
actors. His mother (Pilar Bardem) is an actor,
and his uncle (Juan Antonio Bardem) was a
movie director. His brother Carlos and his
sister Monica are both actors.
A
Javier is famous in both the Spanish­
speaking world and the English-speaking
world. He has many awards, including an
Oscar® and a Golden G lobe for his role
in No Country for O ld Men.

1 Where is Javier Bardem from? de ,s ^rom Spain.


They are actors.
2 What do his brother and sister do?

3 What awards does Javier Bardem have? He has an ° scar and a Golden Globe award

C H I Work in groups. Do you know people who have


similar occupations to other members of their family?
WATCH OUT!
/ engineer
Think of as many as you can and compare.
djf) engineer
My sister, my dad, and my mom are engineers. W ÊÊSËÊÊÊiÊ ÊKSÊSÊiÊ

understanding the mechanics


Use a capital letter at the beginning of every sentence, and a period (.), exclamation
point (!), or question mark (?) at the end of every sentence. Also use capital letters
for the word /, for the names of people and places, for countries, nationalities, and
languages, and for months and days of the week.

nine mistakes in the sentences below.


0
1 My brother is in gypt. 4 I start my new job on0ednesday.
2 Today is0abruary 14. 5 How do you say this in0aglishQ
3 My sister andQare dentistsQ w old is your brother,0eter?

B Write sentences to answer these questions. Be careful with capital


letters and punctuation.

1 What do you do?


2 What day is it to d ay?______________________ ___ — --------------------

3 What month is it? ............

4 Who is your favorite relative?

What do you do? UNIT 2 23


8 3 R A M M Â R : possession
A LANGUAGE IN CONTEXT Read what this
person says and(0rcIg)T (true) or F (false).

Hi, Ijm Liam. Ii^on’t hav^)any brothers, but I(have)two sisters.


(Themnames areKatelyn and Jodie, and they’re very different!
Katelyn(fia^) brown hair, and(pei)eyes are bnownCjo d ie ^ eyes
are brown, too, but she<3oesn t ha^jbrown hair—(Kers)is
blond. Katelyn's a teacherTand sKe loves her job. Jodie’s a
manager.(^hosg)job is the best?(fclime)is! I’m a singer. I’m in a
band with some friends.(^u^band isn’t famous, and we(^on^
(fiavejmany songs, but who knows? Maybe one day ...
NOTICE!
1 Liam, Katelyn, and Jodie are relatives. (^irclg)all the ways of talking about
2 Katelyn and Jodie do the same job. T /(p) possession that you recognize in the
paragraph. What are they?
B ANALYZE Read the text in Exercise A again.
Form Com plete the tables.
Apostrophe for possession
Singular nouns Regular plural nouns
Add (1) s Add (2) ' after s
e.g. Jodie's eyes e.g. my sisters'jobs (= the jobs o f my sisters)
my sister's job (= the job o f my sister)
Irregular plural nouns
e.g. the children's rooms

Remember that's is also the contraction for is. WATCH OUT! I


Jo d ie 's a manager. = Jo d ie is a manager. NOT A m anager o f Jo d ie e> My sisters are both students.
Katelyn's a teacher. = Katelyn is a teacher. NOT A teacher o f Katelyn {££) My sisters are both student's.

whose
w h o s e + noun + verb
e.g. W hose jo b (3) __!L the b e st?

Possessive pronouns
I you he she we you they

mine yours his Ç8) herS ours yours theirs

e.g.
This is my baa. That is your bag. WATCH OUT!
This is mine. That is yours. ^ That pen is mine.
(££) That pen is my.
Function Match 1-3 and a-c to complete the sentences.
m tm m m m m m m
1 We use's o r ' after a noun to \ ^ a ) instead of a noun to talk about possession.
2 We use possessive pronouns_^S^--b)ask about possession.
3 We use w hose to •— " ^c) say who something belongs to.

C PRACTICE circle)the correct options.


1 M y(parent§j)/ parent's jobs are very interesting.
2 Who /(yyhosgtcell phone is this?
3 Is that(gyanjy Ryans-' laptop on the table?
4 Your book is over therm Thi$ one is my /(mine)
5 The Coen brother's / b ro th e r s )new movie is great.
6 Evan and Bill think our house is like them /(the ins?)
7 Whose(^ rotherJ^)/ is brother named Brian?
8 Those are all my family pictures. Now show me you /(yours.)
• Direct the students to the example sentences about
possessive pronouns. Remind the students that they
learned about possessive adjectives in the previous
Lead-in unit. Point out that in the first sentence, my and your are
Use some classroom objects to highlight possessives as possessive adjectives. In the second sentence, mine and
the language point. For example, This is my desk; This is yours are possessive pronouns. Explain that possessive
Liam's dictionary; This is her pen. adjectives are followed by nouns, but that possessive
pronouns substitute for possessive adjective + noun.
A Explain that in the examples, my bag = mine, and your
• Ask the students to read the statements. Then ask them bag = yours.
to read the text and circle T(true) or F (false). • Point out that his is the only example where the
• Ask them to compare their answers in pairs. Check the possessive adjective and the possessive pronoun are
answers with the class. the same.
• Ask the students to complete item 4 and item 5 in the
grammar table.
NOTICE! • Focus on the examples in the second Watch out! box
and highlight that we never use possessive adjectives
• Highlight that there are several ways of expressing
after the verb be.
possession.
• Ask the students to circle all the ways of talking Function
about possession in the text. Note: there are a total • Ask the students to match the sentence halves to
of 13 expressions. complete the rules for the functions of the different ways
of expressing possession.
• Ask them to check their answers with a partner. Check
B the answers with the class.

Form c
• First, ask the students to complete item 1 and item • Do the first sentence with the class as an example.
2 in the grammar table. As the students are working, • Ask the students to do the exercise individually.
draw the table on the board. When the students have • Ask the students to compare answers in pairs. Then
finished, ask for volunteers to write the correct answers check the answers by nominating students to write
on the board. their sentences on the board. Ask the class to help you
• Have the students look at the first Watch out! box. Tell correct any mistakes on the board.
them that this is a common mistake in English (often
made by native speakers). Encourage them to be careful
not to use the singular possessive's with plural nouns. Extra: grammar practice
• Highlight that there is a difference in the position of the Write these fill-in sentences on the board.
apostrophe with singular or plural nouns e.g. sister's or 1 She_______ have any brothers or sisters.
sisters'. 2 _______ you have a pet?
• Focus on the example of the irregular plural possessive. 3 _______ pen is this?
Point out that this example is common. 4 That book is yours. This one is _______ .
• Read the examples in the language box, and remind the Ask the students to work in pairs and find words to fill
students th a t's is also the contracted form of is. in the blanks. Check the answers with the class.
• Check that the students understand the meaning of
whose. Use classroom items to illustrate it (e.g. Whose
bag is this? It's Elena's. Whose book is that? It's Tom's.)
Answers
Have the students complete item 3 in the grammar 1 doesn't 3 Whose
table. Check the answer with the class. 2 Do 4 mine (his/hers)
• Make sure the students understand that possessive
pronouns can be used instead of nouns with apostrophe
's, (e.g. That's Suzie's bag. That bag is hers.).

Extra: is or possessive 's


To reinforce the difference between contracted's
and possessive's, write this sentence on the board:
Richard's sister's a student. Ask the students which's is
the contracted form of is and which is the possessive
(the first one is the possessive). Ask them to tell you
what helped them decide.

What do you do? UNIT 2 T24


• Tell the students to look at the pictures. Put the students Alternative
in pairs, and give them time to share any information Ask the students to keep their books closed. Write the
they know about the people in the pictures. two questions for the exercise on the board. Play the
• Ask a student to read aloud the example sentences. audio once, and ask the students to compare answers
• Ask the pairs to make as many sentences as they can in pairs. Then ask the students to open their books, and
using the possessive forms. Encourage them to write play the audio again so they can check their answers.
their sentences.
• Circulate and monitor, making sure that they are using
the possessive forms correctly.
Answers
• Invite volunteers to share their sentences with the
class, and correct any errors in the use of the 1 She's a teacher.
possessive forms. 2 She's a salesperson in a store.

Possible answers
Will Smith is an actor. His wife, Jada Pinkett Smith is an Extra: conversation practice
actor, too. They have two children. Ask the students to practice reading the conversation
Sofia's dad is a movie director. She has two children and in pairs. When they are comfortable, have them insert
a brother. Her brother's also a movie director. their own information about their family members.
Owen Wilson is an actor. His brother, Luke, is an actor, too.

B
• Draw a simple version of your family tree on the
Culture note board. Write the names of your husband/wife, parents,
Will Smith first became famous when he starred in the brothers, sisters, and children, but don't explain their
TV show The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air. He married Jada relationship to you. Ask the students to tell you the
Pinkett Smith in 1997. She has appeared in more than relationships of your family members to you (e.g.
20 movies, including three Madagascar movies and Teacher: Who is Francisco? Student: He is your father.
Europe's Most Wanted. Teacher: OK, then who is Patricia? Student: Patricia is
Sofia Coppola is an actor and director who won three your mother, etc.). As the students give you the correct
Golden Globes and an Oscar for Lost in Translation. answers, write the family vocabulary under the names.
Her father, Francis Ford Coppola, has directed • Ask the students to draw their own family tree on
numerous movies, including The Godfather and a sheet of paper, but only writing the names, not
Apocalypse Now. the relationships.
Owen Wilson has appeared in Shanghai Knights and • Ask them to work in pairs and ask and answer questions
Marley & Me. Luke Wilson has appeared in Legally in the same way (Who is Luisa?, etc.).
Blonde and The Wendell Baker Story.
c
• Ask the students to work in the same pairs. Point out the
Workbook pp. 12 model conversation, and give a few more examples by
asking questions (e.g. What's your brother's name? What
does he do?).
• When the pairs finish, invite several students to tell
9 Speaking: talking about
r .i ^ v;
you something about their partner's family (e.g. Maria's
father is a doctor.). Correct any errors in the use of
family possessives and the indefinite article.
• Draw the students' attention to the Watch out! box.
Emphasize that we do not say, *This is the sister of
A Lauren, or *This is the pen o f Maria in English.
. m 1 3 See the Student's Book for the audio script.
• Ask the students to look at the picture, and tell them
that they are going to hear these two friends talking
about the woman's family.
• Give the students time to read the questions carefully.
Workbook
p. 14, Read and write
p. 15, Down time
a-
• Play the audio once, and check progress. If necessary,
play it again.
• Check the answers with the class.
D q | NOW YOU DO IT Say what you know about these people. Say what
their relatives do. Work in pairs.

9 SPEAKING: talking about family


A afl 13 Listen to the conversation below.
Answer the questions.
Sam: So, tell me about your family.
Lauren: Well, my brother James is a mechanic.
Sam: And your sister?
Lauren: Nicole's a teacher.
Sam Are they married?
Lauren: Yes, my brother's wife is a taxi driver, and
Nicole's husband is a police officer.
Sam: What about your parents?
Lauren: Mom's a salesperson in a store, and
a lawyer. What about your family?
*4 1 What does Lauren's sister do?

2 What does her mom do?

B Draw your family tree in your


notebook.

C jH Work in pairs. Ask and


answer questions about your
relatives and their occupations.
A: W h a t d o e s y o u r m o m d o ?
B: S h e 's a . ..

What do you do? UNIT 2 25


lifeSkills
CATEGORIZING
• Understand the purpose of categorizing.
• C ateg o rize the items using relevant characteristics.
• Use the information to make a decision.

A Look at the website on the next page. W ho is it for? Choose the correct option.
This website is for people who ...
CaTwant to find their ideal joE^ b) want to find someone to do a job.

B ¡{| Work in pairs. Write these careers in the different categories below. Each career
can be in more than one category.

creative jobs:

well-paid jobs:

office jobs:

jobs working with others:

jobs requiring a physical skill:

jobs working from home:


B
ifeSkills: categorizing • Ask the students to look at the pictures. Say the names
Step 1 Understand the purpose of categorizing. (Ex. A) of the careers, and ask the students to repeat them
Step 2 Categorize the items using relevant chorally. Explain any unfamiliar vocabulary.
characteristics. (Ex. B) • Ask the students to look at the six different categories
Step 3 Use the information to make a decision. (E-x. B, below the pictures. Make sure they understand well-
Ex. C, Ex. D) paid jobs (jobs where you earn a lot of money) and
office job (in a building). Point out that all of the careers
Lead-in
in the pictures can be in more than one category.
• Read the target skill aloud and highlight the three-step • Put the students in pairs, and give them time to
strategy to develop the skill. Check that the students categorize the careers.
understand all the vocabulary. • When the pairs finish, have them join another pair and
• Relate each exercise in this lifeSkills section to the compare their answers, discussing their choices.
relevant stage in the three-step strategy before you ask • Elicit some ideas for each category from the class. Find
the students to begin the exercise (e.g. T h e p u r p o s e o f out which jobs the students think are well paid, for
this e x e rc ise is to c a te g o riz e item s. This is S te p 2 in th e example, and which jobs they think are not so well paid.
th re e -ste p strategy.).
• Ask the students what ca te g o rizin g means (grouping Possible answers
people or things according to their qualities). Emphasize
creative jobs: architect, designer, journalist
that items in a group share the same or similar qualities.
well-paid jobs: architect, software engineer, sales
• Point out that categorizing can help us learn more
manager, designer
effectively and do things more quickly. A lot of the time
office jobs: architect, software engineer, sales manager
we categorize subconsciously, but doing it consciously
jobs working with others: all of them
can help us use information to make decisions.
jobs requiring a physical skill: architect, designer,
• Ask the students when they might have to categorize
mechanic
in the Work and Career domain. Elicit examples (e.g.
jobs working from home: designer, journalist
prioritizing tasks at w ork and m aking d ecisio n s).
• Write three very different jobs from this unit on the
board (e.g. taxi driver, writer, d o cto r). Ask the students
to tell you some differences between them. For Extra: categorizing jobs
example, a doctor works with sick people in a hospital, a
Ask the students to work in pairs and think of other
taxi driver works in a car, a writer works at home, etc.
jobs that could go in each of these categories. Ask
them to think about which category their job, or their
A family members' and friends' jobs, fit into. Listen to
• Read the instructions aloud. Make sure the students their ideas as a class.
understand the question.
• Invite a student to read aloud the partial sentence and
the two options.
• Check that the students understand the word c a re e r —a
job or occupation that you have for many years (e.g.
T ea ch ing is m y career.).
• Explain that ideal c a re e r means th e p e r f e c t jo b fo r yo u .
• Encourage the students to study the website on the
next page carefully, and choose an answer.
• Check the answer with the class. Ask the students what
helped them make their choice (e.g. the expressions
d re a m ca re e rs q u e stio n n a ire , ideal career).

What do you do? UNIT 2 T26


s

c
• Ask the students to look at the questionnaire. Go over Extra: jobs and personalities
the meaning of the words ideal, d re a m , and p e rfe ct.
Elicit the personality traits that are used in the
• Give the students time to read the questionnaire.
questionnaire (carefu l, in d e p e n d e n t, hard-w orking,
Explain that they can choose more than one answer to
crea tive, p a tie n t ). Have the class brainstorm more
each question.
personality words they know. Then have them look
• Note that some of the words in the questionnaire might
at the jobs presented in the unit and discuss which
be cognates, so the students will be able to understand
personality traits are required for each job.
them. Be ready to explain the words a lo n e (just you), jo b
se cu rity (the knowledge that your job is permanent as
long as you want it to be), in d e p e n d e n t (not depènding
on other people), h ard-w orking (someone who puts a lot
$ 5 1 REFLECT 7
of effort intô their work), p a tie n t (the opposite of a n gry
• Ask the students to read the Reflect question.
a n d u p se t —calm), and d e s c r ib e (give details about what
• Give themsome time to think about different situations —
someone or something is like).
in the domains of Self and Society and Study and
• Circulate and monitor, assisting where needed. Answer
Learning where the skill of C a te g o rizin g would be
any questions about vocabulary.
useful. *”
• Elicit the following ideas: organizing chores, choosing
D
a vacation destination; organizing how to study for an
• Put the students in pairs. exam, etc. —
• Make sure the students understand that they need
to choose a career for their partner, according to the
answers their partner gave in the questionnaire.

E
• Read the instructions to the class, and give the students
a few minutes to think about reasons for their choice of
perfect job for their partner in Ex. D.
• Write a few phrases on the board to help the students
do the exercise (e.g. A g o o d jo b fo r A n d y is a p ilo t
b e c a u s e he's I think an a rch ite ct is a p e r fe c t c a re e r for
Sarah b e c a u s e sh e's ...)
• Invite volunteers to tell the class which job they chose
for their partner. Make sure they give reasons why they
chose that job.

0
D Q3 Work in pairs. Compare your answers, and complete the sentence below for your
partner. Use the jobs in Exercise B and the rest of this unit to help you.

My p a r t n e r 's p e r f e c t f o r a c a r e e r a s a /a n . ..

R EFLECT ...
E Tell your classmates about your career
recommendation for your partner. How can the skill of categorizing be
useful to you in Self and Society and
A n n a is p e r f e c t f o r a c a r e e r a s a /a n ... Study and Learning?

What do you do? UNIT 2 27


o Mir

1 VOCABULARY
Look at Mark’s family tree. Then complete
these sentences with one word. There are
three jobs and eight family words. (10 points)
1 Edward and Irene are Mark's parents
2 Edward is Mark's dad/father
3 Irene Is Mark's mom and Edward's wife

4 Mary and Jessica are Mark's


5 Jeff Is his brother
6 Mark is a soldier
7 Jessica Is a police officer

8 Sarah Is Mary's daughter She's four years old.


9 George and Betty are Mark's grandparents
10 George is a taxi briver

Sarah

8-10 correct: I can talk about occupations and family members.


0-7 correct: Look again at Sections 1 and 4 on pages 20 and 22.
SCORE: /10

2 ( SP1
A Read these facts about famous people and their families. Complete the sentences with
a, an, the, or - (no article). (5 points)
Julio Igleslas Is (1) a famous singer. His sons, Enrique and Julio Iglesias, Jr., are (2) - singers, too.
Michael Douglas's wife, Catherlne-Zeta Jones, Is (3) an actor. Michael's father, Kirk Douglas, is also (4) an
actor. He was a sailor In (5) tbe navy, too!

B (0lrcl§)the correct word or phrase to complete each sentence. (5 points)


1 W h o /{ffihosg)daughter |s Stella McCartney?
2 Martin Sheen's sons are actors, but most of them use a different last name from( ^ y th e irs .
3 G e o r g e (^Fooney^)/ C l o o n e y s ' father is a famous TV host and writer.
4 Madonna's name Is Italian, like my /(mine)
5 Ben Affleck's(^b//dren^y c h i ld r e n s ' names are Violet, Seraphlna, and Samuel.

8-10 correct: I can use articles and different ways of talking about possession to discuss occupations and families.
0-7 correct: Look again at Sections 3 and 8 on pages 21 and 24.
SCORE: /10

©
Language wrap-up 1 Vocabulary
Students can do the Language wrap-up exercises in Make sure the students understand they need to refer to
class or for homework. If you give them for homework, the family tree to answer the questions.
remember to check the exercises at the beginning of the 2 Grammar
next class, or collect a few to grade and identify any typical
errors. A
Make sure the students understand that not all the blanks
If you decide to do the exercises in class, you can
need an article. If no article is needed, they write a
approach the wrap-up as a two-step reviewing procedure.
dash (-).
First, ask the students to do the Vocabulary section
individually. When ready, encourage the students to check
B
their answers carefully, and then put them in pairs to
compare answers and discuss any differences. Self- and Encourage the students to read the sentences carefully
peer-correction are two excellent ways of developing before they choose their answers.
learner independence and creating a cooperative learning
environment. After completing the Vocabulary section, you Refer to the Communicative wrap-ups on pp. 130-
can apply the same procedure to the Grammar section. 131 of the Student's Book for more activities.
At the end of each section, make sure that the students
write their score out often. If they have a score lower
than eight, direct them to the appropriate sections of the
unit, and encourage them to read those sections again for
homework. After that, ask the students to complete the
exercise(s) again at home.

Common European Framework: unit map l* * 3 l


Unit 2 Com petence developed C E F Reference (A1)

1 Vocabulary can talk about occupations Table 1; Table 2; Section 4.4.3.1 ;


Section 6.4.7.1
2 Pronunciation can correctly stress occupations Section 5.2.1.4
3 Grammar can use definite, Indefinite, and zero articles Table 1; Table 2; Sections 5.2.1.2;
6.4.7.7; 6.4.7.8
4 Vocabulary can talk about family members Table 1; Table 2; Section 4.4.1.1;
Section 6.4.7.1
5 Listening can anticipate and listen for specific Information Table 1; Table 2; Section 4.4.2.1
6 Reading can understand and respond to a simple biography Table 1; Table 2; Section 4.4.3.1;
7 Writing can use correct punctuation Table 2; Section 4.4.1.2;
Sections 5.2.1.5; 6.4.7.10
8 Grammar can understand and use possessive pronouns Table 1; Table 2; Sections 5.2.1.2;
6.47.7; 6.47.8
9 Speaking can talk about family members and their occupations Table 1; Table 2; Section 4.4.1.1
The expression down time (stress on down) means the same as free time or leisure time—time
when you are not working or studying. Explain to the students that down time is time for fun and
relaxation (e.g. meeting your friends, reading books, watching TV, or going to the movies).

Listening: to a radio show


Unit plan
Unit opener
■5S
(p. 29) 10 min.
Ask the students if they often listen to the radio. What
shows do they listen to? Do they listen to discussion
shows?
Writing: about yourself and your interests
• Optional downloadable unit opener 10 min.
Ask the students to work individually and think of three
1 Grammar: simple present—statements (p. 30) 40 min. adjectives that describe them. Listen to their ideas with the
and yes/n o questions whole class. Then ask them to look through the unit and
2 Pronunciation: third person -s (p. 31) 15 min. find out what adjectives for describing people are in this
3 Reading: recognizing cognates 'Q (p. 31) 30 min. unit.
4 Listening: to a radio show (p. 32) 30 min. Refer the students to the lifeSkills panel. Tell them that
5 Vocabulary: free-time activities (p- 32) 25 min. the topic of this unit's lifeSkills section is U n d e rsta n d in g
6 Grammar: simple present— (p. 33) 40 min. y o u r learning style. Ask them to work in pairs and tell their
information questions partner how they learn something new, such as a new skill
7 Speaking: asking for opinions (p. 34) 20 min. or a new word. Listen to their ideas as a class.
8 Vocabulary: personality adjectives (p. 34) 25 min.
9 Writing: about yourself and 20 min.
A
(p. 35)
• Write on the board Tod a y is ... Ask the students to tell
your interests
you which day of the week it is. Then write a day of the
• Optional downloadable Writing 20 min.
week on the board (e.g. Thursday). Ask the students to
workshop: a personal description work in pairs and write the other days of the week. Ask
lifeSkills: understanding your learning (p. 36) 45 min. students to come to the board one-by-one and each
style (Study and Learning) write another day of the week. Have the class check that
• Optional downloadable unit opener 45 min. the days are in the correct order and that they have the
(Work and Career) correct spelling. Elicit the correct spelling of any words
• Optional downloadable unit opener 45 min. spelled incorrectly.
(Self and Society)
Language wrap-up (p. 38) 15 min.
‘ Alternative
Video and downloadable video worksheet 45 min.
Produce anagrams to review the spelling of the days
of the week (e.g. y o m a d n for M o n d a y). Prepare these
beforehand, making sure you include all the letters,
and ask the students to unscramble the letters to form
the words.

• Ask the students to do the exercise individually. Tell


Lead-in them to check the times in the organizer when they are
Direct the students' attention to the objectives in the unit free.
menu and go through the information with them. Explain • When the students finish, ask them to compare their
that this unit focuses on how to talk about habits and schedules in pairs. Have them look at the example
free-time activities, and on the following skills which will conversation. Explain that they should use these
help them do this: expressions as they compare their schedules. Have the
Reading skills: recognizing cognates students repeat the conversation after you before they
Elicit, or remind students of, some English words that may talk to their partners. Suggest that pairs find out if they
be the same in their language (e.g. tax/, h o tel, co m p u ter). have the same periods of free time or if their free times
Encourage them to look through the unit and find other are different. On which day of the week do they have
English words that are the same in their language or the most down time?
similar to words in their language. • Ask the students to name the activities the people in
Speaking: asking for opinions the pictures do in their down time. Elicit a few more
Ask the students whose opinion they listen to before they examples of down-time activities (e.g. w atch D V D s, play
buy a book or watch a movie. Elicit some possible answers so c c e r, re a d b ook s).
(e.g. frien ds, p a re n ts, b ro th e rs, sisters, ete.).
UNIT 3
IN THIS UNIT YOU
O learn language to talk about
habits and free-time activities
read an article about celebrity MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT SUN
% hobbies— recognizing cognates 6am
7am
ask about people's opinions— 8am

% using polite language 9am


10am

o listen to a radio show about a


free-time activity
11am
12pm
1pm

o write about yourself and your


free-time activities
2pm

4pm
5pm
► watch a video about different
6pm
free-time activities 7pm
8pm
9pm
10pm
11pm

A ^ For each day, check (/) the times when you are
free. With a partner, compare your routines. W ho has
more free time?
A: Are you fre e o n M o n d a y m o rn in g ?
B: N o , I'm n o t.
A: W h a t a b o u t M o n d a y e v e n i n g ?
B: Y e s , I'm f r e e t h e n .
A: G r e a t , w h a t t i m e ?
B: At a b o u t seven .

LIFE Learn to u nd erstan d your


learning style
SKILLS
STUDY &
* LEARNING
Down time UNIT 3 29
1 GRAMMAR: simple present— statements and yes/n o questions
A ^14 LANGUAGE IN CONTEXT Listen to the
conversation below. W hat does May’s brother buy?
Jake: Wow! Your brother has a lot of albums on his computer.
May: Yes, he does. He goes online and buys MP3s. He buys
a new album every week! My sister likes music, too, but
she doesn't buy MP3s. She buys CD s. She has hundreds.
W hat about your sister? Does she like music?
Jake: No, she doesn't really like music, but she loves movies.
She often watches movies online. I prefer music though.
W hat about you?
May: Yes, me too.
Jake: Do you like this song?
May: Yes, I do.
Jake: Me, too! Let's listen to it! NOTICE!
1 Underline all verbs in the conversation in
the simple present. How many are there?
B ANALYZE Read the conversation in Exercise A 2 Is the conversation about general facts and
again. habits or only about the present situation?

Form Com plete the table below.

Affirmative Negative Y es/N o questions Short answers


l/You/We/They buy CDs. I/You/We/They don't buy (3) 9 ° l/you/we/they Yes, l/you/we/they
CDs. buy CDs? (4) .
He/She (1) CDs. He/She (2) ^2SEHlbuy CDs. Does he/she buy CDs? Yes, he/she/it does.
They sound great. They don't sound great. Do they sound great? No, he/she/it doesn't.

Spelling rules
WATCH OUT!
We add -s to the form of the verb used with he, she, or it (e.g. lik es). Also: Do you like music?
Yes, I do.,
With verbs ending in ... we ...
(5?) Do you like music?
consonant + y, (e.g. stu d y), replace y with -ies, (e.g. stu d ie s) Yes, I like.
s, sh, ch, x, z, o, (e.g. w atch, fix, m iss, go), add -es, (e.g. w a tc h e s , fixes, m isse s, g o e s )

Function Choose the correct options. WATCH OUT!


W e use the simple present to talk about: 0 He likes music.
(ffgeneral facts?) < cffeelings and state|> (¿ ) He like music.
tothings happening right now. c^afroutines and KaBiTS^

C PRACTICE Complete these sentences D QU NOW YOU DO IT Work in pairs. Ask


with the correct form of the verbs in and answer questions about these things.
parentheses.
a car hip-hop stamps the piano
1 Charlie ^ es- (like) jazz music.
A: Do you lis te n t o h i p - h o p ? .
2 My brother and I £°^ect (c o l l e c t ) stamps.
B: Yes, / do. H o w a b o u t y o u ?
3 Alison % s (fly) planes on the weekend.
A: N o , I d o n 't .
4 My brother watc^es. (w a tc h ) a lot of sports on TV.
5 Do.. Sara and Kathy ^st£n (liste n ) to hip-hop?
Bl
6 Olivia teaches (teach) piano in her free time.
Asking about habits
7 Does... Richard -E!EL (play) the guitar? Do y o u listen to ... ? Do y o u p la y ... ?
8 My sister , d °,e s n .t (n o t buy) a lot of music. D o y o u c o l l e c t ... ? D o y o u d riv e ... ?
buy
• Have the students look at the spelling rules in the
language box. Point out how the spelling changes in
stu d y —stu d ie s, and explain that this is triggered by the
consonant preceding -y. Elicit other verbs which end
in -y (e.g. marry, carry, try). Contrast with verbs ending
Lead-in
in vowel + -y, where there is no spelling change (e.g.
Ask the students one or two basic questions in the simple b u y —buys, say—says).
present (e.g. D o y o u like m u s ic ? D o y o u b u y C D s?). Elicit • Point out the irregular form of h a ve — has.
responses (yes or no) from a few students.
Function
• Ask the students to look at the four different options
and check the correct functions for the simple present.
14 See the Student's Book for the audio script.
• Tell the students that they should check more than one
Tell the students to look at the picture. Elicit what they
option.
think the man and the woman are talking about (e.g.
T h e y are lookin g at p ic tu re s a n d talking a b o u t th e m ;
a w e b site , etc.).
T h e y are lo o k in g at a p r o d u c t on
c
Read the instructions aloud to the class. Make sure the • Ask the students to do the exercise individually and
■4 then to compare their answers in pairs, discussing any
students understand the verb buy. Play the audio once.
If the students cannot answer the question correctly, differences. Be prepared to answer any vocabulary
play the audio again. Elicit the answer from the class. questions (e.g. c o lle c t sta m p s = to g e t a n d k e e p sta m p s
x* as a hobby).

Answer
He buys MP3s online; he buys a new album every week. Extra: grammar practice
Do this exercise in the same way as Ex. C.
1 My father_______ the car every Saturday, (wash)
NOTICE! 2 My sister is a teacher. S h e_______French, (teach)
1 Explain that the students should underline all the 3 _______Suzie and Carla________rock music? (like)
verbs in the conversation in the simple present. After 4 _______ Peter______ to the radio? (listen)
they underline the verbs, elicit how many instances of
the simple present there are in the conversation. Answers
2 Have the students look at the conversation again to
find out whether it is about general facts and habits, 1 washes 3 Do, like
2 teaches 4 Does, listen
or only about the present situation.

Answers
1 20
2 It is about general facts and habits.
Extra: vocabulary notebooks
Encourage the students to record phrases rather than
single words in their notebooks. For example, if they
write listen, they should write listen to m u sic or listen
B to th e radio. Memorizing chunks of language will help
them use new vocabulary correctly in context.
Form
• First, ask the students to look carefully at the grammar
table and notice where they have to fill in the
information. Tell them to use the conversation in Ex. A • First, ask the students to look at the How to say it box.
to help them. Remind them to use these questions when doing the
• Ask the students to do the exercise individually and exercise. Tell them that H o w a b o u t y o u ? means A n d
then to compare their answers in pairs. you?
• Highlight the contracted forms of the auxiliary verbs • Direct the students' attention to the example
d o n 't (d o not) and d o e s n 't (d o e s not) and the fact that conversation and remind them that the main verb is not
we use the contracted forms in speaking and the full repeated in short answers Yes, / d o and N o , I don 't.
forms in formal writing. Ask the students to repeat these • Elicit the verbs the students could use with the four
forms chorally, and then individually. phrases (e.g. listen to with h ip -h o p , c o lle c t with sta m p s,
• Ask the students to look at the first Watch out! box. d rive with a car, p la y with th e piano).
Point out that we never use the main verb in short • Put the students in pairs to do the exercise.
answers. Then draw the students' attention to the • When the students finish, elicit some questions and
second Watch out! box. Emphasize that this is the only answers from several pairs. Correct any errors in
change to the verb in thesimple present-. question formation and short answers.

Workbook p. 16, Section l


* \i

Down time UNIT 3 T30


A
2 Pronunciation: third person -s • Ask the students to read the title of the text and try to
find a word that is similar to one in their own language
A (ce le b rity is likely to be a cognate).
• Ask the students to complete the exercise by circling
. H 15 See the Student's Book for the audio script. or underlining words they recognize. When they have
• Ask the students to listen for the three different ways the
finished, check their answers with the class.
third person ending is pronounced. Play the audio at least
• Highlight any significant differences in the
twice, so that the students can clearly hear the difference.
pronunciation of cognates (e.g. in the words co n d itio n
• Explain that this difference in the final sound depends
and e d itio n , the stress is on the second syllable, not the
on the sound before the -s ending in the base form of
final syllable in English). A useful pronunciation rule to
the verb. If it is voiceless (e.g. /k/ in like), the -s ending is
tell the students is that whenever there is a word ending
pronounced /s/. If it is voiced (e.g. /n/ in listen), or it is a
in -tion, the syllable just before it is stressed.
vowel sound (e.g. play), the -s ending is pronounced Izl.
• Highlight the difference between the voiceless /s/ and
the voiced /z/. Ask the students to put their fingers in
Possible answers
their ears and repeat the two sounds one after another celebrities, actor, computers, machines, movie, director,
several times. They should be able to hear the difference television, shows, condition, theme, example, action,
clearly. Write likes and listens on the board. Ask the superhero, online, characters, groups, practice, similar
students to work briefly in pairs and say the two words to
each other several times. Ask them which one ends in an
Isl sound (likes) and which in a Izl sound (listens).
• Focus on the /iz/ ending and point out the fact that this
Culture note
ending occurs after verbs that end in a Isl, ///, /tf/, /CJ3/, Tom Hanks is an American actor, writer, and director.
/ks/, ox Izl sound (e.g. p ra ctice , w ash, w atch, ju d g e , He has appeared in numerous movies, including
relax, clo se). Encourage the students to reproduce the A p o llo 13, T h e G re e n M ile, and F o rre s t G u m p .

words themselves, and ask them to repeat the words Quentin Tarantino is an American film director
first chorally, and then practice them individually. and actor. He became famous with his cult movies
• For additional practice, drill the third person ending by R e se rv o ir D o g s and Pulp Fiction.

saying the verbs and asking the students to produce the Mila Kunis is a Ukrainian-born American actress. She
correct ending. is the voice of Meg in the TV series Fam ily Guy. Her
movies include Ted and Black Sw an.
B
B y 16 See the Student's Book for the audio script.
Ask the students to read the sentences individually first. • Ask the students to do this exercise individually and
Then put them in pairs, and have them take turns saying then to compare their answers in pairs. Encourage them
the sentences. to discuss any different answers they have and decide
When the pairs finish, play the audio so that the with their partner which one is correct.
students can check their pronunciation of the words. Ask • Check the answers with the class. Ask them to explain
them to practice saying the sentences again. how the pictures helped them to make their choices
Ask them to tell you how the third person ending in each (e.g. Picture A sh o w s an o ld b o a rd g a m e , etc.).
sentence is pronounced (1 Izl 2 /iz/ 3 Isl 4 hzl).

Extra: reading practice


3 Reading: recognizing Explain to the students that they will practice an
important reading skill, scanning. Explain that scanning
cognates ^______________ is fast reading to find specific information. Write the
following questions on the board and elicit the kind of
Lead-in information in each question the students should scan for
(1 $25, $ 5 0 0 2 the w ord "typewriter" 3 board g a m es
• Prepare a few long English words that may be cognates
4 the nam e o f a g a m e starting with a capital letter). Have
in the students' languages (e.g. te le v isio n , in terestin g,
the students scan the text for the answers.
prog ra m ). Write these on the board. Ask the students if
1 What costs between $25 and $500?
they recognize these words (or parts of them). Remind
2 Who might have an antique typewriter in the attic?
them that some English words may be similar to words
3 Where are Tarantino's board games from?
in their language, and that they practiced recognizing
4 What online video game does Mila Kunis play?
cognates on p. 10.
• Read the information in the skills panel aloud to the class.
• Emphasize that sometimes long words in English can be
Answers
cognates, and students might be able to recognize at least 1 very old typewriters 3 TV shows
parts of the word. This is particularly useful when reading. 2 your family 4 World of Warcraft
2 third person -s
A 15 Listen to the verbs. Notice that the third person -s endings
are pronounced differently.
1 /z/ listens does plays
2 /s/ wants likes collects
3 /iz/ watches practices relaxes

B H ] 16 Work in pairs. Practice saying these sentences.


Listen and check.
1 My dad listens to the radio every morning.
2 Jason practices the piano after school.

3 Mom likes walking the dog.


4 Our class sometimes watches English movies.

3 recognizing cognates Page io Q


In English, long words that look difficult are often cognates in other languages.
Look at long words carefully. You can often understand what the word means even
if you recognize only part of it.

A Q§ Read this text. Find all the words that are similar to words in your
language. Compare the words you find with a partner.

D O YOU W A N T A
Celebrities have free time—and they
Cl□ L □ B □ Mr□ Y have money! So what hobbies do they
■ h |□ Bl□ Y □ ■ have, and can you do the same thing?

A ctor B Match each celebrity to the


Tom H anks correct picture.
collects old typewriters! 1 Tom Hanks
Maybe you like new computers, but Hanks 2 Quentin Tarantino '
likes old machines. Does your family have a
3 Mila Kums v id t S t e
typewriter in the attic? Very old typewriters in
good condition cost about $25-$500. Maybe
you can sell your typewriter to Tom Hanks!

M ovie director
Q u e n tin T a ra n tin o
has a collection of old board games and toys from
television shows!
The value of a board gam e in perfect condition is
$5-$50 or more. Like Tarantino, try to select a theme.
For example, Tarantino likes games and toys from action
movies and superhero television shows.

A ctor
M ila K u n is
plays the online video game World of Warcraft!
In this game, you find and destroy your enemies.
Characters in the Warcraft universe work in groups or
as individuals. It's a very complicated game and it can
continue for a long time. It’s important to practice playing
similar video games before you play Warcraft.

Down time u n it 3 31
4 to a radio show
A El] 17 Listen to the discussion. (^ircle)the
correct person for each sentence.
1(^ p g e tic ÿ ) / T y le r likes sports games.
2 A n g e lic a /Qy/ej)prefers action gam es.
3 A n g e lic a /(J ÿ l e ?)doesn't like puzzle games.

B |J§ Work in groups. Discuss the questions.

50 ◄— Do you play video games


L
I
W hat video games do you play? W hat other games do you play?
What's your favorite game? Why? Do you watch or play sports?
W hat video games don't you like? What's your favorite sport? Why?

5 free-time activities
A Check (/) the free-time activities you do once a week or more.
How much time do you spend on each one in a typical week?

□ play sports hours □ see friends hours □ go bowling hours

□ work out hours play video games hours □ go to the movies hours

B B I Work in pairs. Compare your free-time activities. W ho prefers


doing things with other people? W ho prefers doing things alone?
I liste n to m u s ic fo r a b o u t fiv e h o u rs a w e e k .

0
4 L is t e n in g : to a r a d io show 5 Vocabulary: free-time
Lead-in
activities
Ask the students D o y o u listen to th e ra d io ? Ask them
Lead-in
what shows they listen to (e.g. news, music, sports, etc.). ,
Tell the students what you do in your free time (e.g. I
A w atch TV, I w atch m o v ie s, I re a d b o o k s.). Tell them how
often you do these things (e.g. / w atch T V e v e ry day, I
• H 17 Tell the students to read the sentences w atch a m o v ie o n c e a w eek.). Check that the students
silently. Emphasize that they need to choose A n g e lic a or know the meaning of the expression once a w e e k (one
Tyler in each case. time a week).
• Play the audio once, and check the students' progress. If
necessary, play the audio again. A
• Ask the students to compare answers in pairs. Check the
• Check that the students understand all the vocabulary in
answers with the class.
this exercise before they start. Most words will be clear
from the pictures, but you may need to check w ork o u t
Audio script_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ (exercise to keep fit).
B = Brandon, A = Angelica, T = Tyler • Make sure the students understand that they have to do
B: Hello, I'm Brandon. Welcome to Gaming World, the two things. First, they check the activities, and then they
show that's all about video games. This week, I have write the number of hours they spend on each one.
Angelica and Tyler with me.
ATT: Hi.
B: Now, Angelica, what games do you like? Alternative
A: Well, I play soccer and tennis games.
If you have a monolingual class, ask the students to
B: And you, Tyler?
teach each other the vocabulary before they begin
T: I prefer games with more action. I don't really play
the exercise. Before class, make cards with the free­
sports or puzzle games.
time activity written in English on the front and the
B: So what do you think of this week's game,
translation of the word on the back. Hand out one or
Automania?
two cards to each student and explain that they have
T: I play a lot of driving games, and this one is very
to teach their words to their classmates. Check that
good. It has a lot of action, and the story is great.
the students know how to pronounce the words on
B: And how about you, Angelica? Do you feel the same
the cards. The students then circulate, teaching each
as Tyler?
other the new words. Write some helpful prompts on
A: Yes, well, I don't play driving games, but this game
the board (e.g. You d o this o u ts id e / in sid e / at h o m e /
has a lot of action, and I like the story.
with frien ds / a lo n e. You n e e d a ball / a c o m p u te r ...).
B: OK, thank you both very much for your opinions.
Encourage the students to try to explain the words.
Then they can use the translation to confirm.
B
• Make sure the students understand the question D o you
p la y v id e o g a m e s ? B
• Ask the students to look at the diagram and think about • Read the instructions aloud to the class. Model the
their answers to the questions. Give them time to write exercise with a student by asking W hat d o y o u like to d o
their favorite games and sports, any other games they in y o u r free tim e ? Then share the activities from Ex. A
play, etc. that you like to do.
• Put the students in groups to complete the task. • Put the students in pairs to complete the exercise.
Monitor while the students are working, and check that Encourage them to group the free-time activities they
all the students have a chance to ask and answer the do into two categories: d o in g th in g s a lo n e , and d o in g
questions. th in g s with o th e r p e o p le .
• Elicit some ideas from the class. Ask the students to • When the students have compared their free-time
report back on the other members of their group (e.g. activities in pairs and have discussed whether they
Tom d o e s n 't like sp o rts g a m e s, H e le n likes p u zzle prefer to do things alone or with other people, ask
g a m e s, J a d e plays b a sketball, etc). Correct any errors in several students to tell you about their partner (e.g.
the pronunciation of the third person singular endings. A d a m p la y s v id e o g a m e s e v e ry d a y with his frien ds. H e
plays fo r 2 0 h o u rs a w eek . H e p re fe rs d o in g thing s with
o t h e r p e o p le .). This will give the students practice using
the third person singular form of the simple present.
Encourage them, and praise their efforts.

Workbook p. 17, Section 3

Down time UNIT 3 T32


• Start by having the students look at the W a tch o u t!
box. Ask them to tell you what word is missing in the
incorrect sentence (do). Emphasize the fact that the
Lead-in use of d o / d o e s is a particularly tricky aspect of simple
present information questions.
Write the word fan on the board. Ask who in the class is a
• Remind the students to use a capital letter at the
music fan, and who is a sports fan. Ask what the word fan
is short for (fanatic, which might be a cognate or
beginning of each sentence. Encourage them to C
look back at the grammar table in Ex. B to help them
loan word). C
complete the sentences.
• Ask the students to work individually and then compare
A c
their answers in pairs. Check the answers with the class.
• Invite a student to read the instructions aloud.
• Ask the students to read the text individually and think
about their answers. Extra: grammar practice
• Ask the students to compare their ideas in pairs before
Ask the students to correct the errors in these
you elicit responses from the class.
sentences.
1 What you do in your free time?
NOTICE! 2 Where Tom lives?
3 Why does he likes soccer?
• Ask the students to underline the question words in
4 Where she go after school?
the ad.
5 What they do in the evening?
• Ask which verb follows the question word in each
information question.
Answers
Answer 1 What do you do in your free time?
2 Where does Tom live?
do
3 Why does he like soccer?
4 Where does she go after school?
5 What do they do in the evening?
B
Form D
• Before you ask the students to look at the text again • Go over the questions in the How to say it box. Drill
and complete the grammar table, review the concepts them chorally and individually. Note the stressed words
behind the question words (see pp. 14-15) by writing in the questions W hat d o y o u d o in y o u r fre e tim e ?:
the question words W hat, W h ere, W h en , Why, and W h o W h o d o y o u p la y [tennis] w ith ?; W hy d o y o u like it? Ask
on the board in one box, and the words tim e, o b je c t, the students which of the questions in Ex. C we can
p la c e , p e rs o n , and rea so n in another box. Have the answer with B e c a u s e it's fu n /in terestin g /excitin g (item 1).
students match the question words with their meanings • Put the students in pairs to complete the exercise.
(What—object, Where—place, When—time, Why— Circulate and monitor, assisting where needed. Listen
reason, Who—person). for any problems with the formation of information
• Direct the students' attention to the grammar table. questions. Don't correct any errors now, but wait until
Write W h e re d o e s h e g o ? on the board and underline after the students finish to address any errors.
the word d o e s . Have the students look at the ad in Ex. • When the students finish working in pairs, elicit some
A to find another auxiliary word that is used after the ideas from the class. Find out which students have
question words in the questions. Have them write the similar free-time activities. Encourage them to use
word they find in the blank In the grammar table. sentences like We like th e sa m e activities. I like g o in g to
th e m o vies, a n d s h e likes g o in g to th e m o v ie s, to o ; or
Function W e like d ifferen t activities. I like p laying s o cc e r, a n d sh e
• Ask the students to circle the correct option to complete likes g o in g online.
the sentence.
• Check the answer with the class.
• Elicit one wh- question for each question word from
Workbook p. 18, Section 4
the class using the words in the table (e.g. W hy d o y o u
w atch m o v ie s?). Write the questions on the board, and
have the class repeat the sentences chorally.
6 simple present— information questions
A LANGUAGE IN CONTEXT Read this ad. Answer the questions.

WE WANT TO MAKE A TV SHOW


ABOUT REAL FANS!

Are you a TV fan?


Tell us about the TV shows you watch.
What do you watch every day?
When do you watch them?
Why do you like them?
Where do you watch TV?
Who do you like to watch on TV?
Tell us and you c
be the next TV siar: underline an tne question
words at the start of the
questions in the ad. What verb
B ANALYZE Read the ad in Exercise A again. follows the question words?

Form Com plete the table.


Question word Auxiliary Subject Verb
WATCH OUT!
What/Where • do l/you/we/they watch
When/Why/Who 0 Where do you go in your free time?
do
does he/she/it (g) Where you go in your free time?
go

Function Choose the correct option to complete the sentence.


We use questions beginning with wh- question words to ...
(a) find out information about people, places, times, etc. )
b) check someone understands what we say.
-
C PRACTICE Use the prompts to write questions.
V
1 why / you like tennis?
Why do you like tennis?______________________________________________
2 when / Tom go to the gym?
When does Tom go to the gym?
3 where / they meet for coffee?
Where do they meet for coffee? _______________________
4 what / you want to do this evening?
What do you want to do this evening? ____________________________
5 who / go out with in your free time?
Who do you go out with in your free time? I
6 what / Jane do in her free time? Talking about free-time activities
What does Jane do in her free time? ' W h a t d o y o u d o in y o u r fre e tim e ?
W h o d o y o u p la y /g o /w a tch ... w ith ?
D Q NOW YOU DO IT Work in pairs. Ask and W h y d o y o u like it?
answer questions about your free-time activities. B e c a u s e it's fu n /in te re stin g /e x citin g .
Are they similar or different?

D o w n tim e UNIT 3 33
7 asking for opinions
When you want to know what somebody thinks, you can use different
phrases to ask for their opinion.

A 1 ^1 8 Listen to the conversation. W hat are they discussing?

B Listen to the conversation again. Check (/) the phrases you hear asking
for opinions.
¡7] And you? □ What do you think?
¡7] What's your opinion? [7] How about you?
□ Do you agree?

C |H Work in groups. Talk about your opinions of these kinds of movies.


Use phrases from Exercise B to ask about each other’s opinions.
A: / like comedies. How about you?
B: No, I prefer action movies.
A: Why?
B: Because comedies are silly. Action movies are exciting.

8 personality adjectives
A ¡S3 Check (/) A or B to complete this quiz. Calculate your score.
Then compare with a partner.

A re you an o r an
in tr o v e r t J e x tro v e rt?
TAKE OUR QUIZ AND FIND OUT!
Q
1 I love parties. 1 I like quiet evenings at home.
2 It’s great to meet new people. ,J 2 I get nervous with people I don’t know.
3 I like to talk ... a lot! 3 I like being alone.
4 I hate being alone. 4 I prefer to listen rather than talk.
5 I tell a lot of jokes. 5 I have a few close friends.
6 I have a lot of friends. 8 I always help my friends when they need me. Q
Number of As: Number of Bs:

O
Lead-in Lead-in
• Ask the students what movies they have seen recently. Write the words introvert and e x tro v e rt on the board.
Then ask some simple questions to elicit their opinions Make sure that the students understand that an e x tro v ert
of the movies (e.g. D o y o u like it?; D o y o u like [actor]?). is a person who talks and socializes a lot, while an introvert
• Read aloud the information in the skills panel. Point out is a quiet person who prefers to stay at home and spend
that we can use a variety of phrases to ask for people's time alone. To help the students remember the meanings,
opinions. point out that the prefixes in- and ex- can have the
meaning of in sid e and o u tsid e , respectively.
A
A
’ H 18Draw the students' attention to the question,
and make sure they understand that they only need to • Go over the meaning of the words jo k e (a funny story),
listen for the topic of the discussion. a lo n e (by yourself, just one person), n e rv o u s (scared,
• Play the audio once. Elicit suggestions from the class. afraid), c lo s e frien d (a friend you know well).
• Ask the students to complete the personality quiz
Audio script_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ individually.
• When the students finish the quiz, ask them to calculate
O = Oliver, J = Jenny, C = Caroline, A = Andy
the number of A answers and the number of B answers
O: So Jenny, what movies do you like?
they have.
J: Well, I really like love stories. I think they're great. And you?
• Ask the students to compare their scores in pairs to
O: I don't really like love stories. I think they're boring. I prefer
find out who has more A answers and who has more B
action movies. Hey, Caroline, what's your opinion?
answers. To encourage language practice, remind them
C: Um, I don't like love stories or action movies. I love
to use the full sentences when they compare, rather
science-fiction movies!
than just saying A or B. (I h a ve x A s, h o w m any d o y o u
O: Really? How about you, Andy?
h a v e ? H o w m any B s d o y o u have?)
A: I like things that are funny, so comedies are my favorite.
• Find out if anyone in the class has six A answers or six B
answers.
Answer
They are discussing movies.

B
• Focus on the word opinion. Draw the students' attention
to the fact that the stress in English is on the second
syllable: opinion. Ask the students to read the list of five
ways of asking for someone's opinion.
• Play the audio once, and check the students' progress.
If necessary, play it again. Make sure the students have
checked the correct boxes.

c
• Read the four types of movies aloud. Ask the students
to repeat them after you. Elicit one or two movie titles
for each type of movie.
• Give the students some practice in saying the five
expressions used to ask for opinions in Ex. B, and
encourage them to use the expressions in the group
discussion. Highlight the main stress in each of the
expressions as follows: A n d y o u ?: W hat's v o u r o p in io n ? ;
D o y o u a g r e e ?: W hat d o y o u think?; H o w a b o u t y o u ?
Then ask the students to repeat the expressions chorally
and individually.
• Divide the class into groups of three or four to talk
about their opinions about the four kinds of movies in
the exercise.
• Give the groups a few minutes for their discussions. Ask
each group to choose a student to tell the class what kinds
of movies the students in their group like and dislike.

D o w n tim e UNIT 3 T34


B Answers
• Make sure the students understand that if they have watching TV; playing video games with his friends;
more A answers on their personality quiz, they should running; playing basketball; going to the movies;
read the text on the left first, and if they have more 8 meeting new people
answers, they should read the text on the right first.
• Briefly check their understanding of the adjectives
highlighted in bold type. Some could be cognates, but
c
you may need to explain or define c o n fid e n t (sure of • Encourage the students to take a few notes before they
yourself), s o cia b le (enjoying being with other people), begin to write. Explain that they can use the adjectives
p o p u la r (having many friends), shy (a shy person is from Section 8 and the free-time activities from
nervous in the company of other people), c o n sid e ra te Section 5. Tell them to make a short list in each category
(kind and thoughtful to others). before they start writing. Suggest that they use the text
• Ask the students to read the other text, too, and in Ex. B as a model for their writing.
compare with a partner. Encourage them to use phrases
such as I think H o w a b o u t y o u ? ; W hat is y o u r
o p in io n ? Alternative
Give the students a template with blanks to complete.
Write it on the board (e.g. Hi, I'm___________. I'm
• Before you ask the students to work in pairs, give them __________ years o l d ...).
a little time to think about who they are going to talk
• Draw the students' attention to the Watch out! box. The
about.
verb like is followed by the -ing form of a verb. Point out
• Encourage them to use the adjectives in Ex. B, and
that love, h a te, prefer, and d o n 't like all follow the same
suggest that they make a few notes before they begin.
pattern as like.
• Give the students a simple model by having them listen
• Ask the students to write on a sheet of paper. While
while you describe a person you know well.
they are writing, circulate and monitor, assisting where
• Put the students in pairs to complete the exercise.
needed. Help the students correct any errors before you
• When the pairs finish, elicit a few examples from the
move on to Ex. D. Check in particular that they have
class. Make sure they also give you a reason why the
used the simple present, like + -ing, and the personality
person is, for example, loyal.
adjectives correctly. This is a key time to assess the
students' grasp of the material introduced in the unit.
Workbook p. 19, Section 6
D
• Ask the students to put their descriptions on the wall.
Then have the class circulate, reading the descriptions.

Alternative
If you cannot hang the papers on the wall, another
A approach is to collect all the papers. Then ask the
students to work in groups. Give each group a number
• Read the question aloud. Ask the students to choose a of papers to read and discuss. Then pass the papers
classmate they think they know fairly well.
on to a different group until everyone has had a
• Give the students a little time to prepare their ideas.
chance to read and discuss all the papers. Or, for large
Encourage them to use some of the adjectives that
classes, ask the students to work in groups and read
describe extroverts and introverts, and to think about their group members' papers.
things that their classmates like and do.
• Do this exercise with the whole class. Ask the students • When the students have read their classmates'
being described to say whether or not they agree with descriptions, ask them to stand in groups with people
their classmates' descriptions of them.• with similar interests. Then ask the students to share
some interesting facts they learned about their
classmates.
• Make sure the students understand the question W hat
interests d o e s M ark m e n tio n ? Explain that they need to Workbook
find out what things he likes to do in his free time.
• Give the students time to read the webpage, and then
p. 20; Listen and write
elicit the answer from the class. p. 21; Down time __________________

Alternative
Ask the students to listen while you read the webpage
aloud.
B E l Read about your personality type. Do you think what it says is correct?
Compare with a partner.

more “A ”s more “B”s


You are an extrovert. You are confident and You are an introvert. You are shy and are
believe in yourself. You don’t get nervous I nervous when you first meet people. You
I
easily. You are sociable and love parties. don’t need other people to have a good
You are popular and have a lot of friends. time, and you’re independent. You never
You are funny, and you like telling jokes. tell anyone your friends’ secrets, and you
are loyal. You are considerate, and you care
about how other people feel.

C Ei
Work in pairs. Think of someone you know well. Describe them to
your partner. Use the adjectives in bold from Exercise B.
My s i s t e r is a n e x t r o v e r t . S h e 's v e r y s o c i a b l e . S h e lik e s ...

9 WRITING: about yourself and your interests


A E l How well do you know your classmates? Choose one person and say three things
you know about them.

B Read this webpage. W hat interests does Mark mention?

Hi, everyone! I'm Mark Turner.


I'm 23 years old, and I live in an
apartment with two friends.
I work in a large company, and
I don't have a lot of free time
during the week. In the
evenings, I watch TV or play
video games with my friends.
On weekends, I have more time
and I like running and playing
basketball. I also like going to
the movies. My friends say I'm
funny, and I agree! I think I'm
confident and love meeting
new people. I guess I'm an
extrovert.

Message Connect

C Write about yourself for the website. Describe your


personality and your interests. WATCHOUT!
^ I like listening to music.
D Put your descriptions on the wall. Read your classmates’
(^) I like listen to music.
descriptions. Find two people with interests similar to yours.

Down time UNIT 3 35


UNDERSTANDING YOUR LEARNING STYLE
• Identify your main learning style.
• Use it to help you learn new things.
• Try other styles to support your learning.

A 0 Choose a new skill you want to learn. Say why.

play a musical instrument

take amazing pictures

Check (/) your answers to complete this learning style questionnaire. Calculate your scores.

LEARNING STYLE QUESTIONNAIRES


1 How do you want to learn your new skill?
□ in a class with other people □ by watching a DVD
□ by practicing again and again □ by reading a book about it

2 Think about learning English. How do you prefer to learn new words?
□ I use the words in conversations. □ I draw pictures.
□ I act out the words. □ I write the words.

3 How do you like to learn English grammar?


□ by discussing it with my classmates □ by looking at diagrams
□ by imagining myself in a situation □ by reading grammar rules
Total number of
4 What do you do to remember someone's name? □ _________
□ I use it in conversation with them. I make a mental picture of it. □ _________
I write it down.
□ I say it over and over again.
□ _________
5 Which school activity do you prefer? □ _________
□ debates and discussions □ art and design lessons What is your first color?
□ sports and games □ reading and library work
A
• Ask the students to look at the pictures. Elicit from the
students what the pictures show (d ifferen t skills). Ask the
students if they already have some of these skills (e.g.
Step 1 Identify your main learning style. (Ex. B) W h o plays a m usical instrum ent?).
Step 2 Use it to help you learn new things. (Ex. C, Ex. D) • Check that the students understand the difference
Step 3 Try other styles to support your learning. (Ex. E) between d ra w and paint. Explain that to draw, you
Lead-in simply need a pencil, but to paint you need brushes and
paint.
• Introduce the idea of learning styles. Explain that
• Ask the students to do the exercise individually and
some people learn best by seeing (e.g. looking at
then to compare their answers in pairs. Elicit some ideas
pictures), others learn things more effectively if they
from the class.
are associated with movement, and some need to hear
• Find out how many people want to learn to juggle, how
things to learn them.
many want to play a musical instrument, etc. Find out
• Ask the students what type of learner they think they
why they want to learn these skills.
are.
(If you are interested in exploring this further, you can refer B
to F ra m e s o f M in d : T h e T h e o ry o f M u ltip le In te llig e n ce s • Tell the students that doing this questionnaire will help
by Howard Gardner—a very influential book in the field of them identify their preferred learning style.
neuroscience and education.) • Ask the students to work individually and check one of
the colored boxes for each question. Encourage them
to be as truthful as they can.
• When the students finish, ask them to write their
total scores for each color in the blanks on the right.
Ask them to compare scores in pairs. They may be
interested to find out who has scores similar to theirs, in
particular for their first color, the one with most checks.
They will find out the significance of the colors in Ex. C.

Down time UNIT 3 T36


c
• Make sure that dictionaries are available for this activity • The aim of this exercise is to demonstrate to the
—preferably monolingual. students which learning style tends to be more effective
• Begin by asking the students how they learn a new word for them. Also, it alerts the students to the fact that
in English. Elicit some ideas from the class and write more than one learning style can suit them. Encourage
them on the board (these will probably include ideas them to experiment.
such as write th e w o rd in m y n o te b o o k , re p e a t th e w o rd • Ask the students to repeat the procedure from Ex. C,
m a ny tim es, write th e w o rd in a s e n te n c e , etc.). It's a this time using the instructions for their second color.
good idea to ask the students from time to time about • When the students have tested each other, find out
the way or ways in which they learn words. This can help which strategies they found most effective.
them find methods that work best for them, as well as to
learn helpful study tips from their classmates.
• Put the students in pairs. Ask them to choose who is REFLECT
Student A and who is Student B in each pair. Check that • Ask the students to read the R e f le c t question.
the students understand the instructions and are looking • Give them some time to think about different situations
at the right set of words. in the domains of Self and Society and Work and
• Ask the students to find the color that matches their first Career where the skill of Understanding your learning
color from the questionnaire. Tell them that this color style would be useful.
corresponds to their preferred learning style. • Elicit the following ideas: a visual learner will benefit
• Give the students time to read the text for their color from seeing illustrated instructions in a manual for
silently and ask you any questions about the vocabulary, operating a newly purchased gadget or a new system at
making sure they understand the steps. work; an interpersonal learner will prefer to be informed
• The word-learning exercise should be done individually. of the new team structure at work in a meeting, whereas
Circulate and monitor, assisting where needed. a linguistic learner might prefer to read about it in an
email, etc.
D
• Direct the students to the example conversation. Check
that they understand the meaning of next. Encourage
them to use these phrases and questions when testing
each other.
• Put the students in pairs, and give them time to
complete the exercise. Tell the students that they can
say the meaning of the word in their own language if
appropriate.
• When the students finish, ask them how many words
they could remember.
y

C Work in pairs. Follow the instructions to learn


qj
the words using your preferred learning style.
• Student A, look at the first group of words. Student B, look at the second group.
• Check the definitions of the words and phrases in a dictionary or ask your teacher.
• Read the instructions below that match your main color from Exercise B.
• Follow the instructions to learn the words. You have five minutes.

Student A Student B
• satellite dish • lecture
• current affairs • domain name
• broadcast • tabloid

In te rp e rso n a l V is u a l
Find another student to work with Imagine each word in your mind.
and talk about what the words mean. Draw a picture to represent each
-* Ask and answer questions using the word.
words. Try to remember each word and
-4

Test each other on the spelling and picture together.


the meaning of the words.

K in e s t h e t ic L i n g u i s t ic
dé Imagine a situation where you need Write each word in a sentence and
to use each word. think of the definition.
Do an action connected to that Repeat each word a few times.
situation. Try to remember each word and
dé Try to remember each word and definition together.
dé action together.

D U ! Work in pairs. Cover the words in Exercise C and test each other.
How many words do you remember?
A: Tell me one of the words.
B: The first word is ...
A: What does it mean?
B: It means ... What's the next word?
A: The next word is ...

E BH Look at your scores in Exercise B. What is your second color? Use the
instructions above to learn the new words below. After a few minutes,
test each other. Which of the two ways of learning do you prefer?

— couch potato laid-back pastime puzzle R E F L E C T ...


How can understanding your learning
style be useful to you in Self and
Society and Work and Career?

Down time UNIT 3 37


'

1 I have a computer in my bedroom, and I og nenloi 3 ° online to |3Uy musjc_

2 I tlsine ot • ^'sten t0 music every day. I love rap and hip-hop.


3 I ya/p sropts play sports ¡n my free time. I like soccer, but I prefer basketball.

4 I ese inedfsr see fronds after school. We go bowling, go to the movies, or meet for coffee.
5 I hatcw VT watch TV ¡n the evening. I like reality shows and soap operas.

B Read about Anna and Katy. They are sisters, but they are very different.
Match the adjectives to the explanations. (5 points)
1 Anna is very s h y .^ _______________ a) She makes everyone laugh with her jokes.
2 Katy is very funny. -— She thinks about other people.
3 Anna is very c o n s id e r a t e ^ ^ ^c) Her friends can trust her. She never says a bad thing about them.
4 Katy is very soci abl e. — — d)She loves parties and being with a lot of friends.
5 Anna is very l oyal . — She doesn't like meeting new people.

8-10 correct: I can talk about free-time activities and about people's personalities.
0-7 correct: Look again at Sections 5 and 8 on pages 32 and 34.
SCORE: /10

2
Mark and Jodi are at Beth’s party. Complete the conversation with the verbs in
parentheses in the simple present. (10 points)
Mark: Hi, I'm Mark.
Jodi: Oh, hi. I'm Jodi. So, how (1) you know (know) Beth?
Mark: She (2 ) P^aYs (play) volleyball with my sister.
Jodi: Oh, cool. What (3) you (do), Mark?
Mark: I go to college. I (4) study (study) French and German. And what about you?
Jodi: I (5) work (work) with my dad. He (6) ^as (have) a restaurant.
Mark: Oh, yeah? (7) D° you ^e (like) it?
Jodi: It's OK, but I (8) d °n t want (not want) to do it my whole life.
My mom (9) doesn t think (not th/nk) it's a good job.
Mark: Oh, really? What (10) ^oes she want (want) you to do?
Jodi: She wants me to be a doctor.

8-10 correct: I can use the simple present to talk about myself and to ask questions about other people.
0-7 correct: Look again at Sections 1 and 6 on pages 30 and 33.
SCORE: /10
Language wrap-up 1 Vocabulary
Students can do the Language wrap-up exercises in A
class or for homework. If you give them for homework, Focus the students' attention on the text in italics in the
remember to check the exercises at the beginning of the first sentence and tell them that they must put the letters
next class, or collect a few to grade and identify any typical in the correct order to make words to complete the
errors. sentences.
If you decide to do the exercises in class, you can
approach the wrap-up as a two-step reviewing procedure. B
First, ask the students to do the Vocabulary section Ask the students to read sentences 1 to 5 first and think
individually. When ready, encourage the students to check about both of the sisters' personalities before they do the
their answers carefully, and then put them in pairs to matching activity.
compare answ.ers and discuss any differences. Self- and
2 Grammar
peer-correction are two excellent ways of developing
learner independence and creating a cooperative learning Tell the students to read the conversation carefully before
environment. After completing the Vocabulary section, you trying to do the exercise.
can apply the same procedure to the Grammar section.
At the end of each section, make sure that the students
write their score out of ten. If they have a score lower
than eight, direct them to the appropriate sections of the
unit, and encourage them to read those sections again for
homework. After that, ask the students to complete the
exercise(s) again at home.

Common European Framework: unit map


Unit 3 Com petence developed C E F Reference (A1)

1 Grammar can understand and use statements and questions in Table 1; Table 2; Sections 5.2.1.2
the simple present 6.47.7; 6.47.8
2 Pronunciation can hear and produce different third-person singular Section 5.2.1.4
endings
3 Reading can recognize cognates and use them to understand Table 1; Table 2; Section 4.4.2.2
a text
4 Listening can understand a radio discussion and respond to Table 1; Table 2; Section 4.4.2.1
the topic
5 Vocabulary can talk about free-time activities Table 1; Table 2; Section 4.4.1.1;
Section 4.4.3.1; Section 5.2.1.1
6 Grammar can understand and use information questions in Table 1; Table 2; Section 5.2.1.2
the simple present
7 Speaking can ask for opinions Table 1; Table 2; Section 4.4.3.1 ;
Section 5.2.3.2
8 Vocabulary can talk about personality Table 1; Table 2; Sections 4.4.1.1
4.4.3.1; 5.2.1.1
9 Writing can describe themselves and their interests Table 2; Section 4.4.1.2

D o w n tim e UNIT 3 T38


DAY IN, DAY OUT
The expression day in, day out means every day for a long time and emphasizes routine.

Reading: a magazine article


llnitp Ask the students what time they get up and what time they
go to bed. Ask if they prefer the morning or the evening.
Unit opener (p. 39) 10 min. Ask them to look through the unit and find an article about
this topic.
• Optional downloadable unit opener 10 min.
Speaking: talking about interesting activities
1 Vocabulary: telling time (p. 40) 25 min.
Ask the students to take out a piece of paper. Ask them
2 Reading: a magazine article (p. 40) 30 min. to write an interesting thing that they do on the sheet of
3 Grammar: frequency adverbs and (p. 41) 40 min. paper (e.g. I play sq u a sh .). Collect the sheets of paper and
adverbial phrases mix them up. Read the activities aloud to the class. The
4 Pronunciation: days of the week (p. 42) 15 min. students have to guess who does each activity.
5 Listening: for specific (p. 42) 30 min. Refer the students to the lifeSkills panel. Tell them that the
information topic of this unit's lifeSkills section is M a n a g in g y o u r tim e.
6 Vocabulary: prepositions of time (p. 43) 25 min. Ask them how they remember things that they have to
7 Speaking: talking about interesting (p. 43) 20 min. do. Elicit answers and write a list on the board (e.g. u se a
activities calendar, m ake a list, u se a cell p h o n e , etc.).

• Optional downloadable Speaking 20 min.


A
workshop: talking about interesting
• Write the word tim e on the board. Check that the
activities
students know the meaning. Then write the expression
8 Grammar: clauses with until, before, (p. 44) 40 min.
Tim e is m on ey. Elicit the meaning of this saying from
after the students (th e tim e y o u take to d o th in g s c o sts y o u
9 Writing: understanding the m on ey). Tell them that this type of expression is called
mechanics (p. 45) 30 min. a sayin g or p ro v e rb —an expression that many people
lifeSkilIs: managing your time (p. 46) 45 min. know and use, and that gives an important message or
(Self and Society) advice about life.
• Optional downloadable lifeSkills 45 min. • Ask the students to look at the pictures, and invite
individual students to read the sayings aloud.
lesson (Work and Career)
• Put the students in pairs and ask them to discuss the
• Optional downloadable lifeSkills 45 min. g'eneral meaning of each saying (e.g. Tim e waits for
lesson (Study and Learning) n o man. = Tim e n e v e r s to p s.; Tim e flies w hen y o u are
Language wrap-up (p. 48) 15 min. having fun. = Tim e m o v e s quickly w hen w e are e n jo yin g
Communicative wrap-up Units 3-4 (p. 132) 20 min. som eth in g.).
Video and downloadable video worksheet 45 min.

Extra: sayings with time


Write on the board two more sayings with time:
Th ere's n o tim e like th e p r e s e n t and B e tte r late than
Unit opener n ever. Ask the students to speculate on what they
might mean. Explain that the first one is similar to
Lead-in S e iz e th e m o m e n t (C a rp e diem ).
Direct the students' attention to the objectives in the unit
menu and go through the information with them. Explain
that this unit focuses on language to do with time and B
routines, and on the following skills to help them talk • Read the instructions aloud.
about these topics: • Put the students in pairs to discuss whether they agree
Listening: for specific information with the sayings in Ex. A.
Tell the students what your favorite day of the week is. Tell • Ask the students to think of similar sayings about time
them what you usually do on that day (e.g. M y favorite in their language. Elicit ideas from the class. Note that
d a y is Saturday. In th e m o rn in g , I re a d th e n e w s p a p e r a n d some students find similarities and differences between
in th e a fte rn o o n , I w atch sp o rts on TV). Ask the students their language and English in the use of proverbs and
what their favorite day of the week is. Ask what they sayings very interesting. Focusing on this will help the
usually do on that day. students remember the English expressions more easily.
Writing: understanding the mechanics
Write the sentence Jo h n likes te n n is on the board. Elicit/
Explain that the subject of the sentence is J o h n . Ask the
students to look through the unit and find out if every
sentence in English needs a subject.

(2 )
UNIT 4 DAY IN, DAY OUT
IN THIS UNIT YOU
learn language to talk about time A 0 Read these sayings about time. With a partner,
and routines discuss what you think each one means.
listen to an interview about daily A: S o , w h a t d o y o u th in k t h e first o n e m e a n s ?
routines— listening for specific
% B: M a y b e it m e a n s th a t t im e n e v e r s t o p s . O r th a t n o o n e c a n s t o p tim e .
information
A: Y e s , I th in k y o u ' r e rig h t.
learn to use subjects correctly in
% sentences—writing: understanding
the mechanics
1^1 read about people who prefer
different routines
0 talk about interesting activities
watch a video about unusual
routines

B Work in pairs. Do you agree with the sayings in Exercise A?

— LIFE Learn to m an ag e your tim e

Z SKILLS
1^ SELF &
SO CIETY
Day in, day out K 5 k l l Q E 9 l
1 V telling time
A Match these sentences to the correct times.
Some times match more than one sentence.
noon = 12:00 in the middle of the day
m id d a y = around noon
m id n i g h t = 12:00 at night
a.m. = before noon, e.g. 7 a.m.
p .m . = after noon, e.g. 11 p.m.

m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m rnm m m m m

1 It's twenty after seven. 4 It's a quarter after two. 7 It's seven-twenty. 10 It's five forty-five.
2 It's five to two. 5 It's six-thirty. 8 It's half past six.
3 It's three o'clock. 6 It's a quarter to six. 9 It's two-flfteen.

B 31 Work in pairs. Say what time you usually do these things on weekdays.
• get up • get to school/work • have dinner
• leave for school/work • have lunch • go to bed

A: W h a t t im e d o y o u h a v e l u n c h ?
B: I h a v e lu n c h a t ( a ro u n d ) t w o . A n d y o u ?

2 a magazine article
A Read this article. W hat is the difference between
i
larks and owls?

W hat Type o f Bird Are You?


One In ten people is a lark. Larks and owls often have
About two in ten are owls different jobs. Emergency-
and enjoy staying up very room doctors, for example,
late. If you like to get up work more at night.They are
early, have coffee, and read usually owls. Writers and
the paper, you’re probably a artists are often larks. For
lark. Owls often don't eat example, cartoonist Scott
breakfast and have to hurry Adams is a lark. "I never try to
to get to work In the do any creating past nopn,"
morning. If you do laundry or he says."And I only exercise
surf the Internet at midnight, In the late afternoon. I draw
you're probably an owl. from 6 a.m. to 7 a.m. Then I
write for a few hours."

B 3 f Work in pairs. Ask and answer these questions.


1 Are you a lark or an owl? Why?
2 What time of day do you like to work or study?

3 What time of day do you like to relax?


1 Vocabulary: telling time 2 Reading: a m agazine article
Lead-in
Point at a clock (or draw a clock with a specific time on the
• Write the words ow l and lark on the board. Tell the
board) and ask the students W hat tim e is it? Don't worry
students they are both birds.
at this stage if they can't give you an accurate answer
• Write the following vocabulary from the text on the
because this is the focus of this section. Then write 9 :3 0
board: stay u p late, d o laundry, s u rf th e internet,
on the board. Tell the students there is a very easy way of
m idn igh t, e m e rg e n c y ro o m , n o o n . Try to elicit the
saying this. Elicit it from the class (nine thirty). Write three
meanings from the class, and explain any expressions
more examples on the board (e.g. 11:15, 2 :4 5 , 9:20). Ask
the students don't know.
the students to tell you the time in the same way as n in e
• Draw the students' attention to the question in the
thirty. Emphasize once again how easy this is in English
instructions. Encourage them to think of what the
(e le v e n fifteen, tw o forty-five, n in e tw enty). Return to the
difference is when reading the text.
example of 9:30. Tell the students there is another way to
• Give the students time to read the text and the
say this in English using the word half. If you can't elicit the
descriptive summaries of the two birds.
phrase h a lf p a s t nine, write it on the board. Do the same
for a q u a rte r a fter and a q u a rte r to. Give the students
further practice by dictating some more times, and asking
them to write them as numbers. Continue until they can do
this easily.

A Extra: reading practice


• Focus on the expressions in the information box.
Ask the students to answer these questions.
Remind students of the meaning and usage of a.m.
1 How many people are larks?
(ante meridiem) and p .m . (post meridiem). Elicit that
2 How many people are owls?
a.m . is used before noon (12 o'clock) and p.m. is used
3 Which of these are larks: doctors, writers, artists?
after noon, but before midnight.
4 When does Scott Adams draw?
• Read the instructions for the exercise aloud. Make
sure the students understand that some of the pictures
match more than one sentence. Answers
• Ask the students to do the exercise individually. 1 one in ten
2 about two in ten
3 writers and artists
Culture note 4 from 6 a.m. to 7 a.m.
In the U.S., noon is generally used to mean
12:00 p.m., and midday is used more generally to
mean around noon, in the middle of the day.
Culture note
Larks are primarily found in Europe and Asia. The lark
symbolizes daybreak and early morning in literature and
• Remind the students that we use the preposition at
mythology.
when we give the time something happens (e.g. T h e
le sso n starts at 1 0 :30 a.m . a n d e n d s at 1 1 :15 a.m.).
• Put the students in pairs. Circulate and make sure the B
students are using at and expressing the times correctly. • Read the questions to the class.
• Ask a few students to report back about their partners • Put the students in pairs to discuss the questions.
(e.g. M elissa g e t s u p at 7 o'clock.). Encourage them to give reasons for being larks or owls
(e.g. I'm a lark b e c a u s e I alw ays w ake u p early.) Give the
students an example by telling them reasons why you
Culture note are an owl or a lark.
The 24-hour clock is typically used to talk about travel • When the pairs finish their discussions, elicit some
times in many countries (e.g. T h e train le a v e s at 18:23 responses from several students. Find out who is an
(pronounced e ig h te e n tw en ty-th ree). However, in the owl and who is a lark. Encourage the students to give
United States, the 24-hour-clock is only used in the examples with specific times in their answers (e.g. I like
military and a few other professions. When using the to stu d y late at night. I usually start at 9 p .m .).
12-hour clock, we can use a.m. and p.m.

Workbook p. 22, Section 1

Day in, day out UNIT 4 T40


3 Grammar: freq uencv c
• Read the instructions aloud, and have the class repeat
adverbs and adverbial phrases the activities in thè grammar table. Elicit their meaning.
• Direct the students to the example and explain that
Lead-in they will write sentences like this one for Rick's other
activities. Ask the students to complete the exercise
Write the following sentences on the board: Bill n e v e r
individually. Circulate and monitor, assisting where
Ask the
sta ys u p late. R a ch e l always g o e s to b e d early.
needed.
students how many days a week Bill stays up late (none).
• Tell the students to compare their answers in pairs. Then
Ask how many days a week Rachel goes to bed early
check the answers by calling on students to write their
(seven).
sentences on the board.
A • Ask the class to check that the frequency adverbs are in
the correct place in each sentence. Remind them of the
19 See the Student's Book for the audio script. position of the adverb with respect to the verb.
• Ask the students to read the questions at the end of • Review the pronunciation of the present tense third person
the text. Check that they understand what a lot means singular. Then ask the students to repeat the correct
(many things). Tell them the conversation is between sentences, using correct pronunciation of the verbs.
Rick and Alicia, so they should write either Rick or Alicia
in the blanks.
Extra: grammar practice
Write these sentences on the board. Ask the students
Alternative to put the words in parentheses in the correct place in
Ask the students to listen to the audio once without the sentence.
looking in their books. This will give them practice in 1 She gets up early. (always )
gaining understanding from listening. 2 He is late, (often)
3 We go to the movies, (so m etim es)
• Play the audio once. Check the students' progress, and 4 She is wrong, (never)
play it again, if necessary. Check the answers with the
class. Answers
1 She always gets up early.
NOTICE! 2
3
He is often late.
We sometimes go to the movies.
• Ask the students to read the underlined phrases in 4 She is never wrong.
the conversation again and answer the question.
• Check the answer with the class.

Answer • Ask the students to look at the questions in the How to


The word order is different. say it box. Tell them that H o w often a re y o u ...? is only
used to ask about one of the activities in Ex. C. Elicit
which one it is (be late fo r class —How o fte n are y o u late
fo r class?). For all the other activities, they will need to
B use H o w often d o y o u ... ?
Form • Put the students in groups, and have them discuss
how often they do the activities. To ensure that all the
• Complete items 1-3 as a class. Encourage the students students get practice with the questions as well as the
to look for the answers in Ex. A. answers, for each activity, have one group member start
• When you have elicited the answers, ask the students by asking H o w o fte n ...? to the person on their right.
to look at the Watch out! box. Highlight that the That person answers, and then asks the person on their
frequency adverbs always come after the verb be, not right. The group continues until all the students have
before. had a chance to say how often they do each activity.
Function • Ask the students to report back on their group
discussions. Make sure that they put the frequency
• Draw the students' attention to the diagram, and
explain that 0% indicates never. Emphasize that this adverbs in the correct place. Also make sure that they
diagram is a good way to express how often something use the third person -s ending correctly.
happens.
• Give the students time to complete the diagram
individually. Remind them that they can use the
Extra: hangman
conversation in Ex. A to help them. Play a quick game of "hangman" on the board with
• Ask the students to compare their answers in pairs. Then the class, using adverbs of frequency to review both
check the answers with the class. the words and their spellings.

^ Workbook p. 22, Section 2


3 frequency adverbs and adverbial phrases
A |||] 19 LANGUAGE IN CONTEXT Listen to
the conversation below. Answer the questions.
Rick: I'm always so busy! I never have any free time.
I'm usually at work in the morning, and I always
study in the afternoon. W hat about you?
Alicia: I don't work, so I often get up late. I sometimes
study in the morning and relax in the afternoon.
Five times a w eek, I go out with friends.
Rick: Five time’s a week! I rarely have time to go out—
maybe just once a month. But I love watching
movies. How often do you go to the movies?
Alicia: O h, three or four tim es a month. Do you want to
go this weekend?
Rick: Yeah, that sounds great.
Rick
1 Who does a lot every day?
2 Who doesn't do a lot every day? Alicia
NOTICE!
Look at the underlined phrases in the
B ANALYZE Read the conversation in Exercise A again. conversation. Is the word order the
Form Choose the correct option to complete the sentences. same or different?
1 The frequency adverbs in bold come the verb be. mmmm

a) before (b) a fte r }

2 The frequency adverbs in bold come other verbs.


(afbefore) b) after

3 The adverbial phrases (once a month, etc.) come


(a) at the start or end of a clause) b) between subject and verb

Function Com plete the diagram with two words from the conversation. WATCH OUT!
We use frequency adverbs to talk about how often something happens.
0 i am always happy,
0 % ^-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------► 100% always am happy.

never rar° :!y sometimes often usually always

C PRACTICE Write sentences about how often Rick does each of these
activities. Use each frequency adverb from Exercise B once.

be late for class 0 times a week (1) H&U never tote-for doss.

cook at home 6 times a week pj H e usually c o o k s at h o m e .

chat online 3 times a month H e s o m e tim e s ch ats online.

drive to work every workday h/e always d rives to work.

once a year ^ H e rarely p lays v id e o g a m e s.


play video games

watch the news 4 times a week ... He often w a tch e s th e new s.


Co; —--- ------ —--- --------------- --------———— ---- --------------

D Q§ NOW YOU DO IT Work in groups. Ask and


answer questions to find out how often people in your H O W TO SAY IT
group do each activity in Exercise C. Then report back Asking about frequency
to the whole class. H o w o fte n d o y o u . . . ?
A: In our group, Victor and Lisa rarely cook at hom e. H o w o fte n are y o u . . . ?
B: Vera always cooks at hom e.

D a y in , d a y o u t UNIT 4 41
4 days of the week
A H I 20 Listen and repeat. Notice that the stress is always on the
first syllable.
Sun»day M o rrday Tues»dav W ednes«dav Thurs»day Fn»day Sat* ur«dav

B m ^ ¡2 1 Work in pairs. Practice saying these sentences.


Make sure you stress the correct syllable. Listen and check.
1 I work from Monday to Friday.
2 I go to the gym on Tuesdays and W ednesdays.
3 My favorite day of the week is Saturday.
4 I think Sundays are boring.

5 for specific information page 22 ©


A H|jfl 22 Look at the pictures and listen to Part 1 of an interview.
Match each picture to the day the wom an does the activity.

B H I 23 Listen to Part 2 of the interview. —


W hat does the wom an do on Sundays?
Check (/) the activities she mentions. —

¡73 have breakfast [71 have lunch


(7) read the newspaper ¡7] do the housework
Q watch TV □ go to the gym
0 go for a walk U\ cook
□ meet friends

C Work in pairs. Describe your usual


weekend routine. Do you and your partner
do similar or different things on weekends?
On S a t u r d a y s , I u s u a lly g e t u p la te . I ...

on Mondays = every Monday

E Monday C Thursday
F Tuesday D Friday
A W ednesday B Saturday
4 Pronunciation: days of the Extra: daily routines Q&Â
week Tell the students that you are going to tell them your
daily routine. Explain that they should try to stop you
Lead-in from getting to the end of your day by asking you
Write Today is ... on the board. Invite individual students to a lot of questions. For example, you say / g e t u p a n d
tell you what day It Is. Ask them to spell it for you. Elicit all h ave breakfast, and they say E x c u s e m e , w hat d o
seven days, if possible. y o u e a t fo r b re a k fa st? You answer toast, and they can
then say D o y o u h a ve it with b u tte r? At the end, invite
individual students to come to the front to recount
their day.
2 0 See the Student's Book for the audio script.
Play the audio once, and ask the students to notice the
stressed syllable in each word. B
Play the audio again and ask the students to repeat
• H 23 Before you play the audio, ask the students
each word. Draw the students' attention to the fact that
to look at the list of activities. Tell them that the woman
all the days of the week are stressed on the first syllable.
does six of these activities on Sundays. Ask them to
Highlight that Wednesday has only two syllables
work in pairs and decide which activities she does.
/'wenz.dei/ and that the first d is silent.
• Elicit some suggestions from the class, but do not
Drill the pronunciation by having individual students
correct them at this stage.
repeat the words after you.
• Play the audio, and ask the students to check their
predictions. Check the answers with the class.
B
Audio script __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _______ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
21 See the Student's Book for the audio script.
R = Reporter, W = Woman
Put the students In pairs, and have them take turns
R: Tell me about Sundays. What do you do on Sundays?
practicing the sentences.
W: I usually get up late and have breakfast. I often read the
Play the audio so that the students can check their
newspaper at the same time. After that, I usually go for a
answers.
walk. I like walking around my neighborhood. I get home,
and I have lunch at one.
R: What about after lunch?
5 Listening: for specific W: In the early afternoon, I do the housework. The rest of the
day, I cook and relax.
information 'o
c
Lead-in • Read the instructions aloud, and draw the students'
• Use the pictures to introduce the section. Ask the attention to the model sentence.
students what activity or place they can see in each • Highlight the fact that we use the plural form (on
picture (e.g. A: go to the gym, B: watch TV, C: meet Satu rd a ys, on S un days) to mean e v e ry Saturday, e v e ry
friends, etc.). Sun day, etc.
• Remind the students that they practiced listening for • Give the students time to think about their weekend
specific information on p. 22. routine. Encourage them to use some of the ideas in
Ex. A and Ex. B, as well as the frequency adverbs that
A they learned earlier in this unit.
• Put the students in pairs to complete the exercise.
• Bf?i3 22 Explain that the students should listen and • When the pairs finish, choose a few pairs to tell you the
match the picture to the correct day. Emphasize that things they do which are similar, and the things they do
they will need to listen for both the day and the activity.
which are different.
• Play the audio once and check the students' progress. • Encourage them to use We b o th ... for the things which
Play it again if necessary. are similar.
• Ask the students to compare their answers In pairs. Then
check the answers with the class.
Audio script ____ _____
R = Reporter, W = Woman
What's your daily routine? Here's what one person says about
her week.
R: Um, what's your dally routine?
W: Um, well, on Mondays, I work in the office. On Tuesdays,
I have class after work. On Wednesdays, I go to the gym
before work. That gives me energy for the rest of the
week! On Thursdays, I usually meet friends for a drink.
R: And Friday?
W: Friday evening Is the start of the weekend. I always go
dancing. On Saturdays, I relax at home and watch TV.

D a y in , d a y o u t UNIT 4 T 4 2
6 Vocabulary: prepositions of
time
Lead-in
Review m o rn in g , a fte rn o o n , and e v e n in g . Do this by
writing 6 :0 0 a.m . to 1 2 :00 n o o n , 12 :00 n o o n to 6 :0 0 p .m ., 24 See the Student's Book for the audio script.
and 6 :0 0 p .m . to 11 :00 p .m . on the board. Ask the class Tell the students to look at the picture. Explain that they
which words we use for these different times of day. will hear Owen talking to Ava about his routine.
Ask the students to read the questions at the end of the
A conversation, and check that they understand them.
Play the audio once, and check progress. If necessary,
• Choose a student to read the text aloud.
play the audio again. Check the answers with the class.
• Use the text to help the students figure out the
meanings and use of b e fo re , after, and until. If they have
problems understanding these words, ask them if they
Extra: shadow reading
go out with their friends b e fo re work (or school) or after
work. Tell them the school is open until 10 o'clock (for Use the conversation as a s h a d o w rea d in g exercise.
example) and then it is closed. Play the audio and ask the students to read along.
• Ask them to read the three statements carefully. Make
sure they understand later and ea rlier (8 o'clock is earlier
than 9 o'clock, but later than 7 o'clock).
• When the students finish the exercise, check the • Read the instructions to the class, and give the students
a little time to think about the interesting or unusual
answers with the class.
things that they do. Ask them to read the model
B conversation.
• Highlight that we d o karate (and judo), but we p la y ball
• Ask the students to find examples of on, at, in, b e fo re ,
games (like soccer), and g o swimming (and other sports
after, and until in the text in Ex. A and underline them.
activities ending in -ing, e.g. skiing).
• Ask the students to work individually to complete the
• Explain that students should ask both y e s /n o questions
grammar table.
and wh- questions. Elicit wh- questions as examples.
• When the students finish, check their answers with the
• Encourage the students to circulate, asking and
class.
answering questions about their activities. Ask them to
• Point out that we say in the m orning and in the even in g but
speak to at least five other students.
highlight that we do not say in the night. We say at night.

Possible answers •Extra: follow-up questions


on: Monday (mornings), Tuesday(s), weekdays/ Encourage the students to extend their conversations
weekends, etc. by asking one or two follow-up questions about their
at: two (o'clock), 4 a.m., 9 p.m., etc. partner's activities. For example:
in: the morning(s), the afternoon(s), etc. A : I p la y s o c c e r o n S u n d a y s.
before: two (o'clock), 4 a.m., 9 p.m., lunch, bedtime, etc. B: O h , w h e re d o y o u p la y ?
after: two (o'clock), 4 a.m., 9 p.m., breakfast, school, etc.
until: the morning, two (o'clock), 4 a.m., 9 p.m., etc.
c
c • When the students finish Ex. B, invite several students to
• Ask the students to work individually to complete the share some interesting things they learned about their
sentences with the correct option. classmates.
• Have the students compare their answers in pairs. Tell them • As the students give their answers, encourage the
to refer to the examples in Ex. A and Ex. B to help them rest of the class to ask questions to find out more
complete the exercise. Check the answers with the class. information about their classmates' interests.
• Write any interesting and unusual activities on the board
to help boost the students' vocabulary.
Extra: prepositions with time
Give each student three slips of paper and a thick
marker. Ask the students to write on on one slip, at
on another slip, and in on the third slip in very big
letters. Tell them you will say a time reference (e.g. th e
a fte rn o o n , tw e n ty after five ) and they should hold up
the card with the correct preposition. Once they have
practiced the phrases with you, they can test each -
other in groups or pairs. n
r
Workbook pp. 2 3-2 4, Section 4
I

A Read what this wom an says about her routine.


(^irde)the correct option to complete each explanation.
"I usually work until five o'clock. I get home at six. On weekdays, I go
to bed early. I often watch TV until bedtim e. On Fridays, I always go out
after work and I see friends in the evening. Som etim es, I don't get home
before 3 a.m .l I sleep late on Saturday m ornings."

1 We use(untJfy b efo re / after to say when we stop doing something.


2 W e use until / b efore /(aftehto say at a later time.
3 We use until /(before)/ after to say at an earlier time.

B Read the text in Exercise A again. Write two more


examples of your own for each category in the table below.

before after until

Fridays \ fuse, \ tke-evesdny 3 a,.nc. w o rk , bedtime.

C Choose the correct option to complete the sentences.


1 My English class starts two-thirty, 4 I study about 10 p.m ., and then I go to bed.
a) in b) until (cT a t) a) after b) at (c fu n tiP )

2 Let's go out Thursday. 5 See you the morning!


a) in ( b ) on) c) at a) on (b ) in

3 I always brush my teeth I take a shower. 6 My dad usually plays tennis work.
a) until dbT before) c) at a) on (b) a fte r) c) in

A
Answer the questions.
Ava: So, O wen. W hat do you do in your free time?
Owen: I usually have a very busy week. I do different activities almost
every evening.
Ava: Really? W hat activities do you do?
Owen: W ell, I go in-line skating twice a week. And I take an art class
on W ednesday evenings.
Ava: Art class? That's interesting!
Owen: Why don't you come along next week?
Ava: Sounds fun. And what do you usually do on the weekend?
Owen: I go hang gliding on Saturdays. Do you want to come
along to try that?
Ava: No way! Art class is exciting enough for me!

1 W hat activity does Owen do twice a week? ___!P,:!.iilSjJ&IPJL-

2 W hat activity is Ava interested in trying? ar- cii!SS ......

B Walk around the class and ask each person to tell you
two interesting or unusual things they do each week. Find
out as much as you can.
A: Do you do a n y t h in g u nu su a l e a ch w e e k ?
B: On T u e s d a y s , I ta k e a d a n c e c la s s .

C Q j Tell the rest of the class about any interesting or


unusual things your classmates do.

D a y in , d a y o u t UNIT 4 43
8 GRAMMAR clauses with until, before, after
A LANGUAGE IN CONTEXT Read what this man
says and(gjrcle)T (true) or F (false).
"I'm pretty superstitious. I stay in the locker room until I'm the
last one. Then I follow the others. I always touch the grass before
I start to play. It brings me luck. After I do all of that, I always
play well!"

1 He is the last one in the locker room,


and then he follows the others. F
2 He starts to play and then touches the grass. TO

NOTICE!
Underline after, before, and until in the text. T hey come ...
(a) between clauses or at the start of a clause?)
b) between the subject and the verb.

B ANALYZE Read the text in Exercise A again.


Function(^ircle)the correct option.
To talk about the order of events ...

after After I do all of that, I always play well, We use after with the (1)(^rej)/ second event.

before I always touch the grass before I start to play. We use before with the (2) first /Qeconœevent.

To talk about the duration of events ...

until I stay in the locker room until I'm the last one. We use until to talk about an event that stops at a
particular moment in time.

C PRACTICE Complete these sentences with before, after, or until.


1 Dan has his piano lesson at five. He has dinner at seven.
Dan has his piano lesson .P P ore _ he has dinner. WATCH OUT!
Dan has dinner afteL . he has his piano lesson. 0 I get dressed before I have breakfast.
2 I get home. Then I call my friends. I get dressed before have breakfast.
I call my friends after I get home.

3 Christina studies every day. She stops when she finishes all her schoolwork.
Christina studies every day she finishes all her schoolwork.

4 I arrive at the office. Then I have coffee.


I have coffee after I arrive at the office.
I arrive at the office before | have coffee.

D Q§ NOW YOU DO IT Work in pairs. Ask and answer questions


about what you do before and after you do these things.
• leave the house in the morning
• do your homework
• go out in the evening with friends
• go to bed

A: W h a t d o y o u d o b e f o r e y o u l e a v e t h e h o u s e in t h e m o r n i n g ?
B: B e f o r e I l e a v e t h e h o u s e in t h e m o r n in g , I ...

o

• Highlight the difference between the use of before/


r: clauses w i th until, after to talk about the order of events, and until to talk
about the duration of events. Make sure the students
understand these concepts. An added challenge for
the students may be the way these words are used
Lead-in
grammatically in sentences in their language (e.g. they
Refer the students to Section 6, Ex. C. Tell them to read might be used with infinitives or future tenses).
item 3. Ask who in the class brushes their teeth before • Draw the students' attention to the example sentences.
they take a shower, and who brushes their teeth after they Note the use of the comma when you begin with the
take a shower. Find out what the majority does. Ask other subordinate clause (in this case, the clause beginning
questions about their morning routine: Do you get dressed with after).
before or after you have breakfast? Do you drink coffee
before or after your shower?
Extra: changing order
A
To reinforce this rule, ask the students to work in pairs
• Before you begin the exercise, pre-teach and drill the and write the b e fo re and after sentences from the
pronunciation of some of the words (e.g. superstitious: grammar table in a different order (e.g. B e fo re I start
believing that certain things or behaviors can bring to play, I alw ays to u c h th e grass). Make sure they have
good or bad luck; locker room: the place where athletes remembered to put the comma in the right place.
get dressed; touch: put your hands on something; luck:
good fortune).
• Tell the students to read the text and decide whether c
the statements are true or false. Check the answers with • Point out the Watch out! box. Ask the students why the
the class. second sentence is incorrect (there is a subject pronoun
• Note that pretty here is an adverb and is not related to missing before have). Give the students time to think
the adjective pretty. Here it means fairly or even very. about what they do before and after the activities.
• Ask the students to work individually to complete the
sentences. Then encourage them to check their answers
Extra: popular superstitions in pairs, discussing any differences.
Lead a brief class discussion about popular • Invite the students to read aloud the completed
superstitions in the students' home countries. Ask the sentences to check answers.
students whether they believe in them.

Extra: grammar practice


NOTICE! Insert b e fo re , after, or until to complete the sentences.
1 We usually have coffee_______ we finish our lunch.
Ask the students to read the text again and underline 2 I take a shower_______ I go to school.
the examples of after, b e fo re , and until. Note that 3 I watch T V _______ it is time to go to bed.
there is one example of each. Then ask them to look 4 We clean the classroom_______ we go home.
back at the sentences they underlined, and circle the
correct option to complete the statement.
Answers
1 after 3 until
2 before 4 before
B
Function
D
• Have the students read the text again. Then ask them to
repeat the model sentences in the grammar table after • Invite two students to read the model conversation.
you. Then put the students in pairs to do the exercise.
• Ask the students to circle the correct options in the • When the pairs finish, elicit some examples from the
grammar table individually and then to compare their class. Ask the students to report back on their partners
answers in pairs. Check the answers with the class. (e.g. Daniel watches TV before he does his homework.).
Review the pronunciation of third person -s endings,
and make sure that the students are using before, after,
Alternative and until correctly.

Write this sentence from the text in Ex. A on the board:


I always to u c h th e g ra ss b e fo re I start to play. Ask the Workbook p. 25, Section 5
students which happens first— to u ch th e g ra ss or start
to p la y (touch the grass).

D a y in , d a y o u t UNIT 4 T 4 4
c
• If the students have problems identifying a family
member or a celebrity with an unusual routine, direct
them to the pictures of people on p. 20.
Lead-in • While the students are writing, circulate and monitor,
assisting where needed.
• Write two incorrect sentences on the board (e.g. *H a v e
c o ffe e e v e ry m o rn in g and * H e n e v e r late fo r class).
D
Tell the students there is a mistake in each sentence,
and ask them to work in pairs to correct the mistakes. • Put the students in pairs. Ask them to read each other's
Emphasize that the first sentence is incorrect because sentences and discuss the similarities and differences.
it has no subject, and the second sentence is incorrect • Ask for several volunteers to read their sentences to the
because it has no verb. class. Have the class try to guess the person's job, based
• Remind the students that they practiced understanding on the description of the routine.
the mechanics on p. 23.
• Ask the students to read the information in the skills E
panel carefully. Emphasize that sentences in English • Tell the students they are going to help each other
always have a subject and a verb. correct any errors in their sentences.
• If in your students' language the subject can be omitted, • Put the students in pairs, and have them exchange
encourage the students to remember to include the books. Remind them that sentences in English always
subject in English. have a subject and a verb.
• While the students are correcting each other's work,
A circulate and monitor, assisting where needed. Make
• Before the students do this exercise, remind them to sure that the final versions are correct.
look for the subject and the verb in each sentence to
decide whether the sentence is correct or not.
• Ask the students to work individually or in pairs to Extra: language auction
complete the exercise. Circulate and monitor, assisting On the board, write a list of about 10 correct and 10
where needed. incorrect sentences covering aspects of the language
• Check the answers with the class. Invite individual the students have recently covered, such as the
students to come to the board and write the correct third person singular form, adverbs of frequency,
versions of the incorrect sentences. Ask other students if positioning of adverbs in sentences, and prepositions
they agree with the versions on the board. of time. Put the students in groups, and explain that
each group has $10,000 to spend. They should try
B to "buy" as many correct sentences as possible.
• Ask the students to look at the picture. Ask them where When the auction starts, they bid for their sentences,
the man (Jake) works and what his job is. Try to get the viith the sentences being sold to the highest bidder.
students to predict his daily routine (e.g. He g e ts u p at Keep a tally at the side of the board of how much
9 :0 0 a .m .; H e starts w ork rig h t away; H e g e t s to b e d each group has spent—teams have to stop bidding
etc.).
a ro u n d fo u r in th e m o rn in g , when they run out of money. At the end, reveal which
• Tell the students that they will read a text about the man sentences are correct and who got the most for their
in the picture, and that the text has three sentences with money.
mistakes. Ask them to find the mistakes and underline
them.
• When the students finish, ask them why the sentences Workbook p. 25, Section 6
are incorrect. Elicit the corrected sentences from the
B IS
students and write them on the board.
• Highlight that if there are two verbs in one sentence, Workbook
and the subject is the same for both verbs, it is not p. 26, Read and write
necessary to repeat the subject. An example from the
p .27, Downtime
text is: H e p u ts all th e e q u ip m e n t aw ay a n d finally g e ts
to s le e p at a ro u n d fo u r in th e m orn in g.
• Ask the students why Jake's routine is unusual. (He gets
up very late. He works until 4 a.m.)

Answers
He get up ...—He gets up (The simple present form of
get ends in -s for h e/she/it.)
Is hard work.—It's hard work. (The sentence needs a
subject pronoun before the verb.)
... goes back to work.—... he goes back to work. (The
sentence needs a subject pronoun before the verb.)
I

9 W RITIN G; understanding the mechanics Page 23@


A sentence expresses a whole idea. Sentences in English always have a subject and
a verb. When there is no other subject, we use it.

A Check (/) the correct sentences. Rewrite the incorrect sentences.


1 0 Friday my favorite day. Friday is m y favorite day.

2 B i t is twenty to seven.
It is c o ld today.
3 B Is cold today.
£ 4 0 I an unusual routine. I h a v e an unusual routine.

: 5 0 My dad gets up at 4 a.m .


6 B I S an interesting job. It's an in terestin g jo b .

B Read about an unusual routine. Find three sentences that are


incorrect and underline them. Explain why they are incorrect and
suggest changes.

The life of a roadie isn't easy! And Jake Redman knows. This is his
tenth year as a roadie with some of the biggest names in music.
He has a hard routine on tour. He get up at noon when the
tour bus arrives at the next stadium. He starts work right
away— he helps to get the stadium ready for the show.
It takes four hours and fifty people! Is hard work. Then, it's
time for a meal and a little free time. Sometimes he watches
the show in the evening. When the show is over, after midnight,
goes back to work. He puts all the equipment away and finally gets
to sleep at around four in the morning. What a life!

C Think of someone (a member of your family, a celebrity, etc.)


with an unusual routine. Write a few sentences in your notebook
describing what you think they do on a typical day.

D 0 Work in pairs. Read each other’s sentences.


Do the two people have similar or different routines?

E 0 Read your partner’s sentences again. Is every


sentence correct? Help your partner find any mistakes.

Day in, day out UNIT 4 45


MANAGINGYOURTIME
• Understand any problems you have with managing your time.
• Write a to-do list and categorize each task.
• Decide on the best order for the tasks.

A o f How well do you manage your time? Complete this quiz


Compare your answers in pairs. How accurate is the quiz?
W hat can you do to improve your time management? ^

Some of us are born to be late and

It's time to think about time! others are always on time. Take our
fun quiz to find out which you are!
• Ask the students to look at the pictures on the quiz. Ask
Step 1 Understand any problems you have with them which picture shows a busy person, and which
managing your time. (Ex. A, Ex. E) picture shows a calm, organized person.
Step 2 Write a to-do list and categorize each task. (Ex. B, • Go over the meaning and pronunciation of worried.
Ex. C) • Read the instructions for the quiz. Make sure the
Step 3 Decide on the best order for the tasks. (Ex. D) students understand that they need to choose one
answer for each question. Tell them to circle the answer
Lead-in
that is true for them in each case.
• Ask the students if they have a lot of time to do things, • Ask the students to do the exercise individually.
or if they sometimes feel they don't have enough-time Circulate and monitor, assisting where needed.
to do all the things they need to do. Check that they • When the students finish, have them calculate their
understand the word busy (a busy person has many scores according to the chart on the right of the quiz.
things to do and not enough time). • Take a class poll to find out which category the students
• Emphasize the importance of effective time belong to. Note that you may need to explain achieve
management. Explain that careful planning helps us (do something successfully) and attitude (your opinion
manage our time better. about something).
• Explain the concept of a to-do list (writing down all
the things you have to do in a day or a week) and the
benefits of putting things in order of priority (from most Alternative
important to least important).
The quiz can be done as an interview. Ask the students
• Ask the students if they write to-do lists and, if they do,
to work in pairs and ask each other the questions.
how the lists help them plan their time.
They should then write down their partner's answers to
each question, and figure out their partner's score and
which category they belong to.

D a y in , d a y o u t UNIT 4 T 4 6
B D
• Refer the students to the to-do list. Note that the stress • This is a reflective task, so give the students plenty of
is on d o . Ask the class how many of them make to-do time to do this. Explain that they will need to reorganize
lists regularly. Ask them what three categories are their original to-do lists based on how important
included in the to-do list (the day or date, the tasks, or urgent each task is. Highlight the importance of
the estimated time for each task). Check that they prioritizing.
understand the word task (something that you need to • Emphasize that the students may find it helpful to
do, often something that is difficult). balance out their to-do lists if they move tasks from one
• Ask the students to make a similar to-do list for all the day to another.
days of the next week. Write the three categories on the • While the students are doing this task, circulate and
board to remind the students to include them all. Give monitor, assisting where needed.
them plenty of time to think about this before you move
on to Ex. C. • E
• Read the instructions to the class.
• Put the students in pairs, and have them compare their
Alternative lists. Write a few helpful phrases on the board (e.g.
Ask the students to make a to-do list for just two or W hat d o y o u h a v e to d o on M o n d a y ? I n e e d to clea n m y
three days of the next week. Encourage them to evaluate each other's lists
room .).
and decide if they have enough time to do everything
they have listed.
c • When the pairs finish, briefly get some feedback from
• Ask the students to look at the diagram. Explain that the class. Take a class poll to find out which students
this is one possible way of prioritizing tasks when writing think they have enough time to do everything. If there
a to-do list — important/not important, urgent/not are any students who don't have enough time, ask if
urgent. Explain how to decide whether something is others can help them to prioritize their tasks.
important but not urgent (e.g. paying a credit card bill.
It might not be due for a month, so it is not urgent, but
it is still important.). Explain to the students that one REFLECT
way to determine whether something is important or • Ask the students to read the R e f le c t question.
urgent is to think about what will happen if you don't do • Give them some time to think about different situations
it. Explain that to decide how urgent something is, think in the domains of Work and Career and Study and
about the amount of time you have to complete it. Learning where the skill of M a n a g in g y o u r tim e would
• Point out the How to say it box, and ask the students to be useful.
repeat the sentences chorally, and then individually. • Elicit the following ideas: prioritizing jobs at work,
• Put the students in pairs, and tell them to exchange having a deadline, when you need to make time for
their to-do lists with their partners. Encourage them •meetings or for discussions with colleagues; studying for
to use the questions in the How to say it box to find an exam when you have a bit of homework, when you
out whether the tasks in their partner's to-do list are have a deadline for an assignment, etc.
important or not, and have them work together to rank
the tasks from A to D. When they finish, tell them to
give the to-do lists back to their partners.
B Make a list of things to do in the
coming week. Estimate the time
you need for each one. Look at the
example.

C Work in pairs. Ask and answer


questions about your lists. Use the
diagram and mark each task depending
on how important and how urgent it is.

Key to diagram:

Very important and very urgent.


Very urgent, but not very important.
Very important, but not very urgent.
Not very important and not very urgent.

■ -
D Write your things to do in order. For Day
each day of the week, write A things first,
Sunday
followed by B things, etc. Think about
the time you have and consider moving
some things from one day to another. Monday

E 51 Work in pairs. Compare your daily Tuesday


to-do lists. Can you do everything in the
time you have? Wednesday

Thursday
H O W TO SAY IT Q3
Prioritizing Friday
Is this urgent?
How important is this?
Saturday
It's very important!
I don't really need to ...
I suppose this isn't really urgent, so
REFLECT ...
How can the skill of managing your
time be useful to you in Work and
Career and Study and Learning?

D a y in , d a y o u t UNIT 4 47
1 VOCABULARY
A Rita is talking about her day. Look at the time on each watch. Then complete these
sentences with a verb and the correct time. (6 points)

dinner
se v e n (o'clock)
at

B Rita is talking about other parts of her day.(^irci^)the correct prepositions. (4 points)
1 I always have breakfast at/(^eforg)/ after / until I go to school.
2 I som etim es go for coffee with friends until / at /Rafter)/ on school.
3 / bnt/V / A t Saturday nights, I use my computer or watch a movie b efore / after / on /(untjfomidnight,
and then I go to bed.

8-10 correct: I can tell the time and use prepositions to talk about what I do in a typical day.
0-7 correct: Look again at Sections 1 and 6 on pages 40 and 43.
SCORE: /10

2 GR AR
A Read this text about how frequently five people play video games.
Write their names in the correct order on the scale. (5 points)
When Leo comes home from school, he always plays video games. His sister, Marina, sometimes plays with
him, but she prefers going online to talk to her friends. David often plays video games after school, but not
every day. His sister, Lola, never plays. She thinks video games are boring. Samuel rarely plays video games,
but he likes one soccer game that he plays with his brother.

100% ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ► 0%
„ Leo , D a vid , M arina . Sam uel q Lola

B Rewrite the sentences with before, after, or until. Use the correct punctuation. (5 points)
1 Leo has dinner, and then he plays games on his computer.
L e o has d in n e r b e fo re h e plays g a m e s on his co m p u te r. (b e f o r e )
2 Marina talks to friends online. She stops when it's time for bed.
M arina talks to frien ds o n lin e until it's tim e for b e d . (until)

3 David does his homework. Then he plays video games.


D a vid plays v id e o g a m e s a fter h e d o e s his h o m ew o rk . _ (after)

4 Lola watches TV. She stops when she goes to bed.


Lola w a tch e s T V until s h e g o e s to b e d . (until)

5 Samuel plays a video gam e, and then he listens to music.


A fte r S a m u e l plays a v id e o g a m e , h e listens to m usic. (after)

8-10 correct: I can use frequency adverbs and time clauses to talk about when and how often people do things.
0-7 correct: Look again at Sections 3 and 8 on pages 41 and 44.
SCORE: /10
Language wrap-up 1 Vocabulary
Students can do the Language wrap-up exercises in A
class or for homework. If you give them for homework, Make sure the students understand that they should write
remember to check the exercises at the beginning of the a verb in the first blank and the time that the watch shows
next class, or collect a few to grade and identify any typical in the second blank.
errors.
If you decide to do the exercises in class, you can B
approach the wrap-up as a two-step reviewing procedure. Encourage students to read the sentences carefully before
First, ask the students to do the Vocabulary section they choose their answers.
individually. When ready, encourage the students to check
2 Grammar
their answers carefully, and then put them in pairs to
compare answers and discuss any differences. Self- and A
peer-correction are two excellent ways of developing Focus the students' attention on the scale under the
learner independence and creating a cooperative learning text. Then ask them to read the text carefully, and then
environment. After completing the Vocabulary section, you underline the names and frequency adverbs before they
can apply the same procedure to the Grammar section. write the names in the correct order on the scale.
At the end of each section, make sure that the students
write their score out often. If they have a score lower B
than eight, direct them to the appropriate sections of the Remind the students that they have to use the word in
unit, and encourage them to read those sections again for parentheses when they rewrite the sentence and to check
homework. After that, ask the students to complete the that they have used the correct punctuation. Elicit which
exercise(s) again at home. sentences can have the clauses the other way round
(1 Before Leo plays games on his computer, he ...; 3 After
David does his homework, he ...; 5 Samuel listens to music
after he ...).

Refer to the Communicative wrap-ups on pp. 132-133


of the Student's Book for more activities.

Unit 4 Com petence developed C E F Reference (A1)

1 Vocabulary can tell tim e In a variety of w ays Tab le 1; Tab le 2; Section 3 .5 ;


Section 4 .4 .3 .1
2 Reading can read and respond to a short m agazine article Section 4 .4 .2 .2
3 Grammar can und erstand and use fre q u en cy ad verb s Table 1 ; Table 2; Sections 5 .2 .1 .2 ;
6 .4 .7 .7 ; 6 .4 7 .8
4 Pronunciation can correctly stress days o f the w eek Section 5 .2 .1 .4
5 Listening can listen for sp e cific inform ation Tab le 1; Tab le 2; Section 4 .4 .2 .1
6 Vocabulary can und erstand and use p rep ositions o f tim e Table 1; Table 2; Section 4 .4 .3 .1
7 Speaking can talk abo ut interesting activities Section 4 .4 .3 .1
8 Grammar can und erstand and use clau ses with u n til, b e fo r e , a fte r Table 1; Table 2; Sections 5 .2 .1 .2 ;
6 .4 7 .7 ; 6 .4 7 .8
9 Writing can w rite sen te n ce s and use sub je cts correctly Table 2; Section 4 .4 .1 .2 ;
Section 4 .4 .3 .4

D a y in , d a y o u t UNIT 4 T 4 8
UNIT 5 HERE, THERE, AND EVERYWHERE! E
The expression here, there, and everywhere means all over the world. It is also the title of a
song by The Beatles. You can say that someone has traveled here, there, and everywhere.

Writing: an email to give directions


Ask the students why they usually write emails: for work or
Unit plan study; to get information from a friend or company; to talk
to friends or family; for another reason. Ask them to find
Unit opener (p. 49) 10 min.
the email in this unit and say what it is about.
• Optional downloadable unit opener 10 min.
1 Grammar: there is / there are with (p. 50) 40 min. Refer the students to the lifeSkills panel. Tell them that the
som e, any, several, a lot of, many
topic of this unit's lifeSkills section is Estab lish in g priorities.
Ask them to work in pairs and discuss when they need to
2 Vocabulary: places and attractions (p. 51) 25 min.
order things according to their importance, and if they are
in a city
good at this, and why or why not.
3 Pronunciation: compound nouns (p. 51) 15 min.
4 Reading: for the main idea (p. 52) 30 min. A
5 Listening: to a news report (p. 52) 30 min. • Ask the students to work in pairs and write down in
6 Grammar: the imperative (p. 53) 40 min. English as many country names as they can in two
7 Vocabulary: locations and directions (p. 54) 25 min. minutes. Listen to their suggestions as a class. Correct
8 Speaking: repeating directions to (p. 55) 20 min. any errors with pronunciation.
check understanding • Write the following expressions on the board: / think it's
in ... b e c a u s e th e re is/are . .. ; It's p ro b a b ly . .. ; I d o n 't
9 Writing: an email to give directions (p. 55) 20 min.
think it's . .. ; I w o u ld like to a tte n d th e ... b e c a u s e I like ....
• Optional downloadable Writing 20 min.
Tell the students that these phrases are used to express
workshop: an email to give directions opinions in English. Explain that we use p ro b a b ly when
lifeSkills: establishing priorities (p. 56) 45 min. we are almost certain something is true. Ask them to use
(Self and Society) the expressions on the board when talking about the
• Optional downloadable lifeSkills 45 min. pictures.
lesson (Work and Career) • Ask the students to look at the pictures. Elicit guesses
• Optional downloadable lifeSkills 45 min. for where they think the events in the pictures are, and
ask students to give reasons for their answers.
lesson (Study and Learning)
• Ask the students which of the events they would like to
Language wrap-up (p. 58) 15 min. attend and why.
Video and downloadable video worksheet 45 min.
Answers
A Italy, II Palio horse race in Siena
B Malaysia, harvest festival in Sabah
U n it opener C The U.S., cherry blossom festival in Washington, D.C.
D Mexico, Day of the Dead festival
Lead-in
Direct the students' attention to the objectives in the unit B
menu and go through the information with them. Explain • Ask the students to look at Section 7 on p. 34. Elicit the
that this unit focuses on language to talk about places and questions for asking for others' opinions, and write them
directions, and on the following skills to help them do this: on the board. Ask the students to repeat them chorally
Reading: for the main idea and individually, with the main stress in the correct place
Ask the students where they usually see written opinions (e.g. W hat d o y o u think?).
(e.g. in newspaper articles, on internet blogs, etc.). Ask • Put the students in pairs or small groups. Read the
them if they often read opinions, and why or why not. instructions aloud. The students then discuss their
Speaking: repeating directions to check understanding answers.
Ask the students when it is important to check information. • Encourage the students to use the questions for asking
Ask them to look through the unit and find out what type for others' opinions when they are discussing their
of information people are checking. favorite things to do and places to visit (e.g. A : I really
Listening: to a news report like N e w York. W hat d o y o u th ink ? B : I a g re e . It's a
Ask the students if they listen to any of these types of fantastic city.).
news reports: national and international news, local news, • Elicit ideas from the class.
news about cultural events, commentary about social,
cultural, and political issues.
UNIT 5
IN THIS UNIT
0 learn language to talk about
places and directions A Look at the pictures. Where do you think each of these
events is happening? Give reasons for your answers.
read descriptions of where
Which of these events would you like to attend? Why?
% people live— reading for the
main idea
ask for and follow directions—
repeating directions to check
understanding
^ listen to a news report about a
festival
write emails giving and asking
for directions
watch a video about an interesting
festival

B ^ Work in groups. Talk about your


favorite things to do and places to visit.
A: / r e a lly lik e L o n d o n .
B: M e , t o o ! I lo v e g o i n g to all t h e m u s e u m s .

LIFE Learn to establish priorities to


make decisions
SKILLS
SELF &
SO CIETY
Here, there, and everywhere! UNIT 49
I VV V V
1 GRAMMAR: there is / t h e r e are with some, any, several, a lot of, m any
A LANGUAGE IN CONTEXT Read about the UFO festival.
Answer the questions.

H e le n w r it e s :
“ I’m from Canada, and I’m traveling in the southwest U.S.A. Are there any interesting
festivals in this area right now? Is there a festival in Arizona? I’m in Phoenix right now.”

fa n a n s w e r s :
“There aren’t any festivals in Arizona this month, but there is a cool festival in Roswell,
New Mexico, it’s called the UFO Festival, and it’s all about UFOs and space aliens!
There are a lot of different types of events. For example, there are several planetarium
shows, and there are some talks by astronomers and other scientists. There aren’t
many tickets for these talks, so it’s a good idea to buy them online as soon as
possible. There’s an alien costume competition, and there are many contestants with
really crazy costumes! There’s also an alien parade. Believe me, there isn’t another
festival like the UFO Festival!”

1 Where is the UFO Festival?


NOTICE!
1 The writer uses the phrases there is /
2 What types of events does the festival include?
there are / there aren't / are there / is there.
3 Are all the events in the festival free? Do these phrases refer to things or actions?
2 How do we form a contraction of there is?
B ANALYZE Read the text in Exercise A again.
Function Choose the correct option to complete the sentences.
1 We use t h e r e is / t h e r e a r e t o ...
(a) say that something exists^j b) indicate the location of something.
2 We use words like s o m e , an y, and s e v e r a l to talk about...
a) exact quantities, (b) generalquantities.)

Form Com plete the sentences with the correct form of t h e r e is / th e re a re

Affirmative Negative Questions


T h e re is T h e re isn't Is th e re
( 1) a cool festival in ( 6) another festival (9) a festival in
Roswell, New Mexico. like the UFO Festival! Arizona?
T h e re is T h e re aren't A re th e re any interesting
( 2) an alien costume (7) any festivals in ( 10 )
competition. Arizona this month. festivals in this area right now?
(3) T h e re are a |0t 0f different ( 8) T h e re aren t many tickets for
types of events. these talks.
T h e re are
(4) several
planetarium shows.
(5) T h e re are ___sorne talks by
astronomers and other scientists.

C PRACTICE Circle)the correct option.


1 There is n 't / ( a r e n f y any festivals in my country in November.
2 Is /(Are)there any food festivals in your town?
3 In Mazatlan, there(isV are a carnival in February.
4 There are ( $ e v e r a jy a n y carnivals around the world every year.
5 Are there(anyy a dance competitions during the festival? WATCH OUT!
6 There is /(arma lot of people in the parade. There are a lot of people.
7 There isn'tfay's o m e festival like the UFO Festival in my country.
(££) There is a lot of people.
8 There are any /(¿Qot ¿^festivals in the summer.

D (H NOW YOU DO IT Work in pairs. Choose a festival in your city or


country. Describe it for your partner to guess. Then switch roles.
A: It's in A u g u s t . T h e r e a r e m u s ic ia n s . T h e r e 's a p a r a d e . B: T h e m u s i c fe s tiv a l!

© r

• Ask the students to look at the Watch out! box. Remind


them that p e o p l e is plural, and it follows the plural form.
• Ask the students to read the statements.
• Ask them to do this exercise individually, and then to
compare their answers in pairs. Encourage the students
to discuss any differences in their answers.
• Check the answers with the class. Remind the students
• Tell the students they are going to read about another
that we use an y in questions and negatives (items 1,2,
festival. Ask them to look at the picture of the festival.
and 5), and we never use an y in affirmative sentences.
Ask them what part of the world this could be and what
• Ask the students what helped them select the correct
might happen at the festival.
form of th e re is / th e re are (if the noun is singular, use
• Choose a student to read aloud the three questions
th e re is, and if it is plural, use th e re are).
about the text.
• Ask the students to read the text individually and answer
the questions. When the students finish the exercise, Extra: grammar practice
check the answers with the class.
Ask the students to correct the errors in these
sentences. There is one error in each sentence.
Answers
1 Is there any festivals in your city?
1 in Roswell, New Mexico 2 There aren't some carnivals in this region.
2 planetarium shows, talks, a costume competition, a 3 There is a lot of cultural events here.
parade 4 There isn't any airport in our city.
3 No, the talks are not free.
Answers
NOTICE! 1 Are 2 any 3 are 4 an

• Read the questions aloud to the class.


• Put the students in pairs and ask them to answer the D
questions.
• Ask the students to read the model conversation.
• Check the answers with the class.
• Do another similar example with the class. Choose a
local festival that the students will know—or use one of
Answers the festivals from earlier in this unit—and give a brief
1 things 2 there's description, using th e re is and th e re are. Have the class
guess the festival.
• Give the students time to think of a festival and make
B notes about what happens during the festival. Remind
them to use th e re is and th e re are.
Function • Put the students in pairs to complete the exercise. While
• Give the students time to read the sentences, and have pairs work, monitor and check the students are using
them do the exercise individually. the correct forms of the verb b e with th ere.
• Ask the students to compare their answers in pairs
before you check the answers with the class.
Form Extra: months
• Ask the students to look back at the text in Ex. A and Briefly review the months of the year in English. Have
underline all of the examples of th e re is and th e re are in a spelling race. Divide the class into teams of five or
the text. six students. Say one of the months of the year, and
• Elicit the negative forms (th e re isn't / th e re aren't) and have one person from each team come to the front
the interrogative forms (Is th e re ? / A re there?). of the class and write the word on the board. The
• Highlight that th e re is can be contracted to there's, but first team to write the word correctly scores a point.
th e re are does not normally contract.
Continue until every member of the team has had at
• Ask the students to fill in the blanks in the grammar least one turn.
table using the correct affirmative, negative, and
question forms of th e re is 7 th e re are.
• Highlight that the pronunciation of th in th e re is
Workbook p. 28, Section
/6/. Take some time going over the pronunciation,
emphasizing that the tongue comes out slightly
between the front teeth, and the sound is voiced (i.e.,
if they touch their throats while making the sound, the
students can feel their vocal cords vibrating).
• Invite individual students to say the answers.

H e re , th e r e , a n d e v e r y w h e r e ! u n it 5 T50
2 Vocabulary: places and I 3 Pronunciation: compound
attractions in a city______________I nouns
A A
• H 25 Ask the students to look at the picture, and > H ] 26 See the Student's Book for the audio script.
elicit that the information is about a Chinese New Year • Explain that compound nouns are words with two
festival and parade. parts—two nouns that together form one new word or
• Ask the students to look at the map. Use the icons to phrase. Point out the examples.
help with the meanings of unfamiliar vocabulary. • Play the audio once, and ask the students to notice the
• Tell the students they will hear a guide for visitors to the stressed word in each pair.
festival. Explain that they should listen and circle the • To reinforce the stress on the first noun in the
places on the map that the speaker mentions. compound, have the students say the first noun
• Play the audio once, and check progress. Play it again, if more loudly than the second one. Emphasize that in
necessary. Check the answers with the class. compound nouns of more than one syllable, the stress
falls on the first syllable in the first word. The stressed
Audio script ____ syllables here are: science museum, shopping mall,
Hello, and welcome to our phone guide for this year's Chinese chocolate factory, movie theater.
New Year festival. There's a lot for everyone to enjoy. Between
January 23rd and 28th, there's a special exhibition of Chinese B
paintings at the art gallery on Park Street. There are special • Read the instructions to the class. Then invite volunteers
events at the zoo for children under ten, and Chinese dancers to read the example compound nouns aloud. Correct
and musicians in the park every day at 11 a.m. Chinese food is the pronunciation as needed.
available from special stalls at the shopping mall on weekends. • Put the students in pairs to think of new nouns using the
Please note that there are special buses that leave hourly prompts. Circulate and monitor, assisting where needed.
from the bus station and take you straight to the center o f ... • To check answers, ask for volunteers to write their words
on the board. Ask the students to copy any new words
into their vocabulary notebooks.
• Read the instructions and the question in item 1 aloud.
• Put the students in pairs to answer the first question. Possible answers
Encourage the students to use both affirmative and art museum, maritime museum; bus station, police
negative forms of there is / th e re are when talking about station, gas station; shoe factory, phone factory
their town (e.g. There is a park. T h e re a ren 't an y art
galleries.).
• When the students finish, elicit the answers from the
class. Extra: more compound nouns
• Read the instructions for item 2. Elicit some other compound nouns related to towns
• Ask the students to work in pairs again and list as many and cities: p o s t office, b a s e b a ll/s o c c e r stadium ,
other places in their town as possible. Give them time sw im m in g p o o l, sp o rts cen ter, b u s sto p . Have the class
to ask questions about unknown vocabulary. You can repeat the words after you, making sure they place the
expect the students to mention possible cognates stress on the first word in each pair.
or loan words, such as bank, su p e rm a rk e t, h o tel, and
m u se u m .
• Write new words on the board, marking the stress, and c
ask the students to copy the words in their notebooks. • Put the students in pairs to write sentences using the
compound nouns from Ex. A and Ex. B. Remind them to
use there's and th e re are in their sentences.
► Workbook pp. 28-29, Section 2 O 1» • Have the students read their sentences aloud to each
i other.
• Choose some pairs to read their sentences aloud to the
class. Correct any errors in the use of th ere's and th e re
are and in the stress pattern of the compound nouns
they use.
(
.U 2 VOCABULARY: places and attractions in a city
A | p 25 Listen to the message about the Chinese New Year festival.
(^ircl§)the places on the map that the speaker mentions.

Chinese N ew Year
festival and parade

It’s tim e fo r the Chinese N ew Year!


Come a n d jo in the celebrations.
The colorful dragon parade covers
the fo llow in g route this year:

main
square

science chocolate fountain


museum factory

movie
bus station theater art gallery
shopping mall

B Work in pairs. Answer the questions.


1 How many places on the map are also in your town?
A: T h e re 's a zoo.
B: Yes, a n d th e re a re s e v e ra l ...

2 How many other places in your town can you name in English?
A: T h e re a re a lo t o f b a n k s .
B: A n d th e re 's a h is to ry m u s e u m .

3 PRONUNCIATION: compound nouns


A BP 26 Listen and repeat. Notice that in compound nouns
(noun + noun), the first word is stressed.
r
museum— science museum factory— chocolate factory
mall— shopping mall theater— movie theater

B B1 Work in pairs. Make new compound nouns for places in your city. Then practice
saying the words.
1 history museum 2 train station 3 car factory
museum station factory

C (JH Work in pairs. Use compound nouns from above, or think of others, and write
sentences about things in your town. Practice reading your sentences.
T h e re a re tw o s h o p p in g m a lls h e re . T h e re 's a h is to ry m u s e u m a n d an a rt m u s e u m .

H e r e , th e r e , a n d e v e r y w h e r e ! UNIT 5 51
ING: for the main idea
When you read a text, think about these questions. What is the general topic?
What is the writer saying about the topic?

A Read these texts quickly.(^ircle)the main topic.


eighborhooa|> b) festivals c) families

"I live in a quiet area in Paris. I like living there because it's very friendly and there are several stores
and cafés. The only problem is that it's a little boring sometimes because there aren't any clubs. There's
a good stadium, though. I often go to sports events."

"I live in Singapore, in a very busy neighborhood. I don't like it because it's noisy and there's a lot of
traffic. There's a shopping mall near my house, and I go there a lot. There are also museums and a movie
theater in the area, but I don't have time to go to them. There's a good food festival in April, though."

"I live In a nice neighborhood in the city of Montevideo, Uruguay. The neighborhood is pretty small, and
a lot of our neighbors are my friends. There aren't many big shopping malls near here, but there are some
nice small stores. There's also an art gallery, a movie theater, and a gym. Oh, and there are a lot of great
restaurants! I think it's a fantastic place to live."

B Read the texts in Exercise A again. Decide whether each person has a
positive or negative opinion of where they live.
Em ile ^positive)/ n e g a tiv e M elissa: p o s itiv e / ( n e g a tiv e ) C arlos ( p o s it iv e ) / n e g a tiv e

C Qj| Work in pairs. Talk about your neighborhood. Do you like it?
W hy or why not?
I lik e m y n e i g h b o r h o o d b e c a u s e it's s m a ll a n d ...

5 to a news report
A | | 2 7 Listen to the start of a news report.
Choose the correct option.
1 Bunol is near the city of ... <gWalenciaT)> b) Murcia.
2 La T o m a tin a festival happens in ... a) September.

Qjjg28 Listen to the rest of the report. Choose the


correct option.
1 Mary speaks to a man from ... (afSpam ?) b j t he U . S. c) Germany.
2 All the people go to ... to have breakfast.
<3£the main square^ b) the park c) their houses
3 At eleven o'clock, everyone ...
a) goes home. C ^throws tom atoesTl> c) eats tom atoes.
4 The festival continues f o r ... a) two weeks. b) two days. <cftwo hqurs^>

C Q | Give your opinion. W hat do you think about


La Tomatina? W hat do you think about festivals in
general? Give reasons.
I th in k th e y 're fu n .
I d o n 't lik e th e m b e c a

©
------------------------------------------------------------------- •
A
27 Read the instructions aloud. Ask the students
Lead-in to look at the picture and tell you what they think the
festival is about.
• Ask the students to read the information in the skills
• Give the students time to read the sentences and
panel.
options. Emphasize that they are listening for the name
• Emphasize that when they are trying to identify the main
of the city and the month when the festival takes place.
topic of a text, they can often run their eyes quickly over
• Remind them not to worry if they don't understand
a text to find the main topic from key vocabulary items
every word they hear. Explain that they have worked on
(both words and phrases) in the text. listening for specific information in earlier units, and that
they should apply this same skill here.
A • Play the audio once. Ask the students to compare their
• Read the instructions and topic options to the answers in pairs. Play it again, if necessary.
class. Check that the students understand the word
n e ig h b o r h o o d (the area around where you live). Audio script_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
• Ask the students to read the three texts as quickly as Now, everyone likes a food fight. In the town of Bufiol,
possible. Give them a time limit of no more than two they have perhaps the biggest food fight in the world.
minutes, and then ask them to close their books. Bufiol is near Valencia in Spain. They have a tomato
• Ask the students to discuss the answer in pairs. festival called La Tom atina. It happens in August and
everyone in the town throws tomatoes. About 30,000
B people enjoy this festival every year.
• Read the instructions to the class. Explain that the
people say both positive and negative things about B
where they live, but the students should try to 28 Make sure the students understand all the
understand the person's general feeling about the vocabulary in the sentences, especially throw.
place. • Give the students time to read through the sentences,
• Check answers and ask the students what helped them and elicit some predictions from the class.
decide whether the people had a positive or negative • Play the audio once, and ask the students to listen only.
attitude toward their neighborhoods (e.g. key words like Then play it again, and ask the students to circle their
friendly, b o rin g , busy, noisy, g rea t, fantastic). answers.
• Ask the students to compare their answers in pairs.

Extra: reading practice Audio script___________ _____ _______


1 Where does Emile live? (Paris) H = Host, M = Mary
2 Where does Melissa live? (Singapore) H: We sent our reporter, Mary Turner, to Bunol to learn
3 Why doesn't she like it? (It's noisy and there's a lot more about the festival.
of traffic.) M: Right now, there are more than 30,000 people here
4 Where does Carlos live? (Montevideo) in Bunol, with people from Britain, Germany, and
5 Is Carlos's neighborhood big? (No) other countries. That's because today is the day of
La Tomatina, the tomato festival. I want to ask local
people about the festival. ... Excuse me.
Man: Yes?
• Put the students in pairs. Read the instructions
M: I' m from Channel Ten news. Are you from Bunol?
aloud, and give the students time to prepare for the
Man: Yes. I live here.
exercise. Ask them to make a list of the places in their
M: What happens in La Tomatina?
neighborhoods, and what they like or dislike about their
Man: Well, everyone goes to the main square and has
neighborhoods. Encourage them to use as many of the
breakfast. At eleven o'clock, everyone starts throwing
new words from this unit as they can.
tomatoes at each other.
• Circulate and monitor, assisting with spelling and
M: And how long does it last?
vocabulary where needed.
Man: We throw the tomatoes for about two hours. The whole
• When the students finish, invite several volunteers to
town is red Lt the end!
share their ideas with the class.
M: And .why do you do it?
Man: I don't know! It's just for fun!

• Draw the students' attention to the example sentences.


Elicit additional adjectives to complete the first sentence
and write the students' ideas on the board (e.g. It
s o u n d s g re a t; It s o u n d s stu pid.).
• Read the instructions aloud. Have a group discussion.
• Do a class survey to find out what the majority thinks of
Ask the students for examples of famous festivals around the the festival. Find out which students like festivals, and
world (e.g. M ardi G ras in New Orleans, Carnaval in Rio, etc.). which ones they like.
Write the names of some of the festivals on the board.

Here, there, and everywhere! UNIT 5 T 5 2


g jj J , j£ jj V * Ü -rj ¡1

6 Grammar: the imperative Extra: imperative game


Lead-in To consolidate the rules for forming imperatives,
play a quick game. Ask the students to stand up.
Elicit some positive things students can do if they want to
Give instructions like these using the imperative and
learn English well (e.g. sp e a k o n ly En g lish In class, w atch
negative imperative for the students to act on: Sit
En g lish m o v ie s, d o th eir h o m ew o rk), and write them on
d o w n . S ta n d u p again. D o n 't sit d o w n . L o o k at the
the board. Then ask them to tell you things they shouldn't
b o a rd . L o o k at y o u r n eig h b o r. Sit d o w n . D o n 't sta n d
do if they want to learn English well (e.g. D o n 't s p e a k y o u r
up. D o n 't lo o k at th e bo a rd . S ta n d up. L o o k at y o u r
la n g u a g e in class.).
book. The students will get further practice in
Ex. D.
A
<H 29 See the Student's Book for the audio script.
• Explain the exercise. Ask the students to read the c
sentence beginnings and the different possible endings • Do one example with the class to illustrate the activity.
carefully first. Write these words on the board: this s tre e t a h e a d on
• Play the audio once. Check progress and, if necessary, stra ig h t g o . Tell the students the words are in the wrong
play it again. order and elicit the correct order from the class (Go
• Check the answers with the class. For item 2, point out straight a h e a d on this street.).
that Sophia mentions both the street where the bank is • Ask the students to do the exercise individually. Tell
located (It's on M a so n Street) and how to get there (e.g. them to use the examples in Ex. A and Ex. B to help
turn left on R iver S t r e e t ...). them complete the exercise. Remind the students
to capitalize the first word in each sentence and put
periods at the end of the sentences.
NOTICE! • Ask the students to compare their answers in pairs.
• Ask the students to read the statements and the Check the answers with the class.
different possible answers fully first.
• Ask them to look at the underlined words in the D
conversation and choose the best answers. Check • Put the students in groups of three or four.
the answers with the class. • If possible, ask them to stand up and use the whole
space of the classroom.
• The students take turns giving instructions. The other
B students in their group follow the instructions.

Form
• Ask the students to read the examples of affirmative Extra: homework
and negative imperatives in the grammar table. Ask the students to write a list of D o s and D on 'ts
• Direct the students' attention to item 1 and item 2. for tourists visiting their country. Ask them to use
Ask them to choose the best answers. imperatives to write at least five tips for things visitors
should do and things they shouldn't do (e.g. D rive on
Function
th e right! D o n 't sm o k e in restaurants.).
• Ask them to choose the best answer in the Function
section.
• When they have written a further example in each ^ Workbook p. 30, Section 4
column, check the answers with the class.
• Invite volunteers to read their examples aloud for the
class. Write their examples on the board as the students
say them. Ask the class if all the examples are correct. If
not, invite volunteers to the board to make corrections.
A 11329 LANGUAGE IN CONTEXT Listen to this conversation
Then complete each statement below with the correct option.
Rick: Excuse me. Is there an ATM near here?
Sophia: Yes, there's one in the Union Bank. It's on Mason Street.
Rkk: How do I get there?
Sophia: Go straight ahead on this street for two blocks. Turn right
on Park Street and go one block. Then turn left on River
Street and walk about half a block. The bank is on the
left, next to the supermarket. Dòn't go into the bank.
The ATM is outside.
Rick: O K , right on Park Street, and then left on River é r 9M
Street.
Sophia: That's right. Don't worry. It's easy to get there!
Rick: Thank you very much.
Sophia: You're welcom e.

1 Rick wants to ... 2 Sophia tells him ...


i^ e tm o n e ^ ) a) the location of the bank,
b) buy something. b) directions to get there.
c) eat lunch.

B ANALYZE Read the conversation in Exercise A d give personal information.


again. Read the examples below. m
Form Read the examples below and(çîrcîg)the correct option to complete the sentences.

Affirmative Negative

Go straight ahead on this street. Don't go into the bank.


Turn right on Park Street. Don't worry.
Walk half a block. Don't talk.
Read the signs. Don't be late!
Please write your name.

1 In the imperative form, there is /(7s n o h a subject before the base form of the verb.
2 Negative im peratives have ~ 3 o e s n 't before the base form of the verb.

Function(Çirclg)the correct option to complete the statement. Add one more


example to each column of the table. ____________________________________
W e use the imperative to ta lk a b o u t r o u t i n e s / ( g iv e i n s t r u c t io n s o r d i r e c t i o n s .)

C PRACTICE Put the words in order to make sentences.


1 Street / on / turn / left / Baker / . 5 write / please / name / your / .
Turn left on B a k er Street. Plea së'w rite y o u r n am e. __
2 to / this / song / listen / . 6 three / ahead / go / for / blocks / straight / .
Listen to this so n g . (So straight a h e a d fo r th re e b lo ck s. _____
3 instructions / read / the / . 7 for / concert / tickets / buy / the / two / .
R e a d th e instructions. B u y tw o tick e ts fo r th e co n c e rt. _ _____ ___ J

4 at / don't / answers / the / look / . 8 book / don't / open / your / .


D o n 't lo o k at th e answ ers. D o n 't o p e n y o u r b o o k . __

D NOW YOU DO IT Work in small groups. Take turns giving and


following instructions.
Go s t r a ig h t a h e a d . T u rn rig h t. N o , d o n ' t tu rn le ft; tu rn rig h t. S t o p .
W a lk t o t h e d o o r . O p e n t h e d o o r . D o n 't c l o s e it.
C lo s e y o u r b o o k . L o o k at m e.

H e r e , th e r e , a n d e v e r y w h e r e ! UNIT 5 53
ocations and directions
Read and match the instructions to the pictures.
1 Take the second street on the left. 7 Turn left here.
2 Make a U-turn. 8 Go over the bridge.
3 It's on Laurel Avenue. 9 It's between the bank and the school.
4 It's next to the museum. 10 Go straight ahead.
5 Follow the signs for the zoo. 11 Take the first right.
6 It's across from the movie theater. 12 It's on the corner of Mason Street and Laurel Avenue.

B 2 | Look at this street map. Student A, you are at the


t
main square. Student B, you are at the art gallery.
Asking for and giving directions
Ask each other for directions to different places on the map.
E x c u s e m e , w h e re is th e ...?
A: H o w d o I g e t t o t h e z o o fro m h e r e ?
H o w d o I g e t to ...?
B: Go r ig h t o n M a in S t r e e t . T a k e t h e first s t r e e t o n t h e left. T h a t's R iv e r
Is th e re a ... n e a r h e r e ?
S t r e e t . T h e n . ..
Turn le ft / rig h t o n ...
Extra: giving directions
Ask the students to work in pairs and tell each other
how to get from the school to their home. If they live a
Lead-in long way from the school, they can include instructions
Check that the students understand the words left and like Take bus 47 to ...
right. Ask questions, such as Who is sitting on Lydia's
right? Who is sitting on Ben's left? This will also give you
an opportunity to review possessive's.
Extra: definitions game
A
Divide the class into two teams. Ask one student from
• Tell the stud.ents they are going to learn some useful each team to come to the front of the classroom and
language for getting around a city. sit with their backs to the board. Write a word on the
• Read the instructions to the class. Clarify that they are board behind them. This can either be a word from
matching the sentences to the pictures. this lesson, or a word from earlier in the unit. Choose
• Ask the students to work individually. Circulate and one team to describe the word. The student must not
monitor, assisting where needed. say the actual word, but can use synonyms, define
• Ask the students to compare answers in pairs, its meaning, give an opposite, or even give rhyming
explaining their choices. Then check the answers with words (e.g. it sounds like "night"; it's the opposite
the class. of "left"—right). The two students at the front then
• Highlight that we use expressions like the first street have to guess the word. The first student who guesses
on the left, the second street on the right, etc. Briefly correctly wins the point for his or her team. Ask the
review some basic ordinal numbers (first, second, third, other students on each team to take turns coming to
fourth, fifth). the front, and alternate which team tries to describe
the word.

Alternative
Ask the students to cover the sentences in their Workbook p. 31, Section 5
Student's Book, and tell them to look only at the
pictures. Have them work in pairs or as a whole class
and try to write the accompanying sentences for each
picture. Then have them uncover the directions in the
book and match them.

B
• Read the instructions to the class.
• Ask the students to look at the How to say it box.
Explain that these are ways of asking for and giving
directions. Ask the students to repeat the expressions,
using words for places and attractions in a city (e.g. How
do I get to the bus station?; Excuse me, where is the
art gallery?; Is there a bank near here?; Turn left on
7thAvenue; Turn right on 22nd Street.).
• Ask the students to read the model conversation.
Highlight that we say Take the first/second stre et...,
and not *Go the first/second stre e t...
• Put the students in pairs to complete the exercise.
Circulate and monitor, assisting where needed.
• When the pairs finish, listen to a few conversations from
the class.
• Note any errors in the directions, and write them on the
board. Ask the class to correct the mistakes.

H e r e , th e r e , a n d e v e r y w h e r e ! UNIT 5 T 5 4
8 Speaking: repeating
directions to check
understanding
Lead-in Draw the students' attention to the question What d o e s
• Ask the students a simple question about the school Avril n e e d ?
(e.g. Tea ch er: W h e re is th e s c h o o l ca fe te ria ? S tu d e n ts: Give the students time to read the text individually and
It's n e x t to th e library. T e a ch e r: N e x t to th e library. O K . look for the answer.
Thanks.) Tell them that repeating key information like Ask the students to compare their answers in pairs. Then
this, and adding O K , is a good way of checking the elicit the answer from the class.
information.
• Invite a volunteer to read the information in the skills Answer
panel aloud for the class. She needs directions from the bus station to the art
• Emphasize that when we repeat information like this gallery.
to check that we have heard correctly, we often say it
slowly to confirm understanding.
B
Ask the students to look at the How to say it box. Point
out that we use Hi in informal emails. The expression
30 See the Student's Book for the audio script. D o n 't g e t lost! is friendly and informal. Encourage the
Tell the students they are going to hear two students to use as many of these expressions as they
conversations. In each conversation, people are asking can in their email responses.
for directions. Read the instructions to the class. Ask them to look at
Play the audio and ask the students to underline the the map in Section 7 again, and locate the bus station
places where Speaker A repeats the directions. Check and the art gallery.
the answers with the class. Circulate and monitor, assisting where needed.
Put the students in pairs to practice the two When the students finish writing, ask them to share their
conversations. Ask them to do this twice, exchanging emails in small groups.
the roles of A and B, so that they get the maximum
exposure to the language in the conversations.
Alternative
B
You can give the writing exercise as homework and
Tell the students they will now practice asking for and check it in the next class.
giving directions to places in their own town or city.
Read the instructions to the class, and ask the students
to read the model conversation. ^ Workbook
Encourage the students to use E x c u s e m e at the ■ 5 2
beginning of their conversation and H o w d o I g e t to . . . ?
p. 32, Listen and write
to ask for directions. p. 33, Down time _______________
Put the students in pairs to complete the exercise. When
both students have asked for and given directions, elicit
a few examples from the class.

Extra activity: asking for and giving


directions
Ask the students to look at the map in Section 7 and
choose a starting point and a destination (e.g. from
the art gallery to the zoo). Ask the students to work in
pairs and take turns asking for and giving directions.
Encourage them to repeat some of the directions to
check understanding. When the pairs finish, elicit a
few examples from the class.

^ Workbook p. 31, Section 6


8 SPEAKING: repeating directions to check understanding
When you ask for directions, listen carefully and repeat the essential information to
check that you understand.

A Em 30 Listen to the conversations below.


Underline the information that Speaker A repeats
1 A: Excuse me, how do I get to the main square?
B: Take the first right, and go straight ahead.
Then turn left on Post Street.
A: O K. First right, then left on Post Street.
B: That's right.
A: Thank you.
B: You're welcom e.
2 A: Excuse me, is there a bank near here?
B: Yes, there's one on Fort Street.
A: Fort Street. O K. And how do I get there?
B: You go straight ahead, and take the third left.
A: Straight ahead, and take the second left.
B: No, not the second left, the third left.
A: Third left. O K, thanks.

B Q j Work in pairs. Take turns asking for


directions to places in your town.
A: E x c u s e m e , h o w d o I g e t fro m ... t o . . . ?
B: T a k e t h e . . . It's o n ...
■ i.

9 W R IT IN G : an email to give directions


A Read this email from a friend. W hat does Avril need?

To: m y _ fr ie n d @ m y m a il.m a c .w d

From: a v ril_ w rig h t@ m y m a il.m a c .w d

Subject: D ire c tio n s


H O W TO SAY IT
Hi! Giving directions
Thanks for inviting me to the exhibition. I don’t know where Hi, ...
the art gallery is, exactly. I need directions from the bus station O K . H e re a re th e d ire c tio n s to .
to the gallery. How do I get there? F ro m ...

Thanks a lot! T h e n ...


D o n 't g e t lost!
Avril
S e e you soon !

B Look at the map on page 54 again. In you notebook, write an email to


Avril giving her directions.

H e re , th e r e , a n d e v e r y w h e r e ! UNIT 5 55
ESTABLISHINGPRIORITIES
• Understand the criteria.
• List the options.
• Order the options according to the criteria.

A Read the comment below from a travel website.


Check (/) Danny’s two main criteria.
a) He doesn't want to spend a lot of money. 0 d) He doesn't want to visit a museum. 0
b) He wants to go shopping. e) He wants to see as much as possible.
c) He doesn't have a lot of tim e. 0

¡T ra v e l Forum: I'm in the city for one day next week


The w ebsite for
one day in ... and I don't know what to visit. I arrive
travel inspiration
Subject: at seven in the morning and leave on
Where to go? Help! the 8 p.m. bus. I don't have much
money— only $40. Please give me
HOME Posted on: 05/03/14 some ideas!
at 09:34 by Dannyl992
LOGIN Thanks!
Registered: 03/15/10
REGISTER Posts: 5

ABOUT ¡-TRAVEL Replies: 0

©
REPLY ◄ PREVIOUS I NEXT ►

B Q j Work in pairs. In your notebook,


make a list of the main attractions in W k a t? HourMuck? HourLoha?
your city. Write down as many as you
can. Then write the cost and the time
you need to visit each one.

H O W TO SAY IT
Talking about things to do
H o w lo n g d o y o u n e e d to v i s i t ...?
I th in k y o u n e e d ... h o u rs.
H o w m u c h d o e s th e ... c o s t ?
I th ink it c o s t s $ ...
I th in k it's fre e .
• Before you ask the students to work in pairs and discuss
Step 1 Understand the criteria. (Ex. A) the questions, tell them to look at the expressions in
Step 2 List the options. (Ex. B, Ex. C) the How to say it box. Check that they understand the
Step 3 Order the options according to the criteria. meaning of fre e (you don't pay anything for something
(Ex. D, Ex. E) that is free).
• Make sure the students are familiar with the local value
Lead-in of $40. If you are not sure, check in the newspaper or on
• Read the target skill aloud and highlight the three-step the internet.
strategy to develop the skill. Check that the students • Put the students in pairs to complete the exercise.
understand all the vocabulary. Circulate and monitor, assisting where needed.
• Relate each exercise in this lifeSkills section to the • Explain that this is the second important step when
relevant stage in the three-step strategy before you ask establishing criteria. After we have understood the
the students to begin the exercise (e.g. T h e aim o f this criteria, we list the available options.
e x e rc ise is to u n d e rsta n d criteria. This is S te p 1 in th e
th re e -ste p strategy.).
• Tell the students that this section of the unit will help Exfra: it's free
them with organizing information by establishing
Have the class brainstorm a list of interesting things
priorities.
tourists can do for free in their city.
• Ask the students when they need to prioritize (put things
in order of importance) in their lives. Elicit one or two
ideas from them (e.g. W h en we h a v e a lot o f h o m e w o rk ,
b u t we a lso w a n t to g o o u t with frien ds, etc.). Point out
that prioritizing is extremely important because it can
help them to focus more effectively.

A
• Read the instructions to the class, and ask the students
to read the five statements. Make sure they understand
the meaning of s p e n d (use money to pay for things).
• Ask the students to read the text and decide which two
of the five statements are Danny's main criteria. Check
the answers with the class.
• Emphasize that this email has helped the students
understand the criteria in the process of establishing
priorities: D a n n y is in th e city fo r ju s t o n e d a y a n d has
$ 4 0 to s p e n d .

H e re , th e r e , a n d e v e r y w h e r e !
• Ask the students to work in the same pairs. Ask them to • Put the students in groups of four or five.
look at their list of attractions from Ex. B and decide on • Ask the students to share their responses to Danny with
the five most suitable ones. Remind them that they have their group and decide which ones make the best use of
to conform to Danny's criteria (money and time). his budget and time.
• When the students finish, ask them to rank the five • Invite a few volunteers to read their options to the class.
attractions they have chosen in order of importance
from 1 (most suitable) to 5 (least suitable). Emphasize
that ordering the options according to Danny's criteria is REFLECT
the last important step when establishing priorities. • Ask the students to read the Reflect question.
• Give them some time to think about different situations
D in the domains of Work and Career and Study and
• Give the students time to write their responses. This Learning where the skill of Establishing priorities would
exercise can either be done individually or in pairs as a be useful.
collaborative writing exercise. • Elicit the following ideas: when they have many
• Highlight the framework of the response and point different jobs to do, when they have a lot of work and
out that the students need to fill in the blanks with very little time; when they have a number of different
appropriate suggestions. assignments, when they have to revise for different
• Encourage the students to try to use all five suggestions exams, etc.
from Ex. C, and to write the reasons, too. Circulate
and monitor, assisting where needed. Point out any
grammatical errors in their writing, especially in the use
of imperatives.
Work in pairs. Complete this
Top 5 T h in g s to Do! list for Danny T o p '5 T h in g s T o V o !
using your options from Exercise B.
i
Decide w hy you think Danny should
Reason,:
see or do these things. Remember
to consider the amount of time and 2.

money he has. i> o/i rr\M,‘

Gregg's Chocolate Factory tour 3

Reason: It's cheap (only $12) and interesting. ■ Reason,:

4.

R eason,:

5.
Reason,: F—---- -------------------------..... —:____ _

D W rite a short response to Danny.

¡Travel
The website for
Forum:
one day in ...
IT Hello, Dannyl 992! There are a lot of great
things to do in my city. Here are some ideas:
travel inspiration
Subject: Go to the . It costs about
Re: Where to go? Help!
, and it takes about / you need

Posted on: 05/04/14 about .Try to see the


at 14:21 I think it costs about
HOME Registered: 07/23/10 Visit the . It's near/next to /o n

LOGIN Posts: 12 the corner of . It's free!

Replies: 0 Enjoy your visit!


REGISTER

ABOUT i-TRAVEL

E Read your options to your classm ates. R E F L E C T ...


Decide w hich ones make the best use of How can the skill of establishing
D anny’s time and money. priorities be useful to you in Work and
Career and Study and Learning?

Here, there, and everywhere! UNIT 5 57


A Look at this map. Complete the place nam es with words in the box. (4 points)

Park Street
station

Main S tre e t
theater

mam
bus square shopping
station

B Look at the map in Exercise A again and complete the sentences. (6 points)
1 You are at the bus station on 1st Street. Take the second right, go °Y ?f. the b rid g e,
and turn left. G o straight ahead and the sae is in the park, n e x tt° the café.
m useum 1
2 You are in th e main square. Turn right and go straight ah e ad . Then take the third left.
The P ° lice is on the right the bank.
station across from / across the stre e t from
8-10 correct: I can talk about places and attractions in a city and ask for and give directions.
0-7 correct: Look again at Sections 2 and 7 on pages 51 and 54.
SCORE: /10

2
Read these contributions to a chat room.(gírele)the correct options. (10 points)

In G ra n a d a , there ( i( / s y are a fantastic M oorish m o num ent— the A lham b ra Palace. It has
(2 ) a n y /(m an £ )beautiful d esig n s. T h e food in G ran ad a is e xce lle n t, and there (3) is/(are )a
lot of goocTrestaurants. But (4) y o u d o n 't /(d o n ^ e at in restaurants near the A lh am b ra—
they're very e xp e n sive .

A ntigua is a beautiful city. Th ere (5) is /(a r^ se veral pretty squares w here you can have
lunch or just drink coffee. If po ssib le, (6 )(sta y y y o u s ta y in a hotel in the main square.
(7) D o e s n 't /(^>onjt)travel in taxis in A ntigua It's sm all, and it's possible to w alk everyw here.

Ko Sam ui is a fantastic island. T h e re aren't (8) s o m e /(man^) cars, and yotj can relax
com pletely. T h e restaurants and cafés are very friendly, and there is (9)(^ l o t o f ) m a n y
go od fo o d . So m etim es there (1 0 ) is /(are)traditional d an ce s.

8-10 correct: I can use th ere is, th ere are, and quantifiers to describe where I live. I can use the imperative to give
directions and instructions.
0-7 correct: Look again at Sections 1 and 6 on pages 50 and 53.
SCORE: /10

'
Language wrap-up 1 Vocabulary
Students can do the Language wrap-up exercises in A
class or for homework. If you give them for homework, Refer the students to the map and point out the
remember to check the exercises at the beginning of the incomplete place names 1-4. Ask the students to use the
next class, or collect a few to grade and identify any typical words in the box to complete the names.
errors.
If you decide to do the exercises in class, you can B
approach the wrap-up as a two-step reviewing procedure. Ask the students to refer to the map in Ex. A. Tell them
First, ask the students to do the Vocabulary section that they need to read the text carefully and follow the
individually. When ready, encourage the students to check directions on the map to do the exercise.
their answers carefully, and then put them in pairs to
2 Grammar
compare answers and discuss any differences. Self- and
peer-correction are two excellent ways of developing Ask the students to read through each contribution first
learner independence and creating a cooperative learning before they choose the correct options.
environment. After completing the Vocabulary section, you
can apply the same procedure to the Grammar section.
Culture note
At the end of each section, make sure that the students
The Alhambra, built in the 14th Century, is a palace
write their score out of ten. If they have a score lower
and fortress in Granada, Spain. The palace was once
than eight, direct them to the appropriate sections of the
the residence of the Muslim rulers of Granada. Today,
unit, and encourage them to read those sections again for
the Alhambra is one of Spain's major tourist attractions
homework. After that, ask the students to complete the
and shows the country's most famous Islamic
exercise(s) again at home.
architecture.
Antigua is a city in central Guatemala. It is known for
its beautiful Spanish architecture, as well as the well-
preserved ruins of several colonial churches.
Ko Samui is a tropical island in the south of Thailand. It
is Thailand's third largest island, and it is known for its
beautiful beaches and coral reefs.

Unit 5

Common European Framework: unit map
Competence developed CEF Reference (A1)
1 Grammar can understand and use there is/there are Table 1; Table 2; Sections 5.2.1.2;
6.4.7.7; 6.47.8
2 Vocabulary can describe places/attractions in a city Table 1; Table 2; Section 4.4.3.1
3 Pronunciation can correctly stress compound nouns Section 5.2.1.4
4 Reading can identify the main topic in a text Section 4.4.2.2
5 Listening can understand information in a news report Table 1; Table 2; Section 4.4.2.1
6 Grammar can understand and use the imperative Table 1; Table 2; Sections 5.2.1.2;
6.4.77; 6.47.8
7 Vocabulary can understand and give directions Table 1; Table 2; Section 4.4.3.1
8 Speaking can repeat directions to check understanding Table 1; Table 2; Section 4.4.3.1
9 Writing can respond to and write a short email Table 2; Section 4.4.1.2;
Section 4.4.3.4

H e r e , th e r e , a n d e v e r y w h e r e ! u n it 5 T58

m i

DIFFERENT STROKES
The expression Different strokes for different folks is a saying which m eans that different peop le
like different things and that p eo p le live their lives in different ways. A sk the students if they
know any expressions in their language with the sam e or a similar m eaning.

Speaking: talking to an old friend


Ask the students what questions they usually ask when
t t
they see an old friend after several months or years.
Unit opener (p. 59) 10 min. Refer the students to the lifeSkills panel. Tell them that
• Optional downloadable unit opener 10 min. the topic of this unit's lifeSkills section is Making personal
1 Vocabulary: lifestyle adjectives (p. 60) 25 min. change. Ask them why we sometimes want to make
2 Reading: personal profiles (p. 60) 30 min. changes in our lives, and what kinds of changes people
often make.
3 Listening: for numerical (p- 61) 30 min.
information
A
4 Grammar: present progressive (p. 62) 40 min.
• Read aloud the word and phrase labels for the pictures,
5 Pronunciation: /rj/ (p. 63) 15 min. and ask the students to repeat them. Have them look at
6 Speaking: talking to an old friend (p. 63) 20 min. the pictures and give you a few examples for what each
• Optional downloadable Speaking category means.
workshop: talking to an old friend 20 min. • Read the instructions to the class, and explain that a
7 Vocabulary: a green lifestyle (p. 64) 25 min. big part of your life means something that is important
8 Grammar: present progressive vs. (p. 64) 40 min. in your life. Ask the students to work individually and
check the things that are important in their lives.
simple present
• Have the students think of other things that are also
9 Writing: simple sentences (p. 65) 30 min.
important in their lives, like pets, hobbies, family, and
lifeSkills: making personal change (p. 66) 45 min. travel. Elicit their ideas and write them on the board.
(Self and Society)
• Optional downloadable lifeSkills 45 min. B
lesson (Work and Career) • Read the instructions to the class.
• Optional downloadable lifeSkills 45 min. • Direct the students to the model conversation and have
lesson (Study and Learning) them repeat it after you, both chorally and individually.
Language wrap-up (p. 68) 15 min. • Point out that the speakers in the model conversation
add extra information to their answers. For example,
Communicative wrap-up Unit 5-6 (p. 134) 20 min.
they don't just say Food is a big part o f my life; they
Video and downloadable video worksheet 45 min.
add details to support the answer (e.g. I like going to
restaurants ...). Tell the class that this is an important
conversation skill. Write phrases on the board to help
the students add extra information (e.g. I like ..., I also
like ..., I often ..., I don't usually ...).
• Elicit preferences for the other important categories of
the students' lives that you wrote on the board and add
Lead-in
their preferences to the categories on the board. For
Direct the students' attention to the objectives in the unit example, if students mentioned pets as an important
menu and go through the information with them. Explain part of their lives, elicit what aspects of having pets are
that this unit focuses on how to talk about your life, and on important to them (e.g. dogs, cats, companionship,
the following skills which will help them do this: guardianship, taking care of their pets, etc.).
Listening: for numerical information • Put the students in groups of three or four to discuss
Ask the students in what situations they have to listen for their personal preferences. Encourage them to refer to
numerical information (numbers). Elicit examples and write the model conversation as a guide in their discussions.
them on the board (e.g. on the telephone). • When the groups finish, elicit some ideas from the class.
Writing: simple sentences Find out which activities are a big part of the lives of
Ask the students to look through the unit and find what most of the students in the class.
two things that every English sentence needs. Check the • Invite volunteers from each group to tell you about their
answer (a subject and a verb). group (e.g. Exercise is a big part of Maria's life. She
Reading: personal profiles goes to the gym three times a week. Shopping isn't a
Ask the students where they can read personal profiles. big part of Frank's life. Fie doesn't like shopping.).
Ask if other people read their personal profile and, if so,
where. Ask what kind of information we can usually find in
a personal profile (e.g. likes/dislikes).
I

UNIT 6 DIFFERENT
IN THIS UNIT YOU
Q learn language to talk about
your life A Check (/) the things on this page that are a big part of
listen for specific numbers in
your life. Think of other things that are also very important
personal profiles— listening for in your life, e.g. pets, hobbies, etc.
numerical information
write sentences about a green
lifestyle—simple sentences
read personal profiles from
a website
talk to an old friend about what
you are doing in your life
watch a video about ways to
be green

fshoppinqi
. **£ JÊ

B Work in sm all groups. Compare the things that are important in your lives.
Do most people in your group have very sim ilar or very different lifestyles?
A: F o o d is a big part o f my life. I like g oin g to restaurants, but I also like cooking at hom e.
B: M e, too. I d on't usually g o to restaurants, but I often co ok at home.

Learn to make an action plan to


change things about your life

Different strokes
1 lifestyle adjectives
A Look at these different lifestyles. W rite each word in the box under
the lifestyle it describes.

boring exciting green healthy relaxing stressful unhealthy wasteful

stressful healthy unhealthy relaxing

B Look back at the adjectives in Exercise A. How m any different endings do you notice?
Do all of the adjectives have a special ending?

C Work in pairs. Talk about the type of lifestyle you and your family have. Give reasons.
A: M y m o m h a s a h e a lth y life s ty le . S h e p la y s s p o r t s , a n d s h e e a ts h e a lth y fo o d .
B: R e a lly ? W e ll, m y d a d is 6 5 n o w , s o h is life isn 't v e r y ...

2 personal profiles
A Read these profiles. W here do you think they come from?
dating w ebsite) b) a website about famous people c) an online English course

Youandme. com Home Login Register FAQs Contact us

Find your perfect date


____J Sea cn

Name: Christina Name: Guido


Age: 19 Age: 22
Likes: reading; cooking; Likes: rock music; animals
animals; going to the fast food; surfing
ballet Dislikes: studying; soccer;
Dislikes: soccer; loud music; the winter
cold weather lifestyle is: exciting!
lifestyle is: healthy! Right now: I'm working in a
Right now: I am a college student. music store.

B Q§ Work in pairs. Answ er these questions.


1 What do Christina and Guido have in common? 3 In your opinion, is it a good idea for them to date?
2 In what ways are they different? A: S h e lik e s th e b a lle t, b u t h e lik e s ro c k m u sic.
B: Y e s, b u t th e y b o th like a n im a ls.
2 Reading: personal profiles
A
• Read the instructions and the answer choices to the
Lead-in class. Check that the students understand profile
Make a list of pairs of opposites the students will know (personal information about a person). Elicit or explain
(e.g. big/small; long/short; old/new; hot/cold). Write the that a dating website is a site where you can go to meet
pairs on the board in random order, and ask the students a new boyfriend or girlfriend.
to make four pairs of opposites. Then tell them they are • Give the students time to read the profiles. Then elicit
going to do the same thing with some new adjectives. the answer from the class. Ask the students what helped
them decide on the answer (e.g. the website name, the
A pictures, the style or the format of the page).
• Read the instructions to the class. Then read the • Ask the students if they've ever used a dating website or
adjectives in the box, and ask the students to repeat if they know anyone who has.
them after you.
• Highlight the pronunciation of relaxing /n'lseksirj/
(it has three syllables, with the stress on the second Extra: my profile
syllable) and exciting /ik'saitir]/ (it is also stressed on Ask the students to write their own personal profiles
the second syllable). based on the website format in Ex. A.
• Ask the students to work individually or in pairs to write
the words under the pictures. Check the answers with
the class. B
• Ask the students to work in pairs to match the adjectives • Read the instructions to the class. Check that the
to their opposites. Check the answers with the class students understand have in common (do the same
(relaxing/stressful, healthy/unhealthy, boring/exciting, things or have the same interests).
wasteful/green). • Put the students in pairs to complete the exercise. Ask
them to read the two profiles again and discuss which
likes or dislikes that Christina and Guido have are the
Extra: crossword same or similar.
Write unhealthy on the board in large letters, with a • When the pairs finish, elicit the answers to items 1 and
little space between each letter. Put the students in 2. Draw a two-column chart on the board: one column
pairs to try to link all the other words of this section for the things they have in common and one for their
together to form a crossword. differences.
• Draw the students' attention to the example
conversation in item 3. Explain to the students that both
is used to show that you are referring to two people or
• Write the word beautiful on the board. Point out that things, and that you are saying the same thing about the
this adjective is formed by adding the adjectival suffix two of them. Remind them to use both in their answers
-ful to the noun beauty (with a small spelling change). to item 1.
• Ask the students to look again at the adjectives in Ex. A
and identify the different endings. Answers
• Check the answers as a class. 1 They both like animals. They both dislike soccer. They
both dislike cold weather and the winter.
Answers 2 Christina likes going to the ballet. Christina dislikes
The different adjectival endings are: -ing, -ful, and -y. loud music, but Guido likes rock music. Christina likes
No, green doesn't have a special ending. cooking, but Guido likes fast food. Guido dislikes
studying, but Christina is a college student.
c • Ask the class to look at item 3 and discuss whether it
• Read the instructions to the class. Ask the students to is a good idea or a bad idea for Guido and Christina
read the model conversation. to date. Refer them to the chart on the board. Ask the
• Review additional vocabulary for family members. Elicit students to give reasons.
vocabulary the students know for other family members,
and write the words on the board. Possible answers
• Put the students in pairs to complete the exercise.
3 It's a good idea for Christina and Guido to date
Remind them to give their reasons. Have them use as
because they both like animals / dislike soccer / dislike
many of the adjectives in Ex. A as possible.
cold weather. It's a bad idea for Christina and Guido
• Call on individual students to report back on their
to date because Christina likes going to the ballet and
partner's answers (e.g. Paolo's sister has a stressful
doesn't like loud music, but Guido likes rock music.
lifestyle. She works a lot.).
Christina likes cooking, but Guido likes fast food.
Guido dislikes studying, but Christina is studying at
Workbook p. 34, Section Ì college.

Different strokes unit 6 T60


telling time.
Draw the students' attention to the skills panel. Point
out the strategies that help us when listening for 33 Read the instructions to the class, and give
numerical information. the students time to read the three profiles. Tell them to
think about what type of number they are listening for in
each case (year, date, phone number, time).
Elicit from the students what time they get up / have • Highlight and review the use of on with dates and at
breakfast / start school, etc., and write the times on the with times and phone numbers.
board. • Play the audio once. Check progress, and play it again,
Elicit today's date, and write it on the board (e.g. if necessary. Check the answers with the class.
1/31/14). Ask the students what year it is, and write that Audio script
on the board. Tell the students that the next exercise
1
focuses on different kinds of numbers.
FHi, this is Tom Edwards. Does anyone remember me? Class of
Read the instructions to the class. Give the students
1997? I'm currently working in Mexico. I'm planning to go to
time to match the figures to the types of numbers they
the class reunion in March. Uh, yeah March 18th. My birthday!
refer to.
Hope to see you then.
Ask them to compare their answers in pairs. Then check
2
the answers with the class.
Hello. It's me. Paul Newton. I'm hoping to travel from Sydney,
Australia, to the States for the class reunion. It's happening on
B August 14th this year. Are you going, too? Then please call me
31 See the Student's Book for the audio script. at 011 -61-2-6555-8932. Thanks!
Before you play the audio, ask for several volunteers to 3
try and say the numbers. This is Vanessa Hughes. I'm teaching at Glendale High School
Play the audio so that the students can compare. right now. There's a class reunion for all students from the year
Ask them to repeat the numbers, both chorally and 2004. It's at 7:30 p.m. on April 9th next year in the school gym.
individually. Everyone is invited to come. See you there!
Highlight the way we say years in English. We divide
them into pairs of numbers (e.g. nineteen ninety-eight,
twenty twelve). Note that the exception is the first
decade of the 21st Century. For example, 2009 is two
Give each student slips of paper with on and at written
thousand (and) nine.
Ask the students to look at the How to say it box. on them, and then say dates and times in a variety
Remind them that zero (0) is often pronounced oh, of different ways (e.g. tw enty to five, four forty, etc.).
especially in telephone numbers, and the dash (-) The students should hold up the correct slip for the
in telephone numbers is not said at all. Instead, the date or time. This will help you to quickly assess how
speaker pauses between sets of numbers (e.g. 314 well they are doing, and if they have internalized the
[pause] 586 [pause] 2864). prepositions.

Workbook p. 35, Section 3


32 Tell the students they will hear five short
statements. In each one, they will hear a number. Tell
them to write down only the number. Remind them of
the strategies in the skills panel.
Play the audio once, and check progress. In order to
make it easier for students who are struggling, pause
the audio between each item. Play it again, if necessary.
Call on students to come to the board and write the
answers. Then have the class correct any errors.
Ask the students to tell you what type of number each
one is (item 1 is a date, item 2 is a phone number, item
3 is a time, item 4 is a person's age, item 5 is a year).
Prompt further language by asking the students for their
own phone number, age, or a special year in their lives.
3 ISTENINC for numerical information
When you hear a number, think about the way it looks. This helps you understand
what it is (e.g. a date, a time, a year, or a phone number). To help you remember
a number, say it in your head when you are writing it down.

A Read these figures. Match them to what you think they refer to.
1 (301)522-8801^^^ a) a year
2 11/30/98 ^ ----- b) a time
3 12: 52— ^ _c) a person's age HOW TO SAY IT
4 1998 — ------- d) a phone number 0 can be said as both zero and oh.
5 24 ------- - e) a date

B ||]3 1 Listen and repeat the numbers in Exercise A.

C PH 32 Listen to the statements. W rite the num bers you hear.


Practice saying the num bers in English in your head when you are
writing them down.

1 04/27/92 2 (210)378-4611 3 7:35_____ 4 _____18_____ g 1925 ___

D PH 33 Listen to three audio profiles from a high school reunion website.


Complete the information below.

H ig h S c h o o l R e u n ió

Name: Tom Edwards Name: Paul Newton Name: Vanessa Hughes


High school graduation year: Date of class reunion: August Reunion for year:
(D î997 (3) 14 (5, 2004
Date of class reunion: March Phone number: High school reunion at:
18 (4) (011)-61 -2-6555-8932 (6) Pm on:
(7) April 9

Different strokes UNIT 6 61


I

4 present progressive
A ^34 LANGUAGE IN CONTEXT Listen to part of a conversation.
Do Jonathan and Martina know each other well? How do you know?
Jonathan: It's nice to meet you in person, Martina, and not just on the dating website.
Martina: It's nice to meet you, too.
Jonathan: So ... are you meeting a lot of people on the New Friends website?
Martina: Not really. You're the first, so I'm a little nervous!
Jonathan: Yeah, me, too. W ell, tell me about yourself. You're in dental
school, right?
Martina: Yes, but I'm just studying part time this semester. I'm also
working as a receptionist at a dental clinic. W hat about you?
Jonathan: I'm in school, too. I'm studying robotics. O h, you're not eating
your hamburger. Do you want something different?
NOTICE!
Martina: O h, no. It's fine! I'm just not very hungry. Uh ... are you working, too,
Is the conversation about the
or just studying?
people's routine activities or
Jonathan: I'm just studying, but I want to work during the summer vacation. about activities during this
period in their lives?
B ANALYZE Read the conversation in Exercise A again.
Form Choose the correct option to complete the sentence. Then complete the table.
W e form the present progressive with
(a) be + verb + -ing. ) b) be + the base form of the verb.

Affirmative Negative Yes/No question Short answer Wh- question

I'm working. I'm not (1) workin9 Yes, I (3) a m ___


No, I'm not.

He/She/lt's working. He/She/lt isn't Is he/she/it working? Yes, he/she/it is. No, Where is he/she/it
working. he/she/it isn't. working?

We/They're working. We/They aren't (2) ^re Yes, we/they are. Where (4) are
working. you/they working? No, we/they aren't. you/they working?

Function Choose the correct option to complete the sentence.


The present progressive is used with situations or events that
a) happen all the time and are permanent routines.____________________________________________________
(b) are happening at the moment of speaking or during this period of time in the person's life. )

Spelling rules

When the verb ends in -e, drop the e before adding -ing:
e.g. take—taking, make—making, live—living.
When a one-syllable verb ends in double the final consonant and then add -ing:
consonant-vowel-consonant, e.g. plan—planning, get—getting, stop—stopping.

C PRACTICE Complete these sentences with the present progressive form of the verbs
in parentheses.
1 Right now, I ...am m aking ... (make) a sandwich for lunch.
A re having
you (have) a good time?
3 What you É0Ì2S. (do) these days?
isn 't talking (not talk) to me right now. I don't know why.
4 Sally
5 Com e on! We are w aiting (wait) for you!
6 Right now, Adele living (live) in Montreal.
WATCH OUT!
D NOW YOU DO IT Work in sm all groups. Talk about 0 Right now, I am studying.
things that are happening at this time in your life. Right now, I am study.
Right now I'm not working, so I'm living with my parents.
I'm looking for a new job.
Function
4 Grammar: present • Direct the students to the Function statement. Tell them
progressive to use the verbs in the conversation to help them circle
the correct option to complete the sentence.
Lead-in • Point out that the present progressive is used for
situations that are happening at the moment of
Ask the students what they like to eat for lunch and what
speaking or during this period of time in the person's
they don't like / hate. Elicit examples, such as / like pizza; I
life. Explain that this Is different from the use of the
don't like burgers.
simple present, which is used for routines. Write the
following sentences on the board: / study at the library
A
every night. It is Tuesday night at 8:30 p.m., and I am
34 See the Student's Book for the audio script. studying at the library. Explain that the first sentence
Ask the students to close their books. Tell them that indicates a habit or a routine, but the second sentence
they will hear a conversation between two people, indicates an action in progress at this moment.
Jonathan and Martina. • Point out the language box, and invite a volunteer to
Write the questions Do Jonathan and Martina know read the spelling rules governing verbs ending in -e.
each other well? and How do you know? on the board. Elicit some other examples from the class (e.g. have,
Play the audio once, and check that the students have give, hope, and write) and ask the students to spell the
all written answers. If not, play it again. Check the -ing forms. Write their responses on the board. Point
answer with the class. out that verbs ending in -ee (e.g. see) do not drop an e
Point out that nervous is a false cognate. In English, it (seeing).
means feeling excited and worried, or a little afraid. • Highlight the fact that with one-syllable verbs ending
in consonant-vowel-consonant, we double the final
Answer consonant in the -ing form. Other common examples
They don't know each other well because Jonathan says, are put—putting and run—running.
"It's nice to meet you In person." • Highlight that in words containing more than one
syllable in which the final syllable is unstressed, the final
consonant is not doubled (e.g. travel—traveling).
NOTICE!
c
Ask the students to read the question carefully and
• Draw the students' attention to the Watch out! box. Ask
then to look at the conversation again and answer the
them to tell you why the second sentence is Incorrect
question.
(the main verb does not end in -ing). Emphasize that
Answer we never say */ am study (but this is a very common
The conversation is about the people's activities error). Remind them that if they want to talk about an
during this period in their lives. ' event that is happening right now, they need to use
the present progressive: / am + verb + -ing (e.g. I'm
teaching now.).
• Ask the students to complete the sentences individually,
referring to the forms in the grammar table in Ex. B and
• Have the students read the conversation In Ex. A again. the spelling rules In the language box. Then ask them to
Explain that this time, they should pay close attention to compare their answers in pairs. Check the answers with
the verbs the speakers use. the class. Point out that the contraction is possible in
items 1,5, and 6. As you check, ask the students to spell
Form making, having, and living to make sure that they have
• Direct the students to the Form statement. Tell them omitted the final -e.
to look back at the verbs in the conversation again and
circle the correct option to complete the sentence. D
• Ask the students to work Individually or In pairs to • Read the instructions to the class. Explain that things
complete the grammar table. Tell them to use the that are happening at this time in their life can refer to
conversation in Ex. A to help them. work, study, free time, family, etc.
• Ask the students to compare their answers in pairs. Then • Ask the students to work in small groups and tell their
check the answers with the class. classmates what is happening right now. Encourage the
• Highlight the contractions I'm, You're, He's, She's, students to include interesting information, such as their
It's, We're, and They're, and point out that we usually free-time activities.
use these when speaking. We use the full forms when • Circulate and monitor, assisting where needed. Make
writing. We never use contractions in the short answer. sure the classmates use the correct form of the present
progressive.

^ Workbook pp. 34-35, Section 2

Different strokes u n it 6 T62


A
5 Pronunciation: /rç/ • Give the students time to read the questions carefully
and check the ones they could ask an old friend to get
A information about his or her life now. Elicit that the
present progressive is used to talk about right now.
35 See the Student's Book for the audio script. • Ask the students to compare answers in pairs. Then
• Explain the task and play the audio. Ask if the
check the answers with the class.
underlined sounds are the same or different.
• Ask the students to do some choral repetition to
• Play the audio again. Ask the students to repeat the
practice the pronunciation and intonation of the
words chorally and individually.
questions.
B B
36 See the Student's Book for the audio script. • Read the instructions to the class. Direct the students
• Play the audio, pausing after each word. to the model conversation and have them repeat the
• Ask the students to repeat the words chorally and conversation after you, both chorally and individually.
individually. • Put the students in pairs to do the exercise. Encourage
• Note that in the two-syllable words, the -ing ending is them to begin their conversations in the same way as
never stressed. the model and to use the questions from Ex. A.

c
37 See the Student's Book for the audio script. Alternative
• Read the instructions to the class. Put the students in Ask the students to write the conversation before they
pairs. Ask one partner to read A and the other to read practice it.
B. Circulate while the pairs practice, listening to their
• Ask the students to repeat the conversations two conversations and noting any errors to address later.
or three times until they have a firm grasp of the When the students finish, choose a few pairs to
pronunciation of the words ending in lr\l. perform their conversations for the class. Correct any
• Play the audio for the students to check their errors in the use of the present progressive.
pronunciation.
• Ask the students to switch roles and practice the
conversations again.
Extra: homework
Ask the students to write answers to the questions
in Ex. A, using the present progressive where
6 Speaking: talkinq to an old appropriate.
friend
Lead-in
Ask the students to look at the picture and tell you who
they think the people are. Are they friends? Are they old
friends? Establish the fact that they are old friends and
are very happy to see each other again (after a long time).
Before continuing, ask the students to think about what
kinds of questions they ask people they haven't seen for a
while. Elicit their questions and write them on the board.
5 PRONUNCIATION: /g/
A 1 ^ 3 5 Listen to these pairs of words and phrases. Notice how the
speaker pronounces the underlined letters. Now listen again and repeat
the words.
thin thing walk in walking

B 1 ^ 3 6 Listen and practice these words. Pay special attention to your


pronunciation of the -ng endings.
walking planning song
working doing wrong
thinking sitting young
living taking king

C E l EH 37 P R A C T IC E Work in pairs. Practice these conversations.


Correct each other’s pronunciation of the -ng endings w hen necessary.
Listen and check.
1 A: What's Mom doing?
B: She's talking on the phone.
2 A: Why are you singing?
B: Because this is my favorite song.
3 A: Where are you working these days?
B: I'm not working. I'm studying engineering.

A Check (/) the questions you could


ask an old friend to find out about
their life now.
¡23 How are you?
[7i Where are you working right now?
¡7] What are you doing these days?
l~ l How old are you?
□ When is your birthday?
¡7] What are you studying?
□ What's your name?
[71 Are you dating anyone?
¡7] How is your family?
[7 Where are you living now?
B B i Work in pairs. You are old
friends who meet on the street.
A sk and answer the checked
questions from Exercise A.
A: HI! How are you ?
B: I'm fine! How about yo u ?
A: I'm g o o d , thanks. A n d how is you r family?

Different strokes UNIT 6 63


7 a green lifestyle
A Am y has a very green lifestyle. Match the words and phrases below
to the pictures. Use the red boxes.

1 save water 5 buy organic food


2 turn off the lights 6 reuse bags

3 recycle 7 share a ride


4 ride a bike to school/work 8 clean up trash

B Do you have a green lifestyle? Check (/) the things from Exercise A
that you do to help the environment. Use the blue boxes.

C H| Work in groups. A sk your classm ates questions to find out who


has a green lifestyle. Make notes of your classm ates’ answers.
A: Do you ride a bike to work?
B: No, I don't, but I share a ride. What about you?

D I Q Share the information with your classmates. Is anyone similar to Amy?


I think Irina has a green lifestyle. She rides a bike to schbol every day, and she buys organic
fruit and vegetables.

A LANGUAGE IN CONTEXT Read this extract from a newsletter.


W hat does Adam want his parents to do?

s a n s
NOTICE!
A C T GREEN NEW SLETTER Look back at the text.
(^irclg)the verbs in
This month we're asking our readers to help their friends and family to green that are in the
"act green." Here is what one reader says: simple present tense,
and underline the verbs
My parentsC^jon't hav$)a very green lifestyle! Theyfjjv^lin A rizona, and that are in the present
they(use)a lot of electricity for air conditioning. My dad always^to rg e ts) progressive.
to turn off his c o m puter at night, and that(^ses)a lot of electricity, too
pA; They alsoCjjyate^their yard a lot. But they know the environm ent is
v ■ A AT
Iff; important, and they're trying to change som e things.
Now they're turning off the air conditioning and opening window s in
the m ornings when ¡10cool. T h ey're turning off lights and com puters : A.;'.«-; m
when they're not using th e m. I'm helping them plant cactus and 'i
other plants thatC^on't n e e cf)much water in their yard, so they're
using less water now. Adam Hunter
D
7 Vocabulary: a green lifestyle • Read the instructions to the class, and choose a student
to read the example response.
Lead-in • Ask if any of the groups found someone similar to Amy.
Ask the students to read the heading a green lifestyle and Ask for volunteers to report on their group members'
tell you what they think it means (e.g. keeping the Earth green activities.
clean, recycling, etc.). • Do not correct any errors at this stage, because this will
interrupt the students and interfere with the message.
A Instead, make a note of any serious errors, and when
• Ask the students to look at the pictures while you read they have finished reporting back, write three or four on
the instructions to the class. the board and prompt the students to correct them.
• Read the list of activities aloud, and ask the students to
repeat them. Workbook p. 36, Section 4
• Go over the new vocabulary in this section (e.g. recycle:
to use old waste materials to make new ones; organic:
all-natural foods, not produced with chemicals; reuse:
use again).
• To consolidate the meaning of some of the terms, ask
8 Grammar: present
the students what things you can recycle (paper, glass, progressive vs. simple present
plastic) and what things you can reuse (plastic bags,
paper bags). Use the classroom lights to show the Lead-in
students the meaning of turn off (and turn on), and ask
Give the students a few key words from the text (e.g.
them what things they can turn off to save energy (TV,
electricity, air conditioning, environment, turn off, water)
computer, DVD player, lights).
and ask them to predict what the text is about. Answer any
• Ask the students to match the pictures to the phrases
questions about unfamiliar vocabulary. Don't say whether
individually. Make sure the students know they should
any of their guesses are correct at this stage.
use the red boxes.
• Ask the students to check their answers in pairs. Then
check the answers with the class.
A
• Ask the students what they think Act Green means.
Elicit/Explain that it means to do things in your life that
Culture note are good for the environment.
• Write the question What does Adam want his parents to
These are the essential characteristics of organic food:
do? on the board.
The use of pesticides, insecticides, and herbicides is
• Ask the students to read the text and answer the
restricted. In most countries, organic produce may not
.question.
be genetically modified.
In the U.S., E.U., Canada, and Japan, companies
need to obtain special certification from government
organizations to market food as organic.
Alternative
Ask the students to listen while you read the text
aloud. Or invite a student to read the text aloud for
B the class.
• Read the instructions to the class.
• Ask the students to work individually to check the blue • When the students finish, ask them to compare their
boxes for the things in Ex. A that they do. answers in pairs. Then check the answer with the class.

c Possible answer
• Read the instructions to the class. Note: the answer to the question is not explicit in the text.
• Direct the students to the model conversation and have He wants them to change their habits to "act green."
them repeat it after you, both chorally and individually.
• Point out the negative short answer No, I don't, and
elicit the affirmative Yes, I do.
• Ask the students why this question is in the simple
NOTICE!
present tense and not the present progressive (because • Ask the students to look at the verbs in bold green
the question asks about an activity that happens all the font in the text again.
time, not something that is happening right now). • Ask them to circle examples of the simple present
• Put the students in groups of three or four to complete and underline examples of the present progressive.
the exercise. Encourage them to suggest other things
they can do to live a greener lifestyle.

D iffe re n t s t r o k e s UNIT 6 T64


B • Have the class read your sentences and guess which
one is false. Give them the correct sentences (e.g. I'm
Function driving to work this week.).
• Read the instructions to the class. Ask them to work • Give the students time to write their own sentences.
individually and choose the correct endings for sentences Circulate while they are working, helping with grammar
1 and 2. Then elicit the answers from the class. and vocabulary as needed.
• Explain the use of the simple present by asking what • Invite individual students to read their sentences for the
words we typically use with it (always, every day, usually, class. The rest of the class guesses the false sentence.
often). Have the students refer to the text in Ex. A to
find out how often Adam's dad forgets to turn off his Workbook pp. 36-37, Section 5
computer (always) and how much his parents water their
yard (a lot—in other words, every day).
• Explain tha use of the present progressive by asking
what words we typically use with it (now, right now,
today this week, these days, this month, etc.) and link 9 Writing: simple sentences
this to when we use this tense (for things happening
right now or around now). Lead-in
• Ask the students to read the information in the language Refer the students to the skills panel, and have them read
box and to look at the examples in the Watch out! box. the information. Make sure they understand the concepts
• Highlight that some verbs are never used in the of subject and object. Point out that both the subject and
progressive. They are mostly verbs of feeling and the object can be more than one word (e.g. in item 2 in
perception, and they are called stative verbs. Apart from Ex. A, the object is an article about recycling).
like, know, want, and need, other common examples
include love, hate, understand, seem, and believe. A
• Read the instructions to the class, and point out the
example.
• Give the students time to read the sentences and the • Ask the students to complete the exercise individually.
options. • To check answers, choose students to write their
• Ask the students to do the exercise individually and answers on the board. Have the rest of the class correct
then compare their answers in pairs. any errors.
• Choose students to write their answers on the board. Go
over the answers with the class, and ask the students who
wrote the answers to explain why they chose the present
• Ask the students to look at the pictures while you read
progressive or the simple present (e.g. in item 3, the word
the instructions to the class.
usually indicates this is something that is generally true; in
• Ask the students to tell you what tense they need to use
item 4, want cannot be used in the progressive).
to write about the activities that are happening right
now in the pictures (present progressive).
• Give the students time to write their sentences.
Extra: grammar practice • Elicit possible answers from the class.
Ask students to complete the sentences using the
simple present or present progressive form of the
verbs in parentheses.
1 What tim e_______ you usually_______ ? (get up)
2 _______ you________to school by bus every day? (go)
3 W hat_______ your brother________right now? (do)
4 W hy________ she______________to work today? (drive)
c
Answers • Put the students in pairs to compare answers. Tell them
1 What time do you usually get up? that they should check their partner's answers and help
2 Do you go to school by bus every day? them correct any errors.
3 What is your brother doing right now? • Elicit answers from several students.
4 Why is she driving to work today? • Ask them to identify the subject, the verb, and the
object in each of the sentences.

D ^ Workbook p. 37, Section 6


• Explain the task. Then write three sentences on the board
about yourself. One sentence should be in the simple
present and two in the present progressive. Make sure Workbook
one of the sentences is-false (e.g. I usually go to the gym p. 38, Read and write
(true); I'm living in an apartment (true); I'm walking to p. 39, Down time
work this week (false)).
B ANALYZE Read the text in Exercise A again.
Function Match 1-2 to a-b to complete the sentences.
1 The verbs in the simple present describe .a) things happening right now or around now.
2 The verbs in the present progressive d e scrib e ^ ^ b ) things that are generally true or permanent situations.

W e don't use the present progressive with some verbs:


e.g . like, know, want, need.
WATCH OUT!
l / I want to help the planet I live on.
am wanting to help the planet I live on.
C PRACTICE^ irclg)the correct option.
1 What<fre~you d o in g y do you do right now?
2 Pete (t^ iste n in d y listens to his MP3 player right now.
3 I usuali^f f ia v |) / am having lunch around 1 p.m.
4 My cousin(£yant§y is wanting to be a DJ when he finishes high school.
5 This food is delicious. I am liking /(f/ktjit!
6 Right now, M o m taking)/ takes a Spanish class.

D NOW YOU DO IT W rite four sentences about your life in general and four sentences
about your life right now. One of your sentences should be false. Read them to the class
for them to guess w hich one is false.

9 W R I T I N G : simpl e sentences
Simple statements in English always have a subject and a verb, and often have an object, e.g.
I like cats and dogs.
Subject + verb + object
They usually appear in this order: subject — verb — object.

A Double-underline the subjects of the sentences and write S.(^Ircle)the


verbs and write V. Underline the objects and write O.
S V o
I <geusej>p la s t ic b a a s .
S — V O
1 People ^A/aste)a lot of water.
S _______ V O
2 Iands7eadinq)an article about recycling.
~s"— Y °
3 W e (recyclera 11 our paper.

B Write one sentence about each situation. Make sure you include
a subject, verb, and object in the correct order.

1 ________________ ____________________________ 2 ---- ------------------ ------------------------ 3 ----------

C 3 ! Work in pairs. Compare your sentences. Correct any mistakes.

Different strokes UNIT 6 65


MAKING PERSONAL CHANGE
• Understand what you are doing and not doing right in different areas
of your life.
• Decide what you want to change.
• Make an action plan; consider what changes are realistic and how
much time you need to make each change.

A Look at the lifestyle table and the example. For each category,
write things you are doing right and things you are doing wrong at
this point in your life. Then(pircle)the number from 1 to 5 that best
indicates where you are in each category.

Things I'm doing right Things I'm doing wrong My score

Being green fn c using cloth shopping I'm, nab recycling. 1(2)3 4 5


bags nour, nabplastic. i ’nc using a Labaj- electricity
and water.
I neuer use-public transportation.

Things I'm doing right Things I'm doing wrong My score

Being green

Healthy
living

Work or
study

Social
relationships

.. •
• Ask the students to look at the example section (Being
green) and the example sentences in each of the two
columns. Point out that the score of 2 here indicates
Step 1 Understand what you are doing and not doing that this person needs to make some changes to their
right in different areas of your life. (Ex. A) lifestyle.
Step 2 Decide what you want to change. (Ex. B) • Give the students time to write what they are doing
Step 3 Make an action plan; consider what changes are right and wrong in the appropriate boxes, and to circle
realistic and how much time you need to make their "scores" on the charts individually.
each change. (Ex. C, Ex. D) • When the students finish, ask them to form pairs or
Lead-in small groups to compare their answers. Encourage them
to use adverbs of frequency like usually or sometimes
• Read the target skill aloud and highlight the three-step
(e.g. I have a very green lifestyle; I always walk
strategy to develop the skill. Check that the students
everywhere.).
understand all the vocabulary.
• Elicit a few responses from the class for each category.
• Ask the class if anyone has ever made a change in their
• Tell the class your own personal "scores" for each
lives (e.g. stopped a bad habit, started an exercise
category, and explain your reasons.
program, etc.).
• Ask whether the change was easy or difficult to make.
Tell the students that in this section, they will think about
a current situation in their lives and identify an area that
Culture note
they would like to change in some way. Finally, they will Green lifestyles and healthy lifestyles are very
work to develop an action plan to make the change. important social issues around the world. People are
always looking for new ways to be green, save energy,
and help protect the environment. Many people are
Culture note also health conscious. They are careful about what
they eat, and they exercise regularly—jogging, bike
In many western cultures, particularly in the U.S.A.,
riding, or going to the gym.
having the skills to make personal change and improve
oneself and one's life is very important. People often
buy "self-help" books or attend workshops and
seminars to learn how to improve various aspects of
their personalities or their lives.

Different strokes UNIT 6 T66


B
• Ask the students to work individually and choose one
category from the table that they would like to change.
This could be a category where they had a low score in
Ex. A, but it could also be one where they want to make
a small change. Point out the bullet points and explain
that students might want to use these ideas to help
them choose a category.
• Ask the students to share their choices in pairs.

c
• Tell the students that now they will think of some ideas
to help thefln make the change they want to make in
their lives.
• Ask the students to read the example of an action plan.
• Encourage the students to write notes describing how
they want to change the areas of their lives that they
chose in Ex. B.
• Draw the students' attention to the three future time
expressions in the action plan (next Saturday, in the next D
two months, in the next six months). Then ask them to • Draw the students' attention to the How to say it box.
make a similar action plan for themselves using personal • Highlight the fact that they can begin each statement
information and their ideas. Circulate and monitor, with future time expressions, using tomorrow for
assisting where needed. immediate plans and in the next month for longer-term
• Note that some learners may have problems expressing plans.
in English how they plan to change, so be prepared • Put the students in pairs to share their action plans and
to give them some help. For example, you could give ask questions about each other's plans.
them some prompts like these to help them get started: • When the pairs finish, listen to some ideas from the
Being green: refer the students to the green lifestyle class. Have the students suggest additional ideas to
vocabulary in Section 7; Social relationships: friends, help their classmates achieve their goals.
family, go out more, join a social club; Work and study:
write a schedule for the tasks I have to do, decide which
tasks are important and which are not important, do the
important tasks first; Healthy living: go jogging, go to
& REFLECT
• Ask the students to read the Reflect question.
the gym, go swimming, eat more fruit and vegetables. • Give them some time to think about different situations
in the domains of Study and Learning and Work and
Career where the skill of Making personal change would
Alternative be useful.
Some students may have problems thinking of three • Elicit the following ideas: starting a new course of study;
different things. If this happens, suggest that they finding a new career path, etc.
write statements about more than one category (e.g.
healthy living and being green).
• An area with many problems. Making big changes is very exciting!
• An area with not many problems. Sometimes it's better to start with small changes!
• An area that you are worrying about. It's good to make changes that are important to you!

C Make a realistic action plan sim ilar to this one.

Aread mmtto mokt chatujet Uv: -


i l r e la t io M r u P
S o c it
Tim e
Sjtecifu>plans
G en era l changes to m a k e

1 N e tt Saturday
1 Cooh dinnerfo r my parents
\ppmdy more tim e unth m yfondly
2 One n igh t entry m onth
2 Babysit my brother’s children

1 Oncefaweelc
1 Qo ou t w ith my bestfrie n d
Hare m orefun 2 In th e n e tttu w months
2 Hare a*party a t my house
3 jo in fa d u b tom retn zu rfn en d s 3 tn th e n e tt six months

■ V' v * - / . / >

D 31 Work in pairs. Share your action plan with your partner. Explain what you are
planning to do and w hen you are planning to do it. If you w ant to, ask questions about
your partner’s plan.
A: I'm n o t h a v in g m u c h fun t h e s e d a y s , s o I w a n t to h a v e a p a r ty a t m y h o u s e n e x t S a tu rd a y.
B: T h a t s o u n d s lik e a g r e a t id e a .

HOW TO SAY IT H
HHHHN

Talking about plans


I w ant to / n e e d to , so I'm planning to ...
I'm planning to ...
W hat are yo u planning to d o . . . ?

R EFLECT ...
% How can the skill of making personal
change be useful to you in Self and
Society and Work and Career?

Different strokes UNIT 6 67


1 V O CA BU LA RY
A Read what people say about their lifestyles. W rite the opposite of the adjective in bold
to complete the sentences. (4 points)
1 My lifestyle is pretty healthy. I exercise a lot and eat fruit. My boyfriend watches TV or plays video games all
day. He has a very unhea/thy lifestyle.
2 I work in an office every day. I guess my lifestyle is boring. My brother has a really e*£ltin9 lifestyle. He's
a police officer.
3 My sister has a really relaxing lifestyle. She studies in the morning and goes to the gym in the afternoon.
Her husband has a very stressful ||fe |-|e ^ ^ 5 from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. every day, including Saturdays.
4 I try to be green. I recycle everything. My parents are really wasteful _ though. They throw out everything.
They never recycle.

B Jerry is talking about his “green” lifestyle. Complete the text with words in the box.
(6 points)

lights organic ride reuse save share

"I try to have a green lifestyle. I (1 ) J.aY.£. water, and I always turn off the (2 ) .. before I go to
bed. My office is pretty close to my apartment, so I usually (3 ) r'd e my bike to work. Sometimes I
(4 ) share a wjt|n a frjenc| gQ to the supermarket. I always buy (5) ___ or9.a..0.i£- fruit and vegetables,
and I always (6 ) re£s£ bags."

8-10 correct: I can talk about different lifestyles.


0-7 correct: Look again at Sections 1 and 7 on pages 60 and 64.
SCORE: /10

2 GRAM M AR
Read more of what Jerry says. Write the verbs in parentheses in the simple present or
present progressive. (10 points)

"I (1) don't know (not know) why people are so wasteful. Right now, I (2) rrl L am roading , (read) a great
book about protecting the planet. Everyone (3) knows_ (know) that pollution is a problem. It's obvious
that people (4) are destroying (destroy) the planet. Some people (5) (need) to use a car
som etim es, but not every day. Walk or ride a bicycle! I usually (6) wo,,s (work) downtown, and
I always (7) (ride) my bike to work. Right now though, I (8) m/ a m working (WOrk) from
home, so I don't need to travel anywhere! I know people (9) ^°n f a9ree (not agree) with everything
I say, but now I think people (10) are Iearnin3 (learn) that they need to do more to protect the planet."

8-10 correct: I can contrast the simple present and the present progressive to talk about general time and what is
happening now or around now.
0-7 correct: Look again at Sections 4 and 8 on pages 62 and 64.
SCORE: /10
Language wrap-up 1 Vocabulary
Students can do the Language wrap-up exercises in If you do the exercises on the Language wrap-up page in
class or for homework. If you give them for homework, class, begin by writing the word big on the board. Elicit
remember to check the exercises at the beginning of the from the students what the opposite of this word is (small
next class, or collect a few to grade and identify any typical or little). Tell them that the first part of the Vocabulary
errors. section focuses on opposites. Then briefly elicit some
ideas for a green lifestyle (e.g. save water, turn off lights,
If you decide to do the exercises in class, you can etc.) and tell them that this is the focus of the second part
approach the wrap-up as a two-step reviewing procedure. of the Vocabulary section.
First, ask the students to do the Vocabulary section
individually. When ready, encourage the students to check A
their answers carefully, and then put them in pairs to
Tell the students to read the sentences carefully before
compare answers and discuss any differences. Self- and
they write the opposite of the word in bold in the blanks.
peer-correction are two excellent ways of developing
learner independence and creating a cooperative learning
B
environment. After completing the Vocabulary section, you
can apply the same procedure to the Grammar section. Tell the students to read the whole text carefully before
they write the correct words in the blanks.
At the end of each section, make sure that the students
write their score out often. If they have a score lower 2 Grammar
than eight, direct them to the appropriate sections of the Remind the students of the verbs that aren't used in the
unit, and encourage them to read those sections again for present progressive (e.g. like, want, need, know,
homework. After that, ask the students to complete the agree, etc.).
exercise(s) again at home.
Refer to the Communicative wrap-ups on pp. 134-
135 of the Student's Book for more activities.

■ Framework: unit map


ropean
Unit 6 Competence developed CEF Reference (A1)
1 Vocabulary can describe different lifestyles Table 1; Table 2; Section 4.4.1.1
2 Reading can understand personal profiles Table 1; Table 2; Section 4.4.2.2
3 Listening can listen for numerical information Section 4.4.3.1
4 Grammar can understand and use the present progressive Table 1; Table 2; Sections 5.2.1.2;
6.4.77; 6.47.8
5 Pronunciation can pronounce the /r)/ sound correctly Section 5.2.1.4
6 Speaking can ask a friend for news Table 1; Table 2; Section 4.4.3.1
7 Vocabulary can talk about green lifestyles Table 1; Table 2; Section 4.4.1.1
8 Grammar can differentiate between the present progressive Table 1; Table 2; Sections 5.2.1.2;
and the simple present 6.4.77; 6.47.8
9 Writing can write simple sentences Table 2; Section 4.4.1.2

Different strokes UNIT 6 T68


The expression You have talent! is often used to compliment people's special talents and
uniqueness. It can refer to talents for sports, languages, the arts, etc.

Write the words talent and talented on the board.


Give an example of a talented person (e.g. a talented
musician, singer, or actor). Ask the students which word
Unit opener is an adjective (talented) and which one is a noun (talent).
(p. 69) 10 min.
Establish that a talented person has many talents. Elicit
• Optional downloadable unit opener 10 min.
one or two sentences using the word talented (e.g. I think
1 Vocabulary: personality adjectives (p. 70) 25 min.
Brad Pitt is a talented actor.). This is also an opportunity to
2 Writing: a personal reference (p- 70) 20 min. recycle some of the occupation vocabulary from Unit 2.
• Optional downloadable Writing 20 min.
Refer the students to the HfeSkills panel. Tell them that the
workshop: writing a personal reference
topic of this unit's lifeSkills section Is Working as a group
3 Reading: for the main idea (p- 71) 30 min. to do a task. Ask them to say in what situations they have
4 Grammar: can/can't—ability (p- 72) 40 min. to work with other people in a group. Ask whether they
5 Pronunciation: can/can't (p. 73) 15 min. prefer to be a leader or a follower when they work in a
6 Vocabulary: talents and abilities (p. 73) 25 min. group, and say why.
7 Listening: to a review of a TV show (p. 74) 30 min.
8 Grammar: adverbs of manner (p. 74) 40 min. A
9 Speaking: showing interest 20 min. • Ask the students to look at the pictures and tell you
(p- 75)
lifeSkills: working as a group to do a task (p- 76) 45 min. what they see (clockwise from top: two chess players, an
athlete in a wheelchair, a goalkeeper catching a ball, a
(Work and Career)
DJ playing music, a woman playing the harp). Elicit what
• Optional downloadable Lifeskills 45 min.
DJ stands for (disc jockey).
lesson (Self and Society) • The pictures could provide an opportunity to explore
• Optional downloadable Lifeskills 45 min. some vocabulary. If time allows, you could focus on
lesson (Study and Learning) some of these words: chess, goalkeeper, disabled,
Language wrap-up (p. 78) 15 min. athlete, wheelchair, race, musical instruments.
Video and downloadable video worksheet 45 min. • Read the instructions to the class.
• Put the students In pairs to discuss their responses.
• When the pairs finish, elicit some Ideas from the class.
• Prompt the students to give you reasons for their choices,
and remind them to use phrases to express opinions.
Unit opener
B
Lead-in • Read the instructions to the class.
Direct the students' attention to the objectives In the unit • Direct the students to the model conversation and have
menu and go through the information with them. Explain them repeat it after you, both chorally and individually.
that this unit focuses on how to talk about personality and • Give the students a couple of minutes to think individually
abilities, and on the following skills which will help them about the talents they have. Give them a chance to check
do this: any vocabulary they don't know, and have them write a
Reading: for the main idea few notes to help them in the discussion.
Ask the students how quickly they can find out what a text • Put the students in groups of three or four to share their
Is about. Ask how they can do this. Elicit examples (e.g. talents. Circulate and monitor, assisting where needed.
key words, pictures, titles, headlines, etc.). Encourage all the students to participate in the discussion
Speaking: showing interest and to speak English.
Ask the students in what ways people can show interest in • When the groups finish, elicit some responses from the
a conversation. class.
Listening: to a review of a TV show • List the students' talents on the board next to their
Ask the students these questions: What are your favorite names to recycle third person -s endings (e.g. Tina plays
types o f TV shows? What types o f shows do you not like? the piano.).
Writing: a personal reference
Sometimes employers ask job applicants for personal
references. What types of Information do people usually
include when they write a. personal reference?
UNIT 7 YOU HAVE TALENT!
IN THIS UNIT YO U
learn language to talk about A Look at these pictures. In your opinion,
personality and abilities
who is the most talented? W hy?
read a text about abilities according
to theories of astrology— reading
%
for the main idea
use phrases to show interest in a
% conversation—showing interest
1^1 listen to a review of a TV talent show
write a reference describing
someone's qualities and abilities
watch a video about people with
different abilities

B Q § Are you talented? Tell your classm ates what talents you have.
Use the ideas in the box as w ell as your own ideas.
cook dance play soccer
A: Let's se e ... I play the guitar. I sp ea k Italian and French.
play the guitar speak French
B: / think I'm talented. I'm a g o o d so c ce r player, and I also play basketball.
C: I'm g o o d at cooking, and I'm a g o o d dancer, too.

LIFE Learn to work in a group


to do a task
SKILLS
WORK &
- U
CAREER
You have talent! UNIT 7
$
1 personality adjectives
A Match the personality adjectives to the statements.
1 friendlyv ,a) I'm happy. I think my life is great.
2 generous. / .b )l'm good at making plans.
3 patient /.c) I usually do very well on exams.
4 reliable^/ y r ' d) I love buying things for other people.
5 optim istic*/ \ , e ) I never tell lies.
6 o r g a n iz ^ 'V 'f ) I make friends easily.
7 sm art^ / V^g) My friends can depend on me.
8 h o n e s t/ _ ' h) I'm good at waiting for things.

B 2 ! Work in pairs. Look at these pictures. Say what personality


adjectives from Exercise A you think these people have.

I think Bill G ates is really smart becau se ...

C QS Work in pairs. Tell your partner w hich positive qualities from


Exercise A you think you have and why.
I think I'm optim istic. I'm usually happy.

2 a personal reference
A |j||3 8 Listen to this conversation. Then (circle)T (true) or F (false) for
each statement.

1 Jenny is applying for a job. T /©


2 Jonathan thinks Carmen has good qualities for an English teacher. ©/ F
3 Carmen probably makes friends easily. n r f
4 She isn't good at planning. T/©
5 Carmen speaks Spanish. Q F
6 She is patient when people are learning something. © F
1 Vocabulary: personality Refer the students back to the list of personality
adjectives adjectives in Ex. A. Give students time to write down the
two or three adjectives that describe them and to think
Lead-in of reasons why.
Put the students in pairs to discuss their responses.
Begin by recycling three or four of the personality
When they finish, listen to some examples from the
adjectives from p. 35. Write the words on the board with
class.
spaces instead of vowels (e.g. c__nf_d_nt, p_p_l_r,
c_ns_d_r_t_). Ask individual students to come to the r
board and complete the words with the missing letters ^ Workbook p. 40, Section I
(confident, popular, considerate). Tell the students
that they are going to learn more words to describe
personalities.
2 Writing: a personal
Draw the students' attention to the statements. Call on
reference
individual students to read them aloud to the class.
Explain any unfamiliar words or phrases, especially be
good at (similar to talented, e.g. a talented singer is
good at singing), lies (things which are not true), and 38 Ask the students what a reference is (a letter
depend on (when a person can depend on you, they or email with a list of someone's qualities that says if
know you will help them when they need help). Check they are suitable for a particular job).
that they also understand wait for (you wait for your • Ask the students to read the statements carefully first.
friends when they are late). • Check that they understand apply for a job (to make an
Ask the students to repeat the list of adjectives, first official request for a job).
chorally and then individually. • Play the audio once, and then check the students'
Read the instructions to the class. Then ask the students progress. If necessary, play it again. Check the answers
to do the matching exercise individually. Circulate and with the class.
monitor, assisting where needed.
Check the answers by asking one student to read Audio script
the statement and another student to read the Jo = Jonathan, J = Jenny
corresponding adjective. Jo: Hello?
Highlight the stress in these multisyllabic words, J: Hi, Jonathan. It's Jenny. Listen, Carmen Dean is applying
particularly generous, patient, optimistic, organized, and for a job as an English teacher at a language institute. I'm
honest. Point out also that the initial h in honest is silent. writing a personal reference for her. Can you help me?
Jo: Of course.
B J: OK, so I need to list at least three qualities that make
Tell the students to look at the pictures. Ask them if they Carmen a good candidate for a job as a teacher. What
know what these people are famous for (Bill Gates— qualities do you think she has?
founder of Microsoft™, David Beckham—English Jo: That's easy! First, Carmen is really friendly. She likes
celebrity and former soccer player, Angelina Jolie— meeting new people, and she loves talking to people.
movies, aid work with the United Nations). J: That's true. She is really friendly, and that's important for a
Read the instructions to the class, and elicit some ideas teacher. What else?
about the first person, Bill Gates. Jo: Well, she's very organized and reliable. She's good at
If the students find it difficult to guess which adjectives making plans, and people can depend on her.
describe the people, tell them to think about each J: Yeah, that's good. Organized ... and reliable. Anything
person's job and activities, and what traits they would else?
need to be successful. Jo: Yeah, you know, Carmen is also very patient. She's
Put the students in pairs to discuss their ideas. helping me with my Spanish, and she often explains
Encourage them to use the adjectives from Ex. A when things several times!
talking about the pictures. Tell them they can use more J: Great! That's all I need. Thanks, Jonathan!
than one adjective if they want to. Jo: You're welcome. I hope Carmen gets the job!
When the pairs finish, elicit some ideas from the class.
Prompt the students to give reasons for their choices of
adjective(s) for each person (e.g. I think Angelina Jolie is
organized and patient because she has a busy life and
many children.).

Possible answers
Bill Gates: generous, organized, smart •
David Beckham: friendly, optimistic
Angelina Jolie: friendly, generous, organized

You have talent! UNIT 7 T70


• Tell the students to use the key words in each paragraph
• Explain the task. Tell the students they can use the to decide which of the words and phrases best describe
positive personality adjectives from Section 1 as well as each paragraph, and write the headings in the correct
the personality adjectives on p. 35. You can also recycle places in the text.
the list of jobs on p. 20. • Give the students time to complete the exercise
• Give the students some time to make notes for their individually.
references and to ask you questions about vocabulary. • Do not check answers at this stage.
• Circulate and monitor, assisting where needed. Make
sure that the students finish this section of the unit with D
an accurate piece of writing. • Check the answers with the class and ask the students
• Explain that To whom it may concern is used when we which words helped them to make their choices (e.g.
don't know the addressee's name. When we know the Health: healthy lifestyle, fruit and vegetables, good at
addresse’e's name in a formal situation, we use Dear sports; Good qualities: friendly, optimistic, positive, fun,
John. We can also use Dear Sir or Madam when we sing, dance, a lot of friends, loyal; Bad luck: unlucky; Work
don't know the addressee's name in a letter. and money: like their jobs, rich, aren't very generous).
• You could encourage self-correction by putting a
small mark next to any errors, without identifying the
error type. The students can then self- or peer-correct. Extra: reading practice
Developing this critical eye is essential to improving and Ask the students to answer these questions.
progressing in their written work. 1 How often do people born on February 29 have a
birthday?
2 What four adjectives in paragraph 2 describe
people born on February 29?
3 Why don't they usually give presents?
4 What do they eat?

• Remind the students that they practiced reading Answers


for the main idea when they read about people's 1 every four years
neighborhoods on p. 52. 2 friendly, optimistic, fun, loyal
• Elicit that reading for the main idea is reading a text 3 because they aren't very generous
quickly, to understand what it is about. 4 a lot of fruit and vegetables
• Read the information in the skills panel. Explain that
key words or phrases are the most important words in a
sentence or text. E
• Read the instructions and the questions to the class. Go
A
over the meaning of influences our personality (makes
• Explain the task. Give the students time to circle us change our behavior). Give the students time to think
the nouns and underline the adjectives in the first about their answers individually.
paragraph. • Put the students in groups to discuss the questions.
• Ask them to tell you what the text is about (horoscopes). Circulate and monitor, assisting where needed. Make
• Highlight the pronunciation of horoscope—both the notes on any errors to address later.
stress on the first syllable and the fact that the h is • When the groups finish, elicit some responses from
pronounced. the class. Find out if anyone in the class was born on
• Ask the class where they can find texts like this (e.g. February 29, or if they know anyone with a birthday on
in magazines, online). Elicit what helped the students that date. Is that person unlucky? Are they talented?
decide on the kind of text (e.g. the date in the text, the Find out how many of the students read their horoscope
picture of the fortune teller). and how many believe in astrology.

B
• Set a time limit of two minutes for this exercise, and ask Extra: star signs
the students to begin the task.
Write a list of star signs in English on the board.
• When the students finish, ask them to compare their
Starting from January 20, the English names are:
words in pairs. Then choose four students—one for
Aquarius. Pisces, Aries, Taurus. Gemini, Cancer.
each paragraph—to write their key words on the board.
Leo. Virgo. Libra, Scorpio. Sagittarius, Capricorn.
Check the answers with the class. Help the students
Consolidate the new personality adjectives by asking
understand which are key words and phrases, and why.
the students to speculate about the qualities of
people from each star sign. Alternatively, you could
c review dates in English (e.g. Virgo is between August
• Explain that the words and phrases shown here summarize 23 and September 22.).
the main idea of each paragraph. Check that the students
understand all the words and phrases, especially bad luck
(negative fortune in life) and good qualities (refer to the list
of positive adjectives in Section 1).
#

B Read Jenny’s reference. Then think about your best friend and their
ideal job. Write a personal reference for your friend.

To whom it may concern:


I ’ m writing this reference for my friend Carmen Dean. In my opinion, she is ideal for a job
as an English teacher for several reasons.
First, Carmen is a very friendly person. She likes meeting new people, and she loves talking
to people. Second, Carmen is very organized and reliable. She’s good at making plans, and
people can depend on her. Finally, she is very patient. She is helping a friend with his Spanish,
and she often explains things several times.
I definitely recommend Carmen Dean for a job as an English teacher.

Sincerely yours,
Jenny Richards

3 for the main idea page


When you read for the main idea, look quickly at the text to find key words or phrases.
These can tell you the subject of each paragraph. Key words are often nouns or adjectives.

A Look quickly at paragraph 1 in the text below.(fiirclg)the nouns and


underline the adjectives. Based on these words, what do you think the
text is about?

B Now look quickly at paragraphs 2-4.(^irclg)the nouns and underline


the adjectives.

C Look at the key words you identified in all four paragraphs and write
these headings in the correct places in the text.

Bad luck! Good qualities Health Work and money

D Read the paragraphs more carefully. Check your answers to Exercise C.

iM S i H is M r a j i
M ill I H IM 1 IM
2 G o o d q u a lities
1 B a d lu ck! ________ They are very friendly and optimistic. They
First of all,(geoplg) born onCEgbruary 29 always see the positive (side) of(Tif&)They
are unlucky! They only have oneC^Jrthday are fun, and many of them can sing or
every four(yearsT) But because of this, dance very well. They have a lot oKfriencjs)
they have special(| aien^)and(^bilities ) and they are always loyal to them.

3 Work a n d m o n e y _______ 4 H ealth

People) bom onCfebruary j ^>like their These(fhscean£> usually have a healthy


■jobsjand they want to be rich. But they lifestyle) They eat a lot o f(fru i) and
don't usually give (gifts) because they ^egetables)and they are good atCsports)
aren't very generous!

E 2 ! Work in groups. Answ er these questions.


1 Was anyone you know born on February 29? Do you agree with the text? Why or why not?
2 Do you read your horoscope? Do you think astrology influences a person's personality?

You have talent! UNIT 7 71


ca n/ca n't — ability
A LANGUAGE IN CONTEXT Match the pictures
Yes, he can. My horse can
to people’s statements about their pets.
play soccer! H e’s really
talented!
CAN YOUR PET PLAY A SPORT? OR DANCE? OR SING? J.T. Williams, Texas

Post comments about your pet s unusual talents below!


The most talented pet will win a prize of $500!

My parrot can t talk, but he


can draw. He draws pictures
with colored pencils!
Nina, Brazil

Our dog, Muffin, can balance


things on his nose. It’s very
funny!
Mrs. Hill. Scotland

NOTICES
What word do the people
use to talk about abilities?
ANALYZE Read the texts in Exercise A again.
Form Choose the correct option to complete each sentence. Then complete the table
1 After can we use verb b) a noun

2 The contraction of cannot is can b) cant

3 The correct form after He/She/lt is can b) cans

Affirmative Negative Questions Short answers

It can fly. He can't play soccer. Can they swim? Yes, he can. / No, he can't.

You (1) sing! I (3) can't sing (5) K-Can


a" you play No, I (7) can t
We (2) speak Jamal and Pierre the guitar? Yes, we (8) can
English. can't speak English. (6) Can you and
Carla drive?

Function Choose the correct options to complete the sentences.


1 W e use can/can't to talk about
a) routine activities (CTabilities)
WATCH OUT!
2 W e use can/can't to referto ______________ 0 She can dance.
a) people b) animals pQpeople and anirnaTs^> She can to dance.
(j£) She cans dance.
C PRACTICE Complete these sentences with can or can’t ■ H i H H H i
and the correct form of the words in parentheses.
1 A: Can they p la y (play) tennis? B: Yes, can.
2 Sally is a great chef. Shecan co°^ (c o o k ) French food.
3 I cant open (n o t o p e n ) the door. Can you?
4 A: Can Angela sPea^ (sp e a k ) Japanese? B: \lo ,soe car ’.
5 A: ^an he E lS Z (play) the guitar? B: Yes, can .
6 We can t hear (n o t h ea r) the TV. Please turn down your music.
Function
• Have the students look at the two statements. Instruct
them to check the correct options to complete the
sentences. Ask the students to check their answers with
a partner. Then check answers with the class.
Ask the students if they have pets at home. Find out which
pets are the most common, and if anyone has an unusual
c
pet. Ask if anyone has (or has seen) a pet with a special • Draw the students' attention to the Watch out! box. Ask
talent, and if so, have them describe what it is. the students why the second sentence is incorrect (we
don't use to after can). Point out that we use the base
A form of the verb after can. Ask the students why the
third sentence is incorrect (can does not change in the
• Ask the students to look at the pictures. Elicit the words
third person singular).
for the animals (dog, horse, parrot). Tell the students
• Ask the students to work individually to complete the
that they are going to read a short internet chat about
exercise. Circulate and monitor, assisting where needed.
these three talented animals.
• When the students finish, ask them to compare
• Ask the students to do the exercise individually and
their answers in pairs. Then check the answers by
then to compare their answers in pairs.
calling on different pairs of students to read the short
• Check the answers with the class. Ask the students to
conversations aloud and individual students to give the
read complete sentences aloud when they give their
other answers.
answers, since these include the target language in this
section.

Extra: grammar practice


NOTICE! Complete the sentences using can or can't.
• Read the question aloud to the class. 1 I don't have any money so I _ _ _ _ _ go to the
• Ask the students to look at the comments again, movies this evening.
and then elicit the answer. 2 _______ she play the guitar? Yes, she .
3 _______ you lend me some money? No, I .
4 How many students in your class _ _ _ _ _ speak
Answer
another language?
can (and can't) 5 We ______ come to the beach with you on Saturday
because we have to visit our grandparents.

B Answers
1 can't 4 can
Form 2 Can; can 5 can't
• Have the students complete the rules individually, 3 Can; can't
referring to the three sentences in bold in the text in
Ex. A. Check the answers with the class.
• Refer the students to the examples in the grammar
table. Practice the question form and short answers by
asking the class a few questions (e.g. A: Can you fly?
B: No, I can't. A: Can you swim? B: Yes, I can.). Have the
students complete the table. Check answers with the
class.
• Highlight the fact that cannot is more formal than can't
and is normally only used in written English.


’fc\

You hove talent! UNIT 7 T72


D Read the instructions to the class. Then invite individual
Read the instructions to the class. Then ask the students students to read the phrases in the box aloud for the
to repeat the phrases and check that they understand all class.
of them. Make sure that they can pronounce the words • Ask the students to complete the sentences using the
correctly, especially basketball and opera. Tell them that words in the box, and then check the answers with the
they can also use other abilities apart from the ones class.
given.
• Direct the students to the model conversation and have
them repeat it after you, both chorally and individually. ...
Point out that Can you? can be answered with either Have the class brainstorm skills and talents they would
Yes, / can or No, I can't. like to learn, and write them on the board (e.g. speak
• Highlight the fact that in the example, the second Can Japanese, cook Indian food, paint or draw well, do
you? is stressed like this: Can you? a back flip, etc.). Ask the students to write the list in
• Put the students in pairs to complete the exercise. their notebooks. Then have the class circulate, asking
• When the pairs finish, choose several students to report their classmates if they can do those things. When a
back about their partner's skills (e.g. Kyle can run a classmate answers Yes, / can, students should write the
marathon. He can't dance salsa.). person's name next to the skill and then move on to
ask another classmate about the next skill. At the end,
elicit which students can do the various skills.

B
• Read the instructions aloud, and give the class a model
by talking about the things in Ex. A that you can do, and
other skills and talents you have or don't have (e.g. I can
sing traditional songs. I can't drive a truck.).
• Make sure the students remember that can/can't are
39 See the Student's Book for the audio script. followed by the base form of the verb, so they should
Read the instructions to the class. Give the students an say, for example, / can/can't surf and / can/can't dance
example of a strong vowel (e.g. the /ae/ sound in salsa.
dancer) and a weak sound (e.g. the /a/ sound in • Put the students in groups of three or four to complete
student). the exercise. Tell them to take notes because later they
Highlight the weak form in can /kan/ and the longer will report back about other members of their group.
vowel sound in can't/kaent/. Write the following
sentence on the board: I can't speak Italian, but I can c
speak Spanish. Point out that when contrasting can't • Read the instructions to the class. Refer the students to
and can as in the above sentence, we emphasize can the example sentence, and encourage them to report
and pronounce it as /kaen/ when it occurs in the second back in this way.
position of the sentence. • Elicit a lot of different talents in the class to bring out
individual students' unique abilities. The most important
B thing here is that the students speak with some fluency
40 See the Student's Book for the audio script. about the other members of their group, so try to avoid
Have the students say the sentences to each other in interrupting to correct errors. Instead, make a note of
pairs. any serious errors in the use of can/can't and ask the
Play the audio for the students to check and to repeat students to correct them when they finish reporting
the sentences chorally. back.
Have the students work in pairs again to practice
saying the sentences to each other with the correct
pronunciation of can/can't. Extra: homework
Call on students to say the sentences, and make sure Ask the students to write sentences using can or can't
that can and can't are pronounced correctly. about their family members and/or friends.

• Review the expression be good at (able to do


something well). Tell the students they are going to talk
about things they are good at. Ask the students to look
at the picture and elicit a sentence using can (e.g. He
can play the guitar very well.).
D a f NOW YOU DO IT Work in pairs. Ask and answer questions about
each other’s abilities. Use the phrases below.
• cook Italian food
• swim five kilometers
• sing opera
• dance salsa
• play basketball

A: Can you swim five kilometers?


B: No, I can't. Can you?

5 P R O N U N C I A T I O N : can/ca n't
A Em 39 Listen to the pronunciation of can and can’t in these sentences.
Notice that the vowel sound in can is weaker than in can’t.
1 I can speak French, but I can't cook French food.
2 I can't drive a car, but I can ride a bike.

B P a 40 Practice the sentences below. Then listen, check, and repeat.


1 My sister can dance, but she can't sing.
2 I can't speak Germ an, but I can understand some words.
3 I can't ride a motorcycle, but I can drive a car.
4 I can hear you, but I can't see you!

6 talents and abilities


A Complete these sentences with phrases in the box.

am good at can cook can drive can play can sing can speak

can p la y the guitar,


am g o o d at karate,
can d rive a car.
can s p e a k a foreign language,
can s in g _ opera.
can c o o k French food.

Work in groups. Which


statements in Exercise A are true for
you? What other things can you do?
Use the ideas in the box as well as
your own.

a truck healthy snacks Italian karaoke songs many languages


salsa dancing surfing traditional songs

A: / can play the guitar. What about you?


B: I can't play the guitar, but I can play the piano.
C: / can't play the guitar or the piano,'but I can cook French food.

C H§ Tell the class about a talented person in your group.


We think Emanuel is talented because he is good at salsa dancing, he can play chess, and J .

Y o u h a v e ta le n t! UNIT 7 73
A Look at this picture. What kind of TV show is it?
Do you have TV shows like this in your country?

B |)|] 41 Listen to a man giving his opinion on the


TV talent show Dream Stars.(^ ircle)th e correct option.
1 Dream Stars \s(^J3ritisRy an American show.
2 Some of the dancers /(singers)on Dream Stars are not very talented.
3 The man thinks the dancersm an)/ can't dance very well.
4 The womap saYs that most comedians
can /(car?i)make her laugh.
5 The man thinks most of the com edians on
Dream Stars^rey are not very funny.
6 In general, the man(7/kesy doesn't like the show.

C 23 Work in pairs. Discuss these questions.


1 Which TV talent shows do you like? Why? jS B B B fif
2 Which TV talent shows don't you like? Why not? jH H H B

A: / like American Idol because it's interesting.


B: Really? I don't like it. The contestants can't sing!

8 adverbs of manner
A LANGUAGE IN CONTEXT Read what a judge on a talent show thinks
about one of the contestants. Is the judge’s general impression of Ryan
positive or negative?

Contestant Genre

Ryan Gleason comedian Ryan is very smart and talented. He tells


great jokes, but he isn’t very organized.
Age: 24
That’s why he sometimes can’t remember
Nationality: Canadian his jokes very well. He also speaks very
quickly and very quietly. But Ryan is a
very funny guy and I think we can help
him learn to speak slowly and clearly.
He learns fast, and his audience loves him.

Look back at the words in bold.


B ANALYZE Read the notes in Exercise A again. How are they similar?

Function(^Trclg)the correct option to complete the sentence.


Adverbs of manner describe things or people /(actions?)

Form(^ircle)the correct option to complete the sentences. Then complete the table
on page 75 with the adverb forms of the adjectives.
1 Adverbs of manner usually end in -y ( p A )
2 Adverbs of manner usually come before /(aftefythe verb.
7 Listening: to a review of a 8 Grammar: adverbs of manner
TV show
A
• Read the instructions aloud. Check that the students
understand that a person who takes part in a talent
• Ask the students to look at the picture while you read show is a contestant.
the question. • Highlight the word for the person who gives a score
• Elicit responses to the questions from the class. If they to the contestants in a talent show—a judge. Clarify
don't provide you with the expression talent show, write positive/negative impression (good or bad opinion).
it on the board. • Direct the students to read for the main idea to decide if
• Elicit examples of talent shows from their country. What the impression is positive or negative.
talents do the contestants have (e.g. they can sing, they • Set a time limit of one minute, and ask the students to
can dance, they can play an instrument)? skim the text quickly.
• When the students finish, check the answer with the
B class. Elicit key words or phrases that helped them
• M 41 decide the answer (smart and talented, very funny,
• Tell the students they will hear a man giving his opinion audience loves him).
of a TV talent show called Dream Stars.
• Before you play the audio, ask the students to read the
sentences carefully and make sure they understand what
the options are.
• Play the audio once, and check progress. If necessary,
play the audio again. Check the answers with the class. NOTICE!
Audio s c r i p t _ _ _ _ _ _ ___ • Ask the students to look at the words in bold in the
text.
R = Reporter, M = Mike
• Check the answer with the class.
R: So, Mike, what show are you reviewing this week?
• Elicit that we use adverbs to talk about how someone
M: This week it's Dream Stars— the new British TV talent show.
does something.
R: Another TV talent show!
• Point out that fast and well are irregular adverbs,
M: Yes, but you know what? I love it! OK, some of the
and ask the students to find them in the text.
contestants in the singing competition can't sing very well,
but most of them are very good. My favorite segment is
the dance competition because all of those kids can really
Answer WÊÈÊÈ
dance! In fact, some of them also compete on that great They all end in -ly. They are all adverbs.
American show Can You D a n ce?
R: Oh, yes, that's a great show! OK, and what about the
competition for comedians? Most comedians can't make
B
me laugh. What about these?
M: Well, I don't know about you, but most of the comedians Function
on Dream Stars can certainly make me laugh!
• Direct the students to the Function statement. Have
R: OK, well, it sounds like Dream Stars can become the next
them circle the correct option to complete the sentence.
big hit in the world of talent shows!•
Check the answer with the class.
Form
• Direct the students to the model conversation and have • Direct the students to the Form statements. Have them
them repeat it after you, both chorally and individually. read the notes in Ex. A again and circle the correct
• Before you ask the students to work in pairs, give options to complete the sentences. Check the answers
them a couple of minutes to write down some ideas with the class.
individually.
• Put the students in pairs to complete the exercise.
• When the pairs finish, invite a few pairs to act out their
conversations for the class.

Y o u h a v e ta le n t! UNIT 7 T74
• Have the students complete the grammar table using
the adverb forms of the adjectives.
• Highlight that the final -y of adjectives changes to
i. Elicit other examples in English where the final -y Lead-in
changes to / (e.g. in third person -s: study—studies; with Read the information in the skills panel. Emphasize that
plural nouns, e.g. dictionary—dictionaries). there are different ways of expressing interest—some of
• Draw the students' attention to the irregular adverbs. them verbal (e.g. Wowl; How interesting!; Really?), and
Explain that there are not many irregular adverbs in others, such as facial expressions and body language.
English (the other common one is hard). Encourage
them to memorize these adverbs. A
• Ask the students to look at the Watch out! box and note • Read the instructions, and ask the class to give you their
that we do not use adjectives (e.g. good) to describe impressions of the pictures. Elicit whether the woman
how people do things. Actions are always described looks interested or bored in each picture.
with adverbs (e.g. She can dance beautifully.) and nouns • Encourage the students to think of other ways we show
with adjectives (e.g. She's a beautiful dancer.). Direct the interest in what the other person is saying (e.g. nodding,
students to the third sentence and explain that when we eye contact, asking relevant questions).
use an adverb after a verb, it goes after the entire verb
phrase.

c
• Read the instructions to the students and direct them to
the example. To check the students' understanding of B
the instructions, ask them to change the sentence Helen 42 See the Student's Book for the audio script.
isn't good at French in the same way (Helen can't speak Read the instructions to the class. Make sure the
French well.). students understand that they only have to underline
• Ask the students to do this exercise individually and the expressions that the people in the conversations use
then to compare their answers in pairs. Check the to show they are interested.
answers with the class. Play the audio once. Then check the answers with the
• Highlight that quickly and fast have the same meaning, class.
and remind the students that fast is irregular. Elicit the
other irregular adverb covered in the exercise, good— c
well.
U 43
• Explain to the students that they will hear the underlined
expressions of interest from Ex. B again. Instruct them
Extra: grammar practice
to pay close attention to how the speakers say the
Rewrite the sentences using an adverb. expressions as they listen.
1 He's a good swimmer. • Play the audio, and ask the students to repeat the
2 They're quick readers. underlined expressions with as much interest as
3 My father is a slow driver. possible. Have the students practice saying the
4 She's a wonderful painter. expressions in an interested way.
5 He's a bad singer!
Audio script
Answers 1 Really? That's amazing! Me, too!
2 Wow! Really?
1 He swims well. 4 She paints wonderfully.
3 Oh, how interesting!
2 They read quickly. 5 He sings badly!
3 My father drives slowly.
D
• Read the instructions to the class. Ask the students to
look at the model conversation.
D
• Before you ask the students to work in pairs, give them
• Read the instructions and give the students time to read a couple of minutes to prepare for this exercise by
through the verbs and the adverbs in the boxes. taking a few notes. Encourage them to use expressions
• Point out the example sentence, and draw the students' like Wow! and Really? in response to what their
attention to the use of the conjunction but to show
classmates say.
contrast. • When they finish working in pairs, invite volunteers to
• Put the students in groups of three or four to complete perform their conversations for the class.
the exercise. Circulate and monitor, assisting where
needed.
• When the groups finish, invite students to share Workbook p. 43, Section 6
information about their group members (e.g. Hector can
paint beautifully, but he can't sing very well.).
►► Workbook
jjjjjj^ ^ Q
Workbook pp. 4 2-43, Section 5 p. 44, Listen and write
p. 45, Down time ________________

I
Most adjectives: Add -ly Adjectives ending in -y: Irregular adverbs
Change y to i and add -ly

wonderful— wonderful ly happy—happily good — well


slow— slow/y noisy- (4) .™ *!!L fast — fast
clear— clear ly angry— (5) an9r^
quick— quick/y WATCH OUT!
quiet— (1) ...... °luietly She can speak English well.

n i c e - (2) J2! Z É L (^) She can speak English good.


(£ ) She can speak well English.
b a d - o) badly

C Rewrite these sentences using the verb in parentheses


and an appropriate adverb of manner.

1 Helen Is go od at French. 4 Tom and Ellle are loud talkers.


Helen can sp e a k F re n c h m il . (s p e a k F re n c h ) Tom and Ellie talK !lDudll . (talk)
2 O u r te a ch e r alw ays g ive s cle ar e xp lanatio ns. 5 You are a quick learner.
O u r te a ch e r always explains (e x p la in th in g s ) You Jeam ^guickly_ (|earn)
3 Paul isn't a f a s i rur?ner. ” ' 6 I'm not a go od swim m er.
Paul can't i fast (run) I can't jy y lU L we'll . (sw im )

D 31 NOW YOU DO IT Work in groups. Tell your group about at least


two things you do well and two things you don’t do well. Use verbs and
adverbs in the boxes or your own ideas.

cook dance draw badly beautifully


drive paint run carefully fast loudly
sing speak talk quickly slowly well

I ca n s p e a k E n g lis h w e ll, a n d I d riv e ca refu lly , b u t I s in g b a d ly , a n d I c a n 't d a n c e v e r y w e ll.

You can show interest in different w ays. O n e w ay is by using words such as Wow!
and Really? The other is by using your face and your body.

A Look at these pictures. In which picture does


the wom an look interested?

B 3 ^ 4 2 Listen to the conversations below.


Underline the expressions that the people use
to show they are interested.
1 A : So, w hat do you do ?
B: I'm a pilot.
A: R eally? That's am azing! M e, too!
2 C: Do you sp e ak any o t h e r lan g u ag es? 3 E: C an you coo k C h in e se fo o d ?
D: I can sp e ak C h in e se . F: N o, I can't, but I can cook Indian food really w ell.
C: W ow ! R eally? E: O h , how interesting!

C 5 ^ 4 3 Listen to the expressions from Exercise B. Practice saying the


expressions in an interested way.

D 31 Work in pairs. Talk about things that your family members can do.
Remember to use words to show interest.
A : M y s is t e r is g o o d a t la n g u a g e s . S h e ca n s p e a k J a p a n e s e , E n g lis h , a n d P o r tu g u e s e .
B : W o w , th a t's a m a zin g !

You have talent! UNIT 7 75


lìfeSkills
WORKING AS A GROUP TO DO A TASK
• Break up the big task into sm aller tasks and make a list.
• Identify what the group can do tog ether and what each
person can do individually.
• N egotiate who can do any remaining tasks. Be flexible!

A Work in groups. Your company wants to offer a seminar for small business owners.
Read the email from the marketing director. Then decide on at least two more things to do
for each category and add them to the list in the attachment.

Project: seminar on business management techniques


To: Marketing D epartm ent (all) Proposed date: Saturday, March 1
Target audience: local small business owners and
From: Donald Sanders managers

Subject: Small Business Sem inar Registration fee: $125 per person
Maximum number of participants: 100
Attach: Plan for small business sem inar m Seminar includes: Welcome and introduction to
seminar (Lynn Barton, CEO)
Hi all, Four sessions o f 11/2 hours each
Lunch
We want to offer a seminar for small business
Two coffee breaks
owners in this area. The basic ideas are in the
attachment. Please work out the details and 'ession topics:
'
decide who can do each thing. Can we meet a Writing or revising your business plan (Steve Ellroy,
week from today to discuss? Business Director)
Advertising and promotion: trends and methods
Thanks.
(Donald Sanders, Marketing Director)
3 Financial manacroi-no~*- n-.-i— ’
0____ _ i.cciiy, i-mance Dir
Managing your company’s growth (Ben Collins,
Market Development Director)

Plan for small business seminar

B 2 | Decide which tasks on the list the whole group


can do together. Write G (group) in column 2 next to those things.
Alternative
Use a flipchart or a piece of paper attached to the
Step 1 Break up the big task into smaller tasks and make board to compile the list with the students instead
a list. (Ex. A) of working in groups—this will help them brainstorm
Step 2 Identify what the group can do together and what ideas without being distracted by the content in the
each person can do individually. (Ex. B) book. These notes can then serve as a permanent
Step 3 Negotiate who can do any remaining tasks. Be record of initial ideas as the lesson progresses.
flexible! (Ex. C, Ex. D)
Lead-in Possible answers
Begin this section by emphasizing the importance Location: Find out the cost of the locations. Find out
of teamwork and flexibility when performing tasks. about transportation, parking, etc.
Discuss how different talents contribute to the better Promotion: Contact local businesses by email. Write a
development of ideas and projects. slogan.
Ask if the students work in teams at school/work. If Logistics: Decide layout of seminar room. Make a
so, do they find that easy/difficult? Do they find it schedule. Find out about food, drinks, etc.
beneficial? What are the challenges?
Ask the students to look back through the unit and find
examples of when they worked in pairs or groups. Ask if
this helped them to complete tasks and whether it was • Explain the task and keep the students in the same
useful in improving their communication skills in English. groups.
Examples include: 1 Vocabulary Ex. C, 4 Grammar Ex. D, • Explain to the students that they are going to look at
6 Vocabulary Ex. B, 8 Grammar Ex. D, 9 Speaking Ex. D. their list of tasks and decide which tasks the whole
group can do. Tell them to write G next to these tasks in
the Who does it? column on the list in Ex. A.
• When the students have completed the exercise, elicit
Put the students in groups for this exercise. Tell them
their decisions, and ask them to give reasons.
that they are going to organize a seminar for small
business owners.
Ask the students to read the email. Make sure they
understand it. Check that they understand the term
attachment (a document that you send with an email).
Have the students look at the email attachment (a list of
things to do to organize a small business seminar). Ask
them to work with their groups to add at least two more
things to do to each of the three categories.
Point out, or remind the students, that ad is short for
advertisement.

Y o u h a v e ta le n t! u n it 7 T76
• Read the instructions to the class. Ask the students to
work individually to check their abilities and preferences
on the survey.
• Circulate and monitor, assisting where needed. Be
prepared to answer any questions about vocabulary, as
needed.

• Read the instructions to the class. Ask them to work


in their original groups to decide who will do the
remaining tasks on the list in Ex. A.
• Direct the students to the model conversation and have
them repeat it after you, both chorally and individually.
• Before they start their discussions, tell them to look
at the How to say it box, and encourage them to use
these expressions in their discussions.
• Ask the students to refer to their answers to the survey
in Ex. C when they are discussing their talents and
abilities.
• Ask each group to report their decisions to the rest of
the class, giving reasons for their decisions.

REFLECT
• Ask the students to read the Reflect question.
• Give them some time to think about different situations
in the domains of Self and Society and Study and
Learning where the skill of Working as a group to do a
task would be useful.
• Elicit the following ideas: organize a surprise party, help
a friend move; prepare a presentation for class, work on
a group project, etc.
nd Society
and Career
and Learning
C Think about your preferences and abilities. Check (/)
the appropriate boxes on the survey.

Work with your abilities!

I p re fe r to w o r k . . . alone. □
with other people. □

Km g o o d a t . . . I drawing or painting. □ organizing schedules. □


design. □ managing people. □
writing. □ managing money. □
talking to people. □ solving problems. □

D H§ With your group, decide who can do


each of the remaining things on your list.
A: I'm g o o d at design, so I can design the ads.
B: A n d I'm g o o d at writing, so m aybe I can write the
slogans.
A : O K, let's do the ads together, then.
C: O K, so you and Lisa can d o the ads. What about
the sch edu le?

HOW TO SAY IT Q
Talking about what people can do
I'm good a t ..., so I can ...
I can ..., but I ca n 't...
Can you ... ? / What can you do?
Maybe w e / y o u and Gina can ... because
we/you can both ...
m m m m m rn m m t'v a m

Y o u h o v e ta le n t! UNIT 7 77
Complete this text with words in the box. (10 points)

cook drive generous honest optimistic patient play sing smart speak

My mom is 52. She is very (1 ) 9enerous ( and she buys a lot of gifts for me and my
brother. She is really good in the kitchen. She can (2 ) c2 ° t delicious food. She is
very (3 ) patient anc| never gets mad at my brother or me. She loves to go out with
her friends and (4) sin9 karaoke. My dad is 54. He is really good at math, and he
can (5) speak Italian and German, so I think he is very (6) smart |_|e can
(7 ) P^ay the piano and the violin, too. My brother, Bruno, is 17. He really enjoys
life and doesn't worry about the future, so I guess he is very (8) optimistic _ |_|e ¡s
(9) honest ( too. He doesn't tell lies, and I know I can trust him. He is only 17,
but he can (1 0 ) ;irive a car.

8-10 correct: I can talk about people's positive qualities and their abilities.
0-7 correct: Look again at Sections 1 and 6 on pages 70 and 73.
SCORE: 710

2 GRAM M AR
A Put these words in the correct order to form sentences. (6 points)

1 A: Francesca / dance / can / well / ? Can Francesca dance well?


9

B: can't / dance / no, / she / well / . No, she can't dance well.

2 A: sing / can / your sister / ? Can your sister sing?

B: she / badly / sings / very / no, / . No, she sings very badly.

3 A: you / swim / can / fast / ? Can you swim fast?

B: no, / fast / I / swim / can't / . No, I can't swim fast.

B Read the text and find four mistakes in the use of can/can’t and
adverbs of manner. Cross them out and correct them. (4 points)
fast quickly
My cat is a great pet. She can run very fastly, and she comes quick when I call her name.

At night, she sleeps quietly in her bed, but in the morning, she meows loudly for her
can well
breakfast. She eeee speak cat language very good!

8-10 correct: I can use can, can't, and adverbs of manner to talk about people's abilities.
0-7 correct: Look again at Sections 4 and 8 on pages 72 and 74.
SCORE: /10
Language wrap-up 1 Vocabulary
Students can do the Language wrap-up exercises in Before you ask the students to do the Vocabulary section,
class or for homework. If you give them for homework, point out that two types of words are being tested
remember to check the exercises at the beginning of the here—adjectives and verbs—and that there are five of
next class, or collect a few to grade and identify any typical each in the box.
errors. 2 Grammar
If you decide to do the exercises in class, you can A
approach the wrap-up as a two-step reviewing procedure.
Explain that students need to put the words in the correct
First, ask the students to do the Vocabulary section
order to make sentences.
individually. When ready, encourage the students to check
their answers carefully, and then put them in pairs to
B
compare answers and discuss any differences. Self- and
peer-correction are two excellent ways of developing Explain that there are four mistakes in the short text in the
learner independence and creating a cooperative learning use of adverbs of manner and can.
environment. After completing the Vocabulary section, you
can apply the same procedure to the Grammar section.
At the end of each section, make sure that the students
write their score out of ten. If they have a score lower
than eight, direct them to the appropriat