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Issue #734 Harrisburg, PA July 23, 2018

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DEP: Reauthorizing Federal Mine Reclamation Fee Critical To Continued Success Of


AML Program

DEP told the ​Citizens Advisory Council​ Tuesday


reauthorization of the federal mine reclamation fee that’s
due to expire in 2021 is critical to the continued success
of Pennsylvania’s ​Abandoned Mine Reclamation
Program​.
The remarks came ​in a presentation by John
Stefanko​, Deputy Secretary for Active and Abandoned
Mine Operations, who gave an overview of DEP’s
mining programs to the Council.
In 2017, DEP was able to complete 41 reclamation
projects totalling over ​633 acres at a cost of over $19.3 million​; $16.3 million of that funding
was from the federal Abandoned Mine Reclamation Fund financed by the fee. Another 122
projects are in process.
In addition, he said, DEP completes between 50 and 100 emergency reclamation projects
every year, almost all supported by federal funding.
Over the last 5 years, DEP completed a total of 1,012 reclamation projects spending a
total of over $120.5 million in federal, state and capital budget (for dedicate mine drainage
treatment plants) funds.
Since DEP’s abandoned mine reclamation program began in earnest in the mid-1960s,
more than ​76,391 acres of abandoned mines have been reclaimed​ at a cost of $661 million.
He said the currently Pennsylvania has ​nearly 250,000 acres of abandoned mine sites​ yet
to be reclaimed causing over 5,500 miles of streams to be impaired. ​(​Click Here​ to see if the
stream near you is one.)
Stefanko said for one of the first times mining states are united in the effort to get
Congress to reauthorize the federal reclamation fee in a timely way, noting the last time the fee
was reauthorized it took 13 years.

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He also said Pennsylvania is benefitting from additional federal reclamation funding
through the ​RECLAIM Pilot Program​ that has given DEP an extra $80 million over the last three
years to complete reclamation projects with direct economic benefits.
Stefanko noted there is ​legislation pending in Congress​ to make this now pilot program
permanent.
He said DEP is also working to support federal legislation to ​create a Good Samaritan
Program​ designed to encourage reclamation of abandoned mines by operators, watershed groups
and others not connected to the abandoned mine site.
Pennsylvania has had a ​Good Samaritan Program since 1999​ that has resulted in 79 acid
mine drainage treatment projects in 20 counties all at no cost to taxpayers.
Stefanko also touched on these issues in his presentation and in response to questions
from Council members--
-- Impacts Of Underground Coal Mining:​ The University of Pittsburgh is again doing the
2013-2018 ​Act 54 report​ evaluating the surface impacts of underground coal mining on streams
and structures. DEP is also working to address ​comments made by Council​ on the last Act 54
Report.
Stefanko said a kickoff meeting was held in April with Pitt and work is proceeding. [The
Council was told in November​ DEP was aiming to have a draft report by late 2018.]
Stefanko said this Act 54 report will cost about $800,000 and it is increasingly difficult
for DEP to fund that level of effort. He said DEP will be reviewing Act 54 to determine what
kinds of information absolutely has to be in the report with the hopes of cutting costs in the
future.
DEP is also reviewing a draft report by the U.S. Geological Survey on flow
measurements in small watersheds that may have been impacted by underground coal mining.
-- Active Mine Regulation:​ Stefanko provided a current profile of active mining in the state
regulated by DEP: 127 surface bituminous coal mines, 55 surface anthracite coal mines, 39
underground coal mines, 8 underground anthracite coal mines, 15 underground non-coal mines,
1,800 to 2,000 surface non-coal mines, 40 anthracite refuse piles, 14 bituminous refuse piles, 13
tourist mines and caves and 10 underground storage facilities (former mines).
DEP completes about 22,000 surface and deep mine inspections annually and issues
about 650 permits.
-- Coal Production Increase:​ Stefanko noted coal production increased 18 percent in 2017 over
2016 primarily due to the export market and increased demand for metallurgical coal.
-- Mine Subsidence Insurance: ​He noted his Deputate also administers the state ​Mine
Subsidence Insurance Program​ that issued 61,000 insurance policies to protect homeowners and
businesses from mine subsidence caused by abandoned underground coal and clay mines.
Click Here​ for a copy of Stefanko’s presentation. Visit DEP’s ​Active and Abandoned
Mine Operations ​webpage for more information on these programs.
Transition Paper
The Council has begun work on what it called a transition paper to provide to the
individual elected Governor in November. The paper will identify key issues the Council
believes the Governor and the General Assembly should address related to DEP programs and
administration.
The next meeting of the Council is on September 18 which tentatively plans to have a
discussion of Pennsylvania’s Chesapeake Bay Program.

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Don Welsh​, former EPA Region III Administrator, President of the PA Environmental
Council, DEP Deputy Secretary for State/Federal Relations, among other positions, serves as
Chair of the Citizens Advisory Council.
For more information, visit DEP’s ​Citizens Advisory Council​ webpage. Questions
should be directed to Neil Bakshi, DEP Policy Office, ​nebakshi@pa.gov​.
​ hoto:​ E
(P ​ hrenfeld Mine Reclamation Project,​ Cambria County.)
NewsClip:
Back Mountain Residents’ Input Sought For Upper Toby Creek Conservation Plan
Related Stories:
John Dawes Urges Congress To Reauthorize Federal Abandoned Mine Reclamation Fee
EPCAMR: Tell Congress To Act NOW On Bill To RECLAIM PA’s Abandoned Mines
DEP, Trout Unlimited Testify At U.S. House Hearing On Good Samaritan Bill To Encourage
Mine Reclamation
Related Story This Week:
Trout Unlimited Requests Proposals For Acid Mine Drainage Technical Assistance Program
Consultants
Take Action:
How Good Is The Water Quality In Streams In Your Community? Take A Look, Then Act
[Posted: July 18, 2018]

DEP Proposes To Improve Environmental Justice Public Participation Process, Invites


Public Comment

The Department of Environmental Protection Tuesday


announced it is proposing to improve its approach to
public participation in the permitting process in
Environmental Justice Areas with changes that
increase community involvement and clarify best
practices by permit applicants to encourage community
involvement.
One basic change would increase Environmental
Justice Areas by 12 percent to include 32.5 percent of
Pennsylvanians.
The updated approach is outlined in the 2018 ​draft Environmental Justice Public
Participation Policy​.
“Reflecting DEP’s commitment to strengthening its partnerships with communities in
Environmental Justice Areas, our policy update draws considerably on views expressed by
several hundred Pennsylvanians who participated in listening sessions in 2017, as well as the
expertise of the Environmental Justice Advisory Board,” said DEP Secretary Patrick McDonnell.
“We want to be as effective as possible in minimizing adverse environmental impacts,
empowering communities, and fostering economic opportunity. Strong partnerships are the key.”
The Environmental Justice Public Participation Policy is intended to be used by both
permit applicants and affected communities as well as DEP to promote participation in the
decision-making process.
Among other changes, DEP proposes to determine Environmental Justice Areas based on

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census block groups, rather than tracts, to more accurately reflect population demographics.
Block groups are the smallest geographic unit for which the Census Bureau publishes
sample data, generally maintaining a population of 600-3,000 people.
Environmental justice communities are those where at least 20 percent of the residents
live at or below the poverty line and/or at least 30 percent identifies as nonwhite minority, based
on census data and federal poverty guidelines.
Defining Environmental Justice Areas by census block groups increases the number of
people who live in an Environmental Justice Area by 12 percent to include 32.5 percent of
Pennsylvanians.
Not every DEP permit is included in the revised policy as a “trigger” permit
automatically subject to the Environmental Justice Public Participation Policy.
For example, routine oil and gas well permits for conventional or unconventional wells
are ​not included​, but underground injection wells for waste are.
However, the draft guidance allows DEP to make a determination if special consideration
is warranted for any permit application or renewal based on-- 1) identified community concerns;
2) present or anticipated environmental impacts; and 3) reasonably anticipated significant
adverse cumulative impacts.
Click Here​ for a copy of the revised technical guidance.​ Click Here​ for the 2004
Environmental Justice Public Participation Policy.
Online Map
A new online map tool, the ​Environmental Justice Areas Viewer​, has been developed to
provide the public improved access to centralized geographic, demographic, and
permitted-facilities data.
Further development will continue, with plans for completion and training on using the
viewer offered for community partners and the public later this year.
An outline of community input opportunities before and during a permit review and after
a permit decision, as well as a flow chart of the steps in implementing the Public Participation
Policy will help make the process easier.
A further change enables DEP to enact the steps in the policy if a permit applicant is
unable or unwilling to do so.
Make Comments
All are welcome to ​comment on the draft policy online​. The comment period closes at
11:59 p.m. on August 28, 2018. Public input will be considered for potential incorporation into
the final policy, to be finalized later this year.
DEP established an ​Office of Environmental Justice​ in 2002 to ensure communications
with communities that did not always have a voice in environmental issues. The Office was
recommended by a special DEP ​Environmental Justice Work Group​ formed in 1999.
The program seeks to ensure that all Pennsylvanians are equipped with the proper
resources and opportunities to meaningfully participate in decision-making processes.
Attorney ​Allison Acevedo was named DEP Director of Environmental Justice​ earlier this
month. The 15-member ​Environmental Justice Advisory Board​ represents the interests of
citizens across the state in its advisory function to the DEP Secretary.
​ ap:​ Parts of Allegheny, Washington Counties from EJ Areas Viewer, pink EJ Census Block
(M
Group.)
NewsClip:

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Cusick: With Proposed Policy Change Nearly ⅓ Of Pennsylvanians Live In Environmental
Justice Areas
Related Stories:
DEP Invites Comments On Revised Environmental Justice Public Participation Policy
DEP Names Allison Acevedo Director Of Environmental Justice
PA Conservation Heritage WITF Documentary Justice In Chester Now Available Online
Chester Environmental Partnership Honors 5 With 2018 CEP Awards
Food & Water Watch issues List Of 48 New, Planned Natural Gas-Fired Power Plants In PA
Take Action:
How Good Is The Water Quality In Streams In Your Community? Take A Look, Then Act
[Posted: July 18, 2018]

PUC, DEP: There Needs To Be A Serious Conversation On Legislation Controlling


Pipeline Siting

Andrew Place​, Vice Chair of the Public


Utility Commission, and DEP Secretary
Patrick McDonnell​ told the ​House
Republican Policy Committee​ Tuesday
they would support a serious
conversation on how Pennsylvania can
have a meaningful role in siting
pipelines like the Mariner East 2
Pipeline.
In addition, Secretary
McDonnell said Pennsylvania needs to
adopt private water well construction
and location standards so DEP has fundamental information like where wells are located to
properly consider impacts during pipeline permitting.
The remarks came during a Committee hearing hosted by Rep. Chris Quinn
(R-Delaware) to explore pipeline safety, construction and siting issues in Chester and Delaware
counties from a local and state perspective.
Eve Miari​ of the ​Clean Air Council​ and ​Virginia Marcille-Kerslake​, ​West Whiteland
Residents for Pipeline Safety​, provided the Committee with an overview of community concerns
with the pipeline.
Miari pointed out no state agency has authority over siting pipelines like the Mariner East
project even though Sunoco proposed to transport industrial quantities of natural gas liquids in
close proximity to schools, homes, senior living centers, daycares and many other vulnerable
sites.
“Despite the enormous risks to public safety posed by this project, no regulatory body at
the federal or state level reviewed Sunoco’s route plan with respect to public safety, or
questioned the logic of running a highly volatile hazardous liquids line though dense population
centers,” said Miari. “In Delaware County, approximately 25,000 residents live within the 1⁄2
mile self-evacuation zone of the Mariner East pipelines.”
She also pointed to Sunoco’s environmental compliance record during construction of

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Mariner East 2, including-- 200 known spills, at least 60 notices of violation and damage to 16
private water wells and multiple sinkholes caused by the construction in Chester County.
Miari said, “residents across the state are still without access to clean drinking water due
to Sunoco’s construction activities….”
Virginia Marcille-Kerslake​, ​West Whiteland Residents for Pipeline Safety​, said, “Three
years ago, land agents for Sunoco came to our home in Exton with an easement, and told us that
they were putting in two new pipelines. They told us no trees would be coming down because
they were using HDD drilling. They told us the drill would be located behind the apartment
buildings across the road, out of sight and hearing.
“In the Spring of 2017, Sunoco arrived one Saturday morning and began to cut down
several beautiful mature trees directly across the road from us in front of the apartments that had
provided a screen and sound barrier as well as a lovely streetscape. They strung an ugly grey
curtain between poles roughly 20 feet tall and built a huge worksite.
“This is how we learned that we learned that they would be drilling directly across the
road from us and our neighbors. We learned that instead of 2-3 weeks of drilling as we had been
told, they would be drilling for 350 days, Monday to Saturday 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. And that the
eyesore of the construction site could stay in place for up to 3 years.
“And we learned what it’s like when they are drilling: The noise and vibrations are such
that you can hear and feel it even inside the house and the windows rattle. And forget about
enjoying your yards and gardens.”
She also expressed concerns about safely evacuating from a leak or explosion from the
pipeline when her house is 200 feet from Mariner East.
“We are continuously being told that we have been living with pipelines like this for
decades and that our emergency services are prepared for this. But the truth is we have not and
they are not.
“In the event of a leak on Mariner East, Sunoco and PHMSA [federal Pipeline and
Hazardous Materials Safety Administration] say to evacuate half a mile upwind, on foot. How
are residents to be informed that there is a leak when cellphones can set off a blast? How are
those with small children, the elderly or the physically challenged to evacuate when engines can
set off a blast?
“We get no answer to these questions when they have been posed to emergency services
and regulators in public sessions.
“In West Whiteland [Township] alone, 11,000 people live in the evacuation zone. But
here’s the thing: If we get a chance to evacuate we’d be lucky, because in densely populated
Chester and Delaware there’s a very real chance that before we even knew there was a leak it
could be ignited and there would be no one left to rescue.”
Siting/Water Well Legislation
Rep. Becky Corbin (R-Chester) expressed concern about the lack of state authority to
regulate the siting of pipelines like Mariner East given the public safety and environmental
concerns raised by residents.
She explained since the original Mariner East Pipeline was built in the 1930s and since
then development-- housing, schools and business-- grew up immediately around the pipeline.
Now the Mariner East 2 Pipeline, which carries explosive natural gas liquids and is
parallel to the original pipeline, that has a blast zone of 1,500 feet which clearly threatens people
and property.

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Commissioner Place and Secretary McDonnell noted other states have enacted siting
legislation in several different forms that are available to review that address many of these
issues.
Both said there needs to be a serious conversation about siting legislation given the
concerns of local residents and state agencies.
In response to another question from Rep. Corbin, Secretary McDonnell said there is a
need to adopt legislation to set private water well construction and location standards.
McDonnell said DEP does not know where water wells are that could be impacted by
either leaks from pipelines or affected during construction that could be reviewed during the
permitting process.
He said not knowing where water wells were was part of the problem with the incidents
involving the ​private wells affected by Mariner East 2 Pipeline​ construction in Chester County.
Emergency Response
Timothy Boyce, ​Delaware County Emergency Services​, said the County has worked with
local refineries, the airport, Port of Philadelphia and other businesses on emergency issues and
tried to work with members of the public to understand issues like risk from pipeline facilities.
He pointed out they have developed a variety of warning tools like reverse calling and
Delaware County cell phone warning “Delco Alert” system citizens can sign up for.
Boyce said there is a real burden on first responders, particularly the local volunteers--
can we detect a problem early enough, can we warn people to evacuate in time and deal with
special needs individuals that may need help to evacuate in real time.
He said Delaware County has done tabletop exercises on pipeline incidents to work
through a lot of issues in responding to an emergency like these.
Sunoco was invited to present at the hearing, but declined.
Click Here​ to watch a video of the hearing and for written testimony and handouts.
Rep. Kerry Benninghoff (R-Mifflin) serves as Chair of the ​House Republican Policy
Committee​.
Pipeline Task Force
In February 2016, the ​Pipeline Task Force presented a series of 184​ suggestions to Gov.
Wolf to help Pennsylvania achieve responsible development of natural gas pipeline infrastructure
in the state. Among the recommendations were--
-- Plan, site and route pipelines to avoid/reduce environmental and community impacts
-- Amplify and engage in meaningful public participation
-- Establish early coordination with local landowners and lessors
-- Educate landowners on pipeline development issues
-- Develop long-term operations and maintenance plans to ensure pipeline safety and integrity
-- Train emergency responders
-- Enhance emergency response training for responder agencies
-- Employ construction methods that reduce environmental impact
-- Minimize impacts of stream crossings
-- Ensure adequate agency staffing for reviewing pipeline infrastructure projects
Click Here​ for a copy of the report.
Legislation Introduced
Nine bipartisan bills have been introduced in the Senate to deal with a variety of issues
related to pipelines, including--

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-- ​Pipeline Commission:​ ​Senate Resolution 373​ (Rafferty-R-Montgomery) is a concurrent
Senate-House resolution to establish a Senate-House legislative Commission to Study Pipeline
Construction and Operations and to recommend improvements for the safe transport of oil,
natural gas and other hazardous liquids through pipelines ​(now on the Senate Calendar for
action).
-- Pipeline, Local Emergency Response Coordination​: ​Senate Bill 930​ (Dinniman-D-Chester)
requiring pipeline companies to meet with county emergency coordinators to share emergency
response information ​(now on the Senate Calendar for action).
-- Pipeline Shut-off Valves:​ ​Senate Bill 931​ (Dinniman-D-Chester) requiring pipelines to have
more shut-off valves in more highly developed areas ​(now on the Senate Calendar for action).
-- Pipeline Route Review:​ ​Senate Bill 928​ (Dinniman-D-Chester) requiring pipeline companies
to apply to the PUC on pipeline routes ​(still in the Senate Consumer Protection and Professional
Licensure Committee).
-- Pipeline Inspections At PennDOT: ​Senate Bill 604​ (Rafferty-R-Montgomery) would
centralize state pipeline inspections in PennDOT ​(still in the Senate Consumer Protection and
Professional Licensure Committee).
-- Pipeline Impact Fee: ​Senate Bill 605​ (Rafferty-R-Montgomery) establishes a state impact fee
for areas impacted by pipelines ​(still in the Senate Environmental Resources and Energy
Committee).
-- Notification Of Pipeline Construction:​ ​Senate Bill 1027​ (Rafferty-R-Montgomery) further
providing for notification of residents impacted by pipeline construction ​(still in the Senate
Environmental Resources and Energy Committee).
-- Aquifer Studies On Pipeline Routes:​ ​Senate Bill 1028​ (Rafferty-R-Montgomery) requiring
pipeline operators to conduct studies of aquifers that may be impacted by pipeline construction
(still in the Senate Environmental Resources and Energy Committee).
-- Local Pipeline Impact Fee:​ ​Senate Bill 929​ (Dinniman-D-Chester) allowing municipalities to
impose an impact fee on pipelines to fund emergency response actions ​(still in the Senate
Environmental Resources and Energy Committee).
(​Photo:​ Mariner East Pipeline construction going through residential neighborhoods in Chester
County. C ​ lean Air Council.​ )
NewsClips:
Hurdle: New Mariner East 2 Spill In Western PA
Hurdle: Exposed Pipeline In Chester County NOT Mariner East 1
Hurdle: Independent Study Examining Public Safety Risks Of Mariner East Pipelines
Desperate For Answers, Groups Bankroll 2-County Study Of Mariner East 2 Pipeline
Reuters: Mariner East 2 Pipeline Construction Racks Up 65th Violation From DEP
Mama Bears’ Arrests Signal New Frustration Of Mariner East 2 Pipeline Protesters
Lancaster County Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Protester Cited 3 Times
Williams: Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Going Online In August
Maykuth: Laurel Pipeline Bidirectional Plan Advances At Expense Of Philly Producers
Export, PA Pipe Producer Benefiting From Trump Trade Policies
FERC Approves Gas Pipelines As Powelson Eyes Exit
Powelson Says No Idle Threat To Step Down Early From FERC
LaFleur: FERC Unlikely To Act On Pipeline Review Before Powelson Exit
FERC Pipeline Climate Policy Faces New Challenge In Federal Court

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Related Stories:
PUC Lifts Shutdown Order On Mariner East 1 Pipeline, Mariner East 2, 2x Pipeline
Construction Remains Shut Down In Chester County In Response To Petition By Sen. Dinniman
Senate Committee OKs Resolution To Form Pipeline Commission
Commonwealth Court To Hear Mariner East 2 Pipeline Case Challenging Eminent Domain On
Environmental Rights Amendments
Sinkholes In Chester County Blamed On Mariner East 2 Pipeline, Exposed Portion Of Operating
Mariner East 1 Pipeline
3 Groups Call For Shut Down Of Mariner East 2 Construction Due To Well Contamination
Sunoco Mariner East 2 Pipeline Fined $12.6 Million, DEP Allows Construction To Resume
Senate Hearing On Pipeline Safety Points To Need To Hold Pipeline Companies Accountable
For Impacts, Better Communication
DEP Presents Final Pipeline Infrastructure Task Force Report To Governor
Related Stories This Week:
Nature Conservancy, Pipeline Companies Collaborate On Recommendations To Reduce
Environmental Impacts Of Construction On Slopes
DEP Invites Comments On Proposed Water Quality Certification For Dominion Pipeline In
Greene, Armstrong Counties
Take Action:
How Good Is The Water Quality In Streams In Your Community? Take A Look, Then Act
[Posted: July 19, 2018]

Nature Conservancy, Pipeline Companies Collaborate On Recommendations To Reduce


Environmental Impacts Of Construction On Slopes

Eight energy pipeline companies have


committed to being guided by a new report
titled "​Improving Steep-Slope Pipeline
Construction to Reduce Impacts to Natural
Resources​" resulting from a collaboration
facilitated by ​The Nature Conservancy​.
The report is intended to serve as an impetus
for the pipeline industry to reduce risks of
landslides, slips and erosion and to minimize
adverse effects on habitat health and water
quality.
The companies involved include Dominion Energy, Enbridge, EQT Midstream Partners,
Kinder Morgan, NiSource, Southern Company Gas, UGI Energy Services and Williams.
[Sunoco and Energy Transfer Partners were not part of the group.]
"The participants share a commitment to developing new energy infrastructure in ways
that are safe and avoid and minimize environmental impacts," according to the report.
The report details 10 recommended and four potential best practices, which are organized
according to three characteristic phases of a pipeline project.
The seven pre-construction best practices are identified as follows:
-- Perform a geohazard assessment;

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-- Develop site-specific plans;
-- Accurately identify water features;
-- Identify civil or geotechnical mitigation measures;
-- Develop site-specific reclamation and revegetation strategies;
-- Potential: optimize extent of disturbed area; and
-- Potential: evaluate environmental performance of contractors.
The four recommendations for construction and restoration are identified as follows:
-- Optimize placement and installation of water bars;
-- Optimize groundwater management;
-- Utilize hydroseeding and hydromulching; and
-- Potential: optimize vegetative preservation.
The final three recommendations pertain to operation and maintenance:
-- Effective transition from construction;
-- Post-construction geohazard monitoring; and
-- Potential: foster a culture of environmental stewardship and shared learning.
Background
Projected energy demands over the next 15 years will lead to thousands of miles of new
pipeline infrastructure and tens of billions of dollars in capital expenditures, according to
analyses published by the U.S. Department of Energy, the INGAA Foundation and the Pipeline
& Gas Journal.
Increased activity is already evident across the United States and Canada with
expansions, modifications, replacements and proposed new construction.
Steep slopes and landslide risks occur throughout the U.S., its territories and Canada.
The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has documented landslide problems in regions
known to support high levels of biological diversity, including the Appalachian Mountains,
Rocky Mountains, Pacific Coast Ranges and parts of Alaska and Hawaii. Grading and
excavating trenches on steep slopes increases the potential for slips, landslides and erosion,
which can threaten pipeline safety and increase the risk of environmental impacts.
[​Note:​ The federal Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration determined
the explosion of the newly constructed TransCanada natural gas pipeline in West Virginia on
June 7 was apparently ​caused by a landslide​.]
"The Nature Conservancy's approach to pipelines and other energy development
emphasizes the mitigation hierarchy: Avoid-Minimize-Compensate," said Judy Dunscomb,
senior scientist for TNC in Virginia. "First, we identify ecologically sensitive areas that should
be avoided altogether. Our next priority is to reduce environmental impacts as much as
practicable. The last resort is to secure compensation for those impacts that cannot be avoided."
"The recommended best practices described in this report are an important step to
minimizing impacts from pipeline construction on steep slopes, while the potential best practices
create a roadmap for continuous improvement and shared learning," Dunscomb said."We deeply
appreciate that these companies have joined together in their commitment to this important step."
The Nature Conservancy is concerned that pipeline construction can affect critical forest
and freshwater habitats.
In spring 2017, following initial conversations with Southern Company Gas, the
Conservancy began engaging with pipeline developers and other key stakeholders to garner
interest in collaborative action on steep-slope construction practices in high landslide risk areas.

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A project steering committee was formed, with representatives from TNC and Dominion
Energy, Enbridge, EQT Midstream Partners, Kinder Morgan, NiSource, Southern Company Gas,
UGI Energy Services and Williams.
Based in the U.S. and Canada, these companies committed to work collaboratively with
TNC to achieve the project's objectives and communicate them throughout the industry.
The collaborative project team convened in summer 2017 to develop consensus on the
group's work plan and deliverables, including this report.
From fall 2017 through spring 2018, a series of technical workshops brought together key
stakeholders and experts to further explore and refine the top challenges identified by the project
team and then to identify and articulate best practices and issues requiring further research or
engineering guidance.
Participants in these meetings included representatives from the Federal Energy
Regulatory Commission, the American Gas Association, the Environmental Council of States,
the U.S. Forest Service and Trout Unlimited, as well as several other subject matter experts.
"We found a strong interest for collaboration among the companies, and the
Conservancy's leadership allowed us to freely share the challenges and solutions that we have
been seeing in the field," said Jim Kibler, president of Virginia Natural Gas, which is one of five
natural gas distribution companies of Southern Company Gas. "I know I speak for all the
participating companies when I say we are eager to start using what we have learned
immediately."
Pipeline route selection and planning were beyond the scope of this project.
While recognizing that avoidance of steep slopes or other areas of concern is a
route-selection consideration, the project team focused on best practices that reduce the potential
for landslides on pipeline projects for which the routing process has been completed and where
the routes include segments with steep slopes.
The practices described in the report do not supplant any federal, state/provincial, or local
regulations.
The report intentionally uses language such as "recommend," "encourage," and "may" to
describe the non-compulsory nature of these best practices, which are intended to apply to all
pipeline projects in steep slope areas with a high potential for slope failure.
Because each project will have unique challenges, it is not feasible to provide guidance
for all possible scenarios, nor is it expected that every suggested best practice will be utilized on
a given project.
However, TNC's hope is that articulating these practices will help elevate environmental
awareness, promote a standard of continuous improvement throughout the entire pipeline
industry, and encourage the development of an evidence base for what practices are effective in
reducing landslide potential during and after pipeline construction.
Reaction
“Our company has always strived to balance the energy needs of consumers and the
economy with responsible environmental stewardship,” says Pamela Faggert, chief
environmental officer and senior vice president sustainability of ​Dominion Energy​. “We believe
our partnership with the TNC achieves that balance. This groundbreaking initiative shows that by
working together, industry and the conservation community can responsibly develop public
infrastructure in a way that preserves the environment and protects our most sensitive natural
resources.”

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Click Here​ to download a copy of the report.
For more information on the report, please contact Judy Dunscomb by sending email to:
jdunscomb@tnc.org​ or call 434-951-0573.
To learn more about TNC programs, initiatives and events in Pennsylvania, visit the ​The
Nature Conservancy-PA​ webpage.
(​Photo: ​Aftermath of June 7 explosion of TransCanada natural gas pipeline​ in West Virginia.)
NewsClips:
Landslide Caused West Virginia Natural Gas Pipeline Explosion, TransCanada Reports
Hurdle: New Mariner East 2 Spill In Western PA
Hurdle: Exposed Pipeline In Chester County NOT Mariner East 1
Hurdle: Independent Study Examining Public Safety Risks Of Mariner East Pipelines
Desperate For Answers, Groups Bankroll 2-County Study Of Mariner East 2 Pipeline
Reuters: Mariner East 2 Pipeline Construction Racks Up 65th Violation From DEP
Mama Bears’ Arrests Signal New Frustration Of Mariner East 2 Pipeline Protesters
Lancaster County Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Protester Cited 3 Times
Williams: Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Going Online In August
Maykuth: Laurel Pipeline Bidirectional Plan Advances At Expense Of Philly Producers
Export, PA Pipe Producer Benefiting From Trump Trade Policies
FERC Approves Gas Pipelines As Powelson Eyes Exit
Powelson Says No Idle Threat To Step Down Early From FERC
LaFleur: FERC Unlikely To Act On Pipeline Review Before Powelson Exit
FERC Pipeline Climate Policy Faces New Challenge In Federal Court
Related Stories:
PUC, DEP: There Needs To Be A Serious Conversation On Legislation Controlling Pipeline
Siting
DEP Invites Comments On Proposed Water Quality Certification For Dominion Pipeline In
Greene, Armstrong Counties
Take Action:
How Good Is The Water Quality In Streams In Your Community? Take A Look, Then Act
[Posted: July 19, 2018]

PACD, DEP: Four Pennsylvania Farms Receive 2018 Clean Water Farm Award

The ​PA Association of Conservation


Districts, Inc.​ in conjunction with the
award sponsor, the Department of
Environmental Protection, Wednesday
presented the operators of four farms
with the Clean Water Farm Award
during its annual conference in
Lancaster.
The honor is awarded annually to
farmers who manage their daily farm
operations in an environmentally
conscious manner that helps to protect Pennsylvania’s water quality.

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DEP has sponsored this award for the past thirty-two years. Recipients receive a
certificate signed by the DEP Secretary and a large Clean Water Farm Award sign to erect on
their property.
This year’s award recipients are from Berks, Franklin, Indiana, and Susquehanna
Counties. The 2018 Clean Water Farm Award Recipients are:
-- Ed Chianese, Susquehanna County: ​Ed Chianese owns a beef farm in Susquehanna, PA.
The farm has 80 acres of cropland and 25 acres of pasture. Best management practices include
diversions, grassed waterways, 2.7 acres of riparian buffers, and 1,000 feet of streambank
fencing. Future plans include more pasture work by installing subsurface drainage to collect
water for two water troughs, underground outlets, and livestock water pipeline.
-- Justin and Doreen Geisinger Air Hill Acres Farm, Franklin County:​ Justin and Doreen
Geisinger own Air Hill Acres Farm in Chambersburg, PA. The farm has 70 beef and 40 dairy
cows on 135 acres of pasture. Air Hill Acres is an organic, 100 percent grazing dairy that also
custom raises steers. Best management practices include rotational grazing, concrete manure
storage, stream crossings, livestock fencing, and a grassed waterway. The Geisingers host many
farm tours and pasture walks and were featured in a YouTube video on soil health.
-- Will & Kelly Smith, Deep Roots Valley Farm, Berks County: ​Will and Kelly Smith own
Deep Roots Valley Farm in Mohrsville, PA. The beef, hog, and poultry farm has 95 acres of
pasture. Best management practices include animal walkways, rotational grazing, and riparian
buffers. The conservation district said, “The Smiths have shown their hard work, dedication, and
willingness to research. They have gone above and beyond, creating a sustainable farm for their
family, their community, and the environment.”
-- Dave Pounds, Indiana County: ​Dave Pounds and family own a 101 acre beef cattle farm in
Marion Center, PA. The farm has 16 acres of rotational grazing pasture, with 35 acres of mostly
hayland, and over 20 acres of Conservation Reserve Program land. Best management practices
(BMPs) include grassed diversions, contour farming, stream crossings, and over 35 feet of
riparian buffer on all stream corridors. The conservation district said, “Dave Pounds has allowed
many local and regional farmers, agency personnel, and elected officials to tour his farm for
educational purposes. He is an incredible wealth of knowledge and takes the lead when
explaining the management of his operation, as well as, explaining how the BMPs on his
operations function to improve water quality.”
The Clean Water Farm award was initiated in 1986. Recipients of the award are
nominated by their local county conservation districts.
Financial support for this award is provided by the Department of Environmental
Protection through the Chesapeake Bay Regulatory and Accountability Program and the PA
Chesapeake Bay Education Office administered by the PA Association of Conservation Districts,
Inc..
For more information about the work of the state's 66 conservation districts, visit the ​PA
Association of Conservation Districts​ website or ​follow PACD on Facebook​.
NewsClips:
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New Kensington YMCA Garden Program Grows Young Men Into Leaders
U.S House Again Votes To Restrict Federal Enforcement Of Chesapeake Bay Cleanup
Measure To Weaken EPA Enforcement Of Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Is Up For Vote, Again
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal

13
Click Here​ to subscribe to the free Chesapeake Bay Journal
Click Here​ to support the Chesapeake Bay Journal
Follow Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Twitter
Like Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Facebook
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Take Action:
How Good Is The Water Quality In Streams In Your Community? Take A Look, Then Act
[Posted: July 20, 2018]

PA Assn. Of Conservation Districts Presents Awards, Hosts Northeast Meeting Of


Conservation Leaders

The ​PA Association of Conservation Districts


Thursday presented its annual awards to
conservation leaders in Pennsylvania and played
host to the ​National Association of Conservation
Districts​’ Northeast Regional meeting in Lancaster.
"It is exciting to host a meeting that brings
our counterparts from other northeastern states
together. This week, we were able to showcase some
of Pennsylvania's conservation district projects via
tours and educational sessions,” said Brenda
Shambaugh, PACD Executive Director.
“Attendees learned about the ​Dirt, Gravel, and Low Volume Road Program​ which helps
decrease pollution from unpaved roads and is unique to Pennsylvania. They visited a plain sect
farm where they saw the work the ​Lancaster County Conservation District​ did to help the farmer
control pollution,” she explained.
“They [also] participated in a stormwater tour by ​LandStudies, Inc.​ which shows work
being done in our communities to reduce flooding. Finally, visitors had the opportunity to visit

14
Stroud Water Research Center​ [in Chester County] and learn about research they are conducting
to ensure we have enough clean water for future generations," she added.
"Our conservation districts work hard every day to make a difference in our
communities," Shambaugh said.
PACD Award Winners
The 2018 PACD award winners include--
-- Legislator Leadership Award: Sen. John H. Eichelberger, Jr.​ (R-Blair). Sen. Eichelberger
has been involved with the Blair County Conservation District while serving as a Blair County
Commissioner from 1996 to 2006. His first-hand knowledge of the duties and responsibilities of
a conservation district has been beneficial for the collective causes of the District.
Sen. Eichelberger is an active listener when presented with facts related to budgeting on a
state level which impact the conservation districts in his Senatorial District. He is also a strong
supporter of Blair County agriculture which, in turn, supports the Districts involvement in
agricultural activities and programs in his legislative area.
This award is presented to legislators recognized for their outstanding efforts to further
the activities and accomplishments of the state's conservation districts or PACD on a statewide
basis.
-- President's Award: Pat Sueck.​ Pat was first appointed to the Board of the York County
Conservation District in 1990. In 1998 Pat was elected as the PACD President and served in that
position for two years. For 18 years, she served as the PACD representative to the NACD,
representing Pennsylvania at the National Meetings.
Pat has also served on the PACD Executive Board. Pat has kept busy promoting
conservation by attending countless NACD Annual & Regional Conventions, legislative
"fly-ins" to D.C., county, state and national Envirothon events.
Pat has chaired the NACD North East Education Committee and served as the NACD
North East President. She was also a member of the National Conservation Foundation, which is
now the home of the National Envirothon.
Pat has been the recipient of the District Special Service Award in 1998; the NACD
President's Award in 2010; and the PACD Distinguished Service Award in 2012.
Selected by PACD Executive Board President, this award is given, at the discretion of the
President, to an individual, organization or agency in recognition of their outstanding efforts that
have resulted in furthering the accomplishments of PACD.
-- Ann Rudd Saxman Conservation District Director Excellence Award: Jay Snyder,
Lancaster County:​ Since his appointment to the Lancaster County Conservation District Board
of Directors in 2007, Jay has faithfully served in various roles of leadership to support the
District's overall mission.
He has a combined 50 years of experience managing water and wastewater and his
experience is instrumental in serving the many committees and conservation organizations with
which the District partners.
Jay is an active volunteer taking time off from his job to volunteer at Youth Conservation
School and to provide presentations regarding wastewater and Stormwater. He holds a
commercial driver's license and has driven students and teachers on field trip days.
During his tenure with the LCCD Board of Directors, Jay has actively served on 7 of
LCCD's 10 Program & Operation Committees. Active in his community, Jay has experience
working with the Lancaster Clean Water Consortium, Conservation Foundation of Lancaster

15
County, and the Cocalico Creek Watershed Association.
This award is given to a conservation district director or associate director for his or her
outstanding volunteer efforts which have furthered the activities and accomplishments of
conservation districts on a statewide basis.
-- Conservation District Employee Excellence Award: Renee Swineford, Snyder County​.
Renee began her career with the Snyder County Conservation District in 2006 and in the 12
years since she has held that position, Craig Bingman considers her the model conservation
district employee.
Renee is involved in every program at the District in some way, shape or form. Her
knowledge of each program allows her to help direct the needs of farmers and landowners.
Renee is a very gregarious and dedicated worker by assisting the staff with planning
workshops, farm visits, providing food for events, just to name a few. Her talents do not contain
themselves to the boundaries of Snyder County.
She has taken on a busy role as the registration coordinator with the ​Pennsylvania
Envirothon​ and is also very active in planning of the Canon Envirothon, which is a national
competition. Renee also has volunteered to be a part of promoting PACD by taking volunteer
time slots at various PACD-sponsored events.
People who participate in Snyder County Conservation District programs know that
Renee is the glue that holds the office together.
This award is given to a conservation district employee for his or her outstanding efforts
that have furthered the activities and accomplishments of conservation districts on a statewide
basis.
-- Conservation District Employee Service Recognition Program Awards​--
-- 40 Years of Service: Craig Bingman, Manager, Snyder County
-- 30 Years of Service: Carl Goshorn, Manager, Cumberland County
-- James Pillsbury, Hydraulic Engineer, Westmoreland County
-- Tammie Robinson, Administrative Assistant, Indiana County
-- Lorelle Steach, PA Envirothon Coordinator, Bedford County
The Conservation District Employee Service Recognition Awards recognize conservation
district employees for their years of dedication to conserving Pennsylvania's natural resources.
For more information about the work of the state's 66 conservation districts, visit the ​PA
Association of Conservation Districts​ website or ​follow PACD on Facebook​.
(Photo: L ​ andStudies, Inc.​ leading stormwater tour.)
NewsClips:
State Helps Couple Buy Lancaster Farm In $948,000 Project
New Kensington YMCA Garden Program Grows Young Men Into Leaders
U.S House Again Votes To Restrict Federal Enforcement Of Chesapeake Bay Cleanup
Measure To Weaken EPA Enforcement Of Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Is Up For Vote, Again
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
Click Here​ to subscribe to the free Chesapeake Bay Journal
Click Here​ to support the Chesapeake Bay Journal
Follow Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Twitter
Like Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Facebook
Related Stories:
DEP Now Accepting Small Business Advantage Grant Applications For Water Quality

16
Improvement Projects
PACD, DEP: Four Pennsylvania Farms Receive 2018 Clean Water Farm Award
PennVEST Funds $92 Million In Water Infrastructure Projects In 13 Counties, Including
Nonpoint Source; Lead Service Line Funding Change
Montgomery County Master Watershed Steward: Green Infrastructure Solutions To Stormwater
In Stony Creek Watershed
Pittsburgh Section-Environmental & Water Resources Institute Urban Green infrastructure
Workshop July 26
Philadelphia Eagles, Axalta, Stroud Water Research Center Celebrate All-Pro Teachers In
Stream; New Nominations Being Accepted
Register Now! Dive Deeper: Youth Water Educators Summit Sept. 20 In Harrisburg
U.S. House Narrowly Votes To Restrict EPA Authority To Hold States Accountable For
Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Obligations
Take Action:
How Good Is The Water Quality In Streams In Your Community? Take A Look, Then Act
[Posted: July 20, 2018]

PennVEST Funds $92 Million In Water Infrastructure Projects In 13 Counties, Including


Nonpoint Source; Lead Service Line Funding Change

Gov. Tom Wolf Wednesday announced the investment of $92 million for 19 drinking water,
wastewater, stormwater, and nonpoint source projects in 13 counties through the ​PA
Infrastructure Investment Authority​.
PennVEST also adopted a change in policy to make its programs more attractive for lead
service line replacement projects.
“The projects represented in today’s approvals continue our commitment to clean water
for Pennsylvania.” said Gov. Wolf. “These projects benefit the environment, economic
development and public health, as well as advance our shared goal of a clean and safe
environment for our families to enjoy, both now and for years to come.”
The funding comes from a combination of state funds approved by voters, Growing
Greener, Marcellus Legacy funds, federal grants to PennVEST from the Environmental
Protection Agency, and recycled loan repayments from previous PennVEST funding awards.
Funds for the projects are disbursed after expenses for work have been paid and receipts
are submitted to PennVEST.
Lead Line Replacement Incentive
In addition, PennVEST staff also introduced a policy modification aimed at making the
program’s incentives more attractive for water utilities to utilize for lead service line replacement
projects.
“The change in how we look at these types of projects, and how they impact those
specific areas of concern, should result in funding packages that will best reflect the impact on
those customers, and promote implementation of lead line replacements,” said Brion Johnson,
PennVEST Executive Director.
A modification to the affordability analysis associated with drinking water systems with
lead line replacement projects seeks to promote these projects in the neighborhoods that can least
afford the cost to replace the necessary piping.

17
Eligible projects are with utilities that have adequately mapped areas of concern with
needed lead service line replacement work due to exceeding the safe levels in the drinking water
provided to the customers.
Staff will base the funding upon neighborhoods, or clusters of customers rather than the
entire system user base to determine the financial package.
Nonpoint Source Projects
PennVest funded 5 nonpoint source pollution control projects, including--
-- Armstrong County Conservation District​ received a $904,994 grant to implement the third
phase of the drainage runoff management and infiltration facilities along the Armstrong Trail.
-- Chester County Conservation District (Esh)​ received a $349,000 grant to cover costs related
to manure storage, gravity flow manure transfer, cattle walkways, reception pit, reconstruction of
a cattle crossing, surface inlets, underground outlets, and diversions to reduce run off into
Octoraro Creek.
-- Chester County Conservation District (King)​ received a $334,000 grant to cover the costs
related to construction of manure storage facilities, heavy use areas, walkways, and storm water
controls to reduce the runoff into local streams.
-- Chester County Conservation District (Beiler)​ received a $307,000 grant to cover the costs
related to construction of a manure storage facility, reception pit, gravel access, surface inlets,
underground drains, and runoff controls to reduce runoff into the Octoraro Creek.
-- Northumberland County: Coal Township ​received a $1,467,908 grant to implement phase
two of a streambank stabilization project. Work includes precast walls, re-grading, and rip-rap
rock to reduce sediment loading of Carbon Run.
For more information on water infrastructure funding programs, including onlot septic
systems, visit the ​PA Infrastructure Investment Authority​ website.
Related Stories:
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Leaders
Montgomery County Master Watershed Steward: Green Infrastructure Solutions To Stormwater
In Stony Creek Watershed
Pittsburgh Section-Environmental & Water Resources Institute Urban Green infrastructure
Workshop July 26
Philadelphia Eagles, Axalta, Stroud Water Research Center Celebrate All-Pro Teachers In
Stream; New Nominations Being Accepted
Register Now! Dive Deeper: Youth Water Educators Summit Sept. 20 In Harrisburg
U.S. House Narrowly Votes To Restrict EPA Authority To Hold States Accountable For
Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Obligations
Take Action:
How Good Is The Water Quality In Streams In Your Community? Take A Look, Then Act
[Posted: July 18, 2018]

DEP Now Accepting Small Business Advantage Grant Applications For Water Quality
Improvement Projects

18
The Department of Environmental Protection is now accepting
applications for ​Small Business Advantage Grants​ and for the
first time applicants can applying for funding for projects to
improve water quality. ​(f​ ormal notice​)
Up to $1 million will be available for grants under this
program. The Program is first-come, first-served.
Examples of eligible natural resource protection projects may
include riparian buffer plantings, stream-bank fencing and
barnyard runoff controls.
The program provides up to 50 percent matching grants, up to a
maximum of $9,500. Eligible projects must save the small business a minimum of $500 and at
least 25 percent annually in energy consumption or pollution related expenses.
Natural resource protection projects are exempt from the minimum savings requirements.
However, projects must quantify the sediment and nutrient diversion from the directly related
receiving waterway to be eligible.
The applicant must have 100 or fewer employees, be a for-profit small business owner
and be taxed as a for-profit business located in this Commonwealth.
More information is available DEP’s ​Small Business Advantage Grants​ webpage.
Questions should be directed to DEP’s Small Business Ombudsman Office by sending email to:
epAdvantageGrant@pa.gov​ or call 717-772-5160.
DCNR Riparian Forest Buffer Grants
The Department of Conservation and Natural Resources is accepting applications for its
Multifunctional Riparian Forest Buffer Grants from August 1 to September 28. ​Click Here​ for
more information.
Related Stories:
PACD, DEP: Four Pennsylvania Farms Receive 2018 Clean Water Farm Award
PA Assn. Of Conservation Districts Presents Awards, Hosts Northeast Meeting Of Conservation
Leaders
PennVEST Funds $92 Million In Water Infrastructure Projects In 13 Counties, Including
Nonpoint Source; Lead Service Line Funding Change
Montgomery County Master Watershed Steward: Green Infrastructure Solutions To Stormwater
In Stony Creek Watershed
Pittsburgh Section-Environmental & Water Resources Institute Urban Green infrastructure
Workshop July 26
Philadelphia Eagles, Axalta, Stroud Water Research Center Celebrate All-Pro Teachers In
Stream; New Nominations Being Accepted
Register Now! Dive Deeper: Youth Water Educators Summit Sept. 20 In Harrisburg
U.S. House Narrowly Votes To Restrict EPA Authority To Hold States Accountable For
Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Obligations
[Posted: July 20, 2018]

Philadelphia Eagles, Axalta, Stroud Water Research Center Celebrate All-Pro Teachers In
Stream; New Nominations Being Accepted

19
Axalta​, a leading global supplier of liquid and powder coatings headquartered in Philadelphia,
the World Champion Philadelphia Eagles, and ​Stroud Water Research Center​ hosted a day of
STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) learning in ​White Clay Creek​ in Chester
County for recipients of ​Axalta’s All-Pro Teachers​ designation.
The All-Pro Teachers Program, established in conjunction with the Eagles, identifies,
recognizes and rewards innovative STEM-focused teachers and their schools in the greater
Philadelphia area.
Attendees were joined by Philadelphia Eagles safety Chris Maragos, and Judd Pittman,
Special Consultant to the Pennsylvania Secretary of Education for STEM, as they participated in
a day-long curriculum at the Stroud Center in Avondale, Pennsylvania.
Throughout the day, teachers experienced STEM education in a real-world setting giving
them the tools to cultivate the next generation of freshwater stewards. Activities included water
chemistry and stream habitat assessments.
The most popular activity was the opportunity for participants to get their boots wet and
collect macroinvertebrates with Chris Maragos.
Back in the lab, the teachers learned how Stroud Center scientists use macroinvertebrate
identification to assess stream health and water quality. Partnering with the Chester County
Intermediate Unit, the Stroud Center offered Act 48 Credits to all participants.
“Axalta is inspired by the All-Pro teachers who give so much to their students every
day,” said Regina Tracy, Axalta Global Corporate Social Responsibility Manager. “This is an
exciting opportunity for us to connect for the first time our All-Pro Teacher program with
another partner of ours, the Stroud Water Research Center. We’re certain the teachers will come
away from Stroud Center’s real world, award-winning program not only with continuing
education certifications, but new skills and ideas they can take back to their classrooms to help
develop the next generation of scientists, engineers and freshwater stewards.”
“Stroud Center scientists have been studying White Clay Creek-- a National Wild and
Scenic River, an Experimental Ecological Reserve, and a part of the National Science
Foundation’s prestigious Long-Term Research in Environmental Biology program-- for more
than 50 years, as well as streams and rivers around the world. We are thrilled to share our
knowledge of streams with these exceptional teachers thanks to Axalta and the Philadelphia
Eagles,” said Dave Arscott, Ph.D., Stroud Center Executive Director.
As a global employer of more than 13,000 people worldwide including 1,200 engineers
and scientists, Axalta is committed to corporate social responsibility initiatives with a special
focus on STEM to help teach the next generation of coatings industry innovators.
Nominations Being Accepted
Nominations are currently being accepted for the ​2018 Axalta All-Pro Teachers Program​.
The deadline for nominations is October 31.
Former or current school principals, students, colleagues, as well as members of the
community can nominate teachers in school districts throughout the Greater Philadelphia region.
Based on their educational drive, innovation in the classroom, and community ownership,
ten teachers will be selected as an All-Pro Teacher and recognized at an Eagles home game in
2018.
Each teacher’s school will receive a monetary donation from Axalta for STEM
programming or school supplies, tickets to an Eagles home game, a personalized Eagles jersey
and football, and a nomination for Axalta All-Pro Teacher of the Year.

20
The 2018 Axalta All-Pro Teacher of the Year will receive an additional donation to his or
her school, an Eagles Pep Rally hosted at their school and other recognitions.
Click Here​ for all the details and to submit a nomination.
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the ​Stroud Water
Research Center​ website, ​Click Here​ to subscribe to UpStream. ​Click Here​ to subscribe to
Stroud’s Educator newsletter. ​Click Here​ to become a Friend Of Stroud Research, ​Like them on
Facebook​, ​Follow on Twitter​, include them in your ​Circle on Google+​ and visit their ​YouTube
Channel​.
(​Photo: ​Axalta All-Pro teachers Eric Turnbull, Brooks Twilley, Joe Dell'Arciprete, Heather
Handler, Colleen Mooney, Robin McClean, the Stroud Center’s Dr. Steve Kerlin, Philadelphia
Eagles Safety Chris Maragos, Dr. Javier Dominguez, Ross Cruz, Paul VanHouten, Anne Klein,
and Michelle Fogel got hands on with macroinvertebrates in White Clay Creek.)
NewsClips:
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Register Now! Dive Deeper: Youth Water Educators Summit Sept. 20 In Harrisburg
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PA Assn. Of Conservation Districts Presents Awards, Hosts Northeast Meeting Of Conservation
Leaders
PennVEST Funds $92 Million In Water Infrastructure Projects In 13 Counties, Including
Nonpoint Source; Lead Service Line Funding Change
Montgomery County Master Watershed Steward: Green Infrastructure Solutions To Stormwater
In Stony Creek Watershed
Pittsburgh Section-Environmental & Water Resources Institute Urban Green infrastructure
Workshop July 26
U.S. House Narrowly Votes To Restrict EPA Authority To Hold States Accountable For
Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Obligations
Take Action:
How Good Is The Water Quality In Streams In Your Community? Take A Look, Then Act
[Posted: July 18, 2018]

Bipartisan Bill To Authorize Community Solar Energy Projects Being Circulated

21
Representatives ​James Santora​ (R-Delaware), ​Aaron Kaufer​ (R-Luzerne), ​Donna Bullock
(D-Philadelphia) and ​Peter Schweyer​ (D-Lehigh) Friday circulated a memo to their colleagues
asking them to co-sponsor legislation to authorize community solar energy projects.
“Community solar allows neighbors, businesses, farms, and other community members to
directly participate in and receive the benefits from a solar project connected to their local
electric distribution company’s grid.
“Participants can subscribe to a portion of an offsite solar project and receive credit on
their electricity bill for the power produced, just as if the panels were on their roof.
“This program extends to all Pennsylvania residents and businesses the ability to acquire
solar energy from a specific community solar project. It also gives citizens and businesses the
choice to participate – there is no mandate for participation or request for state funding.
“Under current law, individuals who are renters, have a shaded roof, live in an apartment
building, or lack roof access, are unable to directly participate in Pennsylvania’s growing solar
economy.
“This bill simply removes an existing policy barrier and by doing so will allow
individuals to participate in a community solar project if they choose. It’s a simple fix that opens
a new market sector in the energy industry, allowing for continued innovation.
“Community solar offers many benefits for both participants and the Commonwealth,
including--
-- Economic development through private investment and creation of local jobs through the
entire solar supply chain including installers, contractors, investors and site preparation.
-- Saving consumers and businesses money on their electricity bills, and benefiting all ratepayers
by supplying extra energy to the grid during peak demand on hot days when prices are highest.
-- Using private capital to connect community solar projects to the grid and upgrading the
electricity network for the benefit of all consumers
-- Creating a pathway for low and moderate income residents to enjoy the benefits of solar
because these projects do not require a large upfront investment.
-- Increasing the amount of clean, pollution-free energy coming onto the grid.
-- Promoting good land use decisions since solar projects no longer need to be on the property of
the subscriber. These projects can be located almost anywhere—rooftops, parking lots,
brownfields, reclaimed mining lands—and where these projects make the most sense. For
example, farmers could more aggressively benefit from the cost savings and extra income stream
of solar without having to take farmland out of production. Some ground mounted solar arrays
are now being developed as preserves for native plants and pollinators.
-- Community solar projects can be developed by private owners, municipalities and institutions,
stimulating the development of true community partnerships.
The memo concluded by saying, “The four of us have different backgrounds and

22
perspectives, but are united in the view that it is time for Pennsylvania join this growing and
innovative new market.”
(​Photos:​ Representatives J​ ames Santora​ (R-Delaware), A ​ aron Kaufer​ (R-Luzerne), ​Donna
Bullock​ (D-Philadelphia) and P ​ eter Schweyer​ (D-Lehigh).)
Resource Link:
Vote Solar - Pennsylvania
NewsClip:
Esack: What You Need To Know As PA Politics Heat Up Over Energy Sector Subsidies
Related Stories:
PennLive.com Op-Ed: Community Solar Is Long Overdue In PA, Lawmakers In Harrisburg Can
Fix That
DEP Invites Comments On Draft Plan To Increase PA’s Solar Electric Generation To 10% Of
Consumption By 2030
Keystone Energy Efficiency Alliance: Winners Of 2018 Schools, School District Energy
Efficiency Awards
Gov. Wolf: CFA Awards $3.4 Million In Funding For 5 Alternative, Clean Energy Projects;
New Applications Due Sept. 15
CFA Awards $2 Million Clean Energy Program Grant To Elementary School In Bucks County;
New Applications Due Sept. 15
[Posted: July 20, 2018]

PennLive.com Op-Ed: Community Solar Is Long Overdue In PA, Lawmakers In


Harrisburg Can Fix That

By ​Pari Kasota​ and ​R. Brent Alderfer

The following op-ed was published on Pennlive.com​.

Pennsylvanians embrace America's entrepreneurial


spirit, and few know better than Pennsylvanians the
potential of a thriving energy sector.
Pennsylvania oil and coal powered the country
through the industrial revolution. Now, we're ready to
harness another major energy opportunity - solar,
specifically Community Solar, which offers consumer
choice, economic growth, job creation, and improved
environmental quality.
Community solar is a simple concept.
For the 75 percent of Pennsylvanians who can't install solar on their property - regardless
of whether it's because they rent their home, have a roof incompatible with solar, find long-term
financing unappealing, or any other reason - community solar offers them the same benefits on
their utility bill as traditional panel-on-your-roof solar but from an efficient solar farm located
nearby in the community.
Community solar is a way to deliver the economic benefits of solar to everyone
regardless of where they live. It allows families and businesses to lower and stabilize their

23
electricity bills, control and forecast their energy bills, and contribute to climate-safe energy.
Beyond bill savings, simply having the option to choose is something most people want.
Solar energy holds tremendous opportunities for rural communities in Pennsylvania.
Many farms such as ​Spring Hills Farm in Lackawanna County​ have installed a 10 kW of
ground mount solar that allow the farm owners to offset their energy consumption.
Farmers can lease their land to host community solar projects. Solar farms are now being
constructed to enhance soil quality over the life of the solar farm and return it to farming at the
end of its useful life.
Farmers across the nation are pairing compatible uses with solar production--such as
bee-friendly pollinator plants--preserving farmland and contributing to farm economy as well as
producing clean energy.
So, instead of gravel, pavement, or turf grass, farmers are providing ground cover
beneath the solar PV arrays with pollinator plants.
Community solar is not restricted to farmland. All communities can benefit. Solar can be
sited on brown-fields, capped landfills, parking lots, and warehouse rooftops to optimize solar
production for any community.
With thousands of local solar jobs, solar is a rising star in Pennsylvania. In 2017, solar
jobs grew 20 times faster than the overall state economy.
Community solar projects result in bigger tax revenues, increased job opportunities, more
consumer choices, and a cleaner environment.
As economic development professionals look for innovative solutions to spur local
growth, allowing community solar investment is a win-win.
Pennsylvania businesses such as Crayola, IKEA, Johnson & Johnson, and many others
are already recognizing the triple line benefits that solar offers.
The Commonwealth is ready for community solar. Pennsylvania Department of
Environmental Protection is currently exploring community solar potential in its ​Finding
Pennsylvania Solar Future Project​.
A group of clean energy advocates are also working to enable community solar. And
Pennsylvania is not starting from scratch.
Pennsylvania has 361 MW of solar power, enough to power more than 40,000 homes,
featuring projects that span agricultural, university, and urban communities alike.
Pennsylvania-based Community Energy Solar developed the 5 MW Keystone Solar
Project in agricultural Lancaster County, the ​2 MW Elizabethtown Solar on Elizabethtown
College's campus​, and the rooftop Temple Solar Project, located in urban North Philadelphia.
Community solar projects like these can make solar power directly available to customers
in their respective communities, and at the same time create local jobs and strengthen local
economies.
That's why we're calling for lawmakers in Harrisburg to unlock energy choices through
community solar. Commonsense legislation to enable community solar will give more
Pennsylvania families - rural, urban, and in-between - that energy freedom.
We are ready for the freedom to choose solar energy. On behalf of our members in
Pennsylvania, Vote Solar will be working in Harrisburg to make it a reality. We invite you to
join us.
(​Photo: ​2.6 MW E ​ lizabethtown College Solar Energy Project,​ Lancaster County.)

24
​ ari Kasotia​ is the Mid-Atlantic Director for ​Vote Solar​ working to promote solar
Written by P
friendly policies in Pennsylvania. R​ . Brent Alderfer​ is the CEO of ​Community Energy Solar,
LLC​ based in Radnor, Pa.
NewsClips:
Op-Ed: Community Solar Is Long Overdue In PA, Lawmakers In Harrisburg Can Fix That
Esack: What You Need To Know As PA Politics Heat Up Over Energy Sector Subsidies
Resource Link:
Vote Solar - Pennsylvania
Related Stories:
Bipartisan Bill To Authorize Community Solar Energy Projects Being Circulated
DEP Invites Comments On Draft Plan To Increase PA’s Solar Electric Generation To 10% Of
Consumption By 2030
Keystone Energy Efficiency Alliance: Winners Of 2018 Schools, School District Energy
Efficiency Awards
Gov. Wolf: CFA Awards $3.4 Million In Funding For 5 Alternative, Clean Energy Projects;
New Applications Due Sept. 15
CFA Awards $2 Million Clean Energy Program Grant To Elementary School In Bucks County;
New Applications Due Sept. 15
[Posted: July 16, 2018]

Wildlife For Everyone Foundation Receives National Award For Pennsylvania Wildlife
Magazine

The ​Wildlife for Everyone Foundation​ Thursday


announced it has received a national ​APEX Award of
Excellence​ for its new magazine, Pennsylvania Wildlife.
The annual APEX awards recognize excellence in
publishing by professional communicators. The awards
are based on excellence in graphic design, editorial
content and the ability to achieve overall communications
excellence.
This year more than 1,400 entries competed in 100
subcategories.
The Foundation’s biannual magazine was recognized for
excellence in design and layout in the most popular category, Magazines, Journals & Tabloids.
SDPcreative​, Millersburg, PA, is the design firm that developed the concept for the
Foundation’s new image piece more than a year ago. The magazine conveys inspired content on
conservation topics, as well as profiles of extraordinary people doing impactful work for wildlife
and nature.
“We are all very proud to be able to share our story in a way that resonates with our
readers and helps us connect people with nature,” said Jerry Regan, president of Wildlife for
Everyone Foundation.
"Wildlife for Everyone Foundation does an incredible job of educating and engaging its
audience, encouraging people to enjoy the beauty of nature,” noted Scott Smith, Art Director at
SDPcreative. "Our team is very excited to be a part of the work they are doing.”

25
Jessica Reynolds, lead graphic designer for Pennsylvania Wildlife magazine shares his
sentiment, “The content within Pennsylvania Wildlife magazine is incredibly unique, engaging,
educational and entertaining, and we strive to cultivate design to reinforce that. We are very
honored to receive this award for excellence in the communication field.”
The vision of the ​Wildlife for Everyone Foundation​ is to be the leading advocate for
wildlife conservation in Pennsylvania.
The foundation was formed in 2004 to provide all wildlife enthusiasts with a way to show
their commitment through much-needed financial support for wildlife conservation efforts and
education.
Since its inception, the Foundation has raised millions of dollars to support projects
including wildlife and wetland habitat improvements, creek and lake restorations, the Seedlings
for Schools program and student educational opportunities.
The Foundation’s mission connects all wildlife and nature enthusiasts to the great
outdoors, including birders, hunters, anglers, students and everyone with an appreciation for
nature’s treasures.
NewsClips:
Venesky: Fish & Boat Commission Defers Cuts, Holds Out Hope For License Fee Hike
Fish & Boat Commission Increases Permit Fees To Cover Costs, Hopeful Of Licence Fee Hike
Hayes: PA Anglers Asked To Pitch In To Raise Revenues
Kummer: NJ Finds PFAS In Lower Delaware River Watershed
Hurdle: NJ Issues First Fish Consumption Advisories On PFAS Chemicals
Crable: Dreaded Frankenfish Arrives In Lancaster County
Cellar-Dwelling Fish Are Mystery In South Philadelphia’s Navy Yard
Songbird Nesting Habits May Indicate Severity Of Hurricane Season In Delaware
Marbled Godwit Spotted At Presque Isle, Rare For PA
Frye: Better Definition Of Public Hunting Goal Of New Rules Likely Coming To PA
Reilly: Middle Creek Wildlife Area Plans Special Bowhunt For Deer This Fall
Schneck: Rattlesnakes Really Want To Be Left Along, Go Undetected​ (Video)
Bower: Reflections In Nature: Eggs vs. Live Young
Philadelphia Pianist To Romance The Butterfly At Insectarium
Federal Endangered Species Act Stripped Of Key Provision In Trump Proposal
Related Stories:
DCNR Wild Resource Conservation Program Accepting Grant Applications Thru Aug. 15
Fish & Boat Commission Issues Alert To Contain Invasive New Zealand Mudsnail In Lehigh
County
Governor’s Advisory Council Seeks To Fill 2 Openings On Fish & Boat Commission Board
[Posted: July 19, 2018]

DCNR Wild Resource Conservation Program Accepting Grant Applications Thru Aug. 15

The DCNR ​Wild Resource Conservation Program​ is


now accepting applications for projects related to the
conservation of flora and non-game fauna. The
deadline for applications is August 15.
The ​2018 grant priorities​ include--

26
-- Research:​ Phenology of Plants in PA, Life History of the Chesapeake Logperch, Ramp
Investigations to Determine if PA Vulnerable, Investigating Population Declines of Aerial
Insectivores, Investigation of the diabase plant communities;
-- Surveys:​ Spiny Cheek Crayfish Assessment, Mudpuppy population assessment associated
with the endangered salamander mussel, Devil Crayfish Assessment; and
-- Conservation & Management:​ Response of Wildlife to Fire Management, Rare Plant
Recovery Plan for Pyrularia pubera, Buffalo-nut, Little Brown Bat Fall Migration.
Public Meeting
DCNR will hold a public meeting on applications it receives on August 28 at the
Commissioner Conference Room, Game Commission, 2001 Elmerton Avenue in Harrisburg
starting at 10:00. (​formal notice​)
Wild Resource Conservation Program funding comes from the Wild Resource state
income tax refund checkoff, ​river otter vehicle license plate​, the Environmental Stewardship
(Growing Greener) Fund and direct donations to: Wild Resource Conservation Program, Bureau
of Forestry, 6th Floor, 400 Market Street, Harrisburg, PA 17105-8552.
For all the details, visit DCNR’s ​Wild Resource Conservation Program​ webpage.
Questions should be directed to ​Jennifer Girton, 717-787-3212 or send email to: ​jgirton@pa.gov
or Greg Czarnecki, 717-783-1337 or send email to: ​gczarnecki@pa.gov​.
(​Photo:​ ​Common Mudpuppy,​ P ​ A Herp Identification.​ )
NewsClips:
Federal Endangered Species Act Stripped Of Key Provision In Trump Proposal
Venesky: Fish & Boat Commission Defers Cuts, Holds Out Hope For License Fee Hike
Fish & Boat Commission Increases Permit Fees To Cover Costs, Hopeful Of Licence Fee Hike
Hayes: PA Anglers Asked To Pitch In To Raise Revenues
Crable: Dreaded Frankenfish Arrives In Lancaster County
Cellar-Dwelling Fish Are Mystery In South Philadelphia’s Navy Yard
Marbled Godwit Spotted At Presque Isle, Rare For PA
Reilly: Middle Creek Wildlife Area Plans Special Bowhunt For Deer This Fall
Schneck: Rattlesnakes Really Want To Be Left Along, Go Undetected​ (Video)
Bower: Reflections In Nature: Eggs vs. Live Young
Philadelphia Pianist To Romance The Butterfly At Insectarium
DCNR Dispatches 2 Fire Crews To Nevada To Help With Wildfires
Related Stories:
Wildlife For Everyone Foundation Receives National Award For Pennsylvania Wildlife
Magazine
Wildlife For Everyone Foundation Receives National Award For Pennsylvania Wildlife
Magazine
Fish & Boat Commission Issues Alert To Contain Invasive New Zealand Mudsnail In Lehigh
County
Governor’s Advisory Council Seeks To Fill 2 Openings On Fish & Boat Commission Board
DCNR Celebrates Importance Of Local Parks, Recreation To Communities In Bucks County
CANCELED: July 27-29 Prowl The Sprout Hikes In Clinton County
Friends Of Allegheny Wilderness Holds Successful Tracy Ridge Wilderness Trail Stewardship
Weekend
Brodhead Watershed Assn. Ramble In Cherry Valley Aug. 5, Hiking, Snorkeling For Kids, DIY

27
Eco-Tour In Monroe County
Register Now! 2018 Wild & Scenic Clarion River Sojourn Aug. 18-19
Gifford Pinchot’s Grey Towers 14th Annual Festival Of Wood Aug. 4-5 In Pike County, Free
Giveaways
[Posted: July 20, 2018]

Senate/House Agenda/Session Schedule/Gov’s Schedule

Here are the Senate and House Calendars for the next voting session day and Committees
scheduling action on bills of interest as well as a list of new environmental bills introduced--

Bill Calendars

House (Sept. 12)​: ​House Bill 107​ (Godshall-R- Montgomery) providing a mechanism to cover
costs of extending natural gas distribution systems;​ ​House Bill 1401​ (DiGirolamo-R-Bucks)
which amends Title 58 to impose a sliding scale natural gas severance tax, in addition to the Act
13 drilling impact fee, on natural gas production (NO money for environmental programs) and
includes provisions related to minimum landowner oil and gas royalties; ​House Bill 1446
(Quinn-R- Bucks) encouraging infrastructure for electric and natural gas fueled vehicles; ​House
Resolution 284​ (Moul-R-Adams) urging Congress to repeal the U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency’s MS4 Stormwater Pollution Prevention Program (​sponsor summary​)​; ​Senate Bill 1172
(Vulakovich-R-Allegheny) further providing for enforcement of price gouging provisions during
an emergency declaration (​Senate Fiscal Note​ and summary). ​<> ​Click Here​ for full House Bill
Calendar.

Senate (Sept. 24): ​Senate Bill 820 ​(Aument-R- Lancaster) providing liability protection for
owners and operators of on-farm agritourism activities (​sponsor summary​); ​Senate Bill 917
(Dinniman-R-Chester) amends Act 101 Municipal Waste Planning and Recycling Act to include
spent mushroom compost under the definition of “compost materials to encourage its reuse
(​sponsor summary​); ​Senate Bill 930​ (Dinniman-D- Chester) sets notification requirements
related to pipeline emergencies (​sponsor summary​); ​Senate Bill 931​ (Dinniman-D-Chester)
requires the installation of automatic or remote controlled safety values in natural gas pipelines
in densely populated areas; ​Senate Bill 1199​ (Rafferty-R- Montgomery) providing for a
landowners’ bill of rights in cases of eminent domain, including by private entities like pipeline
companies (​sponsor summary​); ​Senate Resolution 104​ (Bartolotta-R- Washington) resolution
urging the Governor to end the moratorium on new non-surface disturbance natural gas drilling
on state forest land (​sponsor summary​); ​Senate Resolution 373​ (Rafferty-R-Montgomery) is a
concurrent Senate-House resolution to ​establish a Senate-House legislative Commission to Study
Pipeline Construction and Operations and to recommend improvements for the safe transport of
oil, natural gas and other hazardous liquids through pipelines;​ ​House Bill 544​ (Moul-R-Adams)
further providing for liability protection for landowners opening their land for public recreation;
House Bill 927​ (Rader-R-Monroe) amends Act 101 Municipal Waste Planning and Recycling
Act to eliminate the mandate on smaller municipalities to have a leaf waste collection program
(​House Fiscal Note​ and summary); ​House Bill 1550​ (Klunk-R-York) amending the Agricultural
Area Security Law to allow for a residence for the principal landowner (​House Fiscal Note​ and
28
summary). <> ​Click Here​ for full Senate Bill Calendar.

Committee Meeting Agendas This Week

House:​ <> ​Click Here​ for full House Committee Schedule.

Senate:​ <> ​Click Here​ for full Senate Committee Schedule.

Bills Pending In Key Committees

Check the ​PA Environmental Council Bill Tracker​ for the status and updates on pending state
legislation and regulations​ that affect environmental and conservation efforts in Pennsylvania.

Session Schedule

Here is the latest voting session schedule for the Senate and House--

Senate
Recessed to the call of the President Pro Tempore
September 24, 25, 26
October 1, 2, 3, 15, 16, 17
November 14

House
Recessed to the call of the House Speaker
September 12, 13, 24, 25, & 26.
October 1 (Non-Voting), 2 (Non-Voting), 9, 10, 15, 16, & 17.
November 13

Governor’s Schedule

Gov. Tom Wolf's work calendar will be posted each Friday and his public schedule for the day
will be posted each morning. ​Click Here​ to view Gov. Wolf’s Weekly Calendar and Public
Appearances.

The Feds

U.S. House Narrowly Votes To Restrict EPA Authority To Hold States Accountable For
Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Obligations

The U.S. House voted 213 to 202 to approve an amendment offered by Virginia Congressman
Bob Goodlatte (R) to restrict the ability of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to hold
states accountable for meeting their Chesapeake Bay cleanup obligations.
Will Baker, President of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, issued this statement in
response to the vote--
29
“With this amendment, the House voted to undermine the Bay states and what stands to
be the greatest environmental success story of our time: Saving the Chesapeake Bay.
“The Chesapeake Bay Blueprint is a partnership among the watershed states and EPA to
meet the requirements of the Clean Water Act and restore the Bay after years of failed attempts.
And it’s working because it has teeth that previous efforts lacked. Bay grasses are at record
levels, the dead zone is getting smaller, and oysters are beginning to rebound.
“Only EPA can enforce the agreement if a state fails to meet its commitments. By
suspending this authority, the Goodlatte Amendment threatens progress being made and the
legacy of oysters, crabs, and clean water for future generations.
“Rejecting the Bay states wishes by gutting the Blueprint’s accountability is shortsighted.
CBF will work with the Bay region’s Senators to ensure that the Goodlatte amendment is not
included in their appropriations legislation.”
Members of Congress voting against the amendment included Pennsylvania’s Rep. Matt
Cartwright.
For more on Chesapeake Bay-related issues in Pennsylvania, visit the ​Chesapeake Bay
Foundation-PA​ webpage. ​Click Here​ to sign up for Pennsylvania updates (bottom of left
column). ​Click Here​ to support their work.
NewsClips:
U.S House Again Votes To Restrict Federal Enforcement Of Chesapeake Bay Cleanup
Measure To Weaken EPA Enforcement Of Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Is Up For Vote, Again
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
Click Here​ to subscribe to the free Chesapeake Bay Journal
Click Here​ to support the Chesapeake Bay Journal
Follow Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Twitter
Like Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Facebook
Related Stories:
Save The Date: CBF-PA Veterans On The River Kayak Fishing Event Aug. 25 In York County
PennVEST Funds $92 Million In Water Infrastructure Projects In 13 Counties, Including
Nonpoint Source; Lead Service Line Funding Change
PACD, DEP: Four Pennsylvania Farms Receive 2018 Clean Water Farm Award
PA Assn. Of Conservation Districts Presents Awards, Hosts Northeast Meeting Of Conservation
Leaders
Montgomery County Master Watershed Steward: Green Infrastructure Solutions To Stormwater
In Stony Creek Watershed
Pittsburgh Section-Environmental & Water Resources Institute Urban Green infrastructure
Workshop July 26
Philadelphia Eagles, Axalta, Stroud Water Research Center Celebrate All-Pro Teachers In
Stream; New Nominations Being Accepted
Register Now! Dive Deeper: Youth Water Educators Summit Sept. 20 In Harrisburg
Take Action:
How Good Is The Water Quality In Streams In Your Community? Take A Look, Then Act

[Posted: July 19, 2018]

News From Around The State


30
Trout Unlimited Requests Proposals For Acid Mine Drainage Technical Assistance
Program Consultants

Trout Unlimited is seeking a consulting firm that


specialize in acid mine drainage remediation to assist
with technical services for its AMD Technical
Assistance Program. Proposals are due August 10.
Trout Unlimited has been providing technical
assistance to watershed groups, TU chapters,
conservation districts, municipalities, and other groups
working to address abandoned mine drainage (AMD)
through its AMD Technical Assistance Program since
2004.
TU staff, along with consultants specializing in AMD
remediation, fulfill the requests for assistance which cover a variety of needs in the AMD
restoration community.
TU’s AMD Technical Assistance Program will be available statewide; however, projects
located on coldwater streams and in targeted watersheds across western Pennsylvania may be
prioritized due to the program’s funding support.
The types of projects TU is seeking consultants to assist with technical services include
the following:
1) Rapid watershed snapshots: ​Typically requires a one-time site visit of AMD problems on a
specific stream or small watershed (may include water sampling) and review of mining history,
water quality data, and other available information to provide further recommendations and
guidance for developing a monitoring plan or a more comprehensive assessment.
2) Rapid watershed assessments:​ An assessment of AMD problems on a specific stream or
small watershed that typically includes water sampling (and possibly fish and/or
macroinvertebrate surveys) for a determined length of time, which can be implemented by TU,
consultant, or requesting group, and review of mining history, water quality data, and other
available information to develop a report that summarizes the AMD problems and recommends
potential remediation solutions.
3) Conceptual remediation design plan:​ Requesting group should have all the information it
needs to apply for funding for the full-scale design and permitting phase.
4) Treatment system evaluation and recommendations:​ Evaluation and recommendations for
improvement of existing treatment systems that may not be performing up to expectations or
show signs of declining performance. May also include assistance with developing long-term
operation and maintenance plans if necessary.
5) Monitoring plan development:​ Developed to assist groups with monitoring biological
conditions or prioritizing remediation plans and goals. Monitoring plans will contain instructions
for collecting water samples and measuring flows, along with GPS coordinates and a map of
sample locations, sampling frequency, and chemical parameters for field and lab analysis. May
also include evaluation and recommendations for improving or updating existing monitoring
plans.
6) Watershed restoration plan development: ​DEP requires that projects are located within an

31
approved hydrologic unit plan or qualified hydrologic unit to be eligible to receive funding from
the Title IV AMD Set-Aside Program. This type of assistance will assist groups with the data
collection and compilation and development of a watershed restoration plan, according to the
guidelines set forth in DEP’s AMD Set-Aside Program: Program Implementation Guidelines.
The process for providing technical assistance to groups begins with a simple two-page
form that the requesting group fills out and sends to TU. TU staff will contact the group to
determine its eligibility and to further refine the type of assistance the group is requesting.
An initial site visit with the requesting group might be necessary and TU will coordinate
this between the group and the selected consultant. The consultant will then be required to
develop a scope of work and budget, which must be approved by TU and the DEP grant advisor
prior to beginning the project.
TU staff will work with the selected consultant to provide services for projects that
require biological assessments such as stream habitat, fish, and/or macroinvertebrate surveys. TU
staff may also be available to assist the consultant with field work.
TU staff will coordinate each project from its inception through to completion of the final
report, thus the consultant will be working directly for TU as its contractor and must coordinate
all meetings and activities with the requesting groups with TU first.
Technical assistance requests are expected to be fulfilled relatively quickly, dependent
upon the nature of the request, and will be reimbursed upon satisfactory completion.
If interested in contracting for TU as a technical service consultant for its AMD
Technical Assistance Program, please submit a proposal that contains the following:
-- Company’s experience working with volunteer-based watershed groups, conservation districts,
TU chapters, etc.; reference contact information for a minimum of three organizations,
conservation districts, or other entities.
-- Company’s detailed experience developing watershed assessments and remediation plans
specifically relating to AMD; a minimum of three specific examples are required and may be
included on a CD, hard copy, or website links.
-- Company’s detailed experience designing AMD treatment systems; specific examples are
required that contain location, construction date, influent and effluent water quality, and current
reference contact information.
-- Resumes for company personnel that will be providing services.
-- Cost estimates (ranges are adequate) for each type of project listed above.
-- Company’s Federal Tax ID # so we can obtain contractor clearance from DEP.
Proposals are due by August 10, 2018 at 5:00 p.m. EST. Please email proposals as a PDF
document to Amy Wolfe, Director of Trout Unlimited’s Northeast Habitat Program, at
amy.wolfe@tu.org​. Hard copy submissions must be postmarked no later than August 10, 2018
and mailed to Amy Wolfe, Trout Unlimited, 18 East Main Street, Suite 3, Lock Haven, PA
17745.
For more information on the program, visit TU’s ​Eastern Abandoned Mines Program
webpage.
NewsClip:
Back Mountain Residents’ Input Sought For Upper Toby Creek Conservation Plan
Related Story:
DEP: Reauthorizing Federal Mine Reclamation Fee Critical To Continued Success Of AML
Program

32
Take Action:
How Good Is The Water Quality In Streams In Your Community? Take A Look, Then Act
[Posted: July 17, 2018]

Montgomery County Master Watershed Steward: Green Infrastructure Solutions To


Stormwater In Stony Creek Watershed

By: Robert Pace, ​Master Watershed Steward, Montgomery County

When Cutler and Ryan Homes built the Stony Creek


Farms (SCF) community in Montgomery County, PA,
over the last ten years, they were challenged with
what all developers are faced with when they convert
open land to a development … they must develop the
area in such a way that minimizes the impact to
stormwater and streams.
When areas covered in forest or open field are
transformed to rooftops, paved driveways, and streets
and other impermeable surfaces they alter the natural
flow of water after it rains, which can result in serious
impacts to flooding and water quality in the receiving streams.
All water flows downhill and SCF waters flow to Stony Creek.
SCF, where I am a resident, is located in the upper and a relatively undeveloped part of
the Stony Creek Watershed.
Stony Creek meanders through our community as a minor stream, enlarges as it is joined
by other branches and follows its course through the Norristown Farm Park, past the Elmwood
Park Zoo until it ultimately flows a through a network of concrete channels in Norristown where
it reaches the Schuylkill River.
Eventually, these waters reach the Delaware Bay, one of the most environmentally and
commercially important water bodies in our region.
The 8 large basins in our community and the many rain gardens interspersed throughout
were built by the developers to meet local, state, and federal stormwater management regulations
that are intended to minimize flooding and protect the health of our streams.
The vast majority of water that runs off of our driveways, parking lots, streets, and even
lawns finds its way to one of our basins or rain gardens, either through storm drains on our
streets or simply by flow over the land surface.
Our basins and rain gardens work to accomplish two things: First, they collect and detain
the water that would otherwise flow unchecked to Stony Creek. In fact, our system is designed to
handle the most commonly-occurring storms and rainfall based on statistical records of our area.
If these waters otherwise reached Stony Creek unimpeded, they would cause severe
erosion, undercut the stream channel and its banks, thus increasing its sediment load, and
destroying valuable animal and fish habitat.
Secondly, our basins and rain gardens work to ever-so-slowly filter the water through the
marvelous vegetative buffers we created along their slopes and through the naturally-occurring
and carefully planted vegetation and soil medium at the basin bottoms.

33
By doing so, these features naturally remove pollutants such as oil and grease and
dissolved metals that come from our road surfaces, nitrogen and phosphorus from application of
fertilizers, and pathogens from natural and domestic animal waste.
So ultimately, the water that runs off of SCF reaches Stony Creek in a relatively clean
state, and is appreciably slowed and lessened, decreasing the potential for damaging flooding in
downstream communities.
I have encouraged SCF residents that when they drive through or walk the trails by our
basins and rain gardens, to take a moment to enjoy how lovely they are (and we are working to
improve their look and effectiveness), but more importantly, to think about the important
function that they serve.
Much work goes into keeping these basins functional and appealing including annual
inspections, maintenance, and enhancement activities.
My role as the Chair of our community’s Stormwater Management and Basin Committee
and as a Penn State Master Watershed Steward is to continue to look at ways to maintain and
protect our basins and rain gardens so that they work as intended and provide an aesthetically
pleasing amenity for our community.
These experiences and techniques are “exportable” to other existing and developing
communities around Pennsylvania.
For more information about stormwater management, go to Penn State Extension’s
Stormwater Basics​ webpage.
There are Master Watershed Stewards Programs in Allegheny, Berks, Bucks, Chester,
Delaware, Lackawanna, Lehigh, Luzerne, Monroe, Montgomery, Northampton, Wyoming and
York Counties.
Interested in becoming a Master Watershed Steward in your area? Visit Penn State
Extension’s ​Master Watershed Steward Program​ webpage. Questions should be directed to Erin
Frederick at 610-391-9840 or send email to: ​elf145@psu.edu​.
NewsClips:
Letter: McKinley Elementary Projects Restore Our Local Stream​ (Montgomery County)
Latrobe Authority Says Stormwater Project Should Alleviate Sewage Woes
4 Of 5 Allentown Owners Who Appeal Stormwater Bill Got A Reduction
Related Stories:
Pittsburgh Section-Environmental & Water Resources Institute Urban Green infrastructure
Workshop July 26
DEP Now Accepting Small Business Advantage Grant Applications For Water Quality
Improvement Projects
PACD, DEP: Four Pennsylvania Farms Receive 2018 Clean Water Farm Award
PA Assn. Of Conservation Districts Presents Awards, Hosts Northeast Meeting Of Conservation
Leaders
PennVEST Funds $92 Million In Water Infrastructure Projects In 13 Counties, Including
Nonpoint Source; Lead Service Line Funding Change
Philadelphia Eagles, Axalta, Stroud Water Research Center Celebrate All-Pro Teachers In
Stream; New Nominations Being Accepted
Register Now! Dive Deeper: Youth Water Educators Summit Sept. 20 In Harrisburg
U.S. House Narrowly Votes To Restrict EPA Authority To Hold States Accountable For
Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Obligations

34
(Reprinted from ​Penn State Extension.​ )
Take Action:
How Good Is The Water Quality In Streams In Your Community? Take A Look, Then Act
[Posted: July 20, 2018]

Pittsburgh Section-Environmental & Water Resources Institute Urban Green


infrastructure Workshop July 26

The ​Pittsburgh Section-Environmental and Water


Resources Institute​ will host an ​Urban Green
Infrastructure Workshop​ on July 26 from 11:30 a.m.
to 5:00 p.m. at the Engineers' Society of Western
PA, 337 Fourth Avenue in Pittsburgh.
This Spring, record-breaking rainfall
throughout Southwestern Pennsylvania has brought
stormwater management to the forefront of the
public eye.
From landslides to roadway flooding, many issues plague local communities during and
after wet weather events.
Green infrastructure can be a cost effective and resilient solution to help manage the
impacts of wet weather, while delivering environmental, social and economic benefits for
communities.
The local EWRI – Pittsburgh chapter is partnering with representatives from the EWRI
National Technical Councils to focus on Green Stormwater Infrastructure to provide national and
local expertise on the following topics:
-- Low Impact Development (LID) / Green Stormwater Infrastructure (GSI) in CSO Areas
-- Operation and Maintenance of GSI
-- Stormwater Management in the Ultra-Urban Environment
Presenters for this workshop include:
-- Shirley Clark​ – Penn State University
-- Ruth Hocker​ – City of Lancaster
-- Rosanna LaPlante ​– City of Baltimore
-- Tim Prevost​ – ALCOSAN
-- Ryan Quinn ​– Pittsburgh Water & Sewer Authority
-- Greg Scott​ – Buchart Horn, Inc.
-- Matt Zambelli​ – MLZDesign
-- Barton Kirk​ – Ethos Collaborative
-- Jordan Fischbach​ – RAND Corporation
Who Should Attend: Water Quality/Environmental Professionals & Students, Civil/Water
Resource Engineers, Green Infrastructure Professionals, Landscape Architects, Municipal &
Government Officials, Watershed & Environmental Advocacy Groups
Click Here​ to register and for more information.
For information on programs, initiatives and other upcoming events, visit the ​Pittsburgh
Section-Environmental and Water Resources Institute​ website.

35
NewsClips:
Letter: McKinley Elementary Projects Restore Our Local Stream​ (Montgomery County)
Latrobe Authority Says Stormwater Project Should Alleviate Sewage Woes
4 Of 5 Allentown Owners Who Appeal Stormwater Bill Got A Reduction
Related Stories:
Montgomery County Master Watershed Steward: Green Infrastructure Solutions To Stormwater
In Stony Creek Watershed
DEP Now Accepting Small Business Advantage Grant Applications For Water Quality
Improvement Projects
PACD, DEP: Four Pennsylvania Farms Receive 2018 Clean Water Farm Award
PA Assn. Of Conservation Districts Presents Awards, Hosts Northeast Meeting Of Conservation
Leaders
PennVEST Funds $92 Million In Water Infrastructure Projects In 13 Counties, Including
Nonpoint Source; Lead Service Line Funding Change
Philadelphia Eagles, Axalta, Stroud Water Research Center Celebrate All-Pro Teachers In
Stream; New Nominations Being Accepted
Register Now! Dive Deeper: Youth Water Educators Summit Sept. 20 In Harrisburg
U.S. House Narrowly Votes To Restrict EPA Authority To Hold States Accountable For
Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Obligations
Take Action:
How Good Is The Water Quality In Streams In Your Community? Take A Look, Then Act
[Posted: July 20, 2018]

Save The Date: CBF-PA Veterans On The River Kayak Fishing Event Aug. 25 In York
County

The ​Chesapeake Bay Foundation-PA​, ​Trout


Unlimited-PA​, Shank's Mare Outfitters and
Heroes On The Water-Central PA Chapter​ are
partnering on a Veterans On The River Kayak
Fishing Event August 25 at ​Shank's Mare
Outfitters​ in Wrightsville, York County from
1:00 to 5:00 p.m.
Veterans and their families are invited to
this fun and educational event to learn more
about fishing, kayaking and about how to keep
our waterways healthy. All the gear participants
need will be provided, along with a kayak and
guides.
In addition to the fishing/kayaking event, there will be a dinner from 5:30 to 7:30.
Click Here​ for more information on this event (Facebook). For information on other
Heroes On The Water events, visit the ​Heroes On The Water-Central PA Chapter​ webpage.
For more on Chesapeake Bay-related issues in Pennsylvania, visit the ​Chesapeake Bay
Foundation-PA​ webpage. ​Click Here​ to sign up for Pennsylvania updates (bottom of left
column). ​Click Here​ to support their work.

36
NewsClips:
U.S House Again Votes To Restrict Federal Enforcement Of Chesapeake Bay Cleanup
Measure To Weaken EPA Enforcement Of Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Is Up For Vote, Again
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
Click Here​ to subscribe to the free Chesapeake Bay Journal
Click Here​ to support the Chesapeake Bay Journal
Follow Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Twitter
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Related Stories:
PACD, DEP: Four Pennsylvania Farms Receive 2018 Clean Water Farm Award
U.S. House Narrowly Votes To Restrict EPA Authority To Hold States Accountable For
Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Obligations
Take Action:
How Good Is The Water Quality In Streams In Your Community? Take A Look, Then Act
[Posted: July 20, 2018]

Philadelphia PowerCorpsPHL Now Accepting Applications To Work On Environmental


Improvement Projects

PowerCorpsPHL​ is a 12-month workforce


development program for individuals 18 to 26 that
tackles pressing environmental challenges, including
improving stormwater management, increasing tree
coverage, and revitalizing public land in
Philadelphia.
PowerCorpsPHL is a City of Philadelphia
AmeriCorps program operated in partnership with
EducationWorks​.
Members of PowerCorpsPHL serve on crews with the City of Philadelphia’s Water and
Parks & Recreation departments. All members work on projects the first 5 months and spend the
sixth month in intensive career training.
Crews serve Monday through Friday 7:45 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.; and some evenings and
weekends in park and public lands, recreation centers, public gardens, public riverbanks and
waterways, and green stormwater infrastructure sites.
After the first six months, members can apply to become a Fellow with an external
partner and extend their experience to a full-year.
Check out ​Aaron’s story on Twitter​ to understand more about the program.
Click Here​ to apply and for more information.
Other Young Adult Programs
Here are some other young adult conservation-related employment opportunity programs
to check out--
-- ​DCNR PA Outdoor Corps​: 10-month program for ages 18-25, 7-week summer program ages
15-18 to do conservation work in State Parks and Forests. Watch for application period opening.
-- ​LandForce Pittsburgh​: Landforce crews provide restoration and management services for
parks, trails and other outdoor space. Crews are made up of people who have faced a variety of

37
barriers entering the workforce-- whether due to former incarceration, poverty, a lack of
education, as a returning veteran, or as a new refugee.Watch for application period opening.
NewsClips:
Carmichaels PA Envirothon Champion Team Gets Warm Send-Off To National Competition
East Stroudsburg U. Student Research Helps Ensure Clean Drinking Water
Penn State Extension: Wilson College Students Learn How Land Use, Groundwater, Wells
Interconnect
Letter: McKinley Elementary Projects Restore Our Local Stream​ (Montgomery County)
New Kensington YMCA Garden Program Grows Young Men Into Leaders
Philadelphia Pianist To Romance The Butterfly At Insectarium
Bed Of Ringing Rocks In Bucks County Make Music With The Help Of A Hammer
Take Action:
How Good Is The Water Quality In Streams In Your Community? Take A Look, Then Act
[Posted: July 20, 2019]

Register Now! Dive Deeper: Youth Water Educators Summit Sept. 20 In Harrisburg

The Penn State Extension ​2018 Dive Deeper: Youth


Water Educators Summit​ will be held on September
20 at the Central Hotel & Conference Center, 800
East Park Dr., Harrisburg from 8:15 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
The Summit is a multi-state environmental education
summit spotlighting innovative teaching about water.
This biennial conference is for anyone who teaches
youth about water or anyone interested in educational
tools and resources for teaching about water.
It will be an all-day event with hands-on workshops,
networking lunch, and amazing guest speakers--
-- Enjoy new informative speakers, take home new curriculum ideas, and create new networking
opportunities;
-- Learn about current and emerging water issues in the mid-Atlantic region; and
-- Discover new technology resources to enhance your STEM education offerings.
There are two pre-conference tour options are being offered this year for the first time.
Click Here​ for all the details and to register. ​Click Here​ for the detailed agenda.
Discount registration deadline August 20.
NewsClips:
Carmichaels PA Envirothon Champion Team Gets Warm Send-Off To National Competition
East Stroudsburg U. Student Research Helps Ensure Clean Drinking Water
Penn State Extension: Wilson College Students Learn How Land Use, Groundwater, Wells
Interconnect
Letter: McKinley Elementary Projects Restore Our Local Stream​ (Montgomery County)
New Kensington YMCA Garden Program Grows Young Men Into Leaders
Philadelphia Pianist To Romance The Butterfly At Insectarium
Bed Of Ringing Rocks In Bucks County Make Music With The Help Of A Hammer
Related Stories:

38
Philadelphia Eagles, Axalta, Stroud Water Research Center Celebrate All-Pro Teachers In
Stream; New Nominations Being Accepted
PACD, DEP: Four Pennsylvania Farms Receive 2018 Clean Water Farm Award
PA Assn. Of Conservation Districts Presents Awards, Hosts Northeast Meeting Of Conservation
Leaders
PennVEST Funds $92 Million In Water Infrastructure Projects In 13 Counties, Including
Nonpoint Source; Lead Service Line Funding Change
Montgomery County Master Watershed Steward: Green Infrastructure Solutions To Stormwater
In Stony Creek Watershed
Pittsburgh Section-Environmental & Water Resources Institute Urban Green infrastructure
Workshop July 26
U.S. House Narrowly Votes To Restrict EPA Authority To Hold States Accountable For
Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Obligations
Take Action:
How Good Is The Water Quality In Streams In Your Community? Take A Look, Then Act
[Posted: July 17, 2018]

DEP Posts Proposed TMDL For Mill Creek Watershed, Berks County For Comment

The Department of Environmental Protection published notice in the July 21 PA Bulletin


inviting comments on a proposed ​Total Maximum Daily Load water quality plan for Mill Creek
Watershed​ in Berks County.
Comments are due in 30 days from the notice.
This and other TMDLs are available on ​DEP’s TMDL​ webpage. Questions should be
directed to Scott Heidel, 717-772-5647 or send email to: ​scheidel@pa.gov​.
Take Action:
How Good Is The Water Quality In Streams In Your Community? Take A Look, Then Act
[Posted: July 20, 2018]

DEP Reports West Nile Virus Now Found In 2 More Counties, 40 Total

The Department of Environmental Protection Friday


reported on its ​West Nile Virus​ website mosquitoes
testing positive for the virus have been found in 2
more counties -- Cambria and Mercer counties.
This brings to 40 the number of counties with
positive surveillance results, including the previously
reported counties of-- Adams, Allegheny, Beaver,
Bedford, Berks, Blair, Bucks, Carbon, Centre,
Chester, Clearfield, Clinton, Columbia, Cumberland,
Dauphin, Delaware, Erie, Fayette, Forest, Franklin,
Juniata, Lackawanna, Lancaster, Lawrence,
Lebanon, Lehigh, Luzerne, Lycoming, Montgomery,
Montour, Northampton, Northumberland,
Philadelphia, Schuylkill, Union, Westmoreland,

39
Wyoming and York.
Certain mosquito species carry the West Nile virus, which can cause humans to contract
West Nile encephalitis, an infection that can result in an inflammation of the brain. According to
the Department of Health, all residents in areas where virus activity has been identified are at
risk of contracting West Nile encephalitis.
Individuals can take a number of precautionary measures around their homes to help
eliminate mosquito-breeding areas, including:
-- Dispose of cans, buckets, plastic containers, ceramic pots, or similar containers that hold
water;
-- Properly dispose of discarded tires that can collect water. Stagnant water is where most
mosquitoes breed;
-- Drill holes in the bottom of outdoor recycling containers;
-- Have clogged roof gutters cleaned every year as the leaves from surrounding trees have a
tendency to plug drains;
-- Turn over plastic wading pools when not in use;
-- Turn over wheelbarrows and don't let water stagnate in birdbaths;
-- Aerate ornamental pools or stock them with fish; and
-- Clean and chlorinate swimming pools not in use and remove any water that may collect on
pool covers.
If a resident has stagnant pools of water on their property, they can buy Bti products at
lawn and garden, outdoor supply, home improvement and other stores. This naturally occurring
bacterium kills mosquito larvae, but is safe for people, pets, aquatic life and plants.
Additionally, these simple precautions can prevent mosquito bites, particularly for people
who are most at risk:
-- Make sure screens fit tightly over doors and windows to keep mosquitoes out of homes.
-- Consider wearing long-sleeved shirts, long pants and socks when outdoors, particularly when
mosquitoes are most active at dawn and dusk, or in areas known for having large numbers of
mosquitoes.
-- When possible, reduce outdoor exposure at dawn and dusk during peak mosquito periods,
usually April through October.
-- Use insect repellents according to the manufacturer's instructions. An effective repellent will
contain DEET, picardin, or lemon eucalyptus oil. Consult with a pediatrician or family physician
for questions about the use of repellent on children, as repellent is not recommended for children
under the age of two months.
For more information on spraying operation and surveillance results, visit the ​West Nile
Virus​ website.
NewsClips:
Mosquito Eradicators, Tick Sprays Flying Off Shelves In Northeast
Mosquito Spraying Planned In Harborcreek Township
Accuweather: Above-Average Rainfall Boosts Mosquito Populations Across Eastern U.S.
[Posted: July 20, 2018]

Reminder: Keep PA Beautiful Accepting Applications For Fresh Paint Days Grants Until
July 31

40
Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful​, along with partners ​BEHR paint​ and ​The Home Depot​, are
accepting applications for ​2018 Fresh Paint Days Pennsylvania Grants​ until July 31.
The program is designed to provide community groups with paint and painting supplies
enabling them to renew a community structure in need into something beautiful through the
application of fresh paint.
Eight grants of up to 20 gallons of exterior paint and a gift card for painting supplies will
be awarded to tax-exempt groups within Pennsylvania. Groups will have 30 days to complete
their projects, September 1 through 30.
Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful will select the eight winning projects from among
applications submitted.
Selected grantees must meet the following requirements to be considered – only one
building per application, proof of liability insurance, signed permission to paint from the
building owner and two before photos of the intended project.
Selected grantees must also agree to select a color from the Behr paint line and provide a
final report with during and after photos.
“At Behr Paint, we believe in doing the right thing and we’re on a mission to make a
difference in the communities where we live and work,” said Drew Hatcher, Contract
Management Director at Behr Paint. “Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful is an amazing organization
and everyone in the community is enriched by their Fresh Paint Days efforts. We are proud to
once again be partnering with them to help beautify communities across the state.”
“Through our partnership with BEHR and The Home Depot, Fresh Paint Days
Pennsylvania empowers community groups to take a direct role in community revitalization
efforts,” explains Shannon Reiter, President of Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful. “Keep
Pennsylvania is pleased to continue offering this program to organizations as an impetus to
improve our communities’ one structure at a time. It is a valuable program and I want to
encourage community groups in Pennsylvania to take full advantage of this great opportunity.”
Grants will be awarded in early-August.
The Fresh Paint Days Pennsylvania grant is available to any tax-exempt group within the
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Private property owners or individual applicants are not
eligible.
For more information or to download the application. Visit KPB’s ​2018 Fresh Paint Days
Pennsylvania Grants​ webpage. Questions can be answered by Michelle Dunn, Keep
Pennsylvania Beautiful Program Coordinator, at 877-772-3673 ext. 113 or send email to:
mdunn@keeppabeautiful.org​.
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the ​Keep
Pennsylvania Beautiful​ website. ​Click Here​ to become a member. ​Click Here​ to sign up for
regular updates from KPB, ​Like them on Facebook​, ​Follow on Twitter​, ​Discover them on
Pinterest​ and visit their ​YouTube Channel​.
Also visit the ​Illegal Dump Free PA​ website for more ideas on how to clean up
communities and keep them clean and KPB’s ​Electronics Waste​ website.
Related Stories:
Visitors To 3 Centre County Festivals Recycled 5,000+ Pounds Of Material
DEP Holds July 23 Hearing On Proposed Camp Hope Run Landfill Permit, Clearfield County
Register Now! PA Hazmat Training & Education Conference Aug. 23-26 In Seven Springs
[Posted: July 18, 2018]

41
Visitors To 3 Centre County Festivals Recycled 5,000+ Pounds Of Material

The ​Centre County Recycling and Refuse Authority


Tuesday announced visitors to the ​Central
Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts​ and ​The People's
Choice Festival​ and ​Heritage Days​ recycled over 5,000
pounds of organics and recyclable material.
Broken down by festival, the recycling numbers are as
follows:
-- Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts:​ 520
pounds of plastic bottles, 80 pounds of aluminum cans,
240 pounds of miscellaneous plastic, 2,200 pounds of
corrugated cardboard and 300 pounds of organic
material.
-- People’s Choice:​ 695 pounds of plastic bottles, 100 pounds of green glass and 960 pounds of
corrugated cardboard.
-- Heritage Days:​ 80 pounds of plastic bottles, 20 pounds of metal cans and 160 pounds of
corrugated cardboard.
The local festivals keep getting “greener” each year thanks to the efforts of the Centre
County Recycling & Refuse Authority, State College Borough and Fest Zero (a group of Penn
State Alumni, current students and concerned citizens).
In addition to recycling at local festivals, nearly 200 pounds of unused food was donated
to local organizations and food banks.
It was a great year for recycling at Centre County’s local festivals. Thanks to all of the
fair-goers who did the right thing! Look for recycling bins at the Grange Fair next month to help
to divert even more material from our landfills.
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the ​Centre
County Recycling and Refuse Authority​ website.
(​Photo:​ ​24th Annual Recycled Art Show,​ Green Is The New Black, from the ​Art Alliance of
Central Pennsylvania​.)
NewsClips:
Crable: Lancaster Waste Authority Trims Recycling Program To Big 4, Cites Market Collapse
Here Are Recent Changes To Single-Stream Recycling In Lancaster County
Quick Video Tour Of Penn Waste’s Recycling Center
Lehigh County Collects 20K+ Pounds Of Unwanted Drugs, Destroyed In Covanta Chester Plant
Editorial: PCBs In Quarry Fill? PA Needs Tougher Standards
Column: Plastic Straw Bans Are Last Straw, Let’s Get Rid Of Litterbugs Instead
EPA Eases Rules On How Coal Ash Waste Is Stored​ [PA Does Not]
Frazier: Trump Admin. Rolls Back Coal Ash Rules Aimed At Groundwater Protection
Related Stories:
Reminder: Keep PA Beautiful Accepting Applications For Fresh Paint Days Grants Until July 31
DEP Holds July 23 Hearing On Proposed Camp Hope Run Landfill Permit, Clearfield County
Register Now! PA Hazmat Training & Education Conference Aug. 23-26 In Seven Springs
[Posted: July 17, 2018]

42
DEP Holds July 23 Hearing On Proposed Camp Hope Run Landfill Permit, Clearfield
County

The Department of Environmental Protection Monday announced it will hold a public hearing on
July 23 to accept public comments regarding the municipal waste application by PA Waste,
LLC, for a permit to construct the ​proposed Camp Hope Run Landfill​, located in Boggs
Township, Clearfield County.
The public hearing will be held on from 6:30 to 9:00 p.m. at the ​Florian Banquet Center​,
321 Mill Road, Clearfield, PA. During the hearing, citizens may present oral testimony regarding
the proposed project and permit application submitted to DEP in 2017. Comments are limited to
five minutes per person and will be recorded by a court reporter.
Those wishing to speak should register in advance by contacting Megan Lehman by
sending email to: ​meglehman@pa.gov​ or 570-327-3659, no later than 4:00 p.m. on July 20,
2018. Time permitting, those who did not register in advance but who register onsite prior to the
start of the hearing will also be given the opportunity to testify.
Written comments of any length may also be provided to Lisa Houser, PE, DEP Waste
Management Program, at 208 West Third Street, Suite 101, Williamsport, PA 17701, or via
email to: ​lhouser@pa.gov​, no later than 4:00 p.m. on August 3, 2018.
All relevant comments, oral and written, that are submitted by the deadline will be given
equal consideration by DEP during its review of the permit application. DEP will create a written
response to all relevant comments received at the hearing and in writing by the deadline.
The permit application is ​available for public review online​.
Individuals in need of an accommodation as provided for in the Americans With
Disabilities Act of 1990 should contact Megan Lehman at 570-327-3659, or through the
Pennsylvania AT&T Relay Service at 1-800-654-5984 (TDD users), or 1-800-654-5988 (Voice
Users), to discuss how DEP may accommodate your needs.
NewsClips:
Crable: Lancaster Waste Authority Trims Recycling Program To Big 4, Cites Market Collapse
Here Are Recent Changes To Single-Stream Recycling In Lancaster County
Quick Video Tour Of Penn Waste’s Recycling Center
Lehigh County Collects 20K+ Pounds Of Unwanted Drugs, Destroyed In Covanta Chester Plant
Editorial: PCBs In Quarry Fill? PA Needs Tougher Standards
Column: Plastic Straw Bans Are Last Straw, Let’s Get Rid Of Litterbugs Instead
EPA Eases Rules On How Coal Ash Waste Is Stored​ [PA Does Not]
Frazier: Trump Admin. Rolls Back Coal Ash Rules Aimed At Groundwater Protection
Related Stories:
Reminder: Keep PA Beautiful Accepting Applications For Fresh Paint Days Grants Until July 31
Visitors To 3 Centre County Festivals Recycled 5,000+ Pounds Of Material
Register Now! PA Hazmat Training & Education Conference Aug. 23-26 In Seven Springs
[Posted: July 16, 2018]

State Provides $911,113 For Environmental Remediation To Support Reuse Of Brownfield


Site In Dauphin County

43
Gov. Tom Wolf Thursday announced the approval of new funding through the ​Industrial Sites
Reuse Program​ to provide for the cleanup of 2.3 acres of the former Allison Hill Automotive site
in Harrisburg, Dauphin County to provide for further development on the property for a
Hamilton Health Center​ building addition.
“This new funding is great news for the city of Harrisburg because it will transform a
vacant part of the property into a new expansion for Hamilton Health Center, which means even
better health and social services for Harrisburg residents,” Gov. Wolf said. “Investments like
these provide a significant boost to the area.”
The grant will provide $911,113 to remove and dispose of soil at the site so Hamilton
Health Center can construct an adjacent two-story addition to its health center. The new addition
will consist of a preschool, a child day care, second-floor medical office space, and expanded
parking.
Hamilton Health originally moved into its Allison Hill facility in 2012 after extensive
remediation and demolition work on the property that was necessary due to the numerous
environmental hazards left behind by the industrial and manufacturing activities located at the
site since the late 1800s.
This additional funding will enable further remediation work on the property that will
allow Hamilton Health Center to construct its expansion.
“Environmental remediation of contaminated sites is crucial for neighborhood renewal
and stimulating private investment in our communities,” said Bryan Davis, executive director for
the Harrisburg Redevelopment Authority. “We deeply appreciate Gov. Wolf’s announcement of
this award, and our long history of partnerships with the Pennsylvania Departments of
Community and Economic Development and Department of Environmental Protection.”
“This project is great step in further developing the Allison Hill neighborhood,” said
Dennis Davin, secretary of the Department of Community and Economic Development which
administers the ISRP program. “When we take steps to turn vacant lots into useful properties like
medical centers, we’re strengthening the community and promoting further investment.”
The ISRP provides loans and grants for environmental assessments and remediation
carried out by eligible applicants who did not cause or contribute to the contamination. The
program is designed to foster the cleanup of environmental contamination at industrial sites,
thereby bringing blighted land into productive reuse.
“Bringing vacant properties back into use, especially for an important community need
like a health center, is an excellent example of the confluence of environmental protection and
economic development,” said Department of Environmental Protection Secretary Patrick
McDonnell. “Healthy environments and healthy communities go hand in hand, and I am glad the
DEP was able to be a part of this project.”
For more information about the funding program, visit the DCED ​Industrial Sites Reuse
Program​ webpage.
[Posted: July 19, 2018]

Register Now! PA Hazmat Training & Education Conference Aug. 23-26 In Seven Springs

The ​PA Association of Hazardous Materials


Technicians​ will hold its 2018 PA Hazmat
Training Education Conference August 23-26

44
at the ​Seven Springs Resort​ in Somerset County.
The Conference will again feature hands on training, response case studies, equipment
demonstrations, professional qualification certification, naturally recognized hazmat response
leaders, update and certificate course and peer networking opportunities.
Click Here​ to register and for more information on the Conference. Questions should be
directed to 814-229-8063 or send email to: ​conference@pahazmat.com​. ​Click Here​ for
membership information.
Related Stories:
Reminder: Keep PA Beautiful Accepting Applications For Fresh Paint Days Grants Until July 31
Visitors To 3 Centre County Festivals Recycled 5,000+ Pounds Of Material
DEP Holds July 23 Hearing On Proposed Camp Hope Run Landfill Permit, Clearfield County
[Posted: July 16, 2018]

DEP Invites Comments On Proposed Water Quality Certification For Dominion Pipeline
In Greene, Armstrong Counties

The Department of Environmental Protection published notice in the July 21 PA Bulletin


inviting comments on the proposed Water Quality Certification for a natural gas pipeline in
Greene and Armstrong Counties.
The proposed 24-inch Sweden Valley Pipeline Project would run for 3.2 miles in
Franklin, Jefferson and Morgan townships in Greene County and South Bend Township in
Armstrong County.
​ A Bulletin page 4352)​ .
Read the PA Bulletin notice for all the available details ​(P
NewsClips:
Hurdle: New Mariner East 2 Spill In Western PA
Hurdle: Exposed Pipeline In Chester County NOT Mariner East 1
Hurdle: Independent Study Examining Public Safety Risks Of Mariner East Pipelines
Desperate For Answers, Groups Bankroll 2-County Study Of Mariner East 2 Pipeline
Reuters: Mariner East 2 Pipeline Construction Racks Up 65th Violation From DEP
Mama Bears’ Arrests Signal New Frustration Of Mariner East 2 Pipeline Protesters
Lancaster County Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Protester Cited 3 Times
Williams: Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Going Online In August
Maykuth: Laurel Pipeline Bidirectional Plan Advances At Expense Of Philly Producers
Export, PA Pipe Producer Benefiting From Trump Trade Policies
FERC Approves Gas Pipelines As Powelson Eyes Exit
Powelson Says No Idle Threat To Step Down Early From FERC
LaFleur: FERC Unlikely To Act On Pipeline Review Before Powelson Exit
FERC Pipeline Climate Policy Faces New Challenge In Federal Court
Related Stories:
PUC, DEP: There Needs To Be A Serious Conversation On Legislation Controlling Pipeline
Siting
Nature Conservancy, Pipeline Companies Collaborate On Recommendations To Reduce
Environmental Impacts Of Construction On Slopes
Take Action:
How Good Is The Water Quality In Streams In Your Community? Take A Look, Then Act

45
[Posted: July 20, 2018]

Keystone Energy Efficiency Alliance: Winners Of 2018 Schools, School District Energy
Efficiency Awards

The ​Keystone Energy Efficiency Alliance​ Education Fund Monday


announced the winners of this year’s ​Moving to the Head of the Class
Awards​! To date, the winning schools and districts in this statewide
program have saved over 10,000,000 kWh and $1,300,000 on their energy
bills!
The winners are--
-- First Place:​ Honesdale High School, ​Wayne Highlands School District​,
Wayne County;
-- Second Place:​ Steckel Elementary, ​Whitehall-Coplay School District​,
Lehigh County;
-- Best School District:​ ​Corry Area School District​, Erie County; and
-- 2018 Energy Challenge Winner:​ ​Reading School District​, Berks County.
These four schools displayed a commitment to energy efficiency, exceptional savings,
creative low-cost programs or an exceptional need to remove barriers to energy savings.
As winners of KEEF’s annual award, they will receive a no-cost district–wide portfolio
assessment from ​Warren Energy Engineering​.
This “before the energy audit” assessment includes a current state report, identifies
behavioral and operational best practices, and assists district decision-makers with specific next
steps.
Each awardee will receive prizes that help facilitate these upgrades to save their districts
energy and money, which can help each district stretch their annual operations budgets.
Once the benchmarking has been completed, these schools have the opportunity host VIP
tours to showcase the commitment their students, teachers, and administration have made to
energy efficiency.
Invited guests will include legislators, representatives of electric utilities, and businesses
involved in helping the schools complete program work, as well as local press.
Click Here​ for a video description of the ​Moving To The Head Of The Class Award
Program​. Questions should be directed to Kristin Seal, KEEA, by sending email to:
kseale@keealliance.org​ or call 215-910-4786.
Apply For Energy Assessment Soon
KEEA Education Fund will also extend this opportunity to save and learn beyond these
four schools.
This year, every K-12 school district in Pennsylvania is welcome to apply for a no-cost
portfolio assessment provided by Warren Energy Engineering.
For selected districts, collaborative and guided engagements will be conducted with
decision-makers to identify appropriate options for assistance in becoming more energy efficient.
Schools statewide will receive details about the application process this week.
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the ​Keystone
Energy Efficiency Alliance​ website.
NewsClip:

46
Esack: What You Need To Know As PA Politics Heat Up Over Energy Sector Subsidies
Related Stories:
Gov. Wolf: CFA Awards $3.4 Million In Funding For 5 Alternative, Clean Energy Projects;
New Applications Due Sept. 15
CFA Awards $2 Million Clean Energy Program Grant To Elementary School In Bucks County;
New Applications Due Sept. 15
PennLive.com Op-Ed: Community Solar Is Long Overdue In PA, Lawmakers In Harrisburg Can
Fix That
[Posted: July 16, 2018]

Gov. Wolf: CFA Awards $3.4 Million In Funding For 5 Natural Gas Pipeline, Alternative,
Clean Energy Projects

Gov. Tom Wolf Tuesday announced the ​Commonwealth Financing Authority​ approved $3.4
million in funding for 5 alternative and clean energy projects under the ​Alternative and Clean
Energy Program​.
The approved projects include grants to support the renovation and construction of a
highly energy-efficient school building and the installation of pipelines that will bring
Pennsylvania’s abundant natural gas energy resources to more than 190 residential and
commercial customers, boosting economic development in the areas where the projects are
located.
Also, two low-interest loans were approved to small family farms that will enable the
farmers to acquire land.
The deadline for the next round of applications in this program is September 15.
“To spur economic development in Pennsylvania, it is vital for us to support our small
family farmers, develop of our natural gas energy infrastructure, and help promote the
construction and renovation of high-efficiency buildings that lower energy costs and help our
environment,” Gov. Wolf said. “These five projects approved today support those goals and will
help make Pennsylvania a better place to live and work.”
The approved projects include:
-- Bedford County, Bedford County Development Association​ was approved for a $100,000
grant through the Pipeline Investment Program (PIPE) to extend natural gas pipeline into the
Bedford County Business Park II in Bedford Township. The approximately 1,500-foot extension
will make the lots within the business park more attractive to prospective clients while also
providing gas service to YRC Freight. The total project cost is $200,000.
-- Bucks County, Council Rock School District​ was approved for a $2 million grant through
the Alternative and Clean Energy (ACE) program for renovation and more than 10,000 square
feet of additional construction on the Rolling Hills Elementary School located in Northampton
Township.
These improvements will lead to a U.S. Green Building Council Leadership in Energy
and Environmental Design Gold certification. The planned energy saving features include
geothermal heating and cooling, energy-efficient lighting, automated energy control systems,
low-flow water-saving fixtures, occupancy-based temperature and lighting, a 128.8 kW solar
photovoltaic array, and an improved thermal envelope.
The project is anticipated to reduce energy consumption by more than 1 million kBtu

47
annually, and the low-flow water fixtures will reduce water consumption by nearly 54,000
gallons annually. The total project cost is $22,468,100. ​Click Here​ for more.
-- Chester County: Neal B. King and Mary Lou King​ were approved for a $332,500, 15-year
loan at a 3.75 percent rate through the Chester County Economic Development Council for the
acquisition of a 41.5-acre parcel of farmland located in West Fallowfield Township. The Kings
currently lease the land to grow feed for their dairy herd. The funding, approved through the First
Industries program, will assist with the total project cost of $738,000.
-- Franklin County, The Borough of Chambersburg​ was approved for a $584,100 grant
through the PIPE program to expand multiple natural gas pipelines through the borough into
neighboring Greene Township to provide new natural gas services for existing and future
development including the site of the future Summit Health Care campus.
The new construction will also provide natural gas service to the current First Church of
God, the 190 homes within the Grand Point Crossing housing development, and a vacant
200-acre tract of developable land.
Additionally, the borough plans to provide gas service through smaller extensions from
the current natural gas pipeline to a hotel parcel and residential developments including Franklin
Square, Chancellor Drive, Beechwood Lane, and Menno Haven retirement campus. The total
project cost is $1,168,200.
-- Lancaster County, Elisa and Patrick Fleming​ were approved for a $400,000, 15-year loan
at a 2.5 percent rate through EDC Finance Corporation for the acquisition of a 60-acre crop and
beef farm located in Paradise Township. The farm is located within the Lancaster County Amish
Country tourism market and includes a bed and breakfast that offers educational tours to the
public.
The fourth-generation family farm is being purchased from the parent of Elisa Fleming.
In addition to the bed and breakfast, the farm raises 25-30 beef cattle sold in the farm’s retail
store and in bulk to restaurants. It also grows corn, hay, and soybeans that are sold locally. The
funding, approved through the First Industries program, will assist with the total project cost of
$947,598.
A full list of approved projects and guidelines for each CFA program can be found on the
DCED website. For more information about DCED, visit dced.pa.gov.
New Applications Deadline
The Commonwealth Financing Authority is accepting on a rolling basis for several of
energy-related funding programs​. The last deadline for applications for these programs in 2018
is September 15--
-- ​CFA Alternative & Clean Energy Funding
-- ​CFA Renewable Energy-Geothermal & Wind Funding
-- ​CFA Solar Energy Funding
-- ​CFA High Performance Building Funding
NewsClips:
Chambersburg Awarded CFA Grant To Fund Natural Gas Service Extension
Esack: What You Need To Know As PA Politics Heat Up Over Energy Sector Subsidies
Related Stories:
Keystone Energy Efficiency Alliance: Winners Of 2018 Schools, School District Energy
Efficiency Awards
CFA Awards $2 Million Clean Energy Program Grant To Elementary School In Bucks County;

48
New Applications Due Sept. 15
PennLive.com Op-Ed: Community Solar Is Long Overdue In PA, Lawmakers In Harrisburg Can
Fix That
[Posted: July 17, 2018]

CFA Awards $2 Million Clean Energy Program Grant To Elementary School In Bucks
County; New Applications Due Sept. 15

The ​Commonwealth Financing Authority​ Tuesday awarded Council Rock School District a $2
million state grant through the ​Alternative and Clean Energy Program​ for comprehensive energy
efficiency upgrades to ​Rolling Hills Elementary School​ in Northampton Township, Bucks
County, according to Sen. Tommy Tomlinson (R-Bucks).
Sen. Tomlinson said the district will use the grant to help renovate 54,110 square feet as
well as construct 10,524 square feet of additions to Rolling Hills Elementary School.
Planned energy savings features include geothermal heating and cooling, energy-efficient
lighting, automated energy control systems, low-flow water-saving fixtures, occupancy- based
temperature and lighting, solar panels and an improved thermal envelope.
The project is expected to reduce energy consumption by an estimated 1,118,324 kBTU
annually. Low-flow water fixtures will reduce water consumption by more than 53,676 gallons
annually, a savings of 20 percent.
The total project cost is $22,468,100.
“We are thrilled that the residents of Council Rock will benefit from this $2 million grant
toward making energy conservation part of the anticipated renovations of Rolling Hills
Elementary. This brings a total of $6 million that State Senator Tommy Tomlinson has brought
to Council Rock. He also helped to obtain $2 million grants for Holland Middle and Newtown
Middle School, both of which are targeting opening in the fall for the 2018-2019 school year. I
would like to thank Senator Tomlinson for his continuous support of Council Rock. Without his
leadership and that of the entire school board, this would have never happened,” said Jerold
Grupp, President of Council Rock School Board.
“By implementing energy efficiency features, the school district will be able to save tax
dollars and provide a better, more environmentally friendly facility for students and teachers,”
Tomlinson said. “I’m pleased that a school in our district is benefitting from this funding.”
New Applications Deadline
The Commonwealth Financing Authority is accepting on a rolling basis for several of
energy-related funding programs​. The last deadline for applications for these programs in 2018
is September 15--
-- ​CFA Alternative & Clean Energy Funding
-- ​CFA Renewable Energy-Geothermal & Wind Funding
-- ​CFA Solar Energy Funding
-- ​CFA High Performance Building Funding
Related Stories:
Keystone Energy Efficiency Alliance: Winners Of 2018 Schools, School District Energy
Efficiency Awards
Gov. Wolf: CFA Awards $3.4 Million In Funding For 5 Alternative, Clean Energy Projects;
New Applications Due Sept. 15

49
PennLive.com Op-Ed: Community Solar Is Long Overdue In PA, Lawmakers In Harrisburg Can
Fix That
[Posted: July 17, 2018]

PA Chamber Fall Regional Environmental Conference Series Set For Oct. 3, 17, 30

The ​PA Chamber of Business and Industry​ will


hold its fall Environmental Conference Series in
three locations across the state to provide
businesses the latest information on environmental
regulations and compliance.
The Conferences will be held--
-- October 3: ​Harrisburg, ​Click Here​ to register.
-- October 17:​ Mars, Butler County, ​Click Here​ to
register.
-- October 30:​ King of Prussia, ​Click Here​ to register.
With a stronger economy, companies are seeing opportunities, looking to expand,
investing in their operations, and building and buying more.
But when it comes to environmental requirements, companies are finding new regulations
in air and storage tanks are taking effect and need to better understand environmental
compliance.
To help companies succeed, top environmental experts, leading consultants and DEP
officials will explain the most recent changes in the top environmental areas, help you
understand the requirements, and provide the advice and practical solutions to help you develop
and execute your company’s environmental plan more efficiently and effectively.
Conference presentations will address topics like--
-- Understanding the DEP Permitting Process and Permit Review
-- New Source Review Federal Update and Overview of DEP’s Air Quality Regulations to
Address Ozone Attainment
-- New Regulations for Underground and Aboveground Storage Tanks; Strategies to Manage
Your Residual Waste
-- Environmental Recordkeeping and Enforcement
-- Environmental Update—an update on pending environmental policy issues and changes that
may occur in 2019 for all locations.
Top ranking DEP officials will also update participants on the issues of most importance
to the business community from their point-of-view.
This program has been approved for PE, CLE, ABIH and CSP Continuing Education
Credits.
Exhibitor and sponsorship information is also available by contacting Ashley Mostek by
sending email to: ​amostek@pachamber.org​ or call 717-720-5557.
For more information on business education opportunities, visit the ​PA Chamber of
Business and Industry​ website.
[Posted: July 18 2018]

Call For Presentations: PA State Assn. Of Township Supervisors 2019 Conference On

50
April 14-17

The ​PA State Association of Township Supervisors​ has issued a ​request for proposals for
workshop presentations​ to be made at its 97th Annual Educational Conference and Exhibit
Show, which will be held April 14-17, 2019, at the Hershey Lodge in Hershey..
Workshops will be held April 15-16 and can be on a wide variety of topics, including all
aspects of township administration, land use and zoning, public safety and emergency
management, and public works.
Nearly 4,000 elected and appointed township officials, township employees, municipal
service providers and others attend PSATS’ Annual Educational Conference every year, which
also includes the largest municipal exhibit show in Pennsylvania.
Interested parties must submit proposals to PSATS by August 31, 2018, through the
following link: ​Conference Workshop RFP​. All applicants will be notified as to whether their
proposal has been accepted by November 30, 2018.
If you have any questions regarding PSATS’ Annual Educational Conference or the
conference workshop RFP process, please contact Scott Coburn at 717-763-0930, ext. 171 or
send email to: ​scoburn@psats.org​.
[Posted: July 17, 2018]

Dept. Of Agricultural Recognizes Urban Agriculture, Gov. Wolf Issues Proclamation

The week of July 16 to 20, Agriculture Secretary Russell


Redding visited farms at seven different sites in three
Pennsylvania cities, learning how their efforts are
improving their communities as part of ​Urban
Agriculture Week recognized by Gov. Wolf​.
“Gov. Tom Wolf and I share the belief that agriculture
has the power to change lives, and that power was made
clear during this week’s tour,” said Secretary Redding.
“During my visits, I met dozens of Pennsylvanians who
have come together through the power of a simple
garden, building a stronger sense of community and
proving that agriculture is truly zip code neutral.”
As part of the Department’s Planting the Seed Tour, Redding traveled to Philadelphia on
Monday, touring ​Bartram’s Garden​, ​Glenwood Green Acres Urban Farm​, and the ​Norris Square
Neighborhood Project​.
On Tuesday, he visited Pittsburgh’s ​Ballfield Farm​, the ​Homewood Historical Urban
Farm​, and ​Mount Oliver Community Garden​.
On Thursday, he stopped at community garden at ​Altoona’s Providence Presbyterian
Church​. The Planting the Seed Tour recognizes opportunities to engage and educate the next
generation of agriculturalists and those new to the agriculture industry, by bringing to light the
wealth of opportunities in Pennsylvania agriculture.
The Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture’s urban agriculture initiative seeks to raise
awareness of the presence of agriculture and food production in urban environments while
encouraging an increase in the output of products raised in urban environments.

51
Redding noted that urban agriculture provides multiple benefits beyond the primary goal
of growing food, including creating stronger communities, improving community nutrition,
raising real estate values, diminishing crime, reducing blight, opening economic development
opportunities, and improving stormwater runoff.
“The socialization that these gardens offer, the ability to harvest food that one has had a
hand in growing – these are the meaningful experiences that urban agriculture can provide,” said
Redding. “The feeling of being more connected to the land and to the community, in any setting,
is valuable beyond words.”
Click Here​ for a copy of Gov. Wolf’s PA Urban Agriculture Week proclamation.
Visit the Penn State Extension website and search “​Urban Farming​” for more
information, visit ​Grow Pittsburgh’s Urban Farming​ webpage and the ​PA Horticultural Society
Farm For The City​ webpage.
(​Photo:​ Secretary Redding - right.)
NewsClips:
State Helps Couple Buy Lancaster Farm In $948,000 Project
New Kensington YMCA Garden Program Grows Young Men Into Leaders
Related Story:
Allegheny Land Trust Helps Landowner Preserve Catch The Wind Farm
[Posted: July 20, 2018]

Allegheny Land Trust Helps Landowner Preserve Catch The Wind Farm

The ​Allegheny Land Trust​ recently partnered with


Susan Orenstein to protect her historic 12-acre
“Catch the Wind Farm” in Allegheny County.
The agreement will protect a woodlot, scenic
pasture, and shallow valley through a voluntary
conservation easement. The easement will allow
Orenstein or any future owners to continue to use
the land, and ALT will control its future
development.
Orenstein says, “I’m thrilled to give up my right to
profit financially by development in order to
preserve the far more important value of the land itself.”
Currently, ALT protects over 2,200 acres of green space. Although Allegheny County
has substantial green space for an urban area, it’s changing at a rapid pace.
As the population declined 25 percent between 1960-2014, developed land increased by
69 percent during that same period. This continuous growth has made a significant impact on
the County.
In 2000, the County was about 50 percent green space and 50 percent developed. By
2020, the amount of green space will have shrunk to below 40 percent. ALT wants to preserve
large parcels of land, such as Hays Woods and the Orenstein’s farm to ensure that a meaningful
portion of green space remains protected.
Despite the importance of green spaces, according to the National Land Trust Alliance’s
website, few Americans have heard of land trusts. ALT holds environmental education

52
programs and invites landowners like Orenstein to preserve their land.
For more information on programs, initiatives, how to preserve your land and upcoming
events, visit the ​Allegheny Land Trust​ website. ​Click Here​ for a list of events and programs.
Click Here​ to sign up for their newsletter. ​Click Here​ to support their work.
To find a land trust in your community, visit the ​PA Land Trust Association​ website.
To learn more about green innovation in the Pittsburgh Region, visit the ​Pittsburgh Green
Story​ website.
NewsClips:
State Helps Couple Buy Lancaster Farm In $948,000 Project
New Kensington YMCA Garden Program Grows Young Men Into Leaders
Related Story:
Dept. Of Agricultural Recognizes Urban Agriculture, Gov. Wolf Issues Proclamation

(Reprinted from the ​Pittsburgh Green Story​ website.)


[Posted: July 18, 2018]

DCNR Celebrates Importance Of Local Parks, Recreation To Communities In Bucks


County

As part of national Park and Recreation


Month, Department of Conservation and
Natural Resources Secretary Cindy Adams
Dunn Thursday visited three parks in Bucks
County to hear from local officials and
stakeholders about their importance and plans
for improvements.
“Communities across Pennsylvania recognize
that local parks and recreation opportunities
contribute to a high quality of life and attract
and sustain employers and families,” Dunn
said. “Local parks provide close-to-home
nature and recreation that is always free or affordable.”
Dunn’s first stop was the new Great Blue Heron Park at 3202 Dovecote Drive in
Richland Township, which is the trailhead for the ​Brayton Garden Trail​ that connects to the
Pennsylvania Highlands Trail Network​ and Quakertown to the north, with future plans to
connect to a trail in Milford Township to the west.
The secretary also met with young people and others involved in the creation of a skate
park at 676 S. Main St., Quakertown, included in the transformation of the area into an action
sports recreation and training facility. DCNR provided a $250,000 investment in the project.
Finally, she stopped at Park at 4th at the intersection of Mill and 4th streets in
Quakertown, where a $250,000 DCNR grant assisted with the construction of an amphitheater
that is home to the community’s concert series.
“Just at these three parks in upper Bucks County we can see the breadth of amenities that
local parks and recreation provide to communities – trail connections to other places and
networks; opportunities for young people to be active and engaged in positive behavior; and

53
gathering spots for cultural and other activities,” Dunn said.
The source of funding for the DCNR grants in the ​Keystone Fund​, currently celebrating
25 years of supporting thousands of community improvements in the Commonwealth.
In Pennsylvania, outdoor recreation generates $29.1 billion in consumer spending, $1.9
billion in state and local tax revenue, $8.6 billion in wages and salaries, and sustains 251,000
direct Pennsylvania jobs.
Click Here​ to watch a short video of Secretary Dunn’s visits (Facebook).
Pennsylvania has more than 6,000 local parks. Find out more about them by visiting the
PA Recreation & Parks Society’s​ ​Good For You, Good For All ​website.
Visit the ​Explore PA Trails​ website for more information on local hike and biking trails.
For more information on state parks and forests and recreation in Pennsylvania, visit
DCNR’s website​, ​Click Here​ to sign up for the Resource newsletter, Visit the ​Good Natured
DCNR Blog,​ ​Click Here​ for upcoming events, ​Click Here​ to hook up with DCNR on other
social media-- Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr.
(​Photo: ​Skate park at Quakertown.)
NewsClips:
Sen. Yudichak Fulfills Hike Promise
Sen. Yudichak Confident D&L Trail To Wilkes-Barre Will Be A Reality
Editorial: A Few Weeds Don’t Mar Beauty Of River Common In Luzerne
Upper Bucks County Park Tour Highlights Recreation Partnerships
Bids Sought To Put Walking Trail Around Freeport’s Park
Levee Trail Report Project To Cost Less Than Expected In Luzerne
Erie County Trail Network Highlighted
Residents Work To Save Tresckow Playground In Carbon County
Bikeshare Has Equity Problem, Philadelphia Is Tackling It
Op-Ed: With Philly Soda Tax Fight Won, Time To Right By Libraries, Rec Centers
Keystone Edge: 7 Unique Spots For Your Pennsylvania Staycation
Editorial: Open-Water Swimming Should Be Safe As Well As Enjoyable
Bed Of Ringing Rocks In Bucks County Make Music With The Help Of A Hammer
Boyce Park’s Indian Meadow Wows With Flowers, Color
Millcreek Woman Enjoys Biking More After Losing 170 Pounds
Op-Ed: Mountain Bikers vs. Hikers In Proposed Tracy Ridge Wilderness Area
Desperate Schuylkill Rowers Turn To Universities For Money To Dredge River
Water Pump Expected To Help Keep Water In Southern Delaware Canal
Coast Guard Warns Of Debris Hazards On Pittsburgh-Area Rivers
Family Of Kayaker Swept Over Dashields Dam Sues Corps Of Engineers
AP: Swimmer Beware: Pennsylvania Drownings Highlight River Risks
Allentown Parks & Rec Director Ousted As Mayor Shapes Team
Study: National Parks Get Fewer Visits When Air Pollution Rises
Related Stories:
CANCELED: July 27-29 Prowl The Sprout Hikes In Clinton County
Friends Of Allegheny Wilderness Holds Successful Tracy Ridge Wilderness Trail Stewardship
Weekend
Brodhead Watershed Assn. Ramble In Cherry Valley Aug. 5, Hiking, Snorkeling For Kids, DIY
Eco-Tour In Monroe County

54
Register Now! 2018 Wild & Scenic Clarion River Sojourn Aug. 18-19
Gifford Pinchot’s Grey Towers 14th Annual Festival Of Wood Aug. 4-5 In Pike County, Free
Giveaways
DCNR Wild Resource Conservation Program Accepting Grant Applications Thru Aug. 15
[Posted: July 20, 2018]

CANCELED: July 27-29 Prowl The Sprout Hikes In Clinton County

The Department of Conservation and Natural Resources


Tuesday announced the cancellation of the July 27-29 Prowl
The Sproul series of hikes in ​Sproul State Forest​ in Clinton
County due to the lack of advanced registrations. ​(​Click Here
for the Tweet link.)
For hiking and biking opportunities around the state, visit the
Explore PA Trails​ website.
For more information on state parks and forests and
recreation in Pennsylvania, visit​ ​DCNR’s website​,​ ​Click Here
to sign up for the Resource newsletter, Visit the​ ​Good
Natured​ DCNR Blog,​ ​Click Here​ for upcoming events,​ ​Click
Here​ to hook up with DCNR on other social media--
Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr.
NewsClips:
Sen. Yudichak Fulfills Hike Promise
Sen. Yudichak Confident D&L Trail To Wilkes-Barre Will Be A Reality
Editorial: A Few Weeds Don’t Mar Beauty Of River Common In Luzerne
Upper Bucks County Park Tour Highlights Recreation Partnerships
Bids Sought To Put Walking Trail Around Freeport’s Park
Levee Trail Report Project To Cost Less Than Expected In Luzerne
Erie County Trail Network Highlighted
Related Stories:
DCNR Celebrates Importance Of Local Parks, Recreation To Communities In Bucks County
Friends Of Allegheny Wilderness Holds Successful Tracy Ridge Wilderness Trail Stewardship
Weekend
Brodhead Watershed Assn. Ramble In Cherry Valley Aug. 5, Hiking, Snorkeling For Kids, DIY
Eco-Tour In Monroe County
Register Now! 2018 Wild & Scenic Clarion River Sojourn Aug. 18-19
Gifford Pinchot’s Grey Towers 14th Annual Festival Of Wood Aug. 4-5 In Pike County, Free
Giveaways
DCNR Wild Resource Conservation Program Accepting Grant Applications Thru Aug. 15
[Posted: July 17, 2018]

Friends Of Allegheny Wilderness Holds Successful Tracy Ridge Wilderness Trail


Stewardship Weekend

Over the weekend of July 13-15, ​Friends of

55
Allegheny Wilderness​ teamed up with the Harrisburg-based ​Keystone Trails Association​ and
others in a trail stewardship blitz.
Volunteers cleared virtually the entire hiking-only trail system in the 9,700-acre proposed
Tracy Ridge Wilderness Area in the ​Allegheny National Forest​, which includes more than nine
miles of the ubiquitously-cherished ​North Country National Scenic Trail​.
This was a focused event that KTA formally terms a “Trail Care Weekend,” and this was
the first ever KTA Trail Care Weekend in the Allegheny National Forest.
The 2006 Allegheny National Forest Draft Land and Resource Management Plan Tracy
Ridge this way-- “There are few places on the Forest that offer as high quality scenery, natural
integrity and wide-scale ecosystem function as Tracy Ridge. The presence of a significant old
tree component enhances the scenic quality of the area for potential wilderness. Tracy Ridge has
high potential to provide the wilderness attributes and values appropriate for wilderness
designation.”
Members of KTA, FAW, the ​Butler Outdoor Club​, the ​Pennsylvania North Country Trail
Association​, and the ​Allegheny National Forest Chapter of the North Country Trail Association
supported the project.
The above photo was taken first thing Friday morning and represents just a small sample
of the trail stewards who helped out over the course of the weekend. Others joined later in the
day on Friday, and still others joined on Saturday.
For more information on programs, initiatives and other upcoming events, visit the
Friends of Allegheny Wilderness​ website, send email to: ​info@pawild.org​, or call 814-730-3629.
Click Here​ to support their work.
NewsClips:
Sen. Yudichak Fulfills Hike Promise
Sen. Yudichak Confident D&L Trail To Wilkes-Barre Will Be A Reality
Editorial: A Few Weeds Don’t Mar Beauty Of River Common In Luzerne
Upper Bucks County Park Tour Highlights Recreation Partnerships
Bids Sought To Put Walking Trail Around Freeport’s Park
Levee Trail Report Project To Cost Less Than Expected In Luzerne
Erie County Trail Network Highlighted
Related Stories:
DCNR Celebrates Importance Of Local Parks, Recreation To Communities In Bucks County
CANCELED: July 27-29 Prowl The Sprout Hikes In Clinton County
Brodhead Watershed Assn. Ramble In Cherry Valley Aug. 5, Hiking, Snorkeling For Kids, DIY
Eco-Tour In Monroe County
Register Now! 2018 Wild & Scenic Clarion River Sojourn Aug. 18-19
Gifford Pinchot’s Grey Towers 14th Annual Festival Of Wood Aug. 4-5 In Pike County, Free
Giveaways
DCNR Wild Resource Conservation Program Accepting Grant Applications Thru Aug. 15
[Posted: July 16, 2018]

Brodhead Watershed Assn. Ramble In Cherry Valley Aug. 5, Hiking, Snorkeling For Kids,
DIY Eco-Tour In Monroe County

The ​Brodhead Watershed Association​ will hold

56
its ​annual Ramble​ at the ​Cherry Valley National Wildlife Refuge​, 2138 Croasdale Road,
Stroudsburg, Monroe County on August 5. Participants will have their choice of fun events!
Cherry Valley Hike ​- ​Get Outdoors Poconos
Carol Hillestad will lead a 2-mile moderate hike in the Cherry Valley National Wildlife
Refuge starting at Noon.
A year ago, a former golf course in Stroud Township, Pa., became the Cherry Valley
National Wildlife Refuge. Since then, its fairways and greens have returned to nature, no longer
hyper-fertilized, mowed or manicured.
On a hot, still July afternoon, the true beauty of this place unfolds like a new butterfly.
The rolling hills are now paradise for pollinators. Queen Anne’s lace, yellow tickseed, daisies
and black-eyed Susans, milkweed, Joe Pye weed and 6-foot candelabra of mullein fill the open
areas.
Cherry Creek, with some assistance from Trout Unlimited, looks healthier. No longer
mowed right up to the edge of the banks, the water is shadier and dappled with sunlight. Its
musical bubbling is delicious to hear. Two bridges across the creek have already been rebuilt.
Along the cart paths, interpretive signs suggest plants or animals to look for, describe
how a power line cut can be beneficial in a natural landscape, and explain why good water
quality is important, and other items of interest.
The ​Get Outdoors Poconos​ hike series is administered by Brodhead Watershed
Association and supported by a grant from the ​William Penn Foundation​.
The hike is free but registration is required. Direction will be provided upon registration.
Call Call 570-839-1120 or 570-629-2727 or send email to: ​info@brodheadwatershed.org​.
Drive-Yourself EcoTour
A drive-yourself eco-tour, starting and ending at Cherry Valley National Wildlife Refuge,
will focus on the agricultural legacy of Cherry Valley which has resulted in a strong land- and
water-conservation ethic.
Starting at 1 p.m., Ramble participants will tour natural highlights along a mapped
driving route, each spot staffed by some of the area’s finest naturalists eager to share their
knowledge and love of the watershed.
Stops will feature the Josie Porter Farm, Eagles Rest Cellars and its vineyard, and ​Pocono
Wildlife Rehabilitation Center​.
At the national wildlife refuge, Ramblers will see the creek improvement projects made
by ​Trout Unlimited’s Brodhead Chapter​, and how stream monitoring by ​East Stroudsburg
University​ students provides real-time data on water quality.
This event is sponsored by Brodhead Watershed Association and the ​Friends of Cherry
Valley​.
Snorkeling For Kids - Water Wiser Kids
Starting at 12:30, Brittney Coleman, an environmental educator with the ​Kettle Creek
Environmental Education Center,​ will introduce elementary-age children to do creek snorkeling.
“Creek snorkeling is like roaming around inside a natural aquarium,” says Coleman.
“You see tiny underwater forests and landscapes up close. Fish, plants, aquatic insects — it’s
truly another world.”
“People care about things they know and understand,” says Bob Heil, BWA’s executive
director. “While learning about the natural world we share, children learn to love it, too.”
Snorkeling gear is provided. The program is aimed at elementary-age children, but

57
siblings, parents, and grandparents are welcome to take part.
This event is part of the ​Water Wiser Kids Series​ sponsored by Brodhead Watershed
Association, funded by a ​Dr. Claus Jordan Endowment​ Grant from ​Lehigh Valley Health
Network Pocono Foundation​.
Ramble
Enjoy food and conversation at the after-Ramble party, 4 to 5 p.m. at the Refuge. Please
bring your own refillable water bottle! In keeping with BWA’s environmental standards, no
bottled water will be available. Filling stations will be available at each Ramble stop.
Suggested donation for the Ramble is $10 for Friends of Cherry Valley and Brodhead
Watershed Association members, $15 for non-members, with a $2 discount for pre-registration
by August 1. Children under 12 attend for free. The after-party is included in the cost. Tickets
sales benefit FOCV and BWA.
This year’s Ramble is sponsored by the generosity of ​Cherry Creek Hideaway​,
Stroudsmoor Country Inn​, ​Bolock Funeral Home & Crematory​ and ​Mountain Creek Stable​.
To register, visit the ​Brodhead Watershed Association Ramble​ webpage. For information,
call 570-839-1120 or send email to: ​info@brodheadwatershed.org​.
(​Photo:​ Cherry Creek flows through the Refuge. Nancy J. Hopping.)
NewsClips:
Sen. Yudichak Fulfills Hike Promise
Sen. Yudichak Confident D&L Trail To Wilkes-Barre Will Be A Reality
Editorial: A Few Weeds Don’t Mar Beauty Of River Common In Luzerne
Upper Bucks County Park Tour Highlights Recreation Partnerships
Bids Sought To Put Walking Trail Around Freeport’s Park
Levee Trail Report Project To Cost Less Than Expected In Luzerne
Erie County Trail Network Highlighted
Related Stories:
DCNR Celebrates Importance Of Local Parks, Recreation To Communities In Bucks County
CANCELED: July 27-29 Prowl The Sprout Hikes In Clinton County
Friends Of Allegheny Wilderness Holds Successful Tracy Ridge Wilderness Trail Stewardship
Weekend
Register Now! 2018 Wild & Scenic Clarion River Sojourn Aug. 18-19
Gifford Pinchot’s Grey Towers 14th Annual Festival Of Wood Aug. 4-5 In Pike County, Free
Giveaways
DCNR Wild Resource Conservation Program Accepting Grant Applications Thru Aug. 15
[Posted: July 19, 2018]

Register Now! 2018 Wild & Scenic Clarion River Sojourn Aug. 18-19

The ​Western PA Conservancy​ is now accepting


registrations for the ​2018 Wild & Scenic Clarion
River Sojourn​ August 18-19 starting at Hallton in
Elk County and ending in Cooksburg in Clarion
County.
Join participants in celebrating the 50th Anniversary
of the ​federal Wild and Scenic Rivers Act​ protecting

58
America’s greatest river treasures.
The Western PA Conservancy and Department of Conservation and Natural Resources
are hosting a two-day canoe trip along 24 gorgeous miles of the Clarion River in the
Pennsylvania Wilds region​ of northern Pennsylvania.
The Clarion River slowly meanders through scenic narrow valleys, past large pools and
hardwood forests providing a relaxing scenic trip, welcoming to all levels of boaters. On October
19, 1996, Congress designated the Clarion River as a component of the National Wild and
Scenic Rivers System.
Several factors contribute to the special scenic value of the river. The unique land form
(unique in the region of the Allegheny River basin) of the Clarion River valley contributes a
feeling of intimacy to the river.
The sinuous, relatively narrow river valley with steep sides and little floodplain provides
little opportunity for long, focused views. The steeply forested hillsides of almost continuous
mature deciduous and coniferous vegetation contribute to a feeling of remoteness in many places
along the river.
Two segments of the river, measuring 8 miles and 9.1 miles in length, are classified as
scenic.
Other sponsors of the Sojourn also include the ​River Network​ and ​Patagonia​.
Click Here​ to register and for a scheduled of events.
For information on other sojourns, visit the ​PA Organization for Watersheds and Rivers
Sojourns​ webpage.
Click Here​ to see all 6 federal Wild & Scenic Rivers in Pennsylvania. ​Click Here​ to see
the 13 streams and rivers designated a state Wild & Scenic River.
More information is available on programs, initiatives and special events at the ​Western
PA Conservancy​ ​website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates from the Conservancy, ​Like
them on Facebook​, ​Follow them on Twitter​, add them to your ​Circle on Google+​, join them on
Instagram​, visit the ​Conservancy’s YouTube Channel​ or add them to your ​network on Linkedin​.
Click Here​ to support their work.
NewsClips:
Sen. Yudichak Fulfills Hike Promise
Sen. Yudichak Confident D&L Trail To Wilkes-Barre Will Be A Reality
Editorial: A Few Weeds Don’t Mar Beauty Of River Common In Luzerne
Upper Bucks County Park Tour Highlights Recreation Partnerships
Bids Sought To Put Walking Trail Around Freeport’s Park
Levee Trail Report Project To Cost Less Than Expected In Luzerne
Erie County Trail Network Highlighted
Related Stories:
DCNR Celebrates Importance Of Local Parks, Recreation To Communities In Bucks County
CANCELED: July 27-29 Prowl The Sprout Hikes In Clinton County
Friends Of Allegheny Wilderness Holds Successful Tracy Ridge Wilderness Trail Stewardship
Weekend
Brodhead Watershed Assn. Ramble In Cherry Valley Aug. 5, Hiking, Snorkeling For Kids, DIY
Eco-Tour In Monroe County
Gifford Pinchot’s Grey Towers 14th Annual Festival Of Wood Aug. 4-5 In Pike County, Free
Giveaways

59
DCNR Wild Resource Conservation Program Accepting Grant Applications Thru Aug. 15
[Posted: July 19, 2018]

Bay Journal: Environmental Group Warns PA To Protect Forests Or Get Sued

By Donna Morelli, ​Chesapeake Bay Journal

An environmental organization that put the teeth in


Pennsylvania’s Environmental Rights Amendment is
turning its sights on the state agency that manages 2.2
million acres of public forestland.
A lawyer for the Pennsylvania Environmental Defense
Foundation ​sent an “intent to sue” letter​ to the
Department of Conservation and Natural Resources in
early June. The letter states that the foundation will take
court action if the agency continues with its process of
updating local plans under the current 2016 statewide
forest management plan.
John Childe, the attorney representing the activist
organization, said in the letter that the 2016 plan first
must be revised because it fails to uphold the state’s Environmental Rights Amendment in its
handling of natural gas extraction in state forests.
The Environmental Rights Amendment, added to the state constitution in 1971, asserts
the public’s right to “clean air, pure water and the preservation of the natural, scenic, historic and
esthetic values of the environment.” The amendment also says that the state’s natural resources
are the common property of all of the people, including generations yet to come, and that the
state must conserve and maintain them.
“Nothing in the 2016 plan does anything to identify and quantify the impact of drilling on
the 617,000 acres opened up to natural gas leases,” Childe said. “The biggest problem that state
forests have is being ignored.”
The state forest management plan is the road map for managing all aspects of the massive
forest system.
Updated periodically, the plan forms the basis for ​20 local forest district plans​.
By revising the statewide plan now, Childe argues, the DCNR could guide the local plans in
ways that better conform to the law.
“Then they would have a whole section on what their [Environmental Rights
Amendment] obligations are and how they intend to meet them,” Childe said. “They need to tell
how well they are doing across the entire forest system.”
Cindy Adams Dunn, DCNR secretary, said in a written statement that the agency and its
staff “fully embraces” its role as a trustee of the state’s natural resources and that the “DCNR
vehemently disagrees with [the foundation’s] position.”
The DCNR is conducting a series of meetings, scheduled through November, to gather
public input on updates to the district plans.
“[DCNR] encourages all to read the plan and take advantage of these public meetings as
an opportunity to help set management priorities and meet the men and women who serve as

60
trustees for the public forests,” Dunn said.
About 1.5 million acres of state forests are underlain with the Marcellus Shale formation
that harbors natural gas. Most of it is located in a Northcentral region called the Pennsylvania
Wilds, which includes some of the most pristine forestland in the state. To date, the DCNR has
issued three shale gas leases on a total of 138,866 acres.
The 2016 state forest management plan states that “the economic use and sound
extraction and utilization of geologic resources is part of the bureau’s mission.” The foundation
contests this.
“Nothing in the plain language” of the Environmental Rights Amendment, Childe wrote
in his letter, allows for the sale of public natural resources for economic use or benefit, the use of
proceeds from the sale of natural resources for DCNR operational expenses, or “balancing” the
economic gains of gas extraction with the long-term ecological health of state forests.
If a conflict exists between the agency’s mission and constitutional law, Childe argues,
the law must win.
Among other requests, the foundation is asking the DCNR to add to the forest
management plan an inventory of existing and anticipated degradation of natural resources
caused by gas drilling and explain how those impacts can be prevented and repaired.
A DCNR spokesperson said the agency will publish an update to its 2014 Shale-Gas
Monitoring Report in early summer and that it will include information similar to what the
foundation has requested.
The foundation has a history of challenging the state’s handling of gas extraction and
won a landmark 2017 decision from the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania, which found that, based
on the Environmental Rights Amendment, the use of state revenue from oil and gas extraction to
support anything but natural resource conservation is unconstitutional.
The decision also gave unprecedented strength to the amendment by invalidating a prior
requirement to consider the economic value of a contested project against the conservation value
of natural resources.
State Supreme Court Justice Christine Donohue wrote the majority opinion, in which she
stated, “The Commonwealth (including the Governor and General Assembly) may not approach
our public natural resources as a proprietor, and instead must at all times fulfill its role as a
trustee.”
But soon after the court issued its decision, the state legislature and Gov. Tom Wolf
approved a 2017–18 budget that uses revenue from gas leases to support general operations and
other expenditures. The foundation has challenged it in court.
NewsClips:
DCNR Dispatches 2 Fire Crews To Nevada To Help With Wildfires
Deadly Fire Shuts Down Key Route to Yosemite National Park
Growing Oregon Wildfire Crushes Hopes Of Wheat Farmers During Harvest
Related Stories:
DCNR Sets 8 More Public Meetings Seeking Public Input On State Forest District Plans
PA Environmental Defense Foundation urges DCNR To Manage Drilling In State Forests
Consistent With The Environmental Rights Amendment
Related Stories This Week:
Entries To American Chestnut Foundation 2018 Photo Contest Due Sept. 3
Gifford Pinchot's Grey Towers 14th Annual Festival Of Wood Aug. 4-5 In Pike County, Free

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Giveaways
Brian Kavalukas Joins PA Parks & Forests Foundation Board
[Posted: July 16, 2018]

Entries To American Chestnut Foundation 2018 Photo Contest Due Sept. 3

The ​American Chestnut Foundation​ is accepting entries for its


2018 Photo Contest​ until September 3.
The Foundation challenges everyone to find an American Chestnut
tree, take a photo of it and enter it in the contest.
The winning photo will be featured on an upcoming cover of
Chestnut magazine and the winning photographer will receive a
complimentary one-year membership.
To learn more about efforts to repopulate American Chestnut trees
in Pennsylvania, visit the ​PA Chapter of the American Chestnut
Foundation​ website. To become a member and receive regular
updates from the PA Chapter, ​Click Here​.
NewsClips:
DCNR Dispatches 2 Fire Crews To Nevada To Help With Wildfires
Deadly Fire Shuts Down Key Route to Yosemite National Park
Growing Oregon Wildfire Crushes Hopes Of Wheat Farmers During Harvest
Related Stories:
Bay Journal: Environmental Group Warns PA To Protect Forests Or Get Sued
Gifford Pinchot's Grey Towers 14th Annual Festival Of Wood Aug. 4-5 In Pike County, Free
Giveaways
Brian Kavalukas Joins PA Parks & Forests Foundation Board
[Posted: July 16, 2018]

Gifford Pinchot's Grey Towers 14th Annual Festival Of Wood Aug. 4-5 In Pike County,
Free Giveaways

Colorful forest posters, Smokey Bear and


Woodsy Owl items, and a variety of
educational literature and handouts will be
distributed for free at the ​14th Annual Festival
of Wood​ on August 4 - 5 at ​Grey Towers
National Historic Site​, Milford, Pike County.
The U.S. Forest Service and its partners offer
these free items to strengthen the sustainable
forestry and conservation message that is a
theme throughout the event.
Teachers who can use the items in the classroom are encouraged to contact the U.S.
Forest Service in advance of the event.
The family-friendly weekend offers a variety of activities and events that demonstrate the
many ways we use and enjoy wood in our everyday lives. Entry to the grounds, parking and a

62
shuttle are all free. Self-guided tours of the Grey Towers mansion are $5 per person.
Visitors of all ages are encouraged to download the free Agents of Discovery app to their
personal devices before they arrive so they can play the ​Grey Towers Agents of Discovery
missions and win free gifts.
Visitors also are encouraged to download the QR code reader in advance so they can
learn more about the trees at Grey Towers by scanning the QR codes on the Tree ID signs.
A variety of wood crafts will be demonstrated, exhibited and sold. Exhibits, films,
demonstrations, music and free children’s activities are planned. Chainsaw carvings, a free
wildlife show and professional Stilt Walkers are scheduled each day.
For more information and a ​downloadable Program Schedule​, visit the ​14th Annual
Festival of Wood​ webpage, call 570-296-9630 or send an email to ​greytowers@fs.fed.us​.
For more information on programs, initiatives and other upcoming events, visit the ​Grey
Towers Heritage Association​. ​Click Here​ to sign up for updates from the Association, ​Like them
on Facebook​, ​Follow them on Twitter​, visit their ​YouTube Channel​, become part of their
Google+ Circle​ and ​follow them on Instagram​.
Also visit the ​Grey Towers Historic Site​ website and the ​Pinchot Institute for
Conservation​ website for information on its conservation research and policy programs. ​Click
Here​ to sign up for the Institute’s regular updates.
(​Photos:​ Marty Parsons of ​Pennsylvania WoodMizer​ will be on hand to demonstrate how a log
becomes lumber on a portable saw mill; ​Woodsy Owl​ will be making regular appearances in the
children’s tent throughout the weekend, promoting his “reduce, re-use, recycle” message.)
NewsClips:
DCNR Dispatches 2 Fire Crews To Nevada To Help With Wildfires
Deadly Fire Shuts Down Key Route to Yosemite National Park
Growing Oregon Wildfire Crushes Hopes Of Wheat Farmers During Harvest
Related Stories:
Bay Journal: Environmental Group Warns PA To Protect Forests Or Get Sued
Entries To American Chestnut Foundation 2018 Photo Contest Due Sept. 3
Brian Kavalukas Joins PA Parks & Forests Foundation Board
DCNR Celebrates Importance Of Local Parks, Recreation To Communities In Bucks County
CANCELED: July 27-29 Prowl The Sprout Hikes In Clinton County
Friends Of Allegheny Wilderness Holds Successful Tracy Ridge Wilderness Trail Stewardship
Weekend
Brodhead Watershed Assn. Ramble In Cherry Valley Aug. 5, Hiking, Snorkeling For Kids, DIY
Eco-Tour In Monroe County
Register Now! 2018 Wild & Scenic Clarion River Sojourn Aug. 18-19
DCNR Wild Resource Conservation Program Accepting Grant Applications Thru Aug. 15
[Posted: July 20, 2018]

Fish & Boat Commission Issues Alert To Contain Invasive New Zealand Mudsnail In
Lehigh County

After confirming the presence of the


aquatic invasive species (AIS) known as
New Zealand Mudsnail​ (Potamopyrgus

63
antipodarium) in Little Lehigh Creek, Lehigh County, the Fish and Boat Commission Friday
reminded anglers and boaters that cleaning their gear is the easiest, most effective means of
preventing its spread to other waters.
PFBC biologists collected Mudsnail specimens this month in Little Lehigh Creek west of
Emmaus, PA near the ​Wildlands Conservancy​. New Zealand Mudsnail expert Dr. Edward Levri
of Penn State and PFBC Lead AIS Ecologist Bob Morgan confirmed the identity.
New Zealand Mudsnails are very small, measuring less than one-quarter inch, with a
relatively long, narrow, spiral shell that is generally brown to almost black in color. Like other
aquatic invasive species, they disrupt ecosystems by rapidly multiplying and competing with
native species for space and food.
"Based on studies conducted in western U.S. streams, if the population grows quickly,
they could become the dominant organisms in the benthic – or bottom dwelling – community,
upon which many other species depend for food," said Morgan, the PFBC's ecologist who
studies aquatic invasive species. "The first known occurrence of the New Zealand Mudsnail on
the Atlantic slope of the Eastern U.S. was discovered about five years ago in Spring Creek,
Centre County. Whether there is a connection with the infestation in Little Lehigh Creek is
unknown at this time, but hopefully future genetic studies will give the answer. The effects of the
snail in Atlantic slope streams on higher organisms, such as fish, are not certain at this time."
New Zealand Mudsnail has spread to Europe, Asia, Australia and North America. They
were discovered in the Snake River in Idaho and Wyoming in 1987; in Lake Ontario and the St.
Lawrence River in 1991; and in Lake Erie about 4 miles north of Presque Isle Bay in 2007.
Additional populations were found in a small stream near the Niagara River in New York
in 2008 and in another Lake Ontario tributary in 2011. New Zealand Mudsnails have recently
been found in the Gunpowder River in Maryland and in the Musconetcong River in New Jersey
(near Riegelsville, PA) which is a tributary of the Delaware River.
"Spring Creek and Little Lehigh Creek have at least one thing in common – they are both
heavily fished streams, with anglers travelling to them from all over," added Morgan. "Given the
presence of the Mudsnail in other areas of the country, it's not surprising they have been found
here. As with many aquatic invasive species, they are nearly impossible to eradicate once
established. This is even more difficult with the Mudsnail because it usually takes only one small
snail to be able to produce offspring. But we must do our best to slow its spread to other waters."
Clean Your Gear!
Anglers and boaters are urged to "​Clean Your Gear!​" before leaving a waterway and
entering another one.
New Zealand Mudsnails require some specialized disinfection measures. Gear should be
visually inspected and any clinging matter should be removed and disposed of in the trash.
To kill Mudsnails, three methods are effective. Gear can be frozen for a minimum of
eight hours, or it can be soaked in very hot water with detergent - maintained at 120°F to 140°F -
for ten minutes. This last method is not recommended for Gortex®.
Also, a 2005 study by the California Department of Fish and Game showed that
Mudsnails can be killed by soaking gear for five minutes in a one-to-one solution of a
commercial product, Formula 409® Cleaner Degreaser Disinfectant, and water.
After soaking gear for five minutes, thoroughly rinse it with plain water. Simply spraying
gear with the disinfectant or the mixture does not work.
Also, general cleaners such as regular off-the-shelf Formula 409 have not been shown to

64
be effective against Mudsnail.
If you suspect that you have found New Zealand Mudsnail (or any other AIS) in another
waterway, ​please report your information​.
When reporting an AIS sighting it is very important to include as much information as
possible including close-up photos of the organism, the exact location (GPS coordinates work
best), a description of what you found, and your contact information.
For more information about New Zealand Mudsnail, read the ​PA Sea Grant New Zealand
Mudsnail Fact Sheet​.
NewsClips:
Venesky: Fish & Boat Commission Defers Cuts, Holds Out Hope For License Fee Hike
Fish & Boat Commission Increases Permit Fees To Cover Costs, Hopeful Of Licence Fee Hike
Hayes: PA Anglers Asked To Pitch In To Raise Revenues
Kummer: NJ Finds PFAS In Lower Delaware River Watershed
Hurdle: NJ Issues First Fish Consumption Advisories On PFAS Chemicals
Crable: Dreaded Frankenfish Arrives In Lancaster County
Cellar-Dwelling Fish Are Mystery In South Philadelphia’s Navy Yard
Related Stories:
DCNR Wild Resource Conservation Program Accepting Grant Applications Thru Aug. 15
Wildlife For Everyone Foundation Receives National Award For Pennsylvania Wildlife
Magazine
Governor’s Advisory Council Seeks To Fill 2 Openings On Fish & Boat Commission Board
[Posted: July 20, 2018]

Brian Kavalukas Joins PA Parks & Forests Foundation Board

The ​PA Parks and Forests Foundation​ Wednesday announced


Brian Kavalukas has joined the PPFF Board of Directors.
Since graduating from University of Pittsburgh and Joseph M.
Katz Graduate School of Business, Mr. Kavalukas has
concentrated his work in finance management and business
planning for large corporations.
Currently Kavalukas is Director of Finance, Sales and
Commercial Business Partner with Direct Energy. Brian brings to
the PPFF Board of Directors significant financial planning and
budgeting experience.
Growing up in Western Pennsylvania, Brian spent much of his
time camping, hiking, hunting and fishing Pennsylvania’s mountains, valleys, and ridges. As an
Eagle Scout, Brian learned at a young age to appreciate, support, and care for our public lands.
Averaging roughly 125 hiked miles a year, Brian was first attracted to PPFF through the
Ridge Runners of Laurel Highlands Hiking Trail. Additionally Kavalukas is active with
Edgewood Borough’s Street Tree Planning Committee.
“We are excited to welcome Brian to the Board of Directors,” said Marci Mowery,
President of the Pennsylvania Parks and Forests Foundation. “Brian has been a supporter of the
work of the Foundation both as a donor and a volunteer. His enthusiasm for our park and forest
system and his knowledge of finances are assets that will advance the mission of the

65
Foundation.”
“It’s an honor to join the PPFF Board, said Brian. “I’m delighted to help advance the
critical supporting role the organization provides our state’s public lands.”
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the ​PA Parks &
Forests Foundation​ website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates from the Foundation,
Like them on Facebook​ or ​Follow them on Twitter​. ​Click Here​ to become a member of the
Foundation.
Related Stories:
Bay Journal: Environmental Group Warns PA To Protect Forests Or Get Sued
Entries To American Chestnut Foundation 2018 Photo Contest Due Sept. 3
Gifford Pinchot's Grey Towers 14th Annual Festival Of Wood Aug. 4-5 In Pike County, Free
Giveaways
[Posted: July 18, 2018]

Kathleen McGinty Named Head Of Environmental Defense Fund Oceans Program

The ​Environmental Defense Fund​ Monday named former DEP


Secretary Kathleen McGinty as Senior Vice President for EDF’s
Oceans Program​.
Amanda Leland, who headed the Oceans program for the past
six years, was promoted to Executive Vice President in charge of
overseeing EDF’s core programs, including Climate, Energy, Health,
Ecosystems and Oceans.
“Under Amanda’s leadership, the Oceans program has made
tremendous gains toward our goal of ending overfishing and restoring
our seas to abundance,” said EDF President Fred Krupp. “After
decades of declines, more than half of all U.S. federal fisheries that
had been in trouble have been rebuilt - with most of the rest on the way back. And progress is
spreading around the world including Indonesia, Mexico, Sweden, and Japan. But there is more
work in front of us.
“Overfishing is one of the most pressing and solvable environmental challenges of our
time and I’m delighted that Katie will be joining our team of experts to help tackle it,” Krupp
added. “She has the inclusive vision, world-class experience and global perspective to lead the
Oceans program toward a future where we have more food on the plate, more fish in the sea and
more prosperity for the world’s fishing communities.”
McGinty, who served as Deputy Assistant to the President and Chair of the Council on
Environmental Quality, has deep expertise coordinating environmental policy while working
with stakeholders on all sides to ensure the best possible outcome for the environment and the
economy.
For example, during her tenure at CEQ McGinty led efforts to restore salmon runs,
bringing together landowners, farmers, and tribes to find a solution.
“I’m thrilled to be leading EDF’s Oceans program at this critical time because I believe
the Oceans are a fulcrum for the health of our planet and our wellbeing,” McGinty said. “How
the oceans go, so goes our future. We have an amazing opportunity in front of us to achieve
environmental and economic outcomes that benefit future generations who will rely on this

66
fundamental resource, and I’m honored to be a part of that.”
As former head of the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, McGinty
was instrumental in developing balanced environmental policies that allowed the state to be a
leader in aligning environmental stewardship with business growth, including spearheading an
effort to make Pennsylvania a frontrunner in wind and solar manufacturing.
Her leadership resulted in 3,000 new jobs and $1 billion in new investments in the state.
In addition to her public service, McGinty also has significant international private sector
experience, having served as partner at Element Partners, a growth equity fund dedicated to
investments in sustainable technology and innovation in large industrial markets across the
globe.
McGinty has also lived in India and worked in China, overseeing efforts in brownfield
cleanup and sustainable community development.
“EDF’s mission to end overfishing ties in perfectly with Katie’s work throughout her
career to find solutions that benefit the greatest number of people,” said Leland. “With a passion
for working with all sides to find common-sense solutions to environmental and public health
challenges, Katie brings to the role a wealth of experience, depth of knowledge and strength of
relationships that are unparalleled.”
For more information on the program, visit EDF’s ​Oceans: Turn The Tide Of Overfishing
webpage.
[Posted: July 17, 2018]

Governor’s Advisory Council Seeks To Fill 2 Openings On Fish & Boat Commission Board

The ​Governor’s Advisory Council for Hunting, Fishing and


Conservation​ is seeking qualified candidates to fill upcoming
vacancies on the board of the ​Fish and Boat Commission​ from the
Seventh and Fifth Districts. The deadline to express interest is
August 31.
The Seventh District includes Carbon, Lackawanna, Luzerne
Monroe, Pike, Susquehanna, Wayne, and Wyoming counties.
The Fifth District includes Bradford, Columbia, Lycoming, Montour,
Northumberland, Snyder, Sullivan, Tioga, and Union counties.
“The governor is reaching out to the anglers and boaters of northeast
Pennsylvania to find a diverse group of qualified applicants, one of which will fill this vacancy,”
said Robb Miller, director of the advisory council. “We’re encouraging anyone interested in
volunteering on the board to send us a letter that describes their qualifications and experience,
along with a copy of their professional resume.”
Per the Fish and Boat Code, to qualify as a commissioner, the applicant must be a
resident of the district and be well informed about conservation, restoration, fishing, and boating.
The term of service is four years and members may serve three consecutive terms upon
being nominated by the governor and confirmed by a majority vote in the state Senate.
While commissioners are not compensated, they do receive travel reimbursement.
The Seventh District has been represented with distinction by Norman R. Gavlick, of
Luzerne County, since September 27, 2010. The Fifth District has been represented with
distinction by Eric C. Hussar, of Union County, since October 14, 2014.

67
Individuals interested in applying for this seat should send their materials to Robb Miller,
400 Market Street, 7th Floor, Harrisburg, PA 17101-2301. Individuals can also email the
information to Robb Miller at: ​robmille@pa.gov​.
NewsClips:
Venesky: Fish & Boat Commission Defers Cuts, Holds Out Hope For License Fee Hike
Fish & Boat Commission Increases Permit Fees To Cover Costs, Hopeful Of Licence Fee Hike
Hayes: PA Anglers Asked To Pitch In To Raise Revenues
Kummer: NJ Finds PFAS In Lower Delaware River Watershed
Hurdle: NJ Issues First Fish Consumption Advisories On PFAS Chemicals
Crable: Dreaded Frankenfish Arrives In Lancaster County
Cellar-Dwelling Fish Are Mystery In South Philadelphia’s Navy Yard
Related Stories:
DCNR Wild Resource Conservation Program Accepting Grant Applications Thru Aug. 15
Wildlife For Everyone Foundation Receives National Award For Pennsylvania Wildlife
Magazine
Fish & Boat Commission Issues Alert To Contain Invasive New Zealand Mudsnail In Lehigh
County
[Posted: July 20, 2018]

Environmental NewsClips - All Topics

Here are NewsClips from around the state on all environmental topics, including General
Environment, Budget, Marcellus Shale, Watershed Protection and much more.

The latest environmental NewsClips and news is available at the ​PA Environment Digest Daily
Blog​, ​Twitter Feed​ and ​add ​PaEnviroDigest Google+​ to your Circle.

AP-Scolforo: PA Supreme Court Throws Out Welfare Law Over How Bill Was Enacted
-- ​PA Supreme Court Opinion
Air
Legere: DEP’s Overdue Marcellus Shale Air Study Finds Few Health Risks
O’Neill: Pittsburgh’s Version Of Trump’s Wall Will Keep Out The Dirty Air
Allegheny County Defends Air Quality Efforts, Plans Stricter Coke (Coal) Plant Rules
Hopey: Air Advocates Read Scroll Of Smells At Allegheny County Health Board Meeting
Pittsburgh Is No Longer The Smoky City, But It Doesn’t Mean It Has Cleaned Up Its Act
Editorial: Dirty Air Requires Clean Policy
2 More Admit Roles In Tampering With Truck Emission Systems In PA
Delaware Protests EPA Decision On Good Neighbor Air Pollution
Op-Ed: Gov. Wolf Should Move Forward With Methane Regulations​, Rep. Vitali
Study: National Parks Get Fewer Visits When Air Pollution Rises
Alternative Fuels
Cities, States, Business Push For More Electric Vehicles
Amtran Happy With CNG Buses In Blair County
Awards & Recognition
Carmichaels PA Envirothon Champion Team Gets Warm Send-Off To National Competition
68
Biodiversity/Invasive Species
Boyce Park’s Indian Meadow Wows With Flowers, Color
Federal Endangered Species Act Stripped Of Key Provision In Trump Proposal
Budget
Venesky: Fish & Boat Commission Defers Cuts, Holds Out Hope For License Fee Hike
Fish & Boat Commission Increases Permit Fees To Cover Costs, Hopeful Of Licence Fee Hike
4 Of 5 Allentown Owners Who Appeal Stormwater Bill Got A Reduction
Natural Gas Drilling Impact Fee Unique To Pennsylvania
Chesapeake Bay
U.S House Again Votes To Restrict Federal Enforcement Of Chesapeake Bay Cleanup
Measure To Weaken EPA Enforcement Of Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Is Up For Vote, Again
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
Click Here​ to subscribe to the free Chesapeake Bay Journal
Click Here​ to support the Chesapeake Bay Journal
Follow Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Twitter
Like Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Facebook
Climate
Sisk: How Young Activists In PA Hope To Make Climate Change A Political Priority
Rising Seas, Storms Could Cause Problems For Internet Infrastructure
Wagner Asked By Teen About Climate Change: “You’re A Little Young And Naive”
Wagner Calls Climate Advocate ‘Young And Naive’ At Town Hall Meeting
Wagner Needs To Know Climate Science 18-Year-Old Says
Op-Ed: Gov. Wolf Should Move Forward With Methane Regulations​, Rep. Vitali
Songbird Nesting Habits May Indicate Severity Of Hurricane Season In Delaware
FERC Pipeline Climate Policy Faces New Challenge In Federal Court
Earliest New York Will Have Carbon Price Is Q2 In 2021, NYISO Says
Coal Mining
EPA Eases Rules On How Coal Ash Waste Is Stored​ [PA Does Not]
Frazier: Trump Admin. Rolls Back Coal Ash Rules Aimed At Groundwater Protection
Report: DOE Bailout For Coal, Nuclear Plants Could Cost $34 Billion
Study: Trump’s Coal Bailout Could Cost $17.2 Billion Per Year
Black Lung Rate Hits 25-Year High In Appalachian Coal Mining States
Compliance Action
2 More Admit Roles In Tampering With Truck Emission Systems In PA
Old Order Amish Widow Wins Some, Loses Some In Warren Court Fight Over Outhouse
Delaware River
Federal Judge Questions DRBC’s Ability To Fight Fracking
Court Reinstates Wayne County Lawsuit Over Fracking In Delaware Watershed
Annual Delaware River Cleanup In The Poconos Attracts 100+ Volunteers
Volunteers Clean Delaware River, Find Less Trash Every Year
100 Tires And Counting From Delaware River Cleanup
Kummer: NJ Finds PFAS In Lower Delaware River Watershed
Hurdle: NJ Issues First Fish Consumption Advisories On PFAS Chemicals
Delaware RiverKeeper July 20 RiverWatch Video Report
Dream Of Owning An Island In The Delaware River? One’s For Sale Near Easton

69
Drinking Water
Speakers Urge Public Ownership For Pittsburgh Water Authority At Hearing
East Stroudsburg U. Student Research Helps Ensure Clean Drinking Water
Editorial: Mandate Lead Testing For Schools
Middletown Water Compromised, Boil Water Advisory In Effect
Boil Water Advisory In Middletown Is Lifted
Boil Water Advisory Issued For PA American Water System In Mountain Top
McKelvey: After 7 Years, Butler County Residents Have No Water Due To Gas Drilling
Penn State Extension: Wilson College Students Learn How Land Use, Groundwater, Wells
Interconnect
Hurdle: NJ Issues First Fish Consumption Advisories On PFAS Chemicals
Kummer: NJ Finds PFAS In Lower Delaware River Watershed
Watchdog: After Flint, EPA Must Strengthen Oversight Of State Drinking Water Programs
Economic Development
Union: Shell Actively Pursuing Beaver Valley Nuclear Plant Workers For Ethane Plant
Education
Carmichaels PA Envirothon Champion Team Gets Warm Send-Off To National Competition
East Stroudsburg U. Student Research Helps Ensure Clean Drinking Water
Penn State Extension: Wilson College Students Learn How Land Use, Groundwater, Wells
Interconnect
Letter: McKinley Elementary Projects Restore Our Local Stream​ (Montgomery County)
New Kensington YMCA Garden Program Grows Young Men Into Leaders
Philadelphia Pianist To Romance The Butterfly At Insectarium
Bed Of Ringing Rocks In Bucks County Make Music With The Help Of A Hammer
Emergency Response
Protecting Against A Hazardous Chemical Spill In York County
Energy
Esack: What You Need To Know As PA Politics Heat Up Over Energy Sector Subsidies
Maykuth: PUC Cites Philly Nonprofit For Improper Use Of PECO Customer Funds
U.S. Appeals Court Tosses Out Philadelphia Gas Works Landlord Liens Lawsuit
Exelon Considering Battery Storage At its Nuclear Power Plants
Union: Shell Actively Pursuing Beaver Valley Nuclear Plant Workers For Ethane Plant
Natural Gas Power Plant In Westmoreland Will Stabilize Water Rates, Officials Say
Westmoreland County Tenaska’s Natural Gas-Fueled Power Plant Set To Open In December
Dominion Aims To Sell Bucks County, VA Natural Gas Power Plants
Study: Trump’s Coal Bailout Could Cost $17.2 Billion Per Year
FERC Approves Gas Pipelines As Powelson Eyes Exit
Powelson Says No Idle Threat To Step Down Early From FERC
Why FERC’s PJM Capacity Market Order Could Herald Carbon Pricing
PJM Will Respond To FERC Capacity Market Order Within 60 Days
Has FERC’s Landmark Transmission Planning Effort Made Transmission Building Harder?
Earliest New York Will Have Carbon Price Is Q2 In 2021, NYISO Says
Energy Conservation
Esack: What You Need To Know As PA Politics Heat Up Over Energy Sector Subsidies
Environmental Heritage

70
AP: Archaeologists Come To Eckley Mining Community To Study Our Past
Environmental Justice
Cusick: With Proposed Policy Change Nearly ⅓ Of Pennsylvanians Live In Environmental
Justice Areas
Farming
State Helps Couple Buy Lancaster Farm In $948,000 Project
New Kensington YMCA Garden Program Grows Young Men Into Leaders
Flooding
Bridgeville Flood Relief Center Open Through July 21
Solomon Creek Flood Wall Contractor Terminated, Project Delayed In WB
Wilkes-Barre Officials Bicker As Contract For Solomon Flood Wall Terminated
Williamsport Mayor Suggests Giving Levee Control To Water Authority
Lycoming Commissioner: Turning Levee Over To Authority Won’t Solve Core Problems
Grafius Run Survey Of Flood Damage To Begin Today In Lycoming
Levee Trail Report Project To Cost Less Than Expected In Luzerne
Terminated Flood Wall Contractor Faces Criticism Over Previous Project
Songbird Nesting Habits May Indicate Severity Of Hurricane Season In Delaware
Geologic Hazards
Feds To Reimburse State $9 Million For Route 30 Landslide Emergency Repairs
North Huntingdon Landslide Repairs Could Cost $500,000
Displaced Homeowners Seek Quicker Solution In Wake Of Landslide In Washington County
Bed Of Ringing Rocks In Bucks County Make Music With The Help Of A Hammer
Green Infrastructure
Letter: McKinley Elementary Projects Restore Our Local Stream​ (Montgomery County)
Latrobe Authority Says Stormwater Project Should Alleviate Sewage Woes
4 Of 5 Allentown Owners Who Appeal Stormwater Bill Got A Reduction
Land Conservation
Is Stoneleigh Preserved Land Safe From School District Eminent Domain?
Greening Vacant Lots Improves Mental Health In Philly Communities
Bagenstose: Summer Fellows Seeking Support For Bristol Marsh In Bucks County
Allegheny Land Trust Gains 12-Acres, Preserves Vital Green Space
Op-Ed: Mountain Bikers vs. Hikers In Proposed Tracy Ridge Wilderness Area
Littering/Illegal Dumping
White: Yes, Smokers, Cigarette Butts Are Litter
Annual Delaware River Cleanup In The Poconos Attracts 100+ Volunteers
Volunteers Clean Delaware River, Find Less Trash Every Year
100 Tires And Counting From Delaware River Cleanup
Mine Reclamation
Back Mountain Residents’ Input Sought For Upper Toby Creek Conservation Plan
Oil & Gas
Legere: DEP’s Overdue Marcellus Shale Air Study Finds Few Health Risks
Hopey: DEP Environmental Justice Panel To Examine Drilling Impacts On Poor Communities
Court Reinstates Wayne County Lawsuit Over Fracking In Delaware Watershed
Federal Judge Questions DRBC’s Ability To Fight Fracking
McKelvey: After 7 Years, Butler County Residents Have No Water Due To Gas Drilling

71
Natural Gas Drilling Impact Fee Unique To Pennsylvania
Natural Gas Power Plant In Westmoreland Will Stabilize Water Rates, Officials Say
Westmoreland County Tenaska’s Natural Gas-Fueled Power Plant Set To Open In December
Chambersburg Awarded CFA Grant To Fund Natural Gas Service Extension
Esack: What You Need To Know As PA Politics Heat Up Over Energy Sector Subsidies
Amtran Happy With CNG Buses In Blair County
Worley & Obetz CEO Accused Of Gaining $1 Million In Massive Fraud
Loss On Worley & Obetz Loan Cuts Fulton Profits By 22.6%
Dominion Aims To Sell Bucks County, VA Natural Gas Power Plants
Op-Ed: Gov. Wolf Should Move Forward With Methane Regulations​, Rep. Vitali
Highest Summer Gasoline Prices In 4 Years In Lehigh Valley
Op-Ed: Trump Can Save Philadelphia’s Refineries​, Rob Wonderling
Pipelines
Hurdle: New Mariner East 2 Spill In Western PA
Hurdle: Exposed Pipeline In Chester County NOT Mariner East 1
Hurdle: Independent Study Examining Public Safety Risks Of Mariner East Pipelines
Desperate For Answers, Groups Bankroll 2-County Study Of Mariner East 2 Pipeline
Reuters: Mariner East 2 Pipeline Construction Racks Up 65th Violation From DEP
Mama Bears’ Arrests Signal New Frustration Of Mariner East 2 Pipeline Protesters
Lancaster County Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Protester Cited 3 Times
Williams: Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Going Online In August
Maykuth: Laurel Pipeline Bidirectional Plan Advances At Expense Of Philly Producers
Export, PA Pipe Producer Benefiting From Trump Trade Policies
FERC Approves Gas Pipelines As Powelson Eyes Exit
Powelson Says No Idle Threat To Step Down Early From FERC
LaFleur: FERC Unlikely To Act On Pipeline Review Before Powelson Exit
FERC Pipeline Climate Policy Faces New Challenge In Federal Court
Radiation Protection
Esack: What You Need To Know As PA Politics Heat Up Over Energy Sector Subsidies
Exelon Considering Battery Storage At its Nuclear Power Plants
Union: Shell Actively Pursuing Beaver Valley Nuclear Plant Workers For Ethane Plant
Hope For The Nuclear Industry? NuVision’s Brian Beley’s Got It
Recreation
Sen. Yudichak Fulfills Hike Promise
Sen. Yudichak Confident D&L Trail To Wilkes-Barre Will Be A Reality
Editorial: A Few Weeds Don’t Mar Beauty Of River Common In Luzerne
Upper Bucks County Park Tour Highlights Recreation Partnerships
Bids Sought To Put Walking Trail Around Freeport’s Park
Levee Trail Report Project To Cost Less Than Expected In Luzerne
Erie County Trail Network Highlighted
Residents Work To Save Tresckow Playground In Carbon County
Bikeshare Has Equity Problem, Philadelphia Is Tackling It
Op-Ed: With Philly Soda Tax Fight Won, Time To Right By Libraries, Rec Centers
Keystone Edge: 7 Unique Spots For Your Pennsylvania Staycation
Editorial: Open-Water Swimming Should Be Safe As Well As Enjoyable

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Bed Of Ringing Rocks In Bucks County Make Music With The Help Of A Hammer
Boyce Park’s Indian Meadow Wows With Flowers, Color
Millcreek Woman Enjoys Biking More After Losing 170 Pounds
Op-Ed: Mountain Bikers vs. Hikers In Proposed Tracy Ridge Wilderness Area
Desperate Schuylkill Rowers Turn To Universities For Money To Dredge River
Water Pump Expected To Help Keep Water In Southern Delaware Canal
Coast Guard Warns Of Debris Hazards On Pittsburgh-Area Rivers
Family Of Kayaker Swept Over Dashields Dam Sues Corps Of Engineers
AP: Swimmer Beware: Pennsylvania Drownings Highlight River Risks
Allentown Parks & Rec Director Ousted As Mayor Shapes Team
Study: National Parks Get Fewer Visits When Air Pollution Rises
Recycling/Waste
Crable: Lancaster Waste Authority Trims Recycling Program To Big 4, Cites Market Collapse
Here Are Recent Changes To Single-Stream Recycling In Lancaster County
Quick Video Tour Of Penn Waste’s Recycling Center
Lehigh County Collects 20K+ Pounds Of Unwanted Drugs, Destroyed In Covanta Chester Plant
Editorial: PCBs In Quarry Fill? PA Needs Tougher Standards
Column: Plastic Straw Bans Are Last Straw, Let’s Get Rid Of Litterbugs Instead
EPA Eases Rules On How Coal Ash Waste Is Stored​ [PA Does Not]
Frazier: Trump Admin. Rolls Back Coal Ash Rules Aimed At Groundwater Protection
Renewable Energy
Esack: What You Need To Know As PA Politics Heat Up Over Energy Sector Subsidies
Schuylkill River
Desperate Schuylkill Rowers Turn To Universities For Money To Dredge River
Stormwater
Latrobe Authority Says Stormwater Project Should Alleviate Sewage Woes
4 Of 5 Allentown Owners Who Appeal Stormwater Bill Got A Reduction
Sustainability
Homewood, India Grow Sustainable Communities Idea
Wastewater Facilities
Speakers Urge Public Ownership For Pittsburgh Water Authority At Hearing
Kiski Valley Sewage Treatment Customers To Pay Flat Rate
Old Order Amish Widow Wins Some, Loses Some In Warren Court Fight Over Outhouse
Watershed Protection
East Stroudsburg U. Student Research Helps Ensure Clean Drinking Water
Letter: McKinley Elementary Projects Restore Our Local Stream​ (Montgomery County)
Latrobe Authority Says Stormwater Project Should Alleviate Sewage Woes
4 Of 5 Allentown Owners Who Appeal Stormwater Bill Got A Reduction
Editorial: Open-Water Swimming Should Be Safe As Well As Enjoyable
Back Mountain Residents’ Input Sought For Upper Toby Creek Conservation Plan
Penn State Extension: Wilson College Students Learn How Land Use, Groundwater, Wells
Interconnect
Desperate Schuylkill Rowers Turn To Universities For Money To Dredge River
Bagenstose: Summer Fellows Seeking Support For Bristol Marsh In Bucks County
Delaware RiverKeeper July 20 RiverWatch Video Report

73
U.S House Again Votes To Restrict Federal Enforcement Of Chesapeake Bay Cleanup
Measure To Weaken EPA Enforcement Of Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Is Up For Vote, Again
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
Click Here​ to subscribe to the Chesapeake Bay Journal
Follow Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Twitter
Like Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Facebook
Wildlife
Venesky: Fish & Boat Commission Defers Cuts, Holds Out Hope For License Fee Hike
Fish & Boat Commission Increases Permit Fees To Cover Costs, Hopeful Of Licence Fee Hike
Hayes: PA Anglers Asked To Pitch In To Raise Revenues
Kummer: NJ Finds PFAS In Lower Delaware River Watershed
Hurdle: NJ Issues First Fish Consumption Advisories On PFAS Chemicals
Crable: Dreaded Frankenfish Arrives In Lancaster County
Cellar-Dwelling Fish Are Mystery In South Philadelphia’s Navy Yard
Songbird Nesting Habits May Indicate Severity Of Hurricane Season In Delaware
Marbled Godwit Spotted At Presque Isle, Rare For PA
Frye: Better Definition Of Public Hunting Goal Of New Rules Likely Coming To PA
Reilly: Middle Creek Wildlife Area Plans Special Bowhunt For Deer This Fall
Schneck: Rattlesnakes Really Want To Be Left Along, Go Undetected​ (Video)
Bower: Reflections In Nature: Eggs vs. Live Young
Philadelphia Pianist To Romance The Butterfly At Insectarium
Federal Endangered Species Act Stripped Of Key Provision In Trump Proposal
West Nile/Zika Virus
Mosquito Eradicators, Tick Sprays Flying Off Shelves In Northeast
Mosquito Spraying Planned In Harborcreek Township
Accuweather: Above-Average Rainfall Boosts Mosquito Populations Across Eastern U.S.
Hurricanes
Puerto Ricans Return To Power Grid, But Fear For Long Term
Rising Seas, Storms Could Cause Problems For Internet Infrastructure
Wildfires
DCNR Dispatches 2 Fire Crews To Nevada To Help With Wildfires
Deadly Fire Shuts Down Key Route to Yosemite National Park
Growing Oregon Wildfire Crushes Hopes Of Wheat Farmers During Harvest
Federal Policy
Hopey: Acting EPA Administrator Wants To Depoliticize Environmental Issues
Measure To Weaken EPA Enforcement Of Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Is Up For Vote, Again
Report: DOE Bailout For Coal, Nuclear Plants Could Cost $34 Billion
EPA Eases Rules On How Coal Ash Waste Is Stored​ [PA Does Not]
Why FERC’s PJM Capacity Market Order Could Herald Carbon Pricing
Earliest New York Will Have Carbon Price Is Q2 In 2021, NYISO Says
Federal Endangered Species Act Stripped Of Key Provision In Trump Proposal

Click Here For This Week's Allegheny Front Radio Program

Public Participation Opportunities/Calendar Of Events


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This section lists House and Senate Committee meetings, DEP and other public hearings and
meetings and other interesting environmental events.
NEW​ means new from last week. ​[Agenda Not Posted] ​means not posted within 2 weeks
of the advisory committee meeting. Go to the ​online Calendar​ webpage for updates.

Note:​ DEP ​published the 2018 meeting schedules​ for its advisory committees and boards.

July 23--​ ​NEW​. ​DEP Hearing On On Proposed Camp Hope Run Landfill, Clearfield County​.
Florian Banquet Center​, 321 Mill Road, Clearfield. 6:30 to 9:00.

July 23--​ Dept. Of Labor & Industry ​Uniform Construction Code Review and Advisory Council
meeting. L&I Building, First Floor, 651 Boas St., Harrisburg. 10:00. L&I Contact: Cindy
Holtry, 717-783-4560. ​(f​ ormal notice​)

July 25--​ DCNR Public Meeting On Forest District Plans: ​Loyalsock State Forest District​.
District Office, 6735 Route 220, Dushore, Sullivan County. 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. ​Click Here​ for
more.

July 24--​ ​Transitioning From Gray To Green Infrastructure Using Urban Forestry Webinar​. 1:00
to 2:00.

July 25-- ​Agenda Posted.​ ​DEP Small Business Compliance Advisory Committee​ meeting. 12th
Floor Conference Room, Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Nancy Herb,
717-783-9269 or ​nherb@pa.gov​. ​(​formal notice)​

July 25--​ ​EPA Community Engagement Meeting On PFAS​. ​Hatboro-Horsham High School,
899 Horsham Road in Horsham, Montgomery County. Working Session 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
Listening Session 4:00 to 9:00 p.m.

July 25--​ ​DCNR Conservation and Natural Resources Advisory Council​ meeting. Room 105
Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DCNR Contact: Gretchen Leslie, 717-772-9084 or send email
to: ​gleslie@pa.gov​. ​(​formal notice)​

July 25-27--​ ​Registration Open​. ​Professional Recyclers of PA​. ​28th Annual Recycling &
Organics Conference​. Best Western Premier Hotel, Harrisburg.

July 26--​ ​PA Assn. Of Environmental Professionals​, DEP. ​Freshwater Mussels In The Ohio And
Allegheny River Watersheds Workshop​. ​DEP Regional Office, 400 Waterfront Drive in
Pittsburgh. 9:00 to 11:00.

July 26--​ ​NEW​. ​Pittsburgh Section-Environmental & Water Resources Institute​. ​Urban Green
Infrastructure Workshop​. ​Engineers' Society of Western PA, 337 Fourth Avenue, Pittsburgh.
11:30 to 5:00.

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July 26--​ ​Penn State Extension​. ​Introduction To Electric Markets and Procurement Strategies
Webinar​. 1:00 to 2:00.

July 27-29--​ ​CANCELED​. ​Keystone Trails Association​. ​Prowl The Sproul Weekend​. ​Sproul
State Forest​, Clinton County.

July 28--​ ​PA Resources Council​. ​Recycling Bin Distribution Event In Pittsburgh​. Point Breeze
Distribution Event, URA’s Parking Lot on Meade Street. 8:00 to 2:00.​ ​Click Here​ to register.

July 28--​ ​Audubon Society of Western PA​. ​Backyard Habitat Gardening for Pollinators and
Butterflies Workshop​. ​Beechwood Farms Nature Reserve​, 614 Dorseyville Road, Pittsburgh.
10:00.

July 28--​ ​Celebrate The Prairie Bloom​. Jennings Environmental Ed Center, ​2951 Prospect Road,
Slippery Rock, Butler County. 9:00 to 6:00

August 1--​ ​Agenda Posted​. ​DEP Cleanup Standards Scientific Advisory Board​ meeting. Room
105 Rachel Carson Building. 9:00. DEP Contact: Michael Maddigan, 717-772-3609,
mmaddigan@pa.gov​.

August 2--​ ​NEW​. ​DEP Air Quality Technical Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel
Carson Building. 9:15: DEP Contact: Kirit Dalal, 717-772-3436, ​kdalal@pa.gov​.

August 2--​ DCNR Public Meeting On Forest District Plans: ​Michaux State Forest District​, Mont
Alto Fire Company, 517 S. Main St, Mont Alto, Franklin County. 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. ​Click Here
for more.

August 2--​ ​Susquehanna River Basin Commission​ holds a hearing on proposed water
withdrawal requests to be considered at its September 7 business meeting. Room 8E-B East
Wing, Capitol Building, Harrisburg. 2:30. SRBC Contact: Gwyn Rowland, 717-238-0423 ext.
1316. ​Click Here​ for more.

August 4--​ ​Sewickley Creek Watershed Association​. ​2nd Annual Family Field Day​. ​Lowber
Abandoned Mine Drainage Treatment Project​, Herminie-Lowber Road near Lowber,
Westmoreland County. 10:00 to 2:00

August 4-5--​ ​NEW​. ​Gifford Pinchot’s Grey Towers​. ​14th Annual Festival Of Wood​. ​Grey
Towers National Historic Site​, Milford, Pike County.

August 5--​ ​NEW​. ​Brodhead Watershed Association​. ​Ramble In Cherry Valley National Wildlife
Refuge​. ​Cherry Valley National Wildlife Refuge​, 2138 Croasdale Road, Stroudsburg, Monroe
County.

August 8-- ​DEP Oil and Gas Technical Advisory Board​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Todd Wallace, 717-783-9438, ​twallace@pa.gov​.

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August 8--​ ​DEP Aggregate Advisory Board​ meeting. Pennsy Supply, Thomasville Quarry
Office, 55 South Biesecker Road, Thomasville, York County. 10:00. ​DEP Contact: Daniel
Snowden, 717-787-5103, ​dsnowden@pa.gov​. ​(f​ ormal notice​)

August 9--​ ​DEP Hearing On Cumberland Mine Coal Refuse Disposal Facility NPDES Water
Quality Permit,​ Monongahela and Whiteley townships, Greene County. ​Greensboro
VFD/Church Building, 384 Stoney Hill Road, Greensboro. 1:00 to 3:00. ​(J​ uly 7 PA Bulletin
4015​)

August 11--​ ​PA Resources Council​. ​Recycling Bin Distribution Event In Pittsburgh​. ​Fairywood
Distribution Event, B Keppel Trucking, 100 Beechnut Drive, Pittsburgh. ​8:00 to 2:00.​ ​Click Here
to register.

August 14-16--​ ​Penn State College of Agricultural Sciences Ag Progress Days​. ​Russell E.
Larson Agricultural Research Center​ at Rock Springs, 9 miles southwest of State College on
Route 45 in Huntingdon County.

August 15--​ ​NEW​. Joint ​House​ and ​Senate​ Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committees
informational meeting on agriculture industry at ​Penn State’s Ag Progress Days​. Larson
Agricultural Research Center, Theatre Area of the College Exhibits Building, 2710 W. Pine
Grove Road (Route 45), Pennsylvania Furnace, PA, Huntingdon County. 10:00.

August 15--​ ​DEP State Board for Certification of Sewage Enforcement Officers​ meeting. 11th
Floor, Conference Room B, Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Kristen
Szwajkowski, ​717-772-2186,​ ​kszwajkows@pa.gov​.

August 15--​ ​DEP State Board For Certification of Water and Wastewater Systems Operators
meeting. 10th Floor Conference Room, Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Edgar
Chescattie, 717-772-2814, ​eshescattie@pa.gov​.

August 15--​ DCNR Public Meeting On Forest District Plans: ​Gallitzin State Forest District​,
Holiday Inn Express, 1440 Scalp Ave., Johnstown, Cambria County. 6:00 to 8:30 p.m. ​Click
Here​ for more.

August 16--​ ​DEP Agricultural Advisory Board​ meeting. ​Ag Progress Days​, 2710 West Pine
Grove Road, Furnace, Huntingdon County. 10:30. DEP Contact: Jay Braund, 717-772-5636,
jbraund@pa.gov​. ​(​formal notice)​

August 18-19--​ ​NEW​. ​Western PA Conservancy​. ​2018 Wild & Scenic Clarion River Sojourn​.
Elk and Clarion Counties.

August 20-23--​ ​U.S. Biochar Initiatives Conference​. ​Chase Center on the Riverfront​,
Wilmington, Delaware.

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August 21-- ​Environmental Quality Board​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building. 9:00.
DEP Contact: Laura Edinger, 717-772-3277, ​ledinger@pa.gov​.

August 21--​ ​Penn State Extension​. ​Planning, Implementing A Municipal Leaf Compost Facility
Webinar​. Noon to 1:00.

August 22--​ ​Location Added​. DCNR Public Meeting On Forest District Plans: ​Forbes State
Forest District​. Loyalhanna Watershed Association Conference Room, 6 Old Lincoln Highway
West, Ligonier, Westmoreland County. 6:30 to 8:30. ​Click Here​ for more.

August 23-26--​ ​NEW​. ​PA Assn. Of Hazardous Materials Technicians​. ​2018 PA Hazmat
Training Education Conference​. ​Seven Springs Resort​, Somerset County.

August 25--​ ​PA Resources Council​. ​Hard-To-Recycle Collection Event​. ​Century III Mall​, West
Mifflin, Allegheny County. 9:00 to 1:00.

August 25-- ​NEW​. ​Chesapeake Bay Foundation-PA​. ​Veterans On The River Kayak Fishing
Event.​ ​Shank's Mare Outfitters​ in Wrightsville, York County.

August 28-​- ​DEP Climate Change Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: John Krueger, 717-783-9264, ​jkrueger@pa.gov​.

August 28--​ ​NEW​. DCNR ​Wild Resource Conservation Program FY 2018-19 Grant
Applications​ meeting. Commissioner Conference Room, Game Commission, 2001 Elmerton
Ave., Harrisburg. 10:00. DCNR Contact: Jennifer Girton, 717-787-3212 or send email to:
jgirton@pa.gov​ or Greg Czarnecki, 717-783-1337 or send email to: ​gczarnecki@pa.gov​. ​(f​ ormal
notice)​ C
​ lick Here​ for more.

September 4--​ ​DEP Storage Tank Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 10:00. ​DEP Contact: Kris Shiffer 717-772-5809 or send email to: ​kshiffer@pa.gov​.

September 4--​ ​DEP Board Of Coal Mine Safety​ meeting. DEP Cambria Office, 286 Industrial
Park Road, Ebensburg. 10:00. DEP Contact: Peggy Scheloske 724-404-3143 or send email to:
mscheloske@pa.gov​.

September 6-9--​ ​Registration Open.​ ​Delaware Highlands Conservancy​. ​Educational Retreat For
Women Forest Landowners​. ​Highlights Workshop Facility​ in Boyd’s Mill, Milanville, Wayne
County.

September 7--​ ​Susquehanna River Basin Commission​ business meeting. Binghamton, New
York. 9:00. ​Click Here​ for more.

September 12--​ DCNR Public Meeting On Forest District Plans: ​Tiadaghton State Forest
District​, Wheeland Center, 1201 Locust St., Jersey Shore, Lycoming County. 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.
Click Here​ for more.

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September 17-19--​ ​11th Eastern Native Grass Symposium​. Erie Bayfront Convention Center.

September 18-- ​Environmental Quality Board​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building.
9:00. DEP Contact: Laura Edinger, 717-772-3277, ​ledinger@pa.gov​. ​(​formal notice)​

September 18--​ ​DEP Citizens Advisory Council​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building.
10:00. DEP Contact: Neil Bakshi, DEP Policy Office, ​nebakshi@pa.gov​.

September 18-20--​ ​Mid-Atlantic Chapter International Erosion Control Association​. ​25th


Annual Conference, Workshop and Trade Show​. Radisson Hotel, Camp Hill, Cumberland
County.

September 19- ​DEP Water Resources Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 9:30. DEP Contact: Diane Wilson, 717-787-3730, ​diawilson@pa.gov​. ​(f​ ormal
notice)​

September 20--​ ​DEP Solid Waste Advisory Committee​ & Recycling Funding Advisory
Committee meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Laura Henry
717-772-5713 or send email to: ​lahenry@pa.gov​.

September 22--​ Joint meeting of DEP Recycling Fund Advisory Committee and ​Solid Waste
Advisory Committee​. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Laura Henry,
717-772-5713, ​lahenry@pa.gov​.

September 23--​ ​Audubon Society of Western PA​. ​Backyard Habitat Trees and Shrubs,
Supporting Wildlife In Winter Workshop​. ​Beechwood Farms Nature Reserve​, 614 Dorseyville
Road, Pittsburgh. 10:00.

September 25-26--​ ​Coalition for the Delaware River Watershed​. ​2018 Delaware River
Watershed Forum​. Cape May, NJ.

September 26--​ DCNR Public Meeting On Forest District Plans: ​William Penn Forest District​ [
LTBD ] Southeast PA. ​Click Here​ for more.

September 28--​ ​DEP Low-Level Waste Advisory Committee​ meeting Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Rich Janati, 717-787-2147, ​rjanati@pa.gov​.

October 1-3--​ ​Engineers’ Society of Western PA​. ​PA Brownfield Conference​. Sands Bethlehem
Casino, Bethlehem.

October 3--​ ​NEW​. ​PA Chamber Fall Regional Environmental Conference In Harrisburg​.

October 6--​ ​PA Resources Council​. ​Hard-To-Recycle Collection Event​. ​Settlers Cabin Park,
Robinson Township​, Allegheny County. 9:00 to 1:00.

79
October 10--​ ​DEP Technical Advisory Committee On Diesel Powered (Mining) Equipment​.
DEP New Stanton Office, 131 Broadview Road, New Stanton. 10:00. DEP Contact: Peggy
Scheloski, 724-404-3143 or ​mscheloske@pa.gov​.

October 17--​ DCNR Public Meeting On Forest District Plans: ​Buchanan State Forest District​,
District Office, 25185 Great Cove Road, McConnellsburg, Fulton County. 6:00 to 8:30 p.m.
Click Here​ for more.

October 17--​ ​NEW​. ​PA Chamber Fall Regional Environmental Conference In Mars, Butler
County​.

October 17-21--​ ​Passive House Western PA​. ​North American Passive House Network 2018
Conference​. ​David L. Lawrence Convention Center​, Pittsburgh.

October 18--​ ​CANCELED​. ​DEP Radiation Protection Advisory Committee​ meeting


rescheduled to November 15. DEP Contact: Joseph Melnic 717-783-9730 or send email to:
jmelnic@pa.gov​. ​(​formal notice​)

October 24--​ DCNR Public Meeting On Forest District Plans: ​Clear Creek State Forest District
[LTBD ] Clarion, Forest, Jefferson, Mercer, Venango counties. ​Click Here​ for more.

October 30--​ ​NEW​. ​PA Chamber Fall Regional Environmental Conference In King of Prussia​.

November 1-2--​ ​PA Water And Wastewater Technology Summit​. ​Penn Stater Conference
Center Hotel, State College.

November 8--​ DCNR Public Meeting On Forest District Plans: ​Rothrock State Forest District​,
Shaver’s Creek CFD Community Building, 8707 Firemans Park Ln, Petersburg, Huntingdon
County. 6:30 to 8:00 p.m. ​Click Here​ for more.

November 8--​ DCNR Public Meeting On Forest District Plans: ​Weiser State Forest District​,
District Office, 16 Weiser Lane, Aristes, Columbia County. 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. ​Click Here​ for
more.

November 15-- ​ ​DEP Radiation Protection Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel
Carson. 9:00. DEP Contact: Joseph Melnic 717-783-9730 or send email to: ​jmelnic@pa.gov​.
(​formal notice)​

Related Tools ----------------

Visit DEP’s ​Public Participation Center​ for public participation opportunities.

Click Here​ for links to DEP’s Advisory Committee webpages.

80
Visit ​DEP Connects​ for opportunities to interact with DEP staff at field offices.

Click Here​ to sign up for DEP News a biweekly newsletter from the Department.

DEP Facebook Page​ ​DEP Twitter Feed​ ​DEP YouTube Channel

DEP Calendar of Events​ ​DCNR Calendar of Events

Senate Committee Schedule​ ​House Committee Schedule

You can watch the ​Senate Floor Session​ and ​House Floor Session​ live online.

Grants & Awards

This section gives you a heads up on upcoming deadlines for awards and grants and other
recognition programs. ​NEW​ means new from last week.

July 31--​ ​Keep PA Beautiful Fresh Paint Days Grants


July 31--​ ​Fish & Boat Commission Boating Infrastructure Grants
August 1--​ ​Delaware River Basin Commission Summer Photo Contest
August 15-- ​PA Leopold Farm Conservation Award $10,000
August 15-- ​NEW​. ​DCNR Wild Resource Conservation Grants
August 17--​ ​PA Lake Management Society Mini-Grants
August 20--​ ​Foundation For PA Watersheds Grant Letters Of Intent
August 31-- ​OSMRE Not-For-Profit Acid Mine Drainage Watershed Grants
August 31--​ ​Partnership For Delaware Estuary Schuylkill Shots Photo Contest
September 3--​ ​NEW​. ​American Chestnut Foundation Photo Contest
September 5--​ ​PA Parks & Forests Foundation Photo Contest
September 15--​ ​CFA Alternative & Clean Energy Funding
September 15--​ ​CFA Renewable Energy-Geothermal & Wind Funding
September 15--​ ​CFA Solar Energy Funding
September 15--​ ​CFA High Performance Building Funding
September 28-- ​DCNR Multifunctional Riparian Forest Buffer Grants
September 28-- ​DEP Calendar 2017 Recycling Performance Grants
September 29-​- ​Sinnemahoning Watershed Restoration Grants
September 30--​ ​Fish & Boat Commission Clean Vessel Act Grants
September 30--​ ​Duquesne Light, Nissan Electric Vehicle Rebate
October 1--​ ​NEW​. ​DEP Small Business Advantage Grants-Water Quality Projects​ ​(first-come)
October 31--​ ​PA Resources Council Gene Capaldi Lens On Litter Photo Contest
October 31--​ ​NEW​. ​Axalta, Philadelphia Eagles All-Pro Teachers Program
December 14--​ ​DEP Alternative Fuels Incentive Grants
December 31--​ ​DEP County Act 101 Waste Planning, HHW, Education Grants

-- Visit the ​DEP Grant, Loan and Rebate Programs​ webpage for more ideas on how to get
financial assistance for environmental projects.
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-- Visit the DCNR ​Apply for Grants​ webpage for a listing of financial assistance available from
DCNR.

Regulations, Technical Guidance & Permits

Here are highlights of actions taken by agencies on environmental regulations, technical


guidance and permits.

Regulations -----------------------

No new regulations were published this week. ​Pennsylvania Bulletin - July 21, 2018

Technical Guidance -------------------

No new technical guidance published this week.

Permits ------------

Note:​ The Department of Environmental Protection published 71 pages of public notices related
to proposed and final permit and approval/ disapproval actions in the July 21 PA Bulletin - ​pages
4282 to 4353​.

The ​Susquehanna River Basin Commission​ published notice in the ​July 21, 2018 PA Bulletin​ of
projects approved in May.

Related Tools ----------------------

Sign Up For DEP’s eNotice:​ Did you know DEP can send you email notices of permit
applications submitted in your community? Notice of new technical guidance documents and
regulations? All through its eNotice system. ​Click Here​ to sign up.

Visit DEP’s ​Public Participation Center​ for public participation opportunities.

DEP Proposals Out For Public Review


Other Proposals Open For Public Comment​ - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through ​DEP’s eComment System
Recently Closed Comment Periods For Other Proposals​ - DEP webpage
Other Proposals Recently Finalized​ - DEP webpage

DEP Regulations In Process


Proposed Regulations Open For Comment​ - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through ​DEP’s eComment System
Proposed Regulations With Closed Comment Periods​ - DEP webpage

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Recently Finalized Regulations​ - DEP webpage
DEP Regulatory Update​ - DEP webpage
March 3, 2018 DEP Regulatory Agenda - ​PA Bulletin, Page 1374

DEP Technical Guidance In Process


Draft Technical Guidance Documents​ - DEP webpage
Technical Guidance Comment Deadlines​ - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through ​DEP’s eComment System
Recently Closed Comment Periods For Technical Guidance​ - DEP webpage
Technical Guidance Recently Finalized​ - DEP webpage
Copies of Final Technical Guidance​ - DEP webpage
DEP Non-Regulatory/Technical Guidance Documents Agenda (July 2018)​- DEP webpage

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Supporting Member PA Outdoor Writers Assn./PA Trout Unlimited

PA Environment Digest​ is a supporting member of the ​Pennsylvania Outdoor Writers


Association​, ​Pennsylvania Council Trout Unlimited​ and the ​Doc Fritchey Chapter Trout
Unlimited​.

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