Sunteți pe pagina 1din 13

Integrated geotechnical engineering site 

investigation practice – The Dogger Bank Project

Don J. DeGroot, Sc.D., P.E.
University of Massachusetts Amherst

Acknowledgements
Tor Inge Tjelta, Statoil
Tom Lunne, NGI

Integrated Geotechnical Site Charaterisation
Requires multidisciplinary geo‐teams Geological
model
Bathymetry

Soil investigations
‐ field tests
‐ sampling
Site ‐ lab testing
Geophysical Characterization

Design
properties

After NGI

1
Project requirements ‐ geotechnical engineering
1. Foundation design, soil‐structure interaction studies
2. Geohazards assessment, e.g., free gas, submarine landslides, etc.
3. Cabling
4. Pile drivability, jackup platform assessment, e.g., punch through
5. Anthropogenic surveys, e.g., plane/ship wrecks, ordnance, etc.

Geotechnical Site Characterization ‐ outcomes
1. Stratigraphy: soil units, type (spatial distribution)

2. Initial State Variables: current and "past" (geologic) stress states

3. Soil Properties/Design parameters: strength, stiffness, cyclic 
behavior

Key geotechnical parameters ‐ SANDS
1. Current state of stress ‐ 'v0
2. Relative density – DR (proxy for stress history)
3. Drained shear strength ‐ '
4. Stiffness
5. Cyclic and dynamic properties

2
Key geotechnical parameters ‐ CLAYS
1. Current state of stress ‐ 'v0
2. Stress (geologic) history = yield stress or 
preconsolidation stress ('vy = 'p)
3. Undrained shear strength (su) anisotropy
4. Stiffness
5. Cyclic and dynamic properties

su

Integrated Geotechnical Site Characterization

Site Characterization
In Situ Testing Laboratory Testing
CPT

Requires Empirical  Requires Good 
Correlations Correlate & Quality Samples
Corroborate

Design Parameters
‐ DR, ', 'p, su, etc
Best Practice: develop site specific correlations 
between lab data and in situ data

3
Offshore SI deployment modes
ISO/FDIS 19901‐8:2014(E) — Part 8 Marine Soil Investigations
Drilling mode:  borehole advanced using rotary drilling from vessel (= vessel based 
drilling) or seabed system (= seabed based drilling)
Non‐drilling mode: advance of tools from seabed (i.e., no borehole drilling) 

The In Situ Testing Enterprise
Cone Penetration Test (CPTU)

Standard CPTU Diameters:
36 mm or 44 mm

4
The Soil Sampling Enterprise
All steps in the process will influence sample quality
1. Drilling 2. Sampler 3. Processing 4. Transportation

5. Storage 6. Extraction 7. Specimen Prep. 8. Testing

Dogger Bank Zone

www.forewind.co.uk www.wiki.com

5
Dogger Bank Zone key facts
Capacity:
Up to six 1.2 GW projects
Area:
8660 km2. Cape Cod = 880 km2, MA = 
27,000 km2
Distance:
125 ‐ 290 km from shore
Water Depth:
18‐63 m; ≈ 4GW in < 30m water 
depth
Wind:
>10 m/s average wind speed across 
the zone.
From www.forewind.co.uk
www.thecrownestate.co.uk

Historical geologic mapping

From BGS

http://education.nationalgeographic.org/maps/doggerland/

12

6
Geo‐ Site Investigation Work – for consent phase
The Geo‐team: geotechnical engineers (SI 
and foundation), geoscientists, glacial 
geologists, geophysicists, geostatisticians.
Geophysics:
‐ 60,000 line kms of geophysical survey 
data collected
‐ multibean echo sounder
‐ side scan sonar
‐ marine magnetometer
‐ seismic profiles
Geotechnical – staged approach:
‐ 70 boreholes (up to 40 m depth)
‐ 171 CPTUs; ≈ 7 km total of CPTU 
profiles! www.39‐45war.com
Cotterill et al. (2012) and www.forewind.co.uk

Seismic data
‐ seismic data + CPTU data = definition of soil units, soil type, possible 
geologic history (e.g., faulting) and spatial variability
‐ BUT does not give engineering properties for design

From www.forewind.co.uk

7
Note: several slides delivered at this 
point in the oral presentation are not
included here for confidentially 
reasons.

Soil stress (geologic) history
Preconsolidation mechanisms = what causes changes in 
soil (engineering) properties over geologic time

1. Mechanical (e.g., glacial loading)
YES at Dogger Bank

2. Desiccation (e.g., drying, freezing)
YES at Dogger Bank

3. Drained creep (e.g., aging)
4. Physicochemical (e.g., cementation)

8
What is desiccation?
1. Drying, freezing, evapotranspiration

2. Main effect is development of very 
large, highly localized stresses (MPa)

3. Hysteretic, cyclic, nonlinear process

4. Net result = significant and highly 
variable changes in fabric and soil 
properties

5. Very common in terrestrial soils

Why all the scatter in engineering properties?
Major reasons
1. Extremely complex geologic history: desiccation, freezing, 
thawing, folding, faulting, erosion, glacial loading, etc.
2. Coupled with unprecedented size of project – significant 
differences in source material, depositional environment 
and geologic history

Other factors – complicated by above
3. Sampling issues – thick walled tubes, influence of gas
4. Lab testing issues – how to deal with scale effects (micro, 
macro fissures), consolidation test procedures, etc

9
Scale effects – desiccation, glacial loading
Intact (non‐fissured) 
Strength
Shear
Strength

Operational
Strength

Lo 1970
Test Volume
Scale effects = most important factor in characterizing stiff 
desiccated or fissured clays, e.g., London Clay
Common recommendation = in situ plate load tests to determine 
the operational strength for bearing capacity type problems.

Field Validation of CPTU Nkt
Emperical correlaton between undrained 
shear strenght su and CPTU tip resistance qt

su = (qt ‐ v0)/Nkt

1. Jackup barge spud can penetration 
‐ bearing capacity mechanism = operational 
strength
‐ resulted in upper bound Nkt value

2. Bucket foundation for Met Mast
‐ skirt penetration mechanism = nominal 
intact strength
‐ resulted in lower bound Nkt value

10
Outcomes – design basis for foundation options
1. Geologic history + project scale 
‐ complex and challenging site to characterize
2. Soil Units
‐ geology + geophysics + CPTU = soil units
3. Foundation Options
‐ sensitivity studies
4. SANDS
‐ like North Sea sands
‐ CPTU → design parameters + lab cyclic framework
5. CLAYS
‐ nominally equal to or stronger than past North Sea experience, but 
spatial variation, scale effects
‐ lab & field calibrated CPTU → design parameters
6. Predictive GeoModel – Carl F. Forsberg, NGI
‐ simple predictive geo‐statistical model that generates interpolated 
synthetic CPTU profiles

Developed tentative draft Geologic "cartoon"
Rewrote the geology of Dogger Bank: Multiple sediment sources, terrestrial 
& marine sediments, glacial deformation, aerial exposure, sediment freezing, 
tundra, fresh water lakes, rivers, multiple phases of channeling and infill

From BGS

From www.forewind.co.uk

11
Last glacial maximum ice terminus – approx. 25 cal ka
Northeast United States: From Janet Stone, USGS, CT

Schematic Cross Sections – Cape Cod, MA Region
From Janet Stone, USGS, CT
A Asterias 1973 Line 17 A’
South North
Meteroric G.L. Stellwagen
Channel fill
delta

Thrusted
G.L.Cape Cod  Glacially 
Bedrock Lacustrine Fans Lake Clay
deposits modified Coastal 
Plain hills

B Asterias 1979 Line 34, Ferrel 1994 Line 15 B’


West East
‐50‐m Spit ‐30‐m Spit
Glaciomarine Clay
Glacially 
Lake Clay K‐T
modified Coastal 
Lac. Fan G.L. Stellwagen Deltas
Plain hills Bedrock

12
In Sum
Dogger Bank Zone – large site, complex geologic history, complex region for 
geotechnical site characterization. Consent was approved August 2015 for two 
projects areas.

Multidisciplinary team of geo‐specialists working hand‐in‐hand was essential to 
developing an understanding of the geologic history and geotechnical engineering 
properties for foundation design basis

Best practice recommendations for offshore geotechnical SI:
ISO/FDIS 19901‐8:2014(E) — Part 8: Marine soil investigations

DeGroot, D.J., Lunne, T. and Tjelta, T.I. (2010). "Recommended best practice for 
geotechnical site charaterisation of offshore cohesive sediments." Proc. of the 2nd Int. Sym. 
on Frontiers in Offshore Geotechnics. Nov. 2010, pp. 33‐57.

Acknowledgements

13