Sunteți pe pagina 1din 13

Sensation and Perception 1st edition test

bank

https://www.etestbank.com/shop/sensation-perception-1st-edition-test-bank/

Description

Sensation and Perception 1st edition test


bank

Test Bank – Chapter 1

1. Why are sensation and perception studied by psychologists?


2. Because mood disorders arise from deficits in perception.
3. Because biologists tend to shy away from neuroscience issues.
*c. Because perceptual experience is a function of how our brains make sense of the sensory
world.
d. Because sensation and perception are not the same process.

Learning objective number (if applicable): 1.1


Cognitive domain: Knowledge
Answer location: Why Is This Psychology? (3)
Question type: MC

2. Bob and Caroline are both watching the same tennis match. What is one reason that they might
disagree on a judge’s call, based on principles of perception?

*a. Because each is cheering for a different player, their perception of the match is affected.
b. Because sensation in one person may not map onto attention in the other.
c. Because vision and emotion are casually linked.
d. Because different neurons fire in a woman’s brain than in a man’s brain while watching sports
Learning objective number (if applicable): 1.1
Cognitive domain: Comprehension
Answer location: Why Is This Psychology? (3)
Question type: MC.

3. Which is not considered one of the five canonical senses but is, in fact, a human sensory ability?
4. Audition
*b. Proprioception
c. Vision
d. Lateralization

Learning objective number (if applicable): 1.2


Cognitive domain: Application
Answer location: The Myth of the Five Senses (4)
Question type: MC

4. Which of the following is not important in our perception of flavor?


5. Taste
b. Touch
c. Olfaction
*d. Vestibular

Learning objective number (if applicable): 1.2


Cognitive domain: Application
Answer location: The Myth of the Five Senses (4)
Question type: MC

5. The registering of a physical stimulus on our sensory receptors is referred to as:

*a. Sensation
b. Perception
c. Attention
d. Registration

Learning objective number (if applicable): 1.2


Cognitive domain: Knowledge
Answer location: The Basics of Perception (5)
Question type: MC

6. Perception means:

*a. Turning the sensory input into meaningful conscious experience


b. Registering a physical stimulus on our sensory receptors
c. Being respectful of others’ privacy
d. Converting auditory input into a visual stimulus
Learning objective number (if applicable): 1.2
Cognitive domain: Knowledge
Answer location: The Basics of Perception (5)
Question type: MC

7. Transduction is the process of:


8. Having a visual experience
b. Having an auditory experience
*c. Converting physical energy into a neural signal
d. Converting a neural signal into physical energy

Learning objective number (if applicable): 1.3


Cognitive domain: Knowledge
Answer location: The Basics of Perception (6)
Question type: MC

8. The signal produced by receptor cells that can then be sent to the brain is known as the:
9. Perceptual attribute
b. Perceptual absolute
*c. Neural signal
d. Transduction function

Learning objective number (if applicable): 1.3


Cognitive domain: Knowledge
Answer location: The Basics of Perception (6)
Question type: MC

9. Wanda is smelling coffee. The receptor cells in Wanda’s nose are:

1. Converting light waves into an olfactory experience


b. Responding to signals produced by the vestibular system
*c. Transducing the presence of airborne chemicals into a neural signal
d. Just waking up because of the presence of coffee

Learning objective number (if applicable): 1.3


Cognitive domain: Application
Answer location: The Basics of Perception (6-7)
Question type: MC

10. When Sid moves his feet in time to perceived music, we can see that he is:

*a. Engaged in action


b. Conforming to the sensory normal
c. Engaged in a meta-transduction behavior
d. Reforming his neural signal
Learning objective number (if applicable): 1.3
Cognitive domain: Application
Answer location: Action (8)
Question type: MC

11. Our subjective experience of perception can be defined as:


12. Action
*b. Phenomenology
c. Reception
d. Neural Awareness

Learning objective number (if applicable): 1.3


Cognitive domain: Knowledge
Answer location: The Nature of Experience and Phenomenology (8)
Question type: MC

12. The Aristotle illusion is an illusion of:


13. Vision
b. Hearing
c. Proprioception
*d. Touch

Learning objective number (if applicable): 1.4


Cognitive domain: Knowledge
Answer location: The Beginnings (10)
Question type: MC

13. In the Aristotle illusion, two crossed fingers are touched by a pencil. We observe that:

*a. Two points are perceived instead of one


b. Synesthesia is induced
c. The two touches nullify and nothing is felt
d. The experience on the two fingers magnifies the illusory synesthesia

Learning objective number (if applicable): 1.4


Cognitive domain: Knowledge
Answer location: The Beginnings (10)
Question type: MC

14. Thomas Young (1773–1829) is famous for:


15. His development of the theory to explain the Aristotle illusion
b. The theory of experimental phenomenology
*c. The view that three nerve fibers are responsible for color vision
d. The theory of lateralized proprioception

Learning objective number (if applicable): 1.4


Cognitive domain: Knowledge
Answer location: The Beginnings (11)
Question type: MC

15. The doctrine of specific nerve energies argues that:


16. Activating visual neurons will cause auditory experience
*b. Activating auditory neurons can only cause an auditory experience
c. Activating sensory neurons cause loss of action in the opposite hemisphere
d. Three nerve fibers are responsible for color vision

Learning objective number (if applicable): 1.4


Cognitive domain: Knowledge
Answer location: The Beginnings (11)
Question type: MC

16. The view that perceptions are constructed using information from our senses and cognitive
processes is known as the:
17. Young-Helmholtz view of perception
b. Direct perception view
*c. Constructivist view
d. Gestalt view

Learning objective number (if applicable): 1.4


Cognitive domain: Knowledge
Answer location: Hemholtz Versus Hering (11)
Question type: MC

17. Helmholtz and Hering disagreed about:


18. What should be considered perception and what should be considered sensation
b. Signal detection theory and just-noticeable differences
*c. The nature of color vision and whether perception involves unconscious inferences
d. The doctrine of specific energy and the role of psychophysics in understanding perception

Learning objective number (if applicable): 1.4


Cognitive domain: Comprehension
Answer location: Hemholtz Versus Hering (12)
Question type: MC

18. Weber’s law refers to:


19. The observation that all perceptual experience vanishes at threshold
b. That hits and misses are inversely proportional in signal detection theory
*c. A just-noticeable difference between two stimuli is related to the magnitude or strength of
the stimuli
d. All thresholds are relative, not absolute

Learning objective number (if applicable): 1.4


Cognitive domain: Comprehension
Answer location: Weber, Fechner, and the Birth of Psychophysics (13)
Question type: MC

19. Psychophysics is defined as:

*a. The study of the relation between physical stimuli and perception events
b. The relation of energy to psychological function
c. The view that physical energy must be present in all perceptual events
d. The view that physics is illusory

Learning objective number (if applicable): 1.4


Cognitive domain: Knowledge
Answer location: Weber, Fechner, and the birth of Psychophysics (13)
Question type: MC

20. When we spin Benham’s disk:

*a. We see colors that are illusory.


b. We see motion-induced auditory illusions.
c. Psychophysics does not apply.
d. Our fingers detect two-point thresholds.

Learning objective number (if applicable): 1.4


Cognitive domain: Application
Answer location: Weber, Fechner, and the birth of Psychophysics (13)
Question type: MC

21. The school of thought claiming that we view the world in terms of general patterns and well-
organized structures rather than separable individual elements is:
22. Computational approach
b. The cognitive approach
c. Psychophysics
*d. Gestalt psychology

Learning objective number (if applicable): 1.4


Cognitive domain: Knowledge
Answer location: Gestalt Psychology (13)
Question type: MC

22. Which of these is not a law of Gestalt psychology?


23. The law of proximity
b. The law of good continuation
*c. The law of proximate causes
d. All of the above are not laws of Gestalt psychology.

Learning objective number (if applicable): 1.4


Cognitive domain: Application
Answer location: Gestalt Psychology (14)
Question type: MC

23. In Kanizsa’s triangle, the triangle:

*a. Is suggested by the pattern of figures, and our perceptual systems enhance the perceived
brightness of the figure
b. Is physically presented but masked, such that it is not seen
c. Emerges from a pattern that is inherently multi-sensorial
d. All of the above are true.

Learning objective number (if applicable): 1.4


Cognitive domain: Comprehension
Answer location: Gestalt Psychology (14)
Question type: MC

24. The approach to perception that claims that information in the sensory world is complex and
abundant, and therefore the perceptual systems need only directly perceive such complexity, is
known as:
25. The Signal Detection view
b. The Cognitive approach
c. The Unconscious inference approach
*d. The Direct Perception view

Learning objective number (if applicable): 1.4


Cognitive domain: Knowledge
Answer location: Direct Perception (The Gibsonian Approach) (15)
Question type: MC

25. The view that perceptual processes take place over time and can be thought of in terms of a
software/hardware metaphor is known as the:

*a. Information processing view


b. Direct perception view
c. Gibsonian approach
d. Provisionist approach

Learning objective number (if applicable): 1.4


Cognitive domain: Comprehension
Answer location: Information Processing Approach (16)
Question type: MC

26. The computational approach involves:


27. Determining how perceptual processes occur in non-human animal species
*b. Specifying the computational processes that underlie human perception
c. Directing the flow of information within a signal-detection network
d. All of the above
Learning objective number (if applicable): 1.4
Cognitive domain: Comprehension
Answer location: Computational Approaches (16)
Question type: MC

27. A microelectrode can be used to detect the:

*a. Activity of a single cell in a mammalian brain


b. Transfer of retinol from the retina to the optic nerve
c. Threshold of motion in Gestalt models
d. Activity in specific areas of the human brain

Learning objective number (if applicable): 1.4


Cognitive domain: Knowledge
Answer location: Neuroscience in Sensation and Perception (17)
Question type: MC

28. Hubel and Wiesel used single-cell recording to:


29. Uncover the basic organization of the olfactory system
*b. Determine the function of individual neurons in mammalian visual cortex
c. Determine the rate at which information moves across synapses in the mammalian visual
cortex
d. Uncover the role of dopamine and other neurotransmitters in perceptual processes

Learning objective number (if applicable): 1.4


Cognitive domain: Comprehension
Answer location: Neuroscience in Sensation and Perception (18)
Question type: MC

29. The study of the relation of brain damage to changes in behavioral and cognitive function is
known as:

1. Functional Neuroscience
b. Gestalt Psychology
c. Psychophysics
*d. Neuropsychology

Learning objective number (if applicable): 1.4


Cognitive domain: Knowledge
Answer location: Neuroscience in Sensation and Perception (18)
Question type: MC

30. Damage to area V1 in patient DB’s occipital cortex resulted in:


31. A condition known as apraxia
b. A condition known as visual agnosia
*c. Blindness in certain parts of the visual field
d. No behavioral changes
Learning objective number (if applicable): 1.4
Cognitive domain: Comprehension
Answer location: Neuroscience in Sensation and Perception (18)
Question type: MC

31. Which neuroimaging technique measures blood flow to different regions of the brain?

*a. fMRI
b. EEG
c. SAT
d. All of the above

Learning objective number (if applicable): 1.4


Cognitive domain: Knowledge
Answer location: Neuroscience in Sensation and Perception (19)
Question type: MC

32. Agnosia is a(n):


33. Amnesic condition applied to perception
*b. Deficit in some aspect of perception as a result of brain damage
c. Failure to detect visual images due to damage to the eyes
d. Failure to detect sound due to damage to the inner ear

Learning objective number (if applicable): 1.4


Cognitive domain: Knowledge
Answer location: Neuroscience in Sensation and Perception (19)
Question type: MC

33. Sensation and perception research is important for applications to:


34. Civil engineering
b. Developing consoles for airplanes
c. Driving technologies
*d. All of the above

Learning objective number (if applicable): 1.5


Cognitive domain: Application
Answer location: Neuroscience in Sensation and Perception; In Depth: Applications of Sensation
and Perception and Avoiding Collisions (20)
Question type: MC

34. According the size-arrival effect, smaller objects are perceived as:
35. Moving faster
b. Moving slower
c. Closer to the viewer
*d. Farther from the viewer
Learning objective number (if applicable): 1.5
Cognitive domain: Comprehension
Answer location: Neuroscience in Sensation and Perception (21)
Question type: MC

35. A motorcycle is likely to be judged as ____ as it makes a turn while you are driving because it is
_____.

*a. closer; smaller than your car


b. farther away; smaller than your car
c. closer; moving faster than your car
d. farther away; moving slower than your car

Learning objective number (if applicable): 1.5


Cognitive domain: Application
Answer location: Neuroscience in Sensation and Perception (21)
Question type: MC

36. Time to collision is:

*a. The estimate that an approaching object will contact another


b. The likelihood that a moving object will self-destruct
c. The further an object is away from you, the closer it appears
d. When two objects collide, we perceive one as faster than the other

Learning objective number (if applicable): 1.5


Cognitive domain: Knowledge
Answer location: Neuroscience in Sensation and Perception (21)
Question type: MC

37. Prosopagnosia refers to:

*a. An acquired deficit in face perception because of brain damage


b. The complete loss of the somatosensory system
c. Blindness due to brain damage
d. A condition that develops after extended exposure to fMRI fields

Learning objective number (if applicable): 1.4


Cognitive domain: Comprehension
Answer location: Neuroscience in Sensation and Perception (19)
Question type: MC

38. The ecological approach to perception finds fault with experiments that:
39. Focus on audition because vision is more important
*b. Use laboratory stimuli that do not correspond to real-world stimuli
c. Use neuroimaging technology to study perceptual phenomena
d. All of the above
Learning objective number (if applicable): 1.4
Cognitive domain: Comprehension
Answer location: Direct Perception (The Gibsonian Approach) (16)
Question type: MC

39. What does the term JND stand for?


40. Justified null data
b. Judgment of neural density
*c. Just noticeable difference
d. Jaundiced Nasal Dilators

Learning objective number (if applicable): 1.4


Cognitive domain: Knowledge
Answer location: Weber, Fechner, and the Birth of Psychophysics (13)
Question type: MC

40. Which of these people was not important in the development of sensation and perception
research?
41. Hermann von Helmholtz
b.Ewald Hering
c. Gustav Fechner
*d. Ludwig Kessler

Learning objective number (if applicable): 1.4


Cognitive domain: Knowledge
Answer location: The History of Sensation and Perception (9-16)
Question type: MC

41. Human beings have five senses.


42. True
*b. False

Learning objective number (if applicable): 1.2


Cognitive domain: Knowledge
Answer location: The Myth of the Five Senses (4)
Question type: TF

42. Perception is the process of creating conscious perceptual experience from sensory input.

*a. True
b. False

Learning objective number (if applicable): 1.3


Cognitive domain: Knowledge
Answer location: The Basics of Perception (5)
Question type: TF
43. Transduction is the process of converting a physical stimulus into an electrochemical signal.

*a. True
b. False

Learning objective number (if applicable): 1.3


Cognitive domain: Knowledge
Answer location: The Basics of Perception (6)
Question type: TF

44. Phenomenology refers to the pathway of a neural signal from transduction to the brain.
45. True
*b. False

Learning objective number (if applicable): 1.3


Cognitive domain: Knowledge
Answer location: The Nature of Experience and Phenomenology (4)
Question type: TF

45. That the brain needs to reconstruct a visual image based on insufficient information is
consistent with a Constructivist approach.

*a. True
b. False

Learning objective number (if applicable): 1.4


Cognitive domain: Comprehension
Answer location: Hemholtz Versus Hering (11)
Question type: TF

46. Ewald Hering is associated with the development of the idea of unconscious inference in
perception.
47. True
*b. False

Learning objective number (if applicable): 1.4


Cognitive domain: Knowledge
Answer location: Hemholtz Versus Hering (11)
Question type: TF

47. Psychophysics is the study of the relation between physical stimuli and perception events.

*a. True
b. False

Learning objective number (if applicable): 1.4


Cognitive domain: Knowledge
Answer location: Weber, Fechner, and the Birth of Psychophysics (13)
Question type: TF

48. The ecological approach to visual perception stresses the view that perceptual and cognitive
systems can be viewed as the flow of information from one process to another.
49. True
*b. False

Learning objective number (if applicable): 1.4


Cognitive domain: Knowledge
Answer location: Direct Perception (The Gibsonian Approach) (16)
Question type: TF

49. Neuropsychology is the study of the relation of brain damage to changes in behavior.

*a. True
b. False

Learning objective number (if applicable): 1.4


Cognitive domain: Knowledge
Answer location: Neuroscience in Sensation and Perception (18)
Question type: TF

50. The size-arrival effect is the idea that bigger approaching objects are seen as being more likely
to collide with the viewer than smaller approaching objects.

*a. True
b. False

Learning objective number (if applicable): 1.5


Cognitive domain: Knowledge
Answer location: Neuroscience in Sensation and Perception (21)
Question type: TF