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CURRICULUM FOR VOICE BEGINNER 3 years and 6 months to 7 years old (draft)

Design for ArtsInMotion Studio


Type of curriculum: Linear
Designed by Teacher Dixie
Duration: 60 minutes, preferably twice a week with at least one day in between

Objectives (at the end of the 12 sessions, the student must be able to)
Sing in tune and sing independently without straining the voice
Explore their voice instrument
Sing expressively with movement coordination and with confidence
Play kid friendly musical instruments with beat and rhythm
Develop aural analysis
Execute basic singing technique
Perform in culminating activity

METHOD & MUSICAL LITERACY


By exploring, creating, replicating, and observing sounds and music, students build their technical and expressive sk
introduced to concepts that will prepare them for basic music theories in the next level and help build their musica

PHYSIOLOGY
It is important to know the physical aspects of the instrument and how it works. This knowledge is an important fac
TECHNIQUE
students will have the first hand experience and getting to know of the basic concepts in vocal production
REPERTOIRE
students will be given at least 1 song assignment to train their rehearsal and performace techniques.
PERFORMANCE
student will perform as a group in a culminating activity for exposure to performing arts experience.

Requirements:
Reprtoire: at least one (1) individual song (applicable only for students who can already sing independently), one (1) round song or one (1
Play-sing at home practice: 50mins minutes/week

Session Content
1 (diagnostic), 2 METHOD & MUSIC LITERACY
Pitch exploration and vocal warm up
Fragment singing

Movement exploration and warm up

PHYSIOLOGY
Your instrument
The power source

TECHNIQUE
Posture
Breath
Phonation

Resonation
Articulation

3, 4 METHOD & MUSIC LITERACY


Simple songs
Arioso

Song Tales

Movement for form and expression

PHYSIOLOGY
The sound source

TECHNIQUE
Posture
Breath
Phonation
Resonation
Articulation

5, 6 METHOD & MUSIC LITERACY


Pitch exploration and vocal warm up
Vocal acting
Fragment singing
Movement for form and expression

PHYSIOLOGY
Resonators
Articulators

TECHNIQUE
Posture
Breath
Phonation

Resonance
7, 8 PERFORMANCE TECHNIQUE
Vocal acting

Stage play
o)

students build their technical and expressive skils, develop their artistry and a unique personal voice in music, and experience the power o
es in the next level and help build their musicality.

ow it works. This knowledge is an important factor to mastering the instrument that will exponentially develop the student’s skill.

he basic concepts in vocal production

rsal and performace techniques.

e to performing arts experience.

g independently), one (1) round song or one (1) 2-part or 3-part singing piece as a group, 1 group musical play

Content standards (the learner understands that)

There are low sounds and high sounds to match a pitch


Singing tunes can be heard inside their minds and felt througho

Motif is a short phrase prominent in a song


Musical elements can be expressed through movements

The whole body is used in singing


Awareness to the movement of the intrinsic muscles and abdomina

Alignment and proper posture should be maintained while singi


Inhilation is important and should not be neglected
Initiating phonation should start with inhilation
To sing proper vocal placement in its equivalent appropriate regi
To sing well is to open the mouth in singing and speaking
To sing well is to speak well

There are different dynamics used in singing and expression such a


Dynamics is necessary to express in singing
He or she can use the voice through singing and speech creative
Learning music requires expressive sensitivity through listening

He or she can use fine locomotor skills to express musical conce

Awareness to the sound source is needed for singing

Maintaining relaxed body in correct alignment of singing


Upbeat inhilation and natural breathe in breathe out manages the
Using proper vocal placement in its equivalent appropriate regist
To sing well is to open the mouth in speech and singing
To sing well is to speak well

There are different sounds in environment that can be reproduce


Different vocal colors to portray character or mood
Muic is fluid and spontaneous
Movement while singing should be fluid with dynamic expressions

Good sound is produced through proper usage of resonators


Good articulation is being in control of articulators

Proper posture should be always present while singing


Using the power source helps in breath management in singing
Relaxed phonation is important

Free tonewith focus and intensity can be achieved thru open voca

Voice can be used to portray a character or tell a story using mu


Using dynamics the voice can portray and communicate expressio
Stage space can work in their favor where they can move freely
artistry and a unique personal voice in music, and experience the power of music to communicate. Students will be

he instrument that will exponentially develop the student’s skill.

singing piece as a group, 1 group musical play

Performance standard (the learner must be able to)

Use vocal glissandos without straining the voice and exhibit proper use of tone in different registers
Aurally recognize steady beat and sing with a steady beat
Recognize rhythmic and melodic patterns and initiate singing independently and comfortably with accuracy in pitch, r

Listen and identify motifs by singing different demonstrated motifs by the teacher
Explore and express musical elemnts (high sound and low sound, soft and loud) comfortably through movement and impro
Move with steady beat on a music

Identify and isolate stretching the head, shoulders, pelvis, knees, ankles, and feet
Recognize and exercise intrinsic muscles and core muscles

Recognize inappropriate posture in singing and maintain proper posture during vocalizations
Perform apoggio breathing exercises
Relaxed movement of voice box and continuous vibration of the vocal folds thru lip tril glissandos and hum thru a straw
Aural recognition and singing natural voice and headtone through vocalizations imitating animals
Speak words with formed vowels and sing with free tone on vowels and close vowels
Perform simple articulation exercises with ease
Sing with correct formation of mouth in singing vowels

Sing and play play with accuracy kid friendly percussion instrument in contrasting tonalities and tempo
Sing expressively using the dynamics p, pp, f, ff
Display creativity by using syllables in tonal centered improvisation and rhythmic patterns
Analyze song through listening and then identifying and relating tonal components to their own understanding and feeli
Sing ballads with interpretation and expression
Sing and play with expression through finger plays, action songs, and musical games

Exercise isolation of the parts of the sound source, head, neck and shoulders

Stretch and contract muscles through isolation exercises


Comfortably and habitualy inhale in correct phrasing through using sounds such as “zzz” and “tss” in different patterns
Sing the different vocal placements and the proper tone according to range and register without strain in the voice thr
Speak words with formed vowels and sing with free tone on vowels through vocalises
Read and recite song text with proper enunciation and diction through practiced movement of articulators
Sing with correct articulation consonants and well formed vowels

Aural recognition and performance of different sounds in different soundscapes such as nature, animals, metro city.
Display agility and vocal acting through picture games, finger plays, and character pretend
Sing echo songs and call and response songs with fluidity and confidence
Sing and move an entire song with fluidity and gracefulness, with expression using musical elements (dynamics such as p,
Sing and play with kid friendly percussion or toned (example; xylophone)) instrument using colors and numbers for rep

Identify and exercise the muscles used for resonance


Display awareness of the usage of the articulators thru simple vocalises that emphasizes on the natural feel of usage of

Develop a muscle memory of proper posture while singing thru practice of maintaining an elongated spine while singin
Feel the muscles involve in the powerhouse thru different exercises with emphasis in vocal formants and open vocal tract
Lip trill in two to three notes
Hum in short phrases with focus
Do vocal glissandos with projection and free tone quality

Tell stories and portray character using vocal play utilizing learned musical dynamics (p, pp, f, ff, crescendo, decrescendo
Utilize voice to portray and communicate mood, feelings and expressions through small but impactul nuances
Create stage movement in singing expressively with confidence to the large space environment
ames, play, listening, finger plays, character game, story telling, toys, creative visual aids, creative vocalises)

Illustration for vocal glissandos


Egg shaker/castanet/drum/tambourine
Cards for colors and numbers, echo songs, 3-note vocalises
Call and response songs and percussion instrument (shaker/castanets/tambourine)
Short musical phrases with open vowel syllables, 3-note vocalises
Listening tracks (30seconds to 1minute only) with contrasting tonalities and tempo
Medium sized ball easy for dribbling

Listening
Scarf or light cloth, stretching/exercise

String puppet, wall, visual aids


Help the fire fighter (animation), paper mill, candle light (animation)
Straw, kazoo, visual aids
Animal visual aids and listening sample, short story
Flashcards of fruits, objects, colors, alphabets, vowels and consonants
Flash cards of objects with pictures, 3-4 sentences composed of words used for technical practice of constrictors

8-10 bars song & listening track


Illustration
Echo song type vocalise
Listening track

Illustration, story, finger puppets, gloves

Stringed puppet, visual aid, exercise


Visual aids, story game or story telling with visual aids (animation), straw
Visual aids, ample listening, story telling, 2-note vocalises
Round objects for demonstration imatating the space inside the mouth, visual aid
Illustration of the text, flash cards of letters, story telling game
Play vocalises

Illustrations and listening tracks


Empji illustrations, listening tracks
Echo song or call and response song or question and answer vocalise
Listening track, video presentation, visual aid
Percussion instruments, color representation visuals, medium sized ball

Mirror, 2- note vocalises


Illustration of articulators, alphabet flash cards with pictures, 2-4 words tongue twister

Mirror
act

Medium size balls

Short fun story with different characters


Story telling. Play pretend, listening, hand puppets,
Wide venue, listening tracks, play pretend, props for character impersonation
VOICE CURRICULUM for beginner to intermediate 8 years old and above (draft)
Type of curriculum: Spiral
Designed for ArtsInMotion
Designed by Teacher Dixie
Duration: 1 hour per session

Objectives (at the end of the 12 sessions, the student must be able to)
Sing in tune and sing independently without straining the voice
Explore their voice instrument
Sing expressively with movement with confidence
Bare knowledge of basic music theory and fundamental elements of music
Develop aural analysis
Execute basic singing technique
Perform in culminating activity
Build thier own repertoire
REQUIREMENTS:

Repertoire (for Beginner): 2 songs with contrasting style, 1 etude, 1


participation in musical play; (for intermediate) 2-3 songs with contrasting
style, 1 duet, 1 participation in musical play
Practice hours: 100 minutes/week

DURATION OF SESSION: STRICTLY MAXIMUM OF ONE (1) HOUR for adults. Young beginners should only have 30 minutes of vocal lessons,

METHOD
Different methods by reknown vocal padagogues will be used in studying
appropriate vocal and breathing techniques necessary during the vocal
exercises to develop vocal skills for the student.
MUSICAL LITERACY
In order to pursue lifelong music making, music students should understand basic written notation including rhythm, note movements and
students to follow along with some of the songs selected in class, they will need to have a general understanding of how to read sheet mu
memorized, students who read basic sheet music will be able to quickly refer to sections of the song during lessons. In many cases, in ord
making, students will need to understand basic notation (Usher, 2012). Because participation in community music will be encouraged, ba
music theory in the curriculum will be necessary (Abrahams, 2005).
There are a variety of music theory exercises that will be included in the curriculum. During the first section of the curriculum, students w
be expected to memorize note names, but they will learn that when the note heads move up on the staff the voice gets higher and vice ve
sung as intervals. Students will also be able to follow along with their part when looking at the sheet music. In order for students to succe
musical markings such as D.S. al Coda, Coda and repeat signs. In the second and third sections, students will learn how to sing the whole
scales. In the third section, students will learn how to play, sing, write and analyze intervals. Key signatures will be introduced in the fifth
have sharps or flats in them, while others do not. Finally, students will learn about accidentals in the melody line. Understanding these co
and with community music groups.

IMPROVISATION
This section will be incorporated within the bounds of the Music Literacy. should learn how to improvise because studies on improvisation
creativity (Campbell, 1998; Harwood, 1998; Marsh, 2008). The development of creativity is essential for all musicians because it allows th
2000). Because creativity is a student need, there is a moral obligation to include exercises that teach creativity in the curriculum (Froehlic
through improvisational exercises (Nettl, 1998; Pressing, 1998). Improvisation consists of simultaneously performing and creating music, w
abilities (Nettl, 1998; Pressing, 1998). Including improvisation as a learning objective follows a praxial philosophy because improvisation e
2009).
This curriculum will include improvisation activities in order to help develop more creative musicians. In the first section, students will cre
accompaniment. During these improvisation exercises, students will express their emotions vocally and practice using different rhythms (
will and create and sing their own melodies along with a chord progression. Students will also practice singing along with the piano using
fifth sections, students will no longer sing with a chord progression, but rather they will improvise over a piano accompaniment. This will
time (Beegle, 2010). In the final section, students will improvise harmony along with another voice. They will also practice singing a main
By participating in these improvisational activities, students will practice being creative.
PHYSIOLOGY
It is important to know the physical aspects of the instrument and how it works. This knowledge is an important factor to mastering the in
skill. Vocal techqniues will not be fully realized unless the student is the master of his or her own instrument.

TECHNIQUE
Students should learn vocal and breathing techniques because if students sing without understanding these techniques vocal issues could
tension, over singing, pushing air through the vocal chords and nodules can seriously affect a student’s vocal health (Mathis, 1990). In som
breathing exercises (Cahill, 2010). Learning vocal and breathing techniques can also strengthen the tone of the voice, extend vocal range a
This objective will be included in the curriculum because teachers have a moral obligation to make sure that student needs are met (Froeh
continue singing throughout their life are necessary and therefore, vocal and breathing technique will be required as a learning objective i
Technique will be taught through vocal and breathing exercises. Exercises can be modified to suit individual student needs, but the conce
student. Students who follow the curriculum map will learn new concepts in each section. In the first section, students will learn how to
exercises will help students loosen up the tension they have when they breathe (Fett, 1993). Students will develop their ability to match p
exercises that require students to match pitch with an instrument or voice (Moon, 2006). The second section will involve students develop
exercises of more than one octave (Cahill, 2010). Students will also focus on using the diaphragm to control the breath. There are many b
movement of the diaphragm when breathing (Gackle, 1987). In the third section, students will learn about the different dynamics and wil
(Hilty, 2011). Students will continue to work on taking low breaths controlled by the diaphragm and also will practice taking quick catch br
fourth section will include singing in the head voice, chest voice and mix voice and singing melodic phrases. Students will practice melodic
slurs or other phrase markings and planning where they will breathe. In the fifth section, students will practice switching between the thr
ranges. Students will learn how to breathe in preparation for long phrases (Cahill, 2010). In the final section, students will sing vocal exerc
tones (Laukka, 2003). Students will continue to practice their diaphragm breathing until it becomes second nature. By training the voice a
their vocal technique and be able to sing more difficult musical pieces without harming their voices.

REPERTOIRE
There is a disconnection between songs taught in schools and songs learned in everyday life (Mills, 2010). Many students identify with mu
most music taught in schools (Schmidt, 2005). It is important to allow students to choose their own songs in order to develop their own m
reason, students will be allowed to choose their own songs with teacher guidance. By allowing students to make musical choices, teacher
in the studio (Abrahams, 1997). When students feel that the teacher respects music of “their world”, they will be more willing to learn ab
musical world. This mutual respect will lead to real learning for both the students and the teacher (Abrahams, 1997).
This curriculum will require number of songs with contrast, and a vocal etude. In this curriculum there will be opportunities for students to
course, students will choose songs according to their own preference. These choices will need to be approved by the teacher. The studen
the teacher has pre-selected for the student. This will allow the student some control over which song they sing, but also will allow the te
selecting songs from different genres that best suit the student’s unique voice (Abrahams, 2005). These songs will be related to the stude
At the end of the course the student will be able to select one song that they want to sing and one song that the teacher has pre-selected
selecting which two songs to sing for the ending recital. By selecting their own songs, students will develop a sense of their musical self.

PERFORMANCE TECHNIQUE
Performance practice will be included in the curriculum because it helps students conquer anxiety and positively affects student’s self-effic
comfortable in front of a crowd and their anxiety will begin to fade (Tobacyk, 1986). When students begin to feel comfortable performing
encouraged to continue performing. This will increase the student’s self-efficacy (Joet & Bressoux, 2011). Self-efficacy is “the measure of o
goals” (Ormrod, 2006). Increased self-efficacy and lack of anxiety when performing are two extrinsic benefits that music students will gain
2012). Therefore, performance is an integral objective.
In order to best suit student needs, there will be a few performance opportunities in the curriculum. The first two opportunities will be sm
for a few family members or just for themselves. These performances will be recorded, so students can listen back and analyze their perfo
performance will be given by all of the students. This will be a large-scale performance because all students will gather and share what th
and close friends. By participating in these performance opportunities, students will gain increased self-efficacy and will therefore no long

METHOD/MATERIALS USED
Vaccai Method
Marchesi Method
Concone
Dannheüser
Richard Miller Handout
Anne Peckham Method
Full body mirror
Yoga mat
Speaker and piano
Visual aids (white board, pictures, and videos)
Content
MUSIC LITERACY
Funadamental elements of music
Music notation
Solfeggio
Phrasing

PHYSIOLOGY
Power source
Sound source
Resonators
Articulators

TECHNIQUE
Posture
Breath
Phonation
Resonation
Articulation
PERFORMANCE TECHNIQUE
Vocal acting

Stage play
aft)

oung beginners should only have 30 minutes of vocal lessons, anything more than the suggested time frame is already counter productive

basic written notation including rhythm, note movements and sheet music orientation (Usher, 2012). In order for
eed to have a general understanding of how to read sheet music. While these songs could be learned by ear and
r to sections of the song during lessons. In many cases, in order for students to participate in community music
ause participation in community music will be encouraged, based on a critical pedagogy philosophy, including basic

riculum. During the first section of the curriculum, students will learn how to read melodic notation. Students will not
e heads move up on the staff the voice gets higher and vice versa. Large jumps in the music will be recognized and
when looking at the sheet music. In order for students to successfully read their vocal line, they will need to understand
and third sections, students will learn how to sing the whole steps and half steps that make up major and minor
nalyze intervals. Key signatures will be introduced in the fifth section, so students can understand why some songs
about accidentals in the melody line. Understanding these concepts will help students learn new songs on their own

hould learn how to improvise because studies on improvisation suggest that a link exists between improvisation and
t of creativity is essential for all musicians because it allows them to express themselves in original ways (Simonton,
clude exercises that teach creativity in the curriculum (Froehlich, 2006). Students should develop their creativity
on consists of simultaneously performing and creating music, which may aid students in discovering their own creative
objective follows a praxial philosophy because improvisation exercises lead to critical thinking and creativity (Barrett,

more creative musicians. In the first section, students will create and sing their own melodies without
s their emotions vocally and practice using different rhythms (Kiehn, 2003). Parts of the session, student is expected to
Students will also practice singing along with the piano using different dynamics, trills and rhythms. In the fourth and
er they will improvise over a piano accompaniment. This will challenge students to hear two melodic lines at the same
ong with another voice. They will also practice singing a main melody with harmony in the other voice and vice versa.
ng creative.
orks. This knowledge is an important factor to mastering the instrument that will exponentially develop the student’s
ter of his or her own instrument.

ng without understanding these techniques vocal issues could arise (McKinney, 2005). Vocal problems such as muscle
seriously affect a student’s vocal health (Mathis, 1990). In some cases these issues can be handled with vocal and
an also strengthen the tone of the voice, extend vocal range and allow students to sing longer phrases (Sipley, 1993).
oral obligation to make sure that student needs are met (Froehlich, 2006). Healthy voices that will allow students to
d breathing technique will be required as a learning objective in this curriculum.
an be modified to suit individual student needs, but the concepts listed in the curriculum map will be taught to every
n each section. In the first section, students will learn how to take low, relaxed breaths. Relaxation and meditation
the (Fett, 1993). Students will develop their ability to match pitch and develop their vocal tone by singing ear-training
Moon, 2006). The second section will involve students developing and extending their vocal range by practicing vocal
using the diaphragm to control the breath. There are many breathing exercises that will allow students to see the
ction, students will learn about the different dynamics and will practice singing their chosen songs at different volumes
d by the diaphragm and also will practice taking quick catch breaths when singing their songs. Concepts taught in the
ce and singing melodic phrases. Students will practice melodic phrasing in their songs by changing dynamics, adding
fifth section, students will practice switching between the three voices by singing vocal exercises that have large
Cahill, 2010). In the final section, students will sing vocal exercises that allow them to experiment with different vocal
eathing until it becomes second nature. By training the voice and body in these ways, students will gain control over
ut harming their voices.

in everyday life (Mills, 2010). Many students identify with music they hear outside of the classroom, but not with
nts to choose their own songs in order to develop their own musical identity (Hargreaves & Marshall, 2003). For this
dance. By allowing students to make musical choices, teachers will allow students to have a certain amount of power
ts music of “their world”, they will be more willing to learn about other genres of music that are a part of the teacher’s
dents and the teacher (Abrahams, 1997).
e. In this curriculum there will be opportunities for students to choose new songs to sing. In the beginning of the
e choices will need to be approved by the teacher. The students will be able to choose from a selection of songs that
me control over which song they sing, but also will allow the teacher to broaden the student’s musical horizons by
ce (Abrahams, 2005). These songs will be related to the student’s favorite songs, but they will be of a different genre.
y want to sing and one song that the teacher has pre-selected. The student will then have complete power when
wn songs, students will develop a sense of their musical self.

dents conquer anxiety and positively affects student’s self-efficacy. Students who perform regularly will become more
, 1986). When students begin to feel comfortable performing, they will feel a sense of accomplishment and will be
cacy (Joet & Bressoux, 2011). Self-efficacy is “the measure of one’s own competence to complete tasks and reach
orming are two extrinsic benefits that music students will gain when they participate in performances (C. Phillips,

unities in the curriculum. The first two opportunities will be small scale, in studio performances. Students will perform
e recorded, so students can listen back and analyze their performances. At the end of the course, a recital
erformance because all students will gather and share what they learned in front of other students, parents, siblings
ents will gain increased self-efficacy and will therefore no longer be plagued by performance anxiety.
Performance standard (the learner must be able to)

Accuracy in pitch matching, reproducing rhythmic pattern, perform dynamics and aurally recognize timbre.
Read basic music notation
Sight read notes with simple to slightly complex melody
Interpret music notation with musical artistry

Learn and isolate each part of the power source


Learn and isolate each part of the sound source
Identify parts of the resonators and its function and its proper and improper use
Identify parts of the articulators and its function and its proper and improper use

Release tension in legs, spine, shoulders, arms, and neck by stretching and manipulation. Align instrument by lining up feet, hips, shoulder
Inhale with side ribs as well as diaphragm. Slow down the rate of exhalation by using intercostal and abdominal muscles. Use the concept
Onset of tone is coordinated between breath and glottal closure. Sound is neither breathy or pressed. Glottal stops are used to initiate sou
Optimize the tone to produce a solid core sound. Each vowel has a distinct shape that has an optimal sound throughout the range. Registe
Independence of the jaw, lips, tongue and soft palate is cultivated to form consonants and vowels. Articulator movements are coordinated

Tell stories and portray character using vocal play utilizing learned musical expressions
Utilize voice to portray and communicate mood, feelings and expressions through small but impactful nuances
Create stage movement in singing expressively with confidence to the large space environment
counter productive as the vocal muscles need time for muscle memory to build up If a wrong technique is the one that the muscle memor
feet, hips, shoulders and ears. Position rib cage in a stable and broad, but flexible, high position with the sternum pulled up.
s. Use the concept of appoggio breathing
used to initiate sound. Upper harmonics are initially apparent and tone has immediate presence. Releases are also coordinated, with harm
t the range. Registers are balanced and the transitions blended. Range is seamless with no register events. Tone has chiaroscuro quality. To
nts are coordinated with the diaphragm to energize consosnants. Vowel/consonant and consonant vowel joins are swift with no anticipatio
le memorized, it is disasteous for both the student and the teacher as the student will have a hard time undoing the muscle memory and t
with harmonics apparent to the end of the tone. Tone is not stopped by a closure, but by cessation of breath.
quality. Tone projects with harmonics in the room and resounds throughout the whole room. Singer’s forma t is present. Tone is clear but h
anticipation or shadowing. Diphthongs are precise and appropriate
mory and the teacher will have to fix this. . Singing for more than an hour is dangerous to the student’s vocal muscles. Anything further tha
clear but has dimensionality.
further than this can cause injury to the voice. Especially for beginners who are yet to develop and form their vocal muscles to perform as
perform as how it should funtion and how it should be used. Anything more than 1 hour of continuous singing is considered as vocal abuse
ocal abuse and will cause vocal problems such as vocal folds nodules which is the common effect pf abused voice instrument. Educated vo
ducated vocal pedagogues should know how to handle these voice muscles with delicate care as these muscles are also delicate to misuse.
to misuse. A singer in training always secure the vocal technique first before endulging in long rehearsals. A misintruction to voice student
ice student coud cause injury and the teacher and the studio is LIABLE to the student’s wellfare. The studio should understand that vocal m
hat vocal muscles are not as externally strong as the ither muscles used in instrument playing such as the fingers and arms for the violin, be
he violin, because the muscles involve in vocal production are intrinsic muscles. For example, an untrained voice not equipped to a sing son
o a sing song of a whole new different level could cause vocal faults. That is why vocal pedagouges use apropriate songs for each voice to si
voice to sing. And every addition to the repertoire is ONLY a little more challenging than the previous song encounter to make sure vocal
sure vocal production is done correctly and healthily. The problem with uneducated vocal trainers is that they are not well informed about
med about how these vocal muscles develop throughout it stages (from birth to adulthood) and tends to neglect that each student has diff
ent has different natural vocal characteristics, capacities, natural strengths and weaknesses. This is what educated voice teachers should b
rs should be aware of. Singing is more than just singing in tune, belting out a high note, and vocal styling. It is an elite sports science, anato
ence, anatomy and theraphy based training that is intended to enhance each bodily muscle for vocal production. Vocal instruction is a spec
on is a specialized field that has to be done by teachers who are equipped with scientific knowledge of vocal production, and equipped wit
uipped with a teaching skill to make the unknowledgable student in training understand how the voice works for a lifetime of music making
usic making. The studio, the parents, and the student should also understand that as the vocal muscles changes throughout their formative
ir formative years and so achieving a monumental vocal performance takes time and more than the set of sessions enrolled to one enrollm
ne enrollment, which is the same to any kind of bodily movements such as sports and other intrument playing. The more you add to your
dd to your training the more you develop your voice to perform more. It goes without saying that an “intense” vocal training is not based o
not based on the length of each session but based on the productivity by the minute of each session. Frequency weighs more than one tim
an one time big time long hours of session.