Sunteți pe pagina 1din 24

CMAC121

Point Location
Session 2
Hand Tai Yin (Lung) Channel

Chinese Medicine Department

All channel diagrams used with permission.

Deadman, P., Al-Khafaji, M., & Baker, K. (2007). A manual of acupuncture (2nd ed.).
Hove, East Sussex: Journal of Chinese Medicine Publications.

© Endeavour College of Natural Health www.endeavour.edu.au 1


Session 2 Content
• Review
• Introduction to Point Categories
• Points of the Lung Channel
o Location
o Categories
o Actions Indications, contraindications &
cautions

© Endeavour College of Natural Health www.endeavour.edu.au 2


Review
Class Discussion

Outcomes of student investigation into


“What is an acupuncture point?”

Any other questions arising from last


session.

© Endeavour College of Natural Health www.endeavour.edu.au 3


INTRODUCTION TO POINT
CATEGORIES

© Endeavour College of Natural Health www.endeavour.edu.au 4


Introduction to Point
Categories
Specific points of the fourteen meridian
that share special properties are grouped
into categories.

What do you think that the purpose of


categorizing points might be?

© Endeavour College of Natural Health www.endeavour.edu.au 5


Commonly Used
Point Categories
• 5 Shu Transporting • Xi Cleft Points
Points • Yuan Source Points
o Jing Well, • Luo Connecting Points
o Ying Spring,
• Back Shu Points
o Shu Stream,
o Jing River, • Front Mu Points
o He Sea • Hui Meeting Points
• Lower He Sea Points (Influential)
• 8 Confluent Points
• 4 & 6 Command Points
• Crossing Points (only major
ones covered)
© Endeavour College of Natural Health www.endeavour.edu.au 6
Other Point Categories
• Lower He Sea Points
• 12 Heavenly Star Points of Ma Dan–Yang
• Window of Heaven
• Ghost Points
• Nine needles for returning yang
• Points of the Four Seas

© Endeavour College of Natural Health www.endeavour.edu.au 7


Student Directed Learning
• In your own time.

• Using the set text pp. 29-51 (also available as the


Deadman reading for session 1) each student
investigates one or two point categories and
develops a short one or two line statement
summarizing their allocated category.

• This will be to shared with the class next session.

© Endeavour College of Natural Health www.endeavour.edu.au 8


LUNG CHANNEL

© Endeavour College of Natural Health www.endeavour.edu.au 9


Points of the Lung Channel

Lung Channel (Deadman, Al-Khafaji & Baker. 2007, pp. 73)

© Endeavour College of Natural Health www.endeavour.edu.au 10


Indications of Lung Channel

Portion of Channel Major Indications


Chest Chest & lung

Hand & Arm Throat, chest ,lung

Table 1. Indications of Lung Channel (Ellis, Wiseman, Boss & Cleaver, 2004, pp. 57, 88)

© Endeavour College of Natural Health www.endeavour.edu.au 11


Group Work
Investigating the Lung Points
• Break into small groups
• Take ten minutes for each group to investigate
categories, actions, indications, contraindications &
cautions of one or two points each.
o Deadman has grouped indications for each point.
o Summarize indications for each point into one or two words
for each group of indications in the text.
o Do any indications for your selected points relate to the
functions of the Lung Zang?
o How are indications reflected in the point actions?
o Is there a relationship between the category and actions?
• Share your findings with the class.

© Endeavour College of Natural Health www.endeavour.edu.au 12


Common Clinical Use of
Lung Points
• Which Lung point has the action to tonify
the Lung?
• Which Lung point releases the exterior and
expels wind?
• Which lung point moderates acute
conditions?
• Which Lung points disseminate and
descend Lung qi?

© Endeavour College of Natural Health www.endeavour.edu.au 13


Common Clinical Use of
Lung Points
• Which Lung point is indicated for
headache and stiff neck?
• Which Lung point regulates the water
passages?
• Which lung points benefit the throat?
• Which Lung points disseminate and
descend Lung qi?

© Endeavour College of Natural Health www.endeavour.edu.au 14


BREAK

© Endeavour College of Natural Health www.endeavour.edu.au 15


Lung Channel
Anatomical Landmarks
• Lateral extremity of clavicle
• Lateral border of biceps brachii muscle
• Biceps brachii tendon
• Cubital crease
• Distal wrist crease
• Radial artery
• Abductor pollicis longus
© Endeavour College of Natural Health www.endeavour.edu.au 16
Specific Directional
Terms of Hand

Directional terms hand (Esseh, 2007)

© Endeavour College of Natural Health www.endeavour.edu.au 17


Lung Channel
Cun Measurements

Proportional measurement arm yin (Deadman et al., 2007, p. 63)

© Endeavour College of Natural Health www.endeavour.edu.au 18


Point Location
Demonstration & Group Work
Lecturer demonstrates on a student how to use
proportional measurements on the arm and to
locate the points of the Lung channel.

Students form pairs or groups of three and


locate the points on each other.

© Endeavour College of Natural Health www.endeavour.edu.au 19


Lung Channel Case Study
Julia, a thirty-year-old mother of two young children
presents for prevention treatment of asthma. She has
had asthma since she was a child. Julia often suffers
attacks in cold weather. During an attack her chest feels
tight.

Julia’s acupuncturist has diagnosed her with:


Lung Qi deficiency with retention of phlegm in the Lung.
Treatment Principle: Tonify Lung qi, Resolve phlegm.

© Endeavour College of Natural Health www.endeavour.edu.au 20


Group Work
Break into small groups of 4 or 5 students.

Create a simple point prescription for Julia based upon actions, indication
and location of points.

• Select at least two points on the lung channel.


• Select at one point from the Conception Vessel.
• Include at least one local chest point in your prescription.
• What point/s would you use during an attack? Why?
• Do any of these points carry a caution when needling?
• Discuss whether the indications of the points you have chosen reflect the
indications of other points on the Lung channel.

© Endeavour College of Natural Health www.endeavour.edu.au 21


Coming Events
• Session 3 – Pericardium
Channel

• 5 Shu (Transporting) Points

• Reminder – do your directed


learning from slide 7 and
bring findings to class next
session.

• Do activities and pre and post


reading outlined in SSG.

Cinemaaustralia (De Sousa, 2006)

© Endeavour College of Natural Health www.endeavour.edu.au 22


References
De Sousa, F. (2006). Cinemaaustralia [Image]. Retrieved June 17, 2015, from
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cinemaaustralia.jpg

Deadman, P., Al-Khafaji, M., & Baker, K. (2007). A manual of acupuncture (2nd ed.). Hove, East Sussex: Journal of Chinese Medicine
Publications.[Available as web app 2013, mobile app 2009 or text 2007]

Ellis, A. W., Wiseman, N., Boss, K., & Feit, R. (1993). Fundamentals of Chinese acupuncture. Brookline, MA: Paradigm Publications :
Distributed by Redwing Book Co.

Esseh. (2007). Hand directional axes [Image]. Retrieved June 2, 2015, from
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Hand_Directional_Axes.JPG

Maciocia, G., & CAc, G. M. (2015). The foundations of chinese medicine: A comprehensive text for acupuncturists and herbalists (3rd
ed.). Edinburgh: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone.

Tortora, G. J., & Derrickson, B. (2014). Principles of anatomy and physiology (14th ed.). Danvers MA: John Wiley & Sons.

© Endeavour College of Natural Health www.endeavour.edu.au 23


© Endeavour College of Natural Health www.endeavour.edu.au 24