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AIN SHAMS UNIVERSITY

FACULTY of ENGINEERING

GRADUATION PROJECT FALL 2016

AIN SHAMS UNIVERSITY FACULTY of ENGINEERING GRADUATION PROJECT FALL 2016

SECON NILE TOWERS HILTON

SECON NILE TOWERS “ HILTON ”

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

Apart from our effort, the success of our project depends largely on the encouragement and guidelines of many others. We take this opportunity to express my gratitude to the people who have been instrumental in the successful completion of this project.

We would like to show our greatest appreciation to Prof. Dr. Ibrahim ABD El-Rashid and Prof. Dr. Ali Montaser for instructing us during the project period. We also would like to thank Eng. Mohamed Saeed and Eng. Madonna Nabil Without their encouragement and guidance this project would not have materialized.

Finally, we owe our deepest gratitude for our parents as we would have never made it without their endless love and support.

ABSTRACT

Let's shed light upon the importance of this graduation project which is to perform a management plan for SECON HILTON TOWERS. The First chapter discussed the project description, Overview on the project, Participants of the project, project delivery system, also discussed Organization Break Down Structure, HR Management and Communication Management. The Second chapter discussed Site layout and Material Management Principles. The Third chapter discussed Tender procedures, project documents such as B.O.Q, Shop Drawings, Submittal and specifications. The Forth chapter discussed Scope Management and Working Break Down Structure. The Fifth chapter discussed Construction Methods and Optimum Alternatives. The Sixth chapter discussed Contracts and Procurement Management. The Seventh chapter discussed Planning, Scheduling using Primavera and MS project and how to get CPM, we also discussed Resource Management. The Eight chapter discussed Cost Estimate, how to draw S-curve and Time-Cost trade off. The Ninth chapter discussed how to update activities, time and cost Integrated system and also discussed Progress Reports. The Tenth chapter discussed Quality Management and how to make plan, assurance and control, also discussed template of Inspection tests. The Eleventh chapter discussed Productivity in Construction and how to measure productivity and improve it.

The Twelfth chapter discussed Risk Management and how to plan well for any risk happened. The Thirteenth chapter discussed Health, Safety and Environmental Management, also discussed Safety procedures in the site. The Fourteenth chapter discussed Building Information Modelling, Clash Detection, also discussed BOQ form Revit and 4D Modelling NavisWorks. The Fifteenth chapter discussed changes, claims, Disputes, settlement of Disputes, how to make delay analysis and extension of time, also discussed Value engineering and Constructability. The Sixteenth chapter discussed Project close out procedure and reports.

Chapter 1

DESCRIPTION

Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION PROJECT DESCRIPTION “ Chapter 1 ” 1

PROJECT

DESCRIPTION

Chapter 1

Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION PROJECT DESCRIPTION “ Chapter 1 ” 1

1

Chapter 1

DESCRIPTION

Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION Secon Nile towers 1 Project Description 1.1 Overall project description: Fig. 1.0 (Secon

Secon Nile towers

1 Project Description

1.1 Overall project description:

1 Project Description 1.1 Overall project description: Fig. 1.0 (Secon towers planned view) The project is

Fig. 1.0 (Secon towers planned view)

The project is located at El-Maadi Corniche El-Nile with a spectacular design and view on the biggest spot on Nile & El- Dahab Island, and the sight of Giza pyramids, the project is built on 10000 Meter Square, directly on the Nile corniche next to Al- Salam Hospital, the project is composed of 2 towers, 23 Typical floors each and 3 Basement each, as follows:

- 1 st Tower: Residential tower deluxe finishing.

- 2 nd Tower: Five-star hotel.

2

Chapter 1

DESCRIPTION

Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION Fig.1.1 (Area divisions at the site) -The project budget: 928,250,000 Egyptian pound Only.
Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION Fig.1.1 (Area divisions at the site) -The project budget: 928,250,000 Egyptian pound Only.
Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION Fig.1.1 (Area divisions at the site) -The project budget: 928,250,000 Egyptian pound Only.

Fig.1.1 (Area divisions at the site)

-The project budget: 928,250,000 Egyptian pound Only. -The type of contract is unit price. -The Contract is written according to FIDIC 1987.

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Chapter 1

DESCRIPTION

Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION 1.1.1 Scope of the Project: A. the Works to be executed under this

1.1.1 Scope of the Project:

A. the Works to be executed under this Contract comprise of the

execution, completion and remedy of defects of The Falcon Tower Project, all in accordance and as shown in the contract documents. The works are briefly as follows:

B. Tower of total 23 floors and 3 basements, comprise Hotel Suites

and guest rooms with a total of 137 Unit and residential towers offer 108 Unit luxurious apartments of high standard finishing and

accessories.

And this hotel will be a Hilton hotel.

Hilton Hotels & Resorts is an international chain of full-service hotels and resorts and the flagship brand of its parent company, Hilton Worldwide. The original company was founded by Conrad Hilton, and founded at (1919) in the United States. Spread in more than 550 locations around the world, and 17 locations in Egypt in Cairo-Alexandria-Hurghada- Luxor- Marsa Alam- Sharm El Sheikh- Taba, South Sinai. And this project will be the location no. 18 in Egypt for Hilton.

1.1.2 General Location:

-The project location is Nile corniche, Misr Al Qadimah,cairo governorate, Egypt.

-The best time to enjoy sun rays at the site is from 10:30 AM to 2:15 PM.

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Chapter 1

DESCRIPTION

Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION Fig. 1.2 (Location of the project) Fig. 1.3 (satellite location of the project)
Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION Fig. 1.2 (Location of the project) Fig. 1.3 (satellite location of the project)

Fig. 1.2 (Location of the project)

Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION Fig. 1.2 (Location of the project) Fig. 1.3 (satellite location of the project)

Fig. 1.3 (satellite location of the project)

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Chapter 1

DESCRIPTION

Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION 1.1.3 Project buildings: First Residential Tower: - Area of This Tower: 2801 Meter

1.1.3 Project buildings:

First Residential Tower:

- Area of This Tower: 2801 Meter Square.

- 23 Typical Floors divided into 4 floors for services and 19 residential floors with a unique view for each.

- 108 Residential unit with different spaces to satisfy all tastes, with

deluxe

- Various spaces of 10 types of residential flats from 120 sq m- 440 sq m.

- Consists of 4 Elevators.

- Price of Meter: 5000 $.

Second The Hotel: (Five Stars Hotel):

- Area of This Tower: 1868 Meter square.

- Consists of 23 Typical Floors.

- Private entrances to the hotel directly from the Corniche.

- 3 service floors.

- (Luxurious Reception - Restaurants - Cafes - meeting rooms - health club businessmen services).

- The hotel has 137 rooms and 38 suites, consisting of (single - double - triple) rooms.

finishing.

1.1.4 Landscape:

- Consist of Swimming pool and Green Areas.

1.1.5 Parking:

-There Are Two Underground Floors for Parking with Capacity 353 cars divided into 184 for Hotel and 169 for Residential.

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Chapter 1

DESCRIPTION

Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION 1.1.6 Project Parties: Table 1.0 (Project Parties) Employer/Owner: Design Consultant:

1.1.6 Project Parties:

Table 1.0 (Project Parties)

Employer/Owner:

Design Consultant:

Project Management Company:

Supervision Consultant:

Main Contractor:

Saudi Egyptian Construction Company “SECON”

Space Consultants

Hill International North Africa Ltd.

EHAF Consulting Engineers

Arabtec- Siac Joint Venture

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Chapter 1

DESCRIPTION

Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION 1.1.7 Duration of the Project: The duration was 3 years from the date

1.1.7 Duration of the Project:

The duration was 3 years from the date of the beginning of the contract. from (13 February 2013) to (16 February 2016), But the project need time extension from (16 February 2016) to (16 may 2016) to study the needed time claim and it is around two years to the end of (2017).

The expected date of finish at time schedule: is October 2017.

There are two main reasons for that delay those are:

(1) The operator (HILTON) was late to sign the project contract and upon this there were changes in the design according to HILTON requirements.

(2) The excavation works in this project cause sliding of the tower which is next to the project.

1.1.8 Progress of the project during the last years:

-First the site was a plantation area for plants from (2006) to

(2011).

last years: -First the site was a plantation area for plants from (2006) to (2011). Fig.

Fig. 1.4 (site from 2006 to 2011)

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Chapter 1

DESCRIPTION

Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION -Second the site was an empty place or a small desert at (2012).

-Second the site was an empty place or a small desert at (2012).

the site was an empty place or a small desert at (2012). Fig. 1.5 (site at

Fig. 1.5 (site at 2012)

-Third stage of the site is the beginning of excavation works and the execution of the two towers from (2013) to the current date.

of excavation works and the execution of the two towers from (2013) to the current date.

Fig. 1.6 (site at 2013)

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Chapter 1

DESCRIPTION

Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION Fig. 1.7 (site at 2016) 1.1.9 Progress percentage: The actual progress is around
Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION Fig. 1.7 (site at 2016) 1.1.9 Progress percentage: The actual progress is around

Fig. 1.7 (site at 2016)

1.1.9 Progress percentage:

The actual progress is around 31% of the total percentage

Progress Percentage 31% 69% Actual Remaining
Progress Percentage
31%
69%
Actual
Remaining

Fig. 1.8 (project progress chart)

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Chapter 1

DESCRIPTION

Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION Fig. 1.9 (S-curve showing progress in the overall project) Fig.1.10 (KPIs graph showing
Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION Fig. 1.9 (S-curve showing progress in the overall project) Fig.1.10 (KPIs graph showing

Fig. 1.9 (S-curve showing progress in the overall project)

Fig. 1.9 (S-curve showing progress in the overall project) Fig.1.10 (KPIs graph showing concrete progress percentage)

Fig.1.10 (KPIs graph showing concrete progress percentage)

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Chapter 1

DESCRIPTION

Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION 1.2 Method of measurement and payment: Case study: 1.2.1 Method of measurement: According

1.2 Method of measurement and payment:

Case study:

1.2.1 Method of measurement:

According to contract clause (57.1) the works shall be measured net, notwithstanding any general or local custom.

1.2.2 Method of payment:

1) Payments to nominated subcontractors:

According to contract clause (59.4), for all work executed or goods, materials, plant or services supplied by any nominated subcontractor, the contractor shall be entitled to:

(a)The actual price paid or due to be paid by the contractor, on the instructions of the engineer, and in accordance with the subcontract.

(b)In respect of labor supplied by the contractor, the sum, if any, entered in the bill of quantities or, if instructed by the engineer pursuant to paragraph (a) of sub-clause 58.2 which say that in which case the contractor shall be entitled to an amount equal to the value thereof determined in accordance with clause 52.

(c) In respect of all other charges and profit, a sum being a percentage rate of the actual price paid or due to be paid calculated, where provision has been made in the bill of quantities for a rate to be set against the relevant provisional sum, at the rate inserted by the contractor against that item or, where no such provision has been made, at the rate inserted by the contractor in the Appendix to tender and repeated where provision for such is made in a special item provided in the bill of quantities for such purpose.

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Chapter 1

DESCRIPTION

Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION 2) Monthly payment: Delete sub-clause 60.2 and replace with the following: The contractor’s

2) Monthly payment:

Delete sub-clause 60.2 and replace with the following:

The contractor’s statement shall be approved or amended by the engineer in such a way that, in his opinion, it reflects the amounts due to the contractor in accordance with the contract, after deduction, other than pursuant to clause 47, of any sums which may have become due and payable by the contractor to the employer. Within 28 days of receipt of the monthly statement referred to in sub-clause 60.1, the engineer shall determine the amounts due to the contractor and shall issue to the employer and the contractor a certificate hereinafter called “interim payment certificate”, certifying the amounts to the contractor, subject:

(a)To the retention of the amount calculated by applying the percentage of retention stated in the Appendix to Tender, to the amount to which the contractor is entitled under paragraphs (a), (b) and (c) of sub-clause 60.1 until the amount so retained reaches the limit of retention money stated in the Appendix to tender (b)To the deduction, other than pursuant to clause 47, of any sums which may have become due and payable by the contractor to the employer. (c) To the contractor adjustment lump sum fixed amount under article 8 of Appendix (a) against all risks associated with sub- clause 12.2 of the contract conditions. This amount to be distributed equally over the contract duration (36 months). Provided that the engineer shall not be bound to certify any payment under this sub-clause if the net amount thereof, after all retentions and deductions, will be less than the minimum amount of interim certificates stated in the Appendix to tender (contract data). In case there is difference of opinion as to any item included in the contractor’s statement or its value, the engineer’s opinion shall prevail.

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Chapter 1

DESCRIPTION

Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION Notwithstanding the terms of this clause or any other clause of the contract,

Notwithstanding the terms of this clause or any other clause of the contract, no amount shall be certified by the engineer for payment until the performance security has been provided by the contractor and approved by the employer.

3) Payment of retention money:

According to sub-clause 60.3

(a) upon the issue of the taking-over certificate with respect to

the whole of the works, one half of the retention money, or upon

the issue of a taking-over certificate with respect to section or part of the permanent works only such proportion thereof as the engineer determines having regard to the relative value of such section or part of the permanent works, shall be certified by the engineer for payment to the contractor.

(b) Upon the expiration of the defects liability period for the works

the other half of the retention money shall be certified by the engineer for payment to the contractor. Provided that, in the event of different defects liability periods having become applicable to different sections or parts of the permanent works pursuant to clause 48, the expression “expiration of the defects liability period” Shall, for the purposes of this sub-clause, be deemed to mean the expiration of the latest of such periods. Provided also that if at such time, there shall remain to be executed by the contractor any work instructed, pursuant to clause 49 and 50, in respect of the works, the engineer shall be entitled to withhold certification until completion of such work of so much of the balance of the retention money as shall, in the opinion of the engineer, represent the cost of the work remaining to be executed, 4) Final payment certificate:

According to sub-clause 60.8 Within 28 days after receipt of the final statement, and the written discharge, the engineer shall issue to the employer (with a copy to the contractor) a final certificate stating:

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Chapter 1

DESCRIPTION

Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION (a)The amount which, in the opinion of the engineer, is finally due under

(a)The amount which, in the opinion of the engineer, is finally due under the contract or otherwise.

(b)After giving credit to the employer for all amounts previously paid by the employer is entitled other than under clause 47, the balance, if any, due from the employer to the contractor or from the contractor to the employer as the case may be.

(c) Time for payment:

Delete the second sentence of this sub-clause 60.10 to be:

The amount due to the contractor under any interim payment certificate issued by the engineer pursuant to this clause, or to any other term of the contract, shall, subjected to clause 47, be paid by the employer to the contractor within 28 days after such interim payment certificate has been delivered to the employer, or, in the case of the final certificate referred to in sub-clause 60.8, within 56 days, after such final certificate has been delivered to the employer

1.3 Organization structure:

1.3.1 Introduction:

A project organization is a structure that facilitates the coordination

and implementation of project activities. Its main reason is to create an environment that fosters interactions among the team members with minimum amount of disruptions, overlaps and conflict. One of the important decisions of project management is the form of organizational structure that will be used for the project. Each project has its unique characteristics and the design of an

organizational structure should consider the organizational environment, the project characteristics in which it will operate, and the level of authority the project manager is given.

A project structure can take on various forms with each form

having its own advantages and disadvantages. A properly designed project organization is essential to project success.

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Chapter 1

DESCRIPTION

Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION The main objectives of the organization structure are to: 1. Reduce uncertainty and

The main objectives of the organization structure are to:

1. Reduce uncertainty and confusion that typically occurs at the

project initiation phase.

2. Define the relationships among members of the project

management and the relationships with the external environment, i.e. facilitate the interaction of people to achieve the project

ultimate goals within the specified constraints of scope, time, budget and quality.

3. Define the authority by means of a graphical illustration called

an organization chart.

C.E.O Project Manager Financial QC HR Production Technical Manager Manager Manager Manager Manager Secretary
C.E.O
Project
Manager
Financial
QC
HR
Production
Technical
Manager
Manager
Manager
Manager
Manager
Secretary
Staffing
Support
Crew
Senior HR
Junior HR
Specialist
Specialist

Fig.1.11 (Organization Chart)

An organization chart, as shown in fig.1.11, shows where each person is placed in the project structure.

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Chapter 1

DESCRIPTION

Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION An organization chart is drawn in pyramid form where individuals located closer to

An organization chart is drawn in pyramid form where individuals located closer to the top of the pyramid have more authority and responsibility than members located toward the bottom. It is the relative locations of the individuals on the organization chart that specifies the working relationships, and the lines connecting the boxes designate formal supervision and lines of communication between the individuals.

1.3.2 Types of organization structures:

Table1.1 (Influence of Organizational Structures on Projects)

Organization Matrix Structure Functional Project Projectized Weak Matrix Balanced Matrix Strong Matrix
Organization
Matrix
Structure
Functional
Project
Projectized
Weak Matrix
Balanced Matrix
Strong Matrix
Characteristics
Project Manager's
Low to
Moderate
High to
Little or None
Low
Authority
Moderate
to High
Almost Total
Resource
Low to
Moderate
High to
Little or None
Low
Availability
Moderate
to High
Almost Total
Who manages the
project budget
Functional
Functional
Project
Project
Mixed
Manager
Manager
Manager
Manager
Project Manager's
Part-time
Part-time
Full-time
Full-time
Full-time
Role
Project Management
Part-time
Part-time
Part-time
Full-time
Full-time
Administrative staff

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Chapter 1

DESCRIPTION

Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION 1.3.2.1Functional structure The classic functional organization, shown in Figure 1.12, is a

1.3.2.1Functional structure

The classic functional organization, shown in Figure 1.12, is a hierarchy where each employee has one clear superior. Staff members are grouped by specialty, such as production, marketing, engineering, and accounting at the top level. Specialties may be further subdivided into focused functional units, such as mechanical and electrical engineering. Each department in a functional organization will do its project work independently of other departments.

Project Chief Coordination Executive Functional Functional Functional Manager Manager Manager Staff Staff
Project
Chief
Coordination
Executive
Functional
Functional
Functional
Manager
Manager
Manager
Staff
Staff
Staff
Staff
Staff
Staff
Staff
Staff
Staff
( Gray boxes represent staff engaged in) project activities

Fig.1.12 (Functional structure)

1.3.2.2 Matrix Organization

Matrix organizations, as shown in Figures 1.13 to 1.15, reflect a blend of functional and projectized characteristics. Matrix organizations can be classified as weak, balanced, or strong depending on the relative level of power and influence between functional and project managers. Weak matrix organizations maintain many of the characteristics of a functional organization, and the role of the project manager is more of a coordinator or expediter.

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Chapter 1

DESCRIPTION

Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION A project expediter works as staff assistant and communications coordinator. The expediter cannot

A project expediter works as staff assistant and communications coordinator. The expediter cannot personally make or enforce decisions. Project coordinators have power to make some decisions, have some authority, and report to a higher-level manager. Strong matrix organizations have many of the characteristics of the projectized organization, and have full-time project managers with considerable authority and full-time project administrative staff.

While the balanced matrix organization recognizes the need for a project manager, it does not provide the project manager with the full authority over the project and project funding. Table 2-1 provides additional details of the various matrix organizational structures.

Chief Executive Functional Functional Functional Manager Manager Manager Staff Staff Staff Staff Staff Staff
Chief
Executive
Functional
Functional
Functional
Manager
Manager
Manager
Staff
Staff
Staff
Staff
Staff
Staff
Staff
Staff
Staff
Project
( Gray boxes represent staff engaged in) project activities
Coordination

Fig.1.13 (Weak Matrix Organization)

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Chapter 1

DESCRIPTION

Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION Chief Executive Functional Functional Functional Manager Manager Manager Staff Staff
Chief Executive Functional Functional Functional Manager Manager Manager Staff Staff Staff Staff Staff Staff
Chief
Executive
Functional
Functional
Functional
Manager
Manager
Manager
Staff
Staff
Staff
Staff
Staff
Staff
Project Manager
Staff
Staff
Project
( Gray boxes represent staff engaged in) project activities
Coordination

Fig.1.14 (Balanced Matrix Organization)

Chief Executive Functional Functional Manager of Functional Manager Manager Manager Project Managers Staff
Chief
Executive
Functional
Functional
Manager of
Functional
Manager
Manager
Manager
Project Managers
Staff
Staff
Staff
Project Manager
Staff
Staff
Staff
Project Manager
Staff
Staff
Staff
Staff
Project Manager
( Gray boxes represent staff engaged in) project activities
Project Coordination

Fig. 1.15 (Strong Matrix Organization)

1.3.2.3 Projectized structure

At the opposite end of the spectrum to the functional organization is the projectized organization, shown in Figure 1.16. In a projectized organization, team members are often collocated. Most of the organization’s resources are involved in project work, and project managers have a great deal of independence and authority.

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Chapter 1

DESCRIPTION

Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION Virtual collaboration techniques are often used to accomplish the benefits of collocated teams.

Virtual collaboration techniques are often used to accomplish the benefits of collocated teams. Projectized organizations often have organizational units called departments, but they can either report directly to the project manager or provide support services to the various projects.

Project Chief Coordination Executive Project Project Project Manager Manager Manager Staff Staff Staff Staff
Project
Chief
Coordination
Executive
Project
Project
Project
Manager
Manager
Manager
Staff
Staff
Staff
Staff
Staff
Staff
Staff
Staff
Staff
( Gray boxes represent staff engaged in) project activities

Fig.1.16 (Projectized Organization)

21

Chapter 1

DESCRIPTION

Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION Case study: 1.3.3 Secon project under consideration: Type: projectized organization Shape: Project

Case study:

1.3.3 Secon project under consideration:

Type: projectized organization Shape:

Project

Manager

Towers &

Podium

Sections

Deputy Project Manager

Towers & Podium Sections Deputy Project Manager Secretary QA/QC Department Admin Department MEP

Secretary

Podium Sections Deputy Project Manager Secretary QA/QC Department Admin Department MEP Department
Podium Sections Deputy Project Manager Secretary QA/QC Department Admin Department MEP Department
Podium Sections Deputy Project Manager Secretary QA/QC Department Admin Department MEP Department

QA/QC

Department

Admin

Department

MEP

Department

Planning

&

Control

Technical

Manager

Commercial

Department

Finance &

Purchasing

Department

Safety

Environment

Surveying Finishing Construction Construction Construction Construction Department Department Manager Manager
Surveying
Finishing
Construction
Construction
Construction
Construction
Department
Department
Manager
Manager
Manager
Manager

Fig.1.17 (The project OBS)

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Chapter 1

DESCRIPTION

1.3.3.1

Advantages of the used organization structure:

1.3.3.1 Advantages of the used organization structure: 1- Pure project (projectized) presents a simple structure
1.3.3.1 Advantages of the used organization structure: 1- Pure project (projectized) presents a simple structure
1.3.3.1 Advantages of the used organization structure: 1- Pure project (projectized) presents a simple structure

1- Pure project (projectized) presents a simple structure which is easy to understand, implement and operate. 2- Promotes more effective communication between the project manager and the team members. 3- With centralized authority, decisions are made quickly. 4- Increased project commitment and loyalty.

1.3.3.2 Disadvantages of the used organization

structure:

1- The most dangerous disadvantage of the pure or direct project organization is the costly and inefficient use of personnel.

2- Duplication of resources. 3- Resources may not be needed as a full time for the entire length

of the project, increasing the need to manage short term contracts.

1.3.3.3 Roles and Responsibilities:

Project Manager:

A project manager is a person who has the overall responsibility

for the successful initiation, planning, design, execution,

monitoring, controlling and closure of a project.

-The role of the project manager encompasses many activities including:

Planning and Defining Scope.

Activity Planning and Sequencing.

Resource Planning.

Developing Schedules.

Time and cost Estimating.

Developing a Budget.

23

Chapter 1

DESCRIPTION

Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION  Documentation.  Creating Charts and Schedules.  Risk Analysis.  Managing Risks

Documentation.

Creating Charts and Schedules.

Risk Analysis.

Managing Risks and Issues.

Monitoring and Reporting Progress.

Team Leadership.

Strategic Influencing.

Working with Vendors.

Controlling Quality.

Benefits Realization.

Deputy project manager:

On-Site Project Management

Project Coordination & Project Controls

Job Cost Analysis

Cost tracking for sequential costing

Project Schedule Adherence

Weekly OAC (Owner Architect Contractor) Meetings

Project Secretary:

Provide full secretarial and admin support to the project team and department to ensure the smooth running of the department operations.

Maintain records of Engineers and assist in their movements.

Take minutes of meeting and maintain records for the operations and project team.

Develop and maintain document control processes for the efficient management.

Assist to check and verify staff claims and invoices for project team.

24

Chapter 1

DESCRIPTION

Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION Admin Department:  Administer and monitor the financial system in order to ensure

Admin Department:

Administer and monitor the financial system in order to ensure that the municipal finances are maintained in an accurate and timely manner.

Assist with preparation of the budget.

Implement financial policies and procedures.

MEP (Mechanical, Electrical & plumbing) Department:

Assist with MEP design and reviews of HVAC design.

Conduct site inspections to ensure adherence to engineering standards and specifications.

Support construction contractor and provide MEP engineering related support, review and coordination to ensure that the quality expectation are properly met during construction.

Review all project MEP field reports on a monthly basis.

Technical Department:

Preparation of the initial designs.

Revise the shop drawings produced by the contractors.

Checking the quantity surveying conducted by the contractors.

Commercial Department:

Support the PM in commercial negotiations

Screening of project activities; facilitate robust decision making.

Ensure all project risks are managed, monitored and mitigated.

Provide timely, relevant and accurate information to manage the business and provide strategic direction.

25

Chapter 1

DESCRIPTION

Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION Finance and purchasing:  Maintain and implement construction budget for each project. 

Finance and purchasing:

Maintain and implement construction budget for each project.

Negotiate pricing contracts with subcontractors and suppliers.

Financial evaluation and analysis; owner of financial appraisal model.

Issue purchase orders for procurement and expedition of materials and equipment for jobs.

Maintain relationships with subcontractors and suppliers.

Research new materials for design and cost savings.

Handle change order requests.

Assist in settling invoice or contract disputes.

Quality Assurance and Quality Control Department (QA/QC):

Perform all daily inspection and test of the scope and character necessary to achieve the quality of construction required in the drawings and specifications for all works under the contract performed ON or OFF site.

Cary out inspection and checking for all quality related procedures in the site and ensures activity at site are as per approved method statement and inspection test plan.

Coordinate with the consultant’s representative and Site En- charge for inspection and meeting about quality problems including closure of Non-Compliance Report.

Safety Department:

Establishing safety plan.

Establishing level of acceptable risk.

Establishing safety performance goals.

Allocating sufficient resources.

Enforcing safety rules.

Monitoring staff safety performance; and, conducting incident investigations.

Provide feedback to managers.

26

Chapter 1

DESCRIPTION

Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION Planning and control:  Plan and schedule the project by developing a project

Planning and control:

Plan and schedule the project by developing a project master schedule in line with the proposal requirements through the application of the primavera P6 software.

Identify the project deliverables, milestones, and required tasks and targets to determine the staffing requirements, and allotment of available resources to various phases of the project through the project measurement system.

Implement the work schedule and monitor progress of the work for timely execution of the project through daily/weekly/monthly/ reports with respect to review of the overall project.

Construction Manager:

Oversee and direct construction products from conception to completion.

Oversee all onsite and offsite constructions to monitor compliance with building and safety regulations.

Review the work progress on daily basis.

Negotiate terms of agreements, draft contracts and obtain permits and licenses.

Analyze, manage and mitigate risks.

Ensure quality construction standards and the use of proper construction techniques.

27

Chapter 1

DESCRIPTION

Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION 1.4 Human Resources Management: Project Human Resource Management includes the processes that

1.4 Human Resources Management:

Project Human Resource Management includes the processes that organize, manage, and lead the project team. The project team is comprised of the people with assigned roles and responsibilities for completing the project. Project team members may have varied skill sets, may be assigned full or part-time, and may be added or removed from the team as the project progresses. Participation of team members during planning adds their expertise to the process and strengthens their commitment to the project.

1.4.1 Project Human Resource Management processes:

Plan Human Resource Managementthe process of identifying and documenting project roles, responsibilities, required skills, reporting relationships, and creating a staffing management plan.

Acquire Project Teamthe process of confirming human resource availability and obtaining the team necessary to complete project activities.

Develop Project Teamthe process of improving competencies, team member interaction, and overall team environment to enhance project performance.

Manage Project Teamthe process of tracking team member performance, providing feedback, resolving issues, and managing changes to optimize project performance.

28

Chapter 1

DESCRIPTION

Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION . 1.4.2 Project Human Resource Management Overview: Table1.2 (Project human resources overview)

.

1.4.2 Project Human Resource Management Overview:

Table1.2 (Project human resources overview)

Plan Human Resource

Management

.1 Inputs

Project management plan

Activity resource requirements.

Enterprise environmental Factors.

.2 Tools & Techniques

Organization charts and position descriptions

. Networking

Organizational theory

Expert judgment

.3 Outputs

Human resource management plan.

Acquire Project Team

.1 Inputs

Human resource management Plan

Enterprise environmental Factors

Organizational process assets.

.2 Tools & Techniques

Pre-assignment

Negotiation

Acquisition

Virtual teams

Multi-criteria decision Analysis.

.3 Outputs

Project staff assignments

Resource calendars

Project management plan updates.

Develop Project Team

.1 Inputs

Human resource management plan.

Project staff assignments.

Resource calendars.

.2 Tools & Techniques

Interpersonal skills

Training

Team-building activities

Ground rules

Colocation

Recognition and rewards

Personnel assessment tools

.3 Outputs

Team performance assessments

Enterprise environmental factors updates

29

Manage Project Team

.1 Inputs

Human resource management plan

Project staff assignments

Team performance assessments

Issue log

Work performance reports

Organizational process assets.

.2 Tools & Techniques

Observation and conversation

Project performance appraisals

Conflict management

Interpersonal skills

.3 Outputs

Change requests

Project management plan updates

Project documents updates

Enterprise environmental factors updates

Organizational process assets updates

Chapter 1

DESCRIPTION

Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION 1.4.2.1 Plan Human Resource Management: Plan Human Resource Management is the process of

1.4.2.1 Plan Human Resource Management:

Plan Human Resource Management is the process of identifying and documenting project roles, responsibilities, required skills, reporting relationships, and creating a staffing management plan. The key benefit of this process is that it establishes project roles and responsibilities, project organization charts, and the staffing management plan including the timetable for staff acquisition and release.

Plan Human Resource Management: Tools and Techniques:

Various formats exist to document team member roles and responsibilities. Most of the formats fall into one of Three types (Figure 9-4): hierarchical, matrix, and text-oriented. Additionally, some project assignments are listed In subsidiary plans, such as the risk, quality, or communications management plans. Regardless of the method utilized, the objective is to ensure that each work package has an unambiguous owner and that all team members have a clear understanding of their roles and responsibilities. For example, a hierarchical format may be used to represent high-level roles, while a text-based format may be better suited to document the detailed responsibilities.

may be better suited to document the detailed responsibilities. Fig.1.18 (Roles and Responsibility Definition Formats) 30

Fig.1.18 (Roles and Responsibility Definition Formats)

30

Chapter 1

DESCRIPTION

Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION  Hierarchical-type charts. The traditional organization chart structure can be used to show

Hierarchical-type charts. The traditional organization chart structure can be used to show positions and relationships in a graphical, top-down format.

Matrix-based charts. A responsibility assignment matrix (RAM) is a grid that shows the project resources assigned to each work package. It is used to illustrate the connections between work packages or activities and project team members.

31

Chapter 1

DESCRIPTION

Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION Case study Responsibility Assignment Matrix for Secon project. Table 1.3 (RAM) for Secon

Case study

Responsibility Assignment Matrix for Secon project.

Table 1.3 (RAM) for Secon Project

Activities

Project

Project

MEP

Cost/Control

Contracting

Commissioning

QA/Qc

manager

engineer

engineer

engineer

engineer

engineer

engineer

Detailed

S

C

R

I

I

I

R

Design

Procurement

S

C

A

A

R

C

C

Construction

S

R

I

A

C

A

A

Commissioning

S

C

A

C

C

R

I

Project

S

I

I

R

I

I

I

management

activities

R= Responsible, A= Accountable, C= Consult, I= Inform, S= Sign off

32

Chapter 1

DESCRIPTION

Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION  Text-oriented formats. Team member responsibilities that require detailed descriptions can

Text-oriented formats. Team member responsibilities that require detailed descriptions can be specified in text-oriented formats. Usually in outline form, the documents provide information such as responsibilities, authority, competencies, and qualifications.

1.4.2.2 Acquire Project Team:

Acquire Project Team is the process of confirming human resource availability and obtaining the team necessary to complete project activities. The key benefit of this process consists of outlining and guiding the team selection and responsibility assignment to obtain a successful team.

1.4.2.3 Develop Project Team:

Develop Project Team is the process of improving competencies, team member interaction, and overall team environment to enhance project performance. The key benefit of this process is that it results in improved teamwork, enhanced people skills and competencies, motivated employees, reduced staff turnover rates, and improved overall project performance.

1.4.2.4 Manage Project Team:

Manage Project Team is the process of tracking team member performance, providing feedback, resolving issues, and managing team changes to optimize project performance. The key benefit of this process is that it influences team behavior, manages conflict, resolves issues, and appraises team member performance.

33

Chapter 1

DESCRIPTION

Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION Case study: 1.4.3 Human Resources in the project: The contractor (Arabtec- Siac) has

Case study:

1.4.3 Human Resources in the project:

The contractor (Arabtec- Siac) has many rules concerning Human Resource management. The contractor is aware of the importance of managing and developing Human Resources; according to this the contractor makes all these procedures in the project:

Sends out employee performance appraisal (EPA) forms (for staff categories) and worker`s evaluation forms (for operatives) to division / department heads & project managers for the required periodic performance evaluation of their staff / operatives (note: semi- annual for junior staff & annual for senior staff, quarterly for charge hands and twice in a year for operatives).

Coordinates / follows up with division / department heads & project managers on-time submission of completed EPA / worker`s evaluation forms.

Ensures compliance with appraisal and feedback of the results to the concerned employees of their staff performance.

Maintains / updates records of employee performance appraisals (EPA) and worker’s evaluation results.

Prepares & generates reports on EPA results for charge hand quarterly bonus report & annual EPA report for staff annual bonus and submits to top management for approval & further action.

Coordinates with HR Officer HR Affairs for the preparation of warning / termination letters based on EPA results & submits to top management for further action.

Develops proposals for internal training programs on work life skills, self-management, personal leadership, personal efficiency improvement & change management, to support the corporate objective of “providing staff with training techniques and authority they need to identify and resolve problems.

34

Chapter 1

DESCRIPTION

Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION  Assists in developing designs for performance planning, improvement and supervisors on

Assists in developing designs for performance planning, improvement and supervisors on effective performance coaching & evaluation.

Performs other tasks which may be assigned from time to time.

1.4.4 The System of Acquirement of Engineers and Labors:

Engineers:

The system of acquirement of engineers is by advertising in a famous newspaper or famous website. Or the second method is telling the engineers they now about the vacancies in the project. Then making interviews to know the level of experience of the applied engineer, there are two interviews the first is with HR team, then if the engineer passes it he will get on the second interview with the project manager or with the deputy manager.

Labors:

The contractor used to deal with well- known sub-contractors to provide him with the labors and materials. Example:

Sub-contractors of Gypsum board are KNAUF and GYPROS.

1.5 Project Communication Management:

Project Communications Management includes the processes that are required to ensure timely and appropriate planning, collection, creation, distribution, storage, retrieval, management, control, monitoring, and the ultimate disposition of project information. Project managers spend most of their time communicating with team members and other project stakeholders, whether they are internal (at all organizational levels) or external to the organization.

35

Chapter 1

DESCRIPTION

Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION Effective communication creates a bridge between diverse stakeholders who may have different

Effective communication creates a bridge between diverse stakeholders who may have different cultural and organizational backgrounds, different levels of expertise, and different perspectives and interests, which impact or have an influence upon the project execution or outcome.

1.5.1 Project Communications Management Processes:

Plan Communications Managementthe process of developing an appropriate approach and plan for project communications based on stakeholder’s information needs and requirements, and available organizational assets.

Manage CommunicationsThe process of creating, collecting, distributing, storing, retrieving and the ultimate disposition of project information in accordance with the communications management plan.

Control CommunicationsThe process of monitoring and controlling communications throughout the entire project life cycle to ensure the information needs of the project stakeholders are met.

36

Chapter 1

DESCRIPTION

Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION 1.5.2 Project Communications Management Overview: Table 1.4 (Project communication management

1.5.2 Project Communications Management Overview:

Table 1.4 (Project communication management overview)

Plan Communications Management

.1 Inputs .1 Project management plan .2 Stakeholder register .3 Enterprise environmental Factors .4 Organizational process assets

.2 Tools & Techniques .1 Communication requirements analysis .2 Communication technology .3 Communication models .4 Communication methods .5 Meetings

.3 Outputs .1 Communications management plan .2 Project documents updates

Manage Communications

.1 Inputs .1 Communications management plan .2 Work performance reports .3 Enterprise environmental factors .4 Organizational process assets

.2 Tools & Techniques .1 Communication technology .2 Communication models .3 Communication methods .4 Information management systems

.5 Performance

reporting

.3 Outputs .1 Project communications .2 Project management plan updates .3 Project documents updates .4 Organizational process assets

Control Communications

.1 Inputs .1 Project management plan .2 Project communications .3 Issue log .4 Work performance data .5 Organizational process assets

.2 Tools & Techniques .1 Information Management system. .2 Expert judgment. .3 Meetings

.3 Outputs .1 Work performance information .2 Change requests .3 Project management plan updates. .4 Project documents updates. .5 Organizational process assets updates.

Project communication is the exchange of project-specific information with the emphasis on creating understanding between the sender and the receiver. Effective communication is one of the most important factors contributing to the success of a project.

37

Chapter 1

DESCRIPTION

Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION 1.5.3 Stages of communication process: Context: Communication is affected by the context in

1.5.3 Stages of communication process:

Context:

Communication is affected by the context in which it takes place. This context may be physical, social, chronological or cultural. Every communication proceeds with context. The sender chooses the message to communicate within a context. Sender or Encoder:

The sender or the encoder is a person who sends the message. A sender makes use of symbols (words or graphic or visual aids) to convey the message and produce the required response. Sender may be an individual or a group or an organization. The verbal and nonverbal symbols chosen are essential in ascertaining interpretation of the message by the recipient in the same terms as intended by the sender.

Message:

Message is a key idea that the sender wants to communicate. It is

a sign that

elicits the response of recipient. Communication process begins with deciding about the message to be conveyed. It must be ensured that the main objective of the message is clear.

Medium:

Medium is a means used to exchange or transmit the message. The sender must choose an appropriate medium for transmitting the

message else the message might not be conveyed to the desired recipients. The choice of appropriate medium of communication is essential for making the message effective and correctly interpreted by the recipient. This choice of communication medium varies depending upon the features of communication. For instance - Written medium is chosen when a message has to be conveyed to

a small group of people, while an oral medium is chosen when

38

Chapter 1

DESCRIPTION

Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION spontaneous feedback is required from the recipient as misunderstandings are cleared then and

spontaneous feedback is required from the recipient as misunderstandings are cleared then and there.

Recipient or Decoder:

The recipient or the decoder is a person for whom the message is intended, aimed and targeted. The degree to which the decoder understands the message is dependent upon various factors such as knowledge of recipient, their responsiveness to the message, and the reliance of encoder on decoder.

Feedback:

Feedback is the main component of communication process as it permits the sender to analyze the efficacy of the message. It helps the sender in confirming the correct interpretation of message by the decoder. Feedback may be verbal or nonverbal. It may take written form also in form of memos, reports, etc.

Message Decoding Sender Encoding Receiver (Media)
Message
Decoding
Sender
Encoding
Receiver
(Media)
Feedback Response
Feedback
Response

Fig.1.19 (Communication process)

39

Chapter 1

DESCRIPTION

Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION 1.5.4 Barriers in communication: There are two types of barriers: internal and external.

1.5.4 Barriers in communication:

There are two types of barriers: internal and external.

Examples of internal barriers are:

Fatigue.

Poor listening skills.

Attitude toward the sender or the information.

Lack of interest in the message.

Fear, mistrust, past experiences, negative attitude or problems at home.

E-mail not working, bad phone connections.

Lack of common experiences, and emotions.

Examples of external barriers are:

Noise, distractions.

E-mail not working, bad phone connections.

Time of day, sender used too many technical words for the audience, and environment.

1.5.5 Communication Plan:

A communication plan is a document which outlines the information to be provided to all project stakeholders to keep them informed of the progress of the project. A clear communications plan is vital to the success of the project to ensure that all project resources are working towards the stated project objectives and that any obstacles are overcome in a well-planned and informed manner.

40

Chapter 1

DESCRIPTION

Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION 1.5.6 Importance of the communication plan: The project communication management processes provide

1.5.6 Importance of the communication plan:

The project communication management processes provide the critical linksamong people and information that are necessary for successful communications. Project managers use project communication management to:

Develop a communication plan for the project

Distribute information via the methods that reach customers effectively

File data using the Project Development Uniform Filing System and Construction Organization of Project Documents.

Case study:

1.5.7 Communication Management in Secon Project:

Project Manager (HILL INTERNATIONAL) is responsible for manage the communication between all parties participating in this project (Owner- Consultant- Contractor) and responsible for putting the communication plan and directing all the reports to the target office by this table shown in picture (1.20) stamped on each report in the project.

41

Chapter 1

DESCRIPTION

Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION Fig.1.20 (Table of directing reports in the site) Table 1.5 clarification of fig.
Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION Fig.1.20 (Table of directing reports in the site) Table 1.5 clarification of fig.

Fig.1.20 (Table of directing reports in the site)

Table 1.5 clarification of fig. 1.20

position

Lead

Action

Info

action

Project Manager

   

Construction

   

Manager

Contract

     

Administrator

Project Control Manager

 

 

Document Control

     

Secretary

     

Consultant

     

Secon (Owner)

   

42

Chapter 1

DESCRIPTION

Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION Which is mean that the Project Control Manager who will make the action,

Which is mean that the Project Control Manager who will make the action, but the Project Manager (HILL INTERNATIONAL), the Construction Manager (Arabtec- Siac) and the Owner (Secon) will be informed by this action.

1.5.8 Method of communication in Secon project:

Progress meeting per week: This meeting is intended to discuss the general progress of the project and any arising safety or quality issues.

Schedule tracking meeting per week

Shop drawing meeting

RFI (Request for Information) meeting

Technical meeting: Those meetings are related to the infrastructure.

Cost meeting per week

Contract meeting

MEP (Mechanical, Electrical and plumbing) meeting: This meeting is set on a weekly basis where consultants and contractors meet to coordinate everything that is related to the site.

HSE (Health, Safety and Engineering) meeting

FF&E (Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment) meeting

Mails, phone calls, letters, faxes

1.6 Project delivery systems:

1.6.1 Introduction:

Project delivery is not only about the form of contract used to shift or share the risks inherent in a large capital project or the organizational structure of the project team. Project delivery is about getting a quality project done on time and on budget and, more often, taking a life-cycle approach to make sure that the built asset is maintained over the long-term.

43

Chapter 1

DESCRIPTION

Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION 1.6.2 Types of project delivery systems:  Design-bid-build  Design-build  CM at

1.6.2 Types of project delivery systems:

Design-bid-build

Design-build

CM at Risk

1.6.2.1 Design-bid-build

Often considered as the traditional approach, in the DBB project delivery system the project owner or developer hires an architect or engineer to design the project. Upon completion of the design, the architect prepares construction packages with which to solicit competitive bids for construction. Often, the architect’s involvement on behalf of the owner continues during construction in his or her administering the construction contract, managing changes and ensuring general conformance with the contract documents.

1.6.2.2 Design-build

As the main alternative to the various DBB approaches, the DB project delivery system differs as the project owner or developer hires a single entity to design and construct the project. An architect is no longer directly engaged by the owner but rather functions typically as a consultant to the DB entity.

44

Chapter 1

DESCRIPTION

Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION Table 1.6 Comparison between design-build and design-bid-build 1.6.2.3CM (Construction Manager) at

Table 1.6 Comparison between design-build and design-bid-build

1.6 Comparison between design-build and design-bid-build 1.6.2.3CM (Construction Manager) at risk CM at-risk (CMAR)

1.6.2.3CM (Construction Manager) at risk

CM at-risk (CMAR) is a delivery method which entails a commitment by the construction manager to deliver the project within a Guaranteed Maximum Price (GMP), in most cases. The construction manager acts as consultant to the owner in the development and design phases, (often referred to as "Preconstruction Services"), but as the equivalent of a general contractor during the construction phase. When a construction

45

Chapter 1

DESCRIPTION

Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION manager is bound to a GMP, the most fundamental character of the relationship

manager is bound to a GMP, the most fundamental character of the relationship is changed.

In addition to acting in the owner's interest, the construction manager must manage and control construction costs to not exceed the GMP, which would be a financial hit to the CM Company. Before design of a project is completed (6 months to 1½ years of coordination between Designer and Owner), the CM is involved with estimating the cost of constructing a project based on the goals of the Designer and Owner (design concept) and the overall scope of the project. In balancing the costs, schedule, quality and scope of the project, decisions can be made to modify the design concept instead of having to spend a considerable amount of time, effort and money re-designing and/or modifying completed construction documents.

Advantages of Construction Management at-Risk:

• Increases the speed of the project and can also strengthen

coordination between the architect/engineer and the construction manager.

• The client hires the construction manager based on qualifications,

thus better ensuring a construction manager with a strong allegiance to the client, because their business relies on references and repeat work.

• Construction managers, architects/engineers, and the client all collaborate. This creates enhanced synergies throughout the process.

• Transparency is enhanced, because all costs and fees are in the open, which diminishes adversarial relationships between components working on the project, while at the same time eliminating bid shopping.

46

Chapter 1

DESCRIPTION

Chapter 1 DESCRIPTION Disadvantages of construction Management at-Risk:  Since the guaranteed maximum price is

Disadvantages of construction Management at-Risk:

Since the guaranteed maximum price is settled before design begins, it is difficult for owners to know whether they received the best possible bid; this fact also lowers competition in pricing contractor overhead, fee, and subcontract costs.

Case study:

-Second project delivery system is design-bid-build which called also traditional delivery system, and that is obvious from these things:

the owner holds contracts separately with a designer and a construction contractor;

the design and construction are sequential, so the design is completed prior to construction bidding (a DBB project can be fast-tracked so that construction may begin before design is 100 per cent complete);

procurement begins with construction;

specifications are prescriptive;

significant owner involvement and decisions are required;

costs are known and fixed once the construction contract is awarded;

responsibility for project delivery is shared between the designer and the contractor;

the owner is responsible to the contractor for design errors;

the owner controls design and construction quality; and

an extensive number of qualified bidders ensures a high level of competition.

47

Chapter 2

PROJECT SITE LAYOUT

Chapter 2 PROJECT SITE LAYOUT Project Site Layout “ CHAPTER 2 ” 48

Project Site Layout

CHAPTER 2

Chapter 2 PROJECT SITE LAYOUT Project Site Layout “ CHAPTER 2 ” 48

48

Chapter 2

PROJECT SITE LAYOUT

Chapter 2 PROJECT SITE LAYOUT 1. Project site layout: 2.1 Definition: Site layout is the planning

1. Project site layout:

2.1 Definition:

Site

layout

is

the

planning

and

organization

of

the

site

area

around

the

 

proposed

construction

to

accommodate

the

resource

necessary

to

erect

that

construction

without

delay

in

time

and

cost.

2.1.2Factors to plan a Site Layout:

1) Layout must provide the most efficient and Economic methods of

production.

2) Space for erected scaffold, working plant, Small workshops.

3) Improved access, site movements, extra storage and car parking.

4) Road and traffic inside the site.

5) Permanent and temporary structures.

2.1.3 Aims of planning a site layout:

1) To provide safe, easy access to the site.

2) To provide adequate working areas, storage areas and stores.

3) To minimize handling, wastes and loss of material.

4) To locate fixed equipment correctly.

5) To simplify supervision and communications.

6) To provide adequate offices, car parks and accommodation for labor

7) Movement & maneuvering of trucks inside the site.

49

Chapter 2

PROJECT SITE LAYOUT

Chapter 2 PROJECT SITE LAYOUT 2.1.4 Case study on Secon project: - 2.1.4.1 Provides offices for

2.1.4 Case study on Secon project: -

2.1.4.1 Provides offices for managers and engineers

- 2.1.4.1 Provides offices for managers and engineers Fig. (2.1) Caravans & Offices  At project

Fig. (2.1) Caravans & Offices

At project start there were caravans for engineers and managers.

After 2 years of project all offices moved to the second floor of hotel.

50

Chapter 2

PROJECT SITE LAYOUT

Chapter 2 PROJECT SITE LAYOUT 2.1.4 2. Provide safe, easy access to the site : Fig.

2.1.4 2.

Provide safe, easy access to the site:

SITE LAYOUT 2.1.4 2. Provide safe, easy access to the site : Fig. (2.2) Access road

Fig. (2.2) Access road to the site

At the site, materials trucks come from al Ring Road to Cornish el Nile street and then to the site.

51

Chapter 2

PROJECT SITE LAYOUT

Chapter 2 PROJECT SITE LAYOUT Fig. (2.3) Steel storage 52
Chapter 2 PROJECT SITE LAYOUT Fig. (2.3) Steel storage 52

Fig. (2.3) Steel storage

52

Chapter 2

PROJECT SITE LAYOUT

Chapter 2 PROJECT SITE LAYOUT The area of site is very small so that the contractor

The area of site is very small so that the contractor rent a land for steel storage and work shop, and they have a crane tower to deliver steel bars to site area.

2.1.4.3Locate fixed equipment correctly

Crane number 1 for the first tower

Crane number 2 for the second tower

Crane number 3 for deliver steel bars from work shop area to the site

for the second tower  Crane number 3 for deliver steel bars from work shop area

Fig. (2.4) Crane Towers

53

Chapter 2

PROJECT SITE LAYOUT

Chapter 2 PROJECT SITE LAYOUT Fig. (2.5) crane parameter 54
Chapter 2 PROJECT SITE LAYOUT Fig. (2.5) crane parameter 54

Fig. (2.5) crane parameter

54

Chapter 2

PROJECT SITE LAYOUT

Chapter 2 PROJECT SITE LAYOUT 2.1.4.4 Captured photos from site: - Fig. (2.6) Steel Work Shop

2.1.4.4 Captured photos from site: -

Chapter 2 PROJECT SITE LAYOUT 2.1.4.4 Captured photos from site: - Fig. (2.6) Steel Work Shop

Fig. (2.6) Steel Work Shop

55

Chapter 2

PROJECT SITE LAYOUT

Chapter 2 PROJECT SITE LAYOUT Fig. (2.7) Scaffold Storage 56
Chapter 2 PROJECT SITE LAYOUT Fig. (2.7) Scaffold Storage 56

Fig. (2.7) Scaffold Storage

56

Chapter 2

PROJECT SITE LAYOUT

Chapter 2 PROJECT SITE LAYOUT 2.4.1.5 Tower Construction: The key strategy is to facilitate the advancement

2.4.1.5 Tower Construction:

The key strategy is to facilitate the advancement of construction of the towers, and to construct the podium around. Construction of Towers will be done in following 3 major phases:

1. Foundation & Sub-structure Works

2. Structural Works both RCC & Steel Structure

3. Internal & External Finishes including Electromechanical Works

& Steel Structure 3. Internal & External Finishes including Electromechanical Works Fig (2.8) Slabs & Cores

Fig (2.8) Slabs & Cores

57

Chapter 2

PROJECT SITE LAYOUT

Chapter 2 PROJECT SITE LAYOUT 2. Material management: 2.2Definition: Material management is defined as planning,

2. Material management:

2.2Definition:

Material management is defined as planning, identification, procuring, storage, receiving and distribution of materials

2.2.1Aim of material management:

1- To get the right quality

2- To get right quantity of supplies

3- This quantity come at the right time

4- Put material supplies at the right place

5- Using and receive material with minimum cost

2.2.2 Steps of material management:

1- Material planning

2- Buying or purchasing material

3- Procuring and receiving

4- Storing and inventory control

5- Supply and material distribution

6- Quality assurance

4- Storing and inventory control 5- Supply and material distribution 6- Quality assurance Fig. (2.9) Block

Fig. (2.9) Block Storage

58

Chapter 2

PROJECT SITE LAYOUT

Chapter 2 PROJECT SITE LAYOUT 2.2.3Nile towers project: -In our project (Nile tower), we have material

2.2.3Nile towers project:

-In our project (Nile tower), we have material management that, the contractor (Arabtec and Siac) made material planning including measuring, ordering and scheduling, it was very important process to increasing the productivity

-The contractor purchasing material in steps to find vendors.

Step 1:- they send material indent to the owner

Step 2:- enquiry to the vendors.

Step 3:- vendor's comparison

Step 4:- purchase order

Step 5:- vendor's evaluation

-The contractor have inventory control department from to decide about the types of ordering system, fixing the safety stock limits.

2.2.4 Specifications for inventory control department:

1-The project inventory control team shall cover all aspects of inventory control at site right from material receipt and inspection through to demobilization aspects at the end of project.

2-Material received shall be checked by project QA/QC team along with inventory control team and recorded.

3- Material issues to the site and transfers from the site shall be handled by inventory control team in accordance with the material issues and transfers procedure. Valuation of stock transfers shall be as outlined in the valuation of stock transfers.

4- The project QA/QC team should conduct material verification and handover to ensure effective stock verification measures at periodic intervals.

59

Chapter 2

PROJECT SITE LAYOUT

Chapter 2 PROJECT SITE LAYOUT 5- Assets shall be controlled by project inventory team in accordance

5- Assets shall be controlled by project inventory team in accordance with the asset control procedure.

6- The project shall handle all scrap generated in accordance with the guidelines outlined in the scrap handling procedure.

7- At the completion of the project, a detailed stock check and verification of discrepancies shall be performed and a report generated as detailed in the site stores demobilization procedure.

- At receiving material the contractor check material quality and quantity of material.

60

Chapter 2

PROJECT SITE LAYOUT

Chapter 2 PROJECT SITE LAYOUT - The contractor store material inside the site to protect it

- The contractor store material inside the site to protect it from thieves & Weathering Conditions.

store material inside the site to protect it from thieves & Weathering Conditions. Fig. (2.10) Scaffold

Fig. (2.10) Scaffold Storage

61

Chapter 2

PROJECT SITE LAYOUT

Chapter 2 PROJECT SITE LAYOUT 3. Provide adequate working areas, storage areas and stores: Fig (2.11)

3. Provide adequate working areas, storage areas and stores:

3. Provide adequate working areas, storage areas and stores: Fig (2.11) Storage Area •Our site area

Fig (2.11) Storage Area

•Our site area is very Small so block storage is at the entrance of the site.

•Scaffold storage placed at the end of project that we can use scaffold several times and make it near to crane tower.

62

Chapter 2

PROJECT SITE LAYOUT

Chapter 2 PROJECT SITE LAYOUT Material Organization Chart: Fig. (2.12) Organization of Material 63

Material Organization Chart:

Chapter 2 PROJECT SITE LAYOUT Material Organization Chart: Fig. (2.12) Organization of Material 63

Fig. (2.12) Organization of Material

63

Chapter 2

PROJECT SITE LAYOUT

Chapter 2 PROJECT SITE LAYOUT Objectives of Material Management: Fig. (2.13) Objectives of Material Management 64

Objectives of Material Management:

Chapter 2 PROJECT SITE LAYOUT Objectives of Material Management: Fig. (2.13) Objectives of Material Management 64

Fig. (2.13) Objectives of Material Management

64

Chapter 3

TENDERING AND PROJECT DOCUMENTS

Chapter 3 TENDERING AND PROJECT DOCUMENTS Tender And Project Documents “ Chapter 3 ” 65

Tender And Project Documents

Chapter 3

Chapter 3 TENDERING AND PROJECT DOCUMENTS Tender And Project Documents “ Chapter 3 ” 65

65

Chapter 3

TENDERING AND PROJECT DOCUMENTS

Chapter 3 TENDERING AND PROJECT DOCUMENTS 3.1Tendering Documents : - 3.1 INTRODUCTION: - Tender of work

3.1Tendering Documents: -

3.1 INTRODUCTION: - Tender of work

The employer as defined in the tender data above wishes to receive tenders for the execution and completion of the works summarized in the tender documents in accordance to procedures, conditions, contract and tender terms prescribed in the tender documents. The location of the site and scope of work are as stated in the tender data as described in section 01100 "summery of work"

3.1.2 DEFINITIONS :-

Addenda: Means a written or graphic Document issued by the Engineer prior To the Execution of the contract during tendering period which modifies or Interprets the tender documents by additions , deletions , clarifications or corrections.

Tender: Means a tenderer priced and properly signed complete offer submitted to The Employer of the Execution and completion of the works and remedying of any defects there ,in accordance with the tender documents .

Tenderer: Means a person or any entity who submits a tender

Unit price: Means an amount stated in the tender as a price per unit of measurements of materials, Equipment or services of the work or portion of it as described in the tender documents.

66

Chapter 3

TENDERING AND PROJECT DOCUMENTS

Chapter 3 TENDERING AND PROJECT DOCUMENTS 3.1.3 GENERAL :- Invitation 1 Prequalified Tenderers are invited by

3.1.3 GENERAL :- Invitation

1 Prequalified Tenderers are invited by The Employer for participation in The tender described in the the attached conditions and technical specifications for the integrated works.

2 The period named in this information for tenderers shall be consecutive calendar days except that if due date falls on an Egyptian Holiday, The due date will be the next day .

Time For Completion

3 The successful Tenderer shall be required to complete the work within Thirty six (36) months From letter of acceptance date ,This period includes mobilization period for the commencement of the-works.

Cost of Tendering

4 Tenderer shall bear all costs and shall not be reimbursed for any costs associated with the preparation ,submission of his tender ,any subsequent visits to the Employer's and/or Engineer's offices or to the project site or any investigations carried out during Tender preparation ,Regardless of the conduct or outcome of the tendering process.

Tenderer Update Information

5 To be Qualified for award of Contract ,Tenderers are requested to update the following information submitted un their prequalification application

3.1.4 TENDERING PROCEDURING :-

Form and submission of Tender

Tender will be accepted if submitted by the tenderers in accordance with this information to tenderers on the letter of tender (section00400) hereof and contains all the tender documents, The tender security,

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Chapter 3 TENDERING AND PROJECT DOCUMENTS The information requested therein including but not limited to materials,

The information requested therein including but not limited to materials, Documents and forms listed in Contract.

The tender shall not contain alterations .Omissions or additions except Those to comply with instructions issued by the Employer or as necessary to correct errors made by the tenderers in which case such alterations ,erasures and corrections shall be stamped and initiated by the person or person by the tender.

Signing of Tender:

All blanks on the tender shall be filled by the typewriter or manually written indelible ink and shall be stamped and signed by the person or the person authorized on behalf of the tenderer in accordance to sub- clause.

Tender To be Confidential:

All Recipients of the tender Documents shall treat the details of the tender Documents as private and confidential not for use in other projects, not for being published even in case tender may be rejected, The are not entitled to use these documents in other projects.

Tender Language:

The tender and all Correspondence and documents related to the tender shall be written in ENGLISH Language.

One Tender by Tenderer:

Each tenderer shall submit only one tender either by himself or as a partner in a joint-venture, a Tenderer who submits more than one tender shall be disqualified, However This doesn't limit inclusion of the same subcontractor in more than one Tender.

Site Information:

The information given in tender documents related to site conditions is from best sources at present available to the Employer,

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Chapter 3 TENDERING AND PROJECT DOCUMENTS However The Tenderer is Responsible for making his own site

However The Tenderer is Responsible for making his own site investigation, drawings, and his own conclusions and obtain all information through field investigation or otherwise that may be necessary for preparing the tender. The investigations shall include Civil, Mechanical…etc.

Special Insurance The Contractor shall insure all works, Utilities, materials and Equipment in the name on the Employer against all Loss, damage from whatever cause arising during the course of any work or operation carried out by him for all his activities performed and otherwise as required by the tender documents, such Insurance shall be effected in a manner that the Employer is covered during the period of execution of the work and during the defects Liability period of and Guarantees.

3.1.5 TENDER DOCUMENTS: -

1. The tender documents are those stated below and should be read in Conjunction with any addenda issued in accordance and submitted substantially completed by the tender. (a)Invitation for Tender. (b)1- Information for tenders and form of security. 2- General Conditions of Contract. 3- Particular Conditions. 4-Technical specifications. 5-Letter of Tender, Appendices to tender sections. 6-Measurments and payments. 7-Bill of Quantities. 8-Form of Contract (Agreement). 9-Forms of Advance Payments and performance. 10-drawing scheduled in section 00015. 11-General Requirements. 12-Geo-techniqual Studies Report. 13-Documentary Evidence that the tenderer is qualified.

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Chapter 3 TENDERING AND PROJECT DOCUMENTS 2. The Priced Bill of Quantities by tenderer should be

2. The Priced Bill of Quantities by tenderer should be completed by hand of the Original BOQ Stamped by the Engineer, any other BOQ shall be considered nil and void.

3. The tenderer is expected to examine carefully the content of tender Documents and his tender shall comply with all requirements and Obligations as set out in the tender document.

3.1.6 CLARIFICATION OF TENDER DOCUMENTS:

Clarification of tender Documents

A tenderer requiring any Clarification of the tender Documents shall request the Employer with a copy to the Engineer in writing E-mail or Fax at the employer's address indicated in the invitation to Tenderers.

The Employer shall respond in writing to any request for clarification which he receives not less than fourteen (14) days to the deadline for submission of Tenders.

Last Response shall be issued by the employer seven (7) days prior to the deadline for submission of Tenders.

Copies of the Employer's Response shall be forwarded. simultaneously to the all invited Tenders without identified.

3.1.7 AMENDMENT OF TENDER DOCUMENTS: -

At any time prior to the submission date of tenders The employer may for any reason whether at his own initiative or in response to a clarification request by a tenderer modify the tender by issuing an addendum.

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Chapter 3 TENDERING AND PROJECT DOCUMENTS  No addendum shall be issued later than two (2)

No addendum shall be issued later than two (2) days prior to the deadline for-submission-of-tenders.

Any addendum issued shall be part of the tender Documents, and shall be communicated in writing or by fax or e-mail to all purchases of the tender-documents.

3.1.8 REQUIREMENTS FOR TENDERER:

Documentation-for-tenders Any tender submitted by a company, partnership or firm must be accompanied by a duly authenticated extract defining the constitution of the firm and show by which person and in what manner contracts may be entered into on behalf of the partnership of firm and which person are responsible for the due execution of such contracts and can give valid receipts on behalf of the company partnership of firm.

Joint venture

Tenders submitted by a joint venture of two or more firms as

the following requirements

partners

shall

comply

with

The Composition or The constitution of The Joint venture shall not be altered without prior consent of The employer during the performance of the work of the contract

One of the partners shall be nominated as being leading in charge and this authorization shall be evidenced by submitting a power of attorney signed by legally authorized signatories of all the partners

The tender documents and in case of successful tender, The contract documents shall be signed so as to be legally binding on all-partners

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Chapter 3 TENDERING AND PROJECT DOCUMENTS  The partner in charge shall be authorized to incur

The partner in charge shall be authorized to incur liabilities and receive instructions for and on behalf of any partners of joint venture

All partners of the joint venture shall be liable jointly and severally to the employer for the execution of the contract in accordance with the contract terms and a statement to this effect shall be included in the authorization mentioned in sub clause in the contract

A copy of agreement shall be submitted with the tender.

3.1.9 TYPE OF CONTRACT

The contract shall be a Remeasured contract for the whole work based on the BOQ included in the tender documents

Unless otherwise noticed, the units of measurements applicable for The design, drawing, calculation and administration purposes shall be the metric units

3.1.10 TENDER SECURITY

Tenderer shall provide as part from his tender and submit together with the tender according to contract.

In order to secure the performance by the tenderer of the obligations undertaken by him and that the successful Tenderer shall faithfully provide the performance security required.

Letters of Guarantee from banks abroad may also be accepted if endorsed by the acceptable Egyptian bank.

No expense and interest shall be paid in respect of any such Tender security, which is made and accepted generally as a guarantee of the good faith of all tenders.

Any tender not accompanied by an acceptable tender security deposit and in the amount fixed shall be rejected by the employer.

The format of the bank guarantee shall be in accordance with the sample from any tender security.

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Chapter 3 TENDERING AND PROJECT DOCUMENTS 3.2 Shop drawing confirmation codes: A= approved B= approved as

3.2 Shop drawing confirmation codes:

A= approved B= approved as noted C= noted for resubmittal D= rejected

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Chapter 3 TENDERING AND PROJECT DOCUMENTS 3.2 Specifications of project: - DIVISION 01 - GENERAL REQUIREMENTS

3.2 Specifications of project: -

DIVISION 01 - GENERAL REQUIREMENTS

01100

SUMMARY.

01310

PROJECT MANAGEMENT AND COORDINATION.

01320

CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS DOCUMENTATION.

01322

PHOTOGRAPHIC DOCUMENTATION.

01330

SUBMITTAL PROCEDURES.

01400

QUALITY REQUIREMENTS.

01420

REFERENCES AND ABBREVIATIONS.

01500

TEMPORARY FACILITIES AND CONTROLS.

01600

PRODUCT REQUIREMENTS.

01700

EXECUTION REQUIREMENTS.

01731

CUTTING AND PATCHING.

01770

CLOSEOUT PROCEDURES.

01781

PROJECT RECORD (AS-BUILT) DOCUMENTS.

01782

OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE DATA.

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Chapter 3 TENDERING AND PROJECT DOCUMENTS SECTION 01100 SUMMARY PART 1 – GENERAL 1.01 RELATED DOCUMENTS

SECTION 01100

SUMMARY

PART 1 GENERAL

1.01RELATED DOCUMENTS

Drawings and general provisions of the Contract, including Conditions of Contract and other Division 1 Specification Sections, apply to this Section.

1.02PROJECT DESCRIPTION

The Falcon Tower Project Located on Maadi Nile Corniche Next to Al-Salam Hospital.

1.03CONTRACTS

The Employer keeps his right to execute this Project under multiple contracts.

1.04SCOPE OF WORKS

The Works to be executed under this Contract comprise of the execution, completion and remedy of defects of The Falcon Tower Project, all in accordance and as shown in the contract documents. The works are briefly as follows:

Tower of total 23 floors and 3 basements, comprise Hotel Suites and guest rooms with a total of 137 Unit and residential towers offer 108 Unit luxurious apartments of high standard finishing and accessories. With total build up area 107,697 Sq m.

1.05EXISTING UTILITY INTERRUPTIONS

(i)Notify Supervision Consultant and Employer not less than three days in advance of proposed utility interruptions.

any

(ii) Do not proceed with utility interruptions without Engineer's, Employer's and authorities having jurisdictions written permission.

1.06SPECIFICATION FORMATS AND CONVENTIONS

Specification Format: The Specifications are organized into Divisions and Sections using the 16-division format and CSI "Master Format" numbering system.

PART 2 - PRODUCTS (Not Used) PART 3 - EXECUTION (Not Used)

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Chapter 3 TENDERING AND PROJECT DOCUMENTS SECTION 01320 CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS DOCUMENTATION PART 1 - GENERAL 1.1

SECTION 01320 CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS DOCUMENTATION

PART 1 - GENERAL

1.1 RELATED DOCUMENTS

As mentioned before

1.2 SUMMARY

A. This Section includes administrative and procedural requirements for

documenting

performance of the Works, including the following:

1. Preliminary Construction Programme.

2. Contractor's Construction Programme.

3. Two-week look-ahead working programme.

4. Commissioning plan.

5. Submittals Schedule.

6. Daily construction reports.

7. Weekly progress reports.

construction during

and

monitoring

the

progress

of

8. Monthly progress reports.

9. Material location reports.

10. Field condition reports.

11. Special reports.

1.3 SUBMITTALS

A. Qualification Data.

B. Submittals Schedule.

C. Preliminary Construction Programme.

D. Preliminary Network Diagram.

E. Contractor's Construction Programme.

F. CPM Reports: comprise activity report, logic report, resource allocation and

loading report, cash flow estimate and total float report.

G. Revised Programme.

H. Daily Construction Reports.

I. Weekly Progress Reports.

J. Monthly Progress Reports.

K. Material Location Reports.

L. Field Condition Reports.

M. Accident reports.

N. Special Reports.

O. Purchase Order Tracking the Contractor shall transmit for recording every

Purchase Order issued to Sub-Contractors and Suppliers pertaining to Works.

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Chapter 3 TENDERING AND PROJECT DOCUMENTS 1.4 QUALITY ASSURANCE A. Scheduling Consultant Qualifications: An experienced

1.4 QUALITY ASSURANCE

A. Scheduling Consultant Qualifications: An experienced specialist in CPM

scheduling and reporting.

B. Computer Software: Primavera Enterprise (Project Management).

C. Prescheduling Conference: Conduct conference at Project Site to comply

with requirements in Division 1 Section "Project Management and Coordination". Review methods and procedures related to the Preliminary Construction Programme and the Contractor's Construction Programme.

1.5 COORDINATION

A. Coordinate preparation and processing of programmes, schedules and

reports with performance of construction activities and with programming, scheduling and reporting of separate contractors.

B. Coordinate Contractor's Construction Programme with the list of

subcontracts, Submittals Schedule, progress reports, payment requests, and other required schedules and reports.

1. Secure time commitments for performing critical elements of the Works from

parties involved.

2. Coordinate each construction activity in the network with other activities and

schedule them in proper sequence.

PART 2 PRODUCTS

2.1 SUBMITTALS SCHEDULE

Arrange Submittals Schedule in chronological order by dates required by construction programme. Include time required for review, resubmittal, ordering, manufacturing, fabrication, and delivery when establishing dates.

2.2 CONTRACTOR'S CONSTRUCTION PROGRAMME,

GENERAL

Comply with the relevant clauses in the Conditions of Contract.

2.3 SUBMITTAL PROCEDURE

A. Preliminary Network Diagram: Submit diagram within 28 days after the date

of the Letter of Acceptance. Outline significant construction activities for the

first 90 days of construction. Include skeleton diagram for the remainder of the Works and a cash flow prediction based on indicated activities.

B. CPM Schedule: Prepare Contractor's Construction Programme using a

CPM network analysis diagram. Follow procedures and prepare programme in

such form and detail as the Engineer shall reasonably prescribe.

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Chapter 3 TENDERING AND PROJECT DOCUMENTS 2.4 CONTRACTOR’S CONSTRUCTION PROGRAMME (CPM SCHEDULE) A. CPM Schedule

2.4 CONTRACTOR’S CONSTRUCTION PROGRAMME (CPM SCHEDULE)

A. CPM Schedule Preparation: Prepare a list of all activities required to

complete the Works.

B. Initial Issue of Schedule: Prepare initial network diagram from a list sorted

by "early start-total float". Identify critical activities.

C. Schedule Updating/Revisions: Concurrent with making updates and/or

revisions to schedule.

2.5 TWO WEEK LOOK AHEAD PROGRAMME

A. Prepare and submit weekly a two-week look-ahead programme based on

the Contractor’s progress in a format acceptable to the Engineer

B. The programme is to indicate the work for the next two weeks, and indicate

progress against the previous week’s plan.

2.6 RESOURCE SCHEDULE

Prepare a resource schedule containing at least the following information:

1. Numbers and classes of workmen to be employed on Site for each activity.

2. Materials to be used for each activity.

3. Contractor’s equipment and temporary works to be supplied or constructed

and dates for supply, construction and removal.

4. Quantities of work to be performed for each activity.

2.7 COMMISSIONING PLAN

The Contractor shall submit to the Engineer at least 3 months before the Project Completion, or the completion of any other designated milestone, a Commissioning Plan, outlining the organization, scheduling, resources and work plan for commissioning of the Project.

2.8 REPORTS

A. Daily Construction Reports.

B. Material Status Reports: At monthly intervals, prepare a comprehensive list

of materials delivered to and stored at Project Site for the Engineer’s review with a copy to the Supervision Consultant.

C. Field Condition Reports: Immediately on discovery of a difference between

field conditions and the Contract Documents, prepare and submit a detailed

report.

D. Submittals Reports: Prepare and submit, at fortnightly intervals, a

comprehensive list of all submittals status

E. Weekly Progress Report.

F. Monthly Progress Reports.

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Chapter 3 TENDERING AND PROJECT DOCUMENTS G. Wages Books and Time Sheets: The Contractor shall keep

G. Wages Books and Time Sheets: The Contractor shall keep accurate and

proper wage books and time sheets showing wages paid to and time worked by workmen and, when required, produce such wage books and time sheets for inspection by the Engineer.

2.9 ACCIDENT REPORTS

A. In the event of any accident on Site which causes personal injury or

damage to any property, prepare an immediate report of the circumstances. Include statements of witnesses, photographs and sketches as appropriate, and details of immediate remedial action taken.

B. In the event of an accident which causes injury to any person on Site,

inform the relevant public authorities, and the Engineer immediately.

2.10 SPECIAL REPORTS

A. General: Submit special reports, in a format acceptable to the Engineer,

directly to Engineer within one day of an occurrence.

B. Reporting Unusual Events: When an event of an unusual and significant

nature occurs at Project Site, whether or not related directly to the Works, prepare and submit a special report.

2.11 PURCHASE ORDER TRACKING

A. The Contractor shall transmit for recording every Purchase Order issued to

Subcontractors and Suppliers pertaining to Works. That include at least:

1. The Scope of the Purchase,

2. The date of the Purchase,

3. The delay for Procurement,

4. The name of the Supplier or Sub-Contractor.

PART 3 - EXECUTION

3.1 CONTRACTOR'S CONSTRUCTION PROGRAMME

A. Scheduling Consultant: Engage a consultant to provide planning,

evaluation, and reporting using CPM scheduling.

B. Contractor's Construction Programme Updating/Revisions: The Contractor

shall monitor the progress of the Works, including submittal of shop drawings, samples and the like, the procurement of materials and plant, and the supply of resources and cash flow compared with the Contractor’s construction

programme, schedules, and estimates. At monthly intervals, update programme to reflect actual construction progress. Issue programme one week before each regularly scheduled progress meeting, or as otherwise requested by the Engineer.

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Chapter 3 TENDERING AND PROJECT DOCUMENTS C. Distribution: Distribute copies of consented programme to Engineer, and

C. Distribution: Distribute copies of consented programme to Engineer, and Supervision Consultant, with a copy to the Employer, and other parties identified by Contractor with a need-to-know programme responsibility. :

1. Post copies in Project meeting rooms and temporary field offices.

2. When revisions are made, distribute revised programmes to the same

parties and post in the same locations. Delete parties from distribution when they have completed their assigned portion of the Works and are no longer involved in performance of construction activities.

DIVISION 02 SITE CONSTRUCTION

02300

EARTHWORK.

02462

BORED CAST-IN-PLACE PILES.

02463

PILE TESTING.

02780

UNIT PAVERS.

02810

IRRIGATION SYSTEMS.

02900

LANDSCAPING.

02910

PLANT PROCUREMENT AND DELIVERY.

02915

PLANTING SOIL.

02930

EXTERIOR PLANTS (PLANTING).

02935

LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE.

SECTION 02900

1- GENERAL 1.1 DESCRIPTION

Scope of Work: The Contractor shall supply all labor, related materials, plants, and equipment required to construct and maintain the work as described in the Drawings and Specifications and as directed by the Engineer. It should be noted in this section that wherever Landscaping is mentioned it means Landscape with its related works. Related works and sections are:

02910

Plant Procurements and Delivery.

02915

Planting Soil.

02930

Exterior Plants.

02935

Landscape Maintenance.

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Chapter 3 TENDERING AND PROJECT DOCUMENTS 1.2 SUBMISSIONS OF MATERIALS Samples: The Contractor shall submit samples

1.2 SUBMISSIONS OF MATERIALS

Samples: The Contractor shall submit samples or all materials to be used on the project to the Engineer for approval. No materials shall be used until they have been approved in writing by the Engineer.

Samples shall be retained by the Engineer and all subsequent deliverables of materials

shall conform to the approved samples (also see 02915 Planting Soil). The Contractor shall submit the following:

1. Agricultural Soil

2. Organic Soil Amendment

proposed,

3. Aggregate Mulch

4. Amended Soil Mix

for testing.

5. Planting Tabs

6. Tree Stakes

7. Plant Tie Material

8. Staking Material

9. Chemical Fertilizers

proposed.

1 kg 1 kg of each type

1 kg 1 kg as required

5 each. 1 each. 1 meter 1 each. 1 kg of each type

1.3 PRODUCT DELIVERY, STORAGE AND HANDLING A. Delivery:

The Contractor shall notify the Engineer 15 days in advance of the time and manner at delivery of plants. The Contractor shall supply the Engineer with an itemized list of the plants and materials with each delivery date including name, size and quantity not less than three days prior to the actual arrival date at the site.

B. Storage:

Plants, which are not installed on the date of arrival at the site shall be stored and protected from theft, wind, sun and other adverse climatic conditions.

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Chapter 3 TENDERING AND PROJECT DOCUMENTS C. Handling: The Contractor shall handle, load and unload plant

C. Handling:

The Contractor shall handle, load and unload plant material with care in order to avoid damaging the root balls, trunks, or branches. Container grown plants shall be handled and moved only by the root ball container or box. Palms shall be handled in such a way as to not damage the terminal bud in any way. The Contractor shall submit his plan for moving all palms prior to doing so and gain written acceptance from the Engineer.

PART 2- PRODCUTS

2.1 TREE AND SHRUB MATERIAL

2.1.1 General: Furnish nursery-grown trees and shrubs conforming to ANSI Z60.1 with healthy root systems developed by transplanting or root pruning. Provide well-shaped. Fully-branched-healthy, vigorous stock free of disease, insects,

2.1.2 SHADE AND FLOWERING TREES:

A. Shade Trees: Single-stem trees with straight trunk, well-balanced crown, and intact leader, of height and caliper indicated, conforming to ANSI Z60.1 for type of trees required. 1. Branching Height: 1/3 to ½ of tree height 2.0m minimum clearance in

areas open to

pedestrian traffic.

2.2 PLANT PROTECTION MATERIALS:

All materials are specified in detail in Section 02930, Exterior Plants, Item 2.02, Product Accessories and to be read in conjunction with the following:

A-Palm Stakes: Palm stakes shall be made of redwood or lodge pole pine or an approved equal and shall measure 10 cm x 5 cm x length as shown on details. B. Tree Ties: Tree ties shall consist of a synthetic rubber compound hose, approved plastic, adjustable strap type or neoprene tube approximately 0.03 m in diameter and 0.3 m in length, with rubber or hussian buffer.

PART 3 EXECUTION

3.1 PLANTING OPERATIONS:

Contractor’s Superintendence: The Contractor shall provide all personnel and supervisory staff necessary to successfully complete the work as shown on the plans and in specifications. As a minimum, the Contractor shall employ the needed staff as mentioned elsewhere in the project documents, Tendering Procedures (I.5) and to the acceptance of the Engineer. The Contractor's supervisory staff must have the written approval of the Engineer, who shall have the authority to withdraw his approval at any time during the course of the work.

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Chapter 3 TENDERING AND PROJECT DOCUMENTS 3.2 EXCAVATION General: All planting areas shall conform to the

3.2 EXCAVATION

General: All planting areas shall conform to the alignment and grades shown on the plans and the location of underground utilities shall be verified by the Contractor prior to digging. The Contractor shall remove all foreign material, debris, roots, stones, plant parts and contaminated soil to depths necessary to permit planting according to plans and specifications

3.3 LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE

Work Programme: The Contractor shall prepare and submit to the Engineer a detailed monthly programme for each month during the Landscape Maintenance Period.

DIVISION 03 CONCRETE

03300

CAST IN PLACE CONCRETE

03412

PRECAST ARCHITECTURAL CONCRETE

03544

CEMENT SAND SCREED

SECTION 03300 CAST IN PLACE CONCRETE

PART 1 - GENERAL

1.1 RELATED DOCUMENTS

A. Drawings and general provisions of the Contract, Division 1 specification Sections, apply to this section.

1.2 SUMMARY

This Section specifies cast-in place concrete, including formwork, reinforcement, concrete materials, mix design, placement procedures, and finishes.

1.3 SUBMITTALS

A. Product Data: For each type of manufactured material and product indicated.

B. Design Mixes: For each concrete mix. Include alternate mix designs when characteristics of materials, project conditions, weather, test results, or other circumstances warrant adjustments.

C. Steel Reinforcement Shop Drawings: Details of fabrication, bending, and placement, prepared according to ACI 315.

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Chapter 3 TENDERING AND PROJECT DOCUMENTS "Details and Detailing of Concrete Reinforcement." Include material,

"Details and Detailing of Concrete Reinforcement." Include material, grade, bar schedules, stirrup spacing, bent bar diagrams, arrangement, and supports of concrete reinforcement. Include special reinforcement required for openings through concrete structures.

D. Formwork Shop Drawings: Prepared by or under the supervision of a qualified professional Engineer detailing fabrication, assembly, and support of formwork. Design and engineering of formwork are Contractor's responsibility.

E. Mockup samples: furnish samples for each type of formed concrete fair face finish and concrete floor and slab finish and obtain the Engineer’s approval before proceeding with the works.

F. Welding Certificates.

G. Material Test Reports.

H. Material Certificates: Signed by manufacturers certifying that each of the following items complies with requirements:

1. Cementations materials and aggregates.

2. Form materials and form-release agents.

3. Steel reinforcement and reinforcement accessories.

4. Admixtures.

5. Water stops.

6. Curing materials.

I. Construction Joint Location: submit for review the location, details and method of construction of all Construction joints.

J. Minutes of pre installation conference.

1.4 QUALITY ASSURANCE

A. Installer Qualifications: An experienced installer who has completed concrete

Work similar in material, design, and extent to that indicated for this Project and whose work has resulted in construction with a record of successful in service

performance.

B. Professional Engineer Qualifications: A professional Engineer who is legally

qualified to practice in jurisdiction where Project is located and who is experienced in providing engineering services of the kind indicated. Engineering services are defined as those performed for formwork and shoring and re-shoring installations that are similar to those indicated for this Project in material, design, and extent.

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Chapter 3 TENDERING AND PROJECT DOCUMENTS C. Manufacturer Qualifications: A firm experienced in manufacturing ready

C. Manufacturer Qualifications: A firm experienced in manufacturing ready

mixed concrete products complying with ASTM C 94 requirements for production facilities and equipment.

D. Testing Agency Qualifications: An independent testing agency, acceptable to

authorities having jurisdiction, qualified according to ASTM C 1077 and ASTM E 329 to conduct the testing indicated, as documented according to ASTM E 548.

1.5 DELIVERY, STORAGE, AND HANDLING

Deliver, store, and handle steel reinforcement to prevent bending and damage.

PART 2 - PRODUCTS

2.1 MANUFACTURERS

Manufacturers: Subject to compliance with requirements, provide products according to the manufacturers stated in this section or equal and approved by the Engineer.

2.2 FORM-FACING MATERIALS:

A. Rough-Formed Finished Concrete: Plywood, lumber, metal, or another

approved material. Provide lumber dressed on at least two edges and one side

for tight fit.

B. Fair face formed finished concrete: form facing panels that will provide

continuous, true and smooth concrete surfaces. Furnish in largest practicable sizes to minimize number of joints, plywood, metal or other approved panel

materials.

C. Chamfer Strips: Wood, metal, PVC, or rubber strips, 20 by 20 mm, minimum.

2.3 STEEL REINFORCEMENT:

Reinforcing bars: ESS 262 / 1988 Hot Rolled Steel Bars, Grade 36/52,

deformed.

2.4 REINFORCEMENT ACCESSORIES:

A. Bar Supports: Bolsters, chairs, spacers, and other devices for spacing.

B. Joint Dowel Bars: Plain-steel bars.

2.5 CONCRETE MATERIALS:

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Chapter 3 TENDERING AND PROJECT DOCUMENTS A. Cement: 1. Use Portland Cement: ASTM C 150, Type

A. Cement: 1. Use Portland Cement: ASTM C 150, Type I or Egyptian Standard

Specification No. 373 / 1991 for all concrete.

B. Normal-Weight Aggregate: ASTM C 33, or Egyptian Standard Specification

No. 1658/1991 uniformly graded, and as follows: 1. Nominal Maximum Aggregate Size:

a.

Foundation, 25 mm.

b.

Other elements 30 mm.

C.

Water: Potable clean and free from mud, oil, acid, salt, alkali, organic matter

and other deleterious substances and complying with ASTM C 94.

2.6 ADMIXTURES

Air-Entraining Admixture--Water-Reducing Admixture--High-Range, Water- Reducing Admixture--Water-Reducing and Retarding Admixture--Retarding

Admixture.

2.7 WATERSTOPS

Flexible PVC Water stops: CE CRD-C 572, for embedding in concrete to prevent passage of fluids through joints.

2.8 VAPOR BARRIERS

A. Vapor Retarder: ASTM E 1745, Class C, of one of the following materials; or

polyethylene sheet, ASTM D 4397, not less than 0.25 mm thick.

2.09 CURING MATERIALS

A. Evaporation Retarder: Waterborne, monomolecular film forming,

manufactured for application to fresh concrete.

B. Moisture-Retaining Cover.

C. Water: Potable.

2.10 REPAIR MATERIALS

Repair Topping: Traffic-bearing, cement-based, polymer-modified, self-leveling product that can be applied in thicknesses from 6 mm.

2.11 CONCRETE MIXES

A. Prepare design mixes for each type and strength of concrete determined by

either laboratory trial mix or field test data bases, as follows:

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Chapter 3 TENDERING AND PROJECT DOCUMENTS 1. Proportion normal-weight concrete according to ACI 211.1 and ACI

1. Proportion normal-weight concrete according to ACI 211.1 and ACI 301.

2. Proportion lightweight structural concrete according to ACI 211.2 and ACI

301.

2.12 FABRICATING REINFORCEMENT

A. Comply with Concrete Reinforcing Steel Institute's (CRSI’s) recommended practice for "Placing Reinforcing Bars," for details and methods of reinforcement placement and supports and as herein specified.

B. Clean reinforcement of earth, and other materials that reduce or destroy bond

with concrete.

C. Accurately position, support, and secure reinforcement against displacement.

Locate and support reinforcing by chairs, runners, bolsters, spacers, and hangers, as approved by Engineer.

D. Place no reinforcing until forms have been coated with release agent.

E. Do not place concrete until reinforcing has been inspected and approved by

Engineer.

2.13 CONCRETE MIXING

A. Ready-Mixed Concrete: Measure, batch, mix, and deliver concrete according

to ASTM C 94 and ASTM C 1116

PART 3 - EXECUTION

3.1 FORMWORK

A. Design, erect, shore, brace, and maintain formwork, according to ACI 301 and

ACI347R, to support vertical, lateral, static, and dynamic loads, and construction loads that might be applied, until concrete structure can support such loads.

B. Construct formwork so concrete members and structures are of size, shape,

alignment, elevation, and position indicated, within tolerance limits of ACI 117.

3.2 EMBEDDED ITEMS

A. Place and secure anchorage devices and other embedded items required for

adjoining work that is attached to or supported by cast-in-place concrete. Use Setting Drawings, templates, diagrams, instructions, and directions furnished with items to be embedded.

3.3 REMOVING AND REUSING FORMS

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Chapter 3 TENDERING AND PROJECT DOCUMENTS A. Formwork, for sides of beams, walls, columns, and similar

A. Formwork, for sides of beams, walls, columns, and similar parts of the Work,

that does not support weight of concrete may be removed after cumulatively curing at not less than 10 degree C for 24 hours after placing concrete provided concrete is hard enough not to be damaged by form-removal operations and provided curing and protection operations are maintained.

B. Leave formwork, for beam soffits, joists, slabs, and other structural elements,

that supports weight of concrete in place until concrete has achieved the following: 1. At least 75 percent of 28-day design compressive strength. 2. Remove forms only if shores have been arranged to permit removal of forms without loosening or disturbing shores.

C. Clean and repair surfaces of forms to be reused in the Work. Split, frayed,

delaminated, or otherwise damaged form-facing material will not be acceptable for exposed surfaces. Apply new form-release agent.

3.4 SHORES AND RESHORES

Plan sequence of removal of shores and reshore to avoid damage to concrete. Locate and provide adequate re-shoring to support construction without excessive stress or deflection.

3.5 VAPOR BARRIERS

A. Vapor Barrier: Place, protect, and repair vapor-retarder sheets according to

ASTME 1643 and manufacturer's written instructions.

3.6 STEEL REINFORCEMENT

A. Comply with CRSI's "Manual of Standard Practice" for placing reinforcement.

Do not cut or puncture vapor retarder. Repair damage and reseal vapor retarder before placing concrete.

B. Clean reinforcement of loose rust and mill scale, earth, and other foreign

materials.

3.7 JOINTS

Construction Joints: Install so strength and appearance of concrete are not impaired, at locations indicated or as approved by Engineer. Place joints perpendicular to main reinforcement. Continue reinforcement across construction joints, unless otherwise indicated.

3.8 WATERSTOPS

Flexible Water stops: Install in construction joints as indicated to form a continuous diaphragm. Install in longest lengths practicable.

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Chapter 3 TENDERING AND PROJECT DOCUMENTS 3.9 CONCRETE PLACEMENT A. Before placing concrete, verify that installation

3.9 CONCRETE PLACEMENT

A. Before placing concrete, verify that installation of formwork, reinforcement,

and embedded items is complete and that required inspections have been

performed.

B. Do not add water to concrete during delivery, at Project site, or during

placement, unless approved by Engineer.

3.10 FINISHING FORMED SURFACES

A. Rough-Formed Finish: As-cast concrete texture imparted by form-facing

material with tie holes and defective areas repaired and patched. Remove fins and other projections exceeding ACI 347R limits for class of surface specified.

B. Fair face-Formed Finish: As-cast concrete texture imparted by form-facing

material, arranged in an orderly and symmetrical manner with a minimum of seams. Repair and patch tie holes and defective areas. Remove fins and other projections exceeding 1 mm in height.

3.11 FINISHING FLOORS AND SLABS

A. Comply with recommendations in ACI 302.1R for screeding, restraightening,

and finishing operations for concrete surfaces. Do not wet concrete surfaces.

B. Scratch Finish: While still plastic, texture concrete surface that has been

screeded and bull-floated or darbied. Use stiff brushes, brooms, or rakes.

C. Float Finish: Consolidate surface with power-driven floats or by hand floating

if area is small or inaccessible to power driven floats. Restraighten, cut down

high spots, and fill low spots. Repeat float passes and restraightening until surface is left with a uniform, smooth, granular texture.

D. Trowel Finish: After applying float finish, apply first trowel finish and

consolidate concrete by hand or power-driven trowel.

3.12 CONCRETE PROTECTION AND CURING

Protect freshly placed concrete from premature drying and excessive cold or hot temperatures. Comply with ACI 306.1 for cold-weather protection and with recommendations in ACI 305R for hot-weather protection during curing.

3.13 JOINT FILLING

A. Prepare, clean, and install joint filler according to manufacturer's written

instructions. 1. Defer joint filling until concrete has aged at least six months. Do not fill joints until construction traffic has permanently ceased.

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Chapter 3 TENDERING AND PROJECT DOCUMENTS B. Remove dirt, debris, saw cuttings, curing compounds, and sealers

B. Remove dirt, debris, saw cuttings, curing compounds, and sealers from joints;

leave contact faces of joint clean and dry.

3.14 CONCRETE SURFACE REPAIRS

A. Defective Concrete: Repair and patch defective areas when approved by

Engineer. Remove and replace concrete that cannot be repaired and patched to Engineer's approval.

B. Patching Mortar: Mix dry-pack patching mortar, consisting of one part

Portland cement to two and one-half parts fine aggregate passing a No. 16 (1.2- mm) sieve, using only enough water for handling and placing.

C. Perform structural repairs of concrete, subject to Engineer's approval, using

epoxy adhesive and patching mortar.

3.Bil of Quantities: -

3.3.1Definition:

A bill of quantities (BOQ) is a document used in tendering in the Construction industry in which material, parts and labor (and their costs) are itemized. It also (ideally) details the terms and conditions of the construction or repair contract and itemizes all work to enable a contractor to price the work. Bills of quantities are prepared by quantity surveyors and building estimators

3.3.2 Standards for bills of quantities:

It is very important that bills of quantities are prepared according to a standard, widely recognised methodology. This helps avoid any ambiguities or misunderstandings and so helps avoid disputes arising through different interpretations of what has been priced.

3.3.3 Preparing bills of quantities:

Bills of quantities can be prepared elementally or in works packages, by a process of 'taking off which involves identifying elements of construction works that can be measured and priced.

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Chapter 3 TENDERING AND PROJECT DOCUMENTS Bills of quantities are most useful to the contractor when

Bills of quantities are most useful to the contractor when they are prepared in work sections that reflect likely sub-contract packages. This makes it easier for the contractor to obtain prices from sub-contractors and is more likely to result in an accurate and competitive price. The bill of quantities should identify the different kinds of work required, but should not specify them as this can lead to confusion between information in the bill of quantities and information in the specification itself.

3.3.4 Kinds of bills of quantities:

Quantity take off: It is being done by the representatives of the owner, the quantities are approximate and is one of the Contract Documents.

Quantity working off: It is being done by the contractor, those quantities are already used in the work so the quantities are accurate.

3.3.5 We will make bill of quantities to the following items:

1. Columns, cores and shear walls.

2. Rafts.

3. Excavation.

4. Piles.

5. Retaining walls.

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Chapter 3 TENDERING AND PROJECT DOCUMENTS 3.3.5.1Columns, cores and shear walls: Fig. (3.1) Columns, cores and

3.3.5.1Columns, cores and shear walls:

3 TENDERING AND PROJECT DOCUMENTS 3.3.5.1Columns, cores and shear walls: Fig. (3.1) Columns, cores and shear

Fig. (3.1) Columns, cores and shear walls

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Chapter 3 TENDERING AND PROJECT DOCUMENTS Fig. (3.2) Columns Layers Fig. (3.3) Columns RFT Detailing 93
Chapter 3 TENDERING AND PROJECT DOCUMENTS Fig. (3.2) Columns Layers Fig. (3.3) Columns RFT Detailing 93

Fig. (3.2) Columns Layers