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STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT OF

OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH

FINSBURY HEINZ LIMITED


People . Process . Performance
SAFETY MOMENT

EMERGENCY BRIEF

LEARNING FROM INCIDENTS


LEARNING FROM INCIDENT
TRAINING OBJECTIVES & OUTCOMES
Upon completion of this programme, Participants will be able to:

Establish safe working practices - Understand the application, Care


safe behaviours - to assist them and Inspection of Personal
work safely from the exposure of Protective Equipment (PPE
hazards/risks encountered at work Know and appreciate the relevance
Identify and evaluate workplace of Emergency Response Planning,
health and safety risks so as to put Basic First Aid and CPR in the work
mitigating measures in place. environment.

Identify and record potential and Understand the key elements of


Fire Safety including an overview
actual hazards associated with
of the main fire hazards in the
facilities, equipments,
workplace and what measures can
environment, processes, and be taken to prevent the risk of fire
practices.
Become a SAFETY CHAMPION!
SAFETY ( freedom from Danger, Injury or Death) is our
Primary Goal for this Training….

It is hoped that your being safe is also your Main Goal


for attending.

…..Don’t forget that if a student hasn’t learnt, the


Instructor hasn’t taught, Kindly ask questions
FINSBURY HEINZ LIMITED
People . Process . Performance
WORKING AND MANAGING SAFELY

MODULE 1
NAPO
VOICE OF WISDOM

“We recognise the importance of costing loss events as part of total safety
management. Good safety is good business”
Dr. J Whiston, ICI Group SHE Manager

“Safety is, without doubt, the most crucial investment we can make, and the
question is not what it costs us, but what it saves.”
Robert McKee, Chairman Conoco (UK) Ltd

“Prevention is not only better, but cheaper than cure…Profits and safety are
not in competition. On the contrary, safety at work is good business.”
Basil Butler, MD British Petroleum Plc
WORKPLACE ACCIDENT STATISTICS
Reports from ILO show that “Globally 2.2 million people die
annually from work-related accidents and diseases and work-
related deaths appear to be on the rise”.

APRIL 28:
WORLD DAY FOR HEALTH AND SAFETY AT WORK
What is HSE?
HEALTH:
Is a state of complete physical, mental and social wellbeing and
not merely the absence of disease or infirmity

SAFETY:
 Is the freedom from man-equipment-method and
environmental interactions that result in accident
 is an acceptable level of risk, a risk that is reduced to
ALARP (As Low As Reasonably Practicable )

ENVIRONMENT:
Surroundings in which an organization operates, including air,
water, land, natural resources, flora, fauna, humans and
their interrelation.
STRESS
OUR ENVIRONMENT
WHY HSE ?

Fines and costs


Pain and
Court time
suffering
Civil cases
Duty to fellow
Notices
human being
Legal
Moral
Business

Premiums
Uninsured losses
Reputation
Morale
Productivity
HSE LEGISLATION: Where are We?
 EIA Decree of No 86 of 1992 (EIA ACT)

 NESREA (Establishment) Act of 2007

The Factories Act cap 126 Laws of the Federation of


Nigeria 1990

 Employee Compensation Act 2010

ILO OSH Guidelines (Conventions & Recommendations)

 Regulation of Smoking in Public places – Lagos State


SAFETY TERMINOLOGIES

.
HAZARD:
Source, situation, or act with a potential for harm in terms of human
injury or ill health , or a combination of these (OHSAS 18001:2007)
Types include: Physical, Chemical, Biological, Ergonomical and
Psychological

INCIDENT:
Work-related event(s) in which an injury or ill health (regardless
of severity) or fatality occurred, or could have occurred (OHSAS
18001:2007)

ACCIDENT:
Is any unplanned, undesired event that results in personal injury or
in property damage

NEAR MISS:
Describe incidents where, given a slight shift in time or distance,
.
injury, ill-health or damage could have occurred, but did not.
RISK
Is a function of the probability of occurrence of an
undesirable event together with a measure of its
adverse consequences i.e

Risk = Chance (likelihood) X Consequence (outcome)

MUSTER POINT

Is a clear open space outside the work place that is used


as a meeting point for assembly during emergencies, i.e.
It is a place of relative safety.

TOOL BOX MEETING

Is a brief safety talk provided to workers before the


commencement of Work.
CONCEPT OF ACCIDENTS

 HAZARD + EXPOSURE = ACCIDENT


Unsafe
Unsafe Acts
Conditions
Working without Inadequate or missing
authority. machine guards.

Failure to warn others of Defective tools or


danger equipment

Using dangerous equip. Fire Hazards

Using wrong equipment Ineffective housekeeping

Failure to issue control Excessive noise


measures Poor ventilation and
Horseplay ..etc ..etc lighting ..etc…etc..
UNSAFE ACT
QUIZ & REWARD

How do you prevent Unsafe Act?

How do you prevent Unsafe Condition ?

Which is more difficult to prevent and why?


RESULT

Unsafe Condition is
easier to prevent

Unsafe Act is more


difficult to prevent

Prevention of Unsafe Condition


Safety audits
Safety inspections
Maintenance schedules for equipment
Encouraging employee reporting
Good housekeeping
Prevention of Unsafe Acts
Changing behaviour is not easy
Best prevented by developing a “safety culture”
Safety Culture is the product of individual and group values, attitudes, perceptions, competencies, and
patterns of behaviour that determine the commitment to, and the style and proficiency of, an
organization’s health and safety management
INCIDENT RATIO MODEL – HEINRICH’S THEORY

Serious Injury or Death


Most Accident 1
Investigations
Conducted
29
Biggest
Minor Injury
percentage
of injury-causing
Few Investigations potential!
Conducted
300
Near-Miss

3,000
Unsafe Acts, Behaviors or Conditions

PPT-001-02 27
A CHALLENGE

What is the difference between


1. HAZARD and RISK
2. INCIDENT and ACCIDENT
Hazard: Anything with the
potential to harm life, health or
property.

Risk: The measure of the


likelihood and severity of
potential injury or illness
resulting from a hazard.
Can you identify hazards in this picture?
Can you identify any other hazards in this picture?

That’s right! This


wet work surface is
a hazard!
Good Job! These
cables and other
items laying
around are trip
hazards and must
be removed
before work
begins.
….OFFICE HAZARDS?

33
OVERVIEW OF HSE
ERGONOMICS
Basic Manual Handling Principles
 Avoid handling more load than can be managed

 Carry loads correctly – sort by size or weight

 Organise the work area to reduce handling time and stack loads
appropriately

 Do not carry objects that would obstruct your view

 If item is too heavy, ask for help or use mechanical aids

 Be watchful and alert

 Have a Safe Lifting Plan


SAFE LIFTING PLAN

Get close Squat Grip the Hug the


to the load Down Load Load

Slowly
Lift
OHS MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

An Occupational Health and Safety Management System in the


workplace is the foundation for any illness and injury prevention
initiative within an organization.

The system is comprised of policies, procedures, written


responsibilities and a specific accountability system.

Paramount to any Health and Safety System is the active


involvement and commitment of Senior Management of the
organization.

Without active involvement and commitment of the management, no


Health and Safety System can work, no matter how detailed or
involved.
Facilities
Tools & Procedures,
Standards & Training
Equipmen
t Policy

Communication LEADERSHIP Risk Assessment


& Information

Audits Responsibility &


Goals & Motivation Accountability
Objectives
CONTINUAL IMPROVEMENT

ACT: take appropriate


actions to ensure
continual improvement
PLAN: establish
of process performance
objectives and
processes necessary
to deliver results that
meet customer’s
requirements and the
CHECK: monitor and Company policy
measure processes
against policies,
objectives and
requirements for the DO: implement
product and report the processes
results

Continual Improvement – A Permanent Objective of the Organization


42
Benefits of the Management System

INCREASE PROFITABILITY: Working for World Class


Companies.

generate positive PR for the


Company. .

lower insurance
premiums.
Increased Performance and
Productivity.

Reduces the level of risk


and ensures that Improved relations and morale.
Organisations comply
with legislation.

reduces the number of mistakes and


the cost of correcting problems
…Journey so far

1. Safety begins by recognising the hazards.

 If you don’t see the threat you have no control


over the impact.

2. Once hazards are identified , we need


effective options to avoid or control the
impact.

3. Develop an attitude of safety.

 You must recognise that you are the key.


MANAGING HAZARDS
Location/
operation

Hazard Performance
Activity to measures
Standards control risk
procedures
HSE-MS Competence
Threat
Task
People

Threat
control
Hazardous
event Recovery Consequence
HEMP Process
Risk Assessment
HEMP : Hazard and Effects
Management Process

Identify Are people, environment, assets or reputation


exposed to potential harm? Hazard, Threats.

What are the risks?


Assess Risks = Consequences X Likelihood?
What is the likely scenario & likelihood?
Is it ALARP?

Can the risks be eliminated?


Control What controls are needed?
How effective are the controls?
Standards.
Can the potential consequences or effects
Recover be mitigated?
What recovery measures are needed?
Are recovery capabilities suitable and sufficient?

…Be pro-active not reactive towards safety


HAZARD HIERARCHY OF CONTROL
Flow Chart for Risk Control
Why eliminate the hazard when you can buy
personal protective equipment?
Personal Protective Equipment

Personal protective equipment (PPE) should be considered only after other


control methods have been tried or shown not to be feasible.

It requires the employee to understand the nature of the hazard and the
limitations of the PPE.

It also requires constant management to ensure the PPE is appropriate for the
hazard, employees are properly trained to use the PPE correctly, and a supply of
replacements is readily available.
Examples of PPE

Body Part Protection


Eye safety glasses, goggles
Face face shields
Head hard hats
Feet safety Footwear
Hands and arms gloves
Bodies Vests, Coveralls
Hearing earplugs, earmuffs

 The best PPE in the world is useless unless you know how to use and care for it!
Class A

 General service (building construction, shipbuilding, lumbering)


 Good impact protection but limited voltage protection

Class B

 Electrical / Utility work


 Protects against falling objects and high-voltage shock and burns

Class C
 Designed for comfort, offers limited protection
 Protects against bumps from fixed objects, but does not protect
against falling objects or electrical shock
Remember your hands will obey any commands your brain sends them. Think
before you place these valuable and irreplaceable body parts in harms way
without adequate and proper protection.

Avoid The Risk – Always Protect Your Hands!


Spectacle Goggle

Face shield
PPE Continues

Canal Caps
Earmuffs

Earplugs
Implementing HSE for Success
SAFETY COMMUNICATION

 Safety Signage and Barricades


 Safety Meetings
 Safety Trainings
 Emergency Alarms
 MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheets)
 Safety Handbook and Leaflets/Posters

Red : Prohibitive (Must not do)


Blue : Mandatory (Must do)
Yellow : Caution (Hazard warning)
Green: Safe Condition (The Safe Way)
Orange: Warning
HAZARD IDENTIFICATION TOOLS

Several types of tool are available

Workplace/Facility Inspections
• see what really happens

Job safety survey


• see what is supposed to happen

Safety Audits
• measure what happens against what should happen

Accident / incident data analysis


• measure what went wrong

Documentation Review
An Accident through the Bow-tie Concept

Events and Harm to people ,assets


Circumstances What controls are there to reputation or environment
prevent the event happening or escalating
BARRIERS

C
H O
A N
Z S
A E
R Q
D U
E
N
C
Undesirable event with E
potential for harm or damage S
Engineering activities
Maintenance activities
Operations activities
HSE support
HAZARD ANALYSIS VS RISK ASSESSMENT
RISK ASSESSMENT

Risk Assessment is the process of:

Identifying hazards,
Analysing / evaluating the associated risk
Determining appropriate ways to eliminate or
control the hazard

The main aim of the risk assessment is to protect


workers’ health and safety though it is also helps to
minimize the possibility of the assets or the environment
being negatively impacted as a result of work-related
activities.
NAPO - 2
WHAT IS RISK ASSESSMENT?

A careful examination of what,


in your work, could cause
harm to people.

The aim is to make sure no


one gets hurt or becomes ill.
WHAT RISKS SHOULD BE ASSESSED?

Ignore the trivial and concentrate on significant


hazards
RISK ASSESSMENT – THE 5 STEPS

Identify Hazards

Decide who and what might be


harmed and how

Evaluate and control the Risks

Record findings and Implement


them

Review and update Assessment if


necessary
Outline Of JHA Process
Initiate the JHA:

Identify the scope


and JHA objectives

Break down task into


basic steps

For each step:

Identify hazards and Assess hazard Define controls and


threats potential recovery measures

Record results
Summarise:
•the task steps
•hazards
•controls and recovery measures
PAGE OF
JOB HAZARD ANALYSIS / ACTION PLAN
JOB TITLE: DATE JOB DEPARTMENT:
OF LOCAT
ANALY ION:
SIS:

PERSON PERFORMING ANALYSIS: TITLE: PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT:

STEP HAZARD PREVENTIVE


MEASURE
RISK ESTIMATOR

6-9 Unacceptable
Take immediate action
3-4 Tolerable
Look to improve
1-2 Acceptable
No further action, but
ensure controls are
maintained
OVERVIEW OF PTW SYSTEM:
WHAT IS A PTW SYSTEM
 is a formal written system used to control certain types
of work which are identified as potentially hazardous.

 the paper or electronic certificate or form which is used


as part of an overall system of work, and which has
been devised by a company to meet its specific needs

 is a written document which authorises certain people to


carry out specific work, at a certain time and place, and
which sets out the main precautions needed to complete
the job safely.

 A permit-to-work system aims to ensure that proper


consideration is given to the risks of a particular job or
simultaneous activities at site.
TYPES OF WORK BEING PERMITTED

 GENERAL (Cold) WORK : Covers all maintenance and


construction activities, or any other activities outside
normal operations that does not involve any form of hot
work or confined space entry.
 HOT WORK: Covers all work activities that involve a source
of ignition, or where sufficient heat may be generated to
ignite flammable or combustible materials. Used in
conjunction with a General Work Permit
 CONFINED SPACE ENTRY: Required for entry into any area,
storage vessel, with restricted entry and exit and where
there is a potential for a hazardous environment to exist.
It is not one more administrative paper!

Fill in and follow correctly the work permit,


because….

It could save your life!

PERMITS SAVE LIVES -


GIVE THEM PROPER ATTENTION
SAFE ELECTRICAL WORK PRACTICES

• Know where the hazards are

• Properly maintain equipment

• No exposed parts or energized surfaces

• Use barriers and devices where appropriate

• No conductors to walk on or trip on

• No jewelry, or other metal objects around electricity


74
LOCKOUT/TAGOUT (LOTO)

……Prevents
Equipment from unexpectedly starting-up

Co-workers from restarting


equipment

Injury and death during servicing


or maintenance of equipment
SLIPS, TRIPS AND FALL
• Avoid spill, Clean up spills
• Use signage
• On elevated surface, maintain balance
• Remove trailing cables and loose materials from the
walkways
• Maintain good housekeeping
• Avoid dark areas; illuminate work environment
WORKPLACE EMERGENCY

An unforeseen situation that threatens staff, customers, or


the public, disrupts or shuts down operations, or causes
physical or environmental damage.
TYPES OF EMERGENCY

 Natural Disaster
 Medical Emergency
 Energy/utility outages
 Fire hazards
 Civil Disturbance
 Terrorism: BH
BASIC FIRST AID & RESPONSE

The 3 Ps
SAFETY AND EMERGENCY
 So What???

 Emergencies take their toll on business in lives,


well-being, and dollars

 Prevention is the best medicine, but

 Preparedness is the key to survival

 Employees must be properly trained in


emergency response long before the day they
have to act

Training + Drills = Safe Evacuations


Humans are key in getting safety right
or getting safety wrong

Accident ?
Organisation

Individual Job
Corporate HSE Interactions

83
HAZARD AWARENESS

84
ACCIDENT CONTROL TECHNIQUE (ACT)

SHARE OBSERVE
KNOWLEDGE
MANAGEMENT& HAZARD AWARENESS
LESSONS LEARNT MODULES

PROACTIVE APPROACH
RECORD
INTERVENTION
CULTURE
AGREE DISCUSS

…Don't fix the blame, fix the problem


ENCOURAGEMENT as a Safety Tool

Why should I do this…


I never get any thanks
for it anyway !!

Well Done !! I'm Impressed !!


STAR CONCEPT

SEE the threats and hazards in the workplace by


observing people, conditions and the
surroundings
THINK about the consequences and identify the
most serious hazards first
AVOID the hazards by taking decisive action

REPORT the hazards when immediate action


cannot be taken
STEPBACK 5X5
"ENGAGE YOUR MIND BEFORE YOUR HANDS"

STEPBACK 5 X 5 Move Back 5 Paces


When you arrive at the job site, step
back five paces from the job, then ..…

Invest 5 Minutes

5 5  Observe the work area and


surroundings
 Step through the job in your mind
 Think about what else is happening in
the area
 Identify the hazards
 Control the hazards
Identify 12 Things
Your Company Needs
To Put in Place to
achieve the goal of
Creating a Workplace
Where NOBODY GETS
HURT
ACCOUNTABILITY FOR SAFETY

Not just yours, but


others.
Intervene to correct any
unsafe act or condition.

Don’t pass the buck –


pass the baton.
Influence others through
your attitude and
actions.

Be accountable!!!
SAFETY & ATTITUDE

Arrange all the alphabets by giving them


numbers according to their position :

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26
S K I L L S
19 11 9 12 12 19 = 82
K N O W L E D G E
11 14 15 23 12 5 4 7 5 = 96
H A R D W O R K
8 1 18 4 23 15 18 11 = 98 SAFETY IS
REALLY ABOUT
A T T I T U D E
1 20 20 9 20 21 4 5
= 100 ATTITUDE
Watch Out For The Unexpected !!!

…Don't be safety blinded, be safety minded.


MODULE 2
FIRE FACTS
Fire is like cancer, once it starts, it grows and destroy
anything in its path

Fire defies gravity and will always do

Statistics show that Nigeria records one of the highest


rates of fire incidents in the World

Majority of these incidents are as a result of ignorance


of best practices in fire safety management.

Fire incidents are preventable!


CAUSES OF FIRE

MAJOR CAUSES WORKS OF NATURE


Ignorance Thunder and lightening
Negligence strike
Hurricane/wild wind
COMMON CAUSES
Earthquake
Arson
Volcanic eruption
Flammable liquids
Smoking in prohibited areas
Defective electrical equipment
Spontaneous ignition
THEORY OF COMBUSTION
Oxygen Sources Heat Sources
Approximately 16% Required To Reach Ignition Temperature
Normal air contains 21% O2 Open Flame- The Sun
Hot Surfaces
Some fuel materials contain Sparks Arcs
sufficient oxygen within their Friction-Chemical Action
makeup to support burning. Electrical Energy
Compression of Gases

Fuel

Physical State

Gases Liquids Solids


Bulky-Dust
Natural Gases, Propane, Petrol, Kerosene, Turpentine,
Finely Divided
Butane, Hydrogen, Acetylene, Alcohol, Cod Liver Oil, Paint,
Coal, Plastic, Sugar, Grease
Carbon Monoxide Varnish, Lacquer, Olive Oil,
Paper, Grain, Cloth, Leather,
Others Others
Hay, Wax, Cork, Others
THE FIRE TRIANGLE
Three things must be present at the same time to
produce fire:

1. Enough OXYGEN to sustain combustion


2. Enough HEAT to reach ignition
temperature
3. Some FUEL or combustible material
Together, they produce the CHEMICAL
REACTION that is fire!

Take away any of these things and the fire will be


EXTINGUISHED !
CLASSES OF FIRE
Fires are classified according to the type of
fuel that is burning.
If you use the wrong type of fire extinguisher
on the wrong class of fire, you might make
matters worse.
It is very important to understand the four
different classes of Fire…
CLASSES OF FIRE

Class A
Ordinary combustibles or fibrous material, such
as wood, paper, cloth, rubber, and some plastics.
Class B
Flammable or combustible liquids such as
gasoline, kerosene, paint, paint thinners and
Class C propane.
Energized electrical equipment, such as
appliances, switches, panel boxes and power tools.
Class D
Certain combustible metals, such as magnesium,
titanium, potassium, and sodium.
FIRE EXTINCTION PRINCIPLES

OXYGEN
FUEL SMOTHERING
STARVATION

HEAT
COOLING
FIRE MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES:
THE 4 ES
ENGINEERING

EDUCATION

ENFORCEMENT 767
112
ENCOURAGEMENT
THE 15 POINTS
Inspect all areas for fire hazards

Make sure you have the right fire extinguishers

Store materials safely.

Dispose of wastes promptly and correctly.

Emphasize good housekeeping

Install and Maintain Smoke Detectors

Service equipment regularly


THE 15 POINTS

Pay careful attention to electrical safety.

Enforce fire safety rules.

A Match is a Tool for Adults

Plan and Practice Your escape

Crawl Low Under Smoke

Be Careful Cooking

STOP, DROP, AND ROLL

Educate your Workers, make them part of your Fire


Safety Plan.
FIRE EMERGENCY PLAN
Check the location of fire alarms and know how they
work.
Learn your building evacuation plan.
Know where your two nearest exits are located.
Learn how doors swing and where stairs lead.
Make sure nothing blocks fire pulls, extinguishers
and emergency exits.
Learn the sound of your building fire alarm.
Post emergency numbers (including security
and first aid) near your telephone.
Make sure you know what to do if the fire alarm
sounds. Plan your escape.
FOLLOW R.A.C.E.
Remove or rescue anyone from the
R immediate danger area

A Activate the building fire alarm and


report the fire

C Confine the fire by closing all doors


Evacuate the building/ Extinguish the fire
E
TYPES OF FIRE EXTINGUISHERS

Different types of fire extinguishers are


designed to fight different classes of fire.

The 3 most common types of fire


extinguishers are:

1. Water (APW)

2. Carbon Dioxide (CO2)

3. Dry Chemical (Powder)


Types of Fire Extinguishers

1. Water (APW) Fire Extinguishers

APW Fire Extinguishers extinguish fire by taking


away the “heat” element of the Fire Triangle.

APW Fire extinguishers are designed for Class A


fires only: Wood, paper, cloth.

Using water on a flammable liquid fire could cause


the fire to spread.

Using water on an electrical fire increases the risk


of electrocution. If you have no choice but to use an
APW on an electrical fire, make sure the electrical
equipment is un-plugged or de-energized.
Types of Fire Extinguishers

2. Carbon Dioxide Fire Extinguishers

CO2 extinguishers are designed for Class B and C


(Flammable Liquids and Electrical Sources)
fires only!

Carbon dioxide is a non-flammable gas that takes


away the oxygen element of the fire triangle.
Without oxygen, there is no fire

CO2 is very cold as it comes out of the


extinguisher, so it cools the fuel as well.
3. Dry Chemical (ABC) Fire Extinguishers

• Dry chemical extinguishers put out fire by coating the


fuel with a thin layer of dust. This separates the fuel from
the oxygen in the air.

• The powder also works to interrupt the chemical


reaction of fire. These extinguishers are very
effective at putting out fire.

• Dry chemical extinguishers come in a variety of


types…
You may see them labeled:

DC (for “Dry Chemical”)


ABC (can be used on Class A, B, or C fires)
BC (designed for use on Class B and C fires)
USING A FIRE EXTINGUISHER
USING A FIRE EXTINGUISHER

P Pull the pin

Aim at the
A base of flames

S Squeeze the
handle
S Sweep side to
side
RULES FOR FIGHTING FIRES

Do not fight the fire if:

You don’t have adequate or appropriate equipment.


If you don’t have the correct type or large enough
extinguisher, it is best not to try fighting the fire.
You might inhale toxic smoke. When synthetic
materials such as the nylon in carpeting or foam
padding in a sofa burn, they can produce hydrogen
cyanide, and ammonia in addition to carbon
monoxide. These gases can be fatal in very small
amounts.
Your instincts tell you not to. If you are
uncomfortable with the situation for any reason, just
let the fire department do their job.
RULES FOR FIGHTING FIRES CONTINUE

The final rule is to always position yourself with


an exit or means of escape at your back before
you attempt to use an extinguisher to put out a
fire.

In case the extinguisher malfunctions, or


something unexpected happens, you need to be
able to get out quickly. Do not be trapped!
…Your attitude
 You have to be willing
to do what it takes NOT
to be a victim.

 NO ONE can keep you


safe but YOU!

Good housekeeping
must be a culture

Fire Prevention Is
Everyone’s
Responsibility
Safety Leadership Attributes

Recognise Participate & Inspire &


and Reward Communicate Motivate
Safety
Safety Leaders Improvement
Lead Provide Show
by Example Resources Concern

Role Model Build Trust


Compliance is Key!
Supervisors must…
Set the tone!

Make safety a core personal value!

Remind workers rules are designed to protect


them, their co-workers, and their families!

Continually strive for 100% Compliance!

It all begins or ends with you…


Is your attitude in sync with company goals?
FINAL MESSAGE
YOU are responsible for SAFETY

YOU are the KEY to SAFETY


Thank you for your We are done!
time and attention
FINSBURY HEINZ LIMITED
People . Process . Performance
www.finsburyheinz.com
info@finsburyheinz.com