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Nathan Gardiner 18037454

Contemporary Teacher
Leadership Assessment 1

Abstract
The following report focusses on the improvement of a stage 5, Year 9 PD/H/PE unit called
‘Being Active Now and Forever’. This unit was originally designed for an intermediate class
at St Dominic’s College, Kingswood.
The following report proposes recommendations suited for a class with mixed abilities. In
order to effectively achieve this, numerous strategies such as understanding by design have
been utilised to target areas of literacy, numeracy, critical and creative thinking, personal and
social capabilities.

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Contents

Executive Summary ......................................................................................................................... 3


Objective and Context .................................................................................................................. 3
Goals............................................................................................................................................. 4
Recommendations ........................................................................................................................ 4
Background Information .................................................................................................................. 5
Comparative Table ........................................................................................................................... 6
Recommendations with persuasive, evidence-based reasoning and conclusion .............................. 7
Reconstructed Unit ......................................................................................................................... 10
Scope and Sequence ................................................................................................................... 10
Concept Map .............................................................................................................................. 12
Assessment Task and Marking Criteria ...................................................................................... 13
Redesigned Unit Outline ............................................................................................................ 20
References ...................................................................................................................................... 27
Appendices of Original Documents ............................................................................................... 28

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Executive Summary
Objective and Context

This report has been designed for the PD/H/PE faculty at St. Dominic’s College, Kingswood,
located in Western Sydney. St. Dominic’s College is an all-boys, non-government, private
school with approximately 1,000 students. The student body contains five percent Indigenous
students and 11 percent having a language background other than English. The socio-
economic status of the school is somewhat balanced with the majority being in the middle
quarter.
Reference: Statistics and tables below are retrieved from the MySchool Website. Retrieved
from: https://www.myschool.edu.au/school/43678

Originally this unit ‘Being Active Now and Forever’ was taught in a year 9 PD/H/PE class
with moderate/high achieving students. The re-constructed unit will cater for a more mixed
lower ability class (support class with students who have additional needs).

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Goals

 Implement and improve both literacy and numeracy elements within each learning
task through a range of platforms.
 Use inquiry-based learning where students learn to solve problems and collaborate
in groups to achieve a collective goal.
 Create an assessment which effectively examines student’s ability to demonstrate
learning in a variety of ways.
 Ensure learning is sequential by basing each topic on student’s prior knowledge so
that progression is sufficiently achieved.

Recommendations

The following recommendations are based on the unit being taught in a comprehensive
classroom where students are of mixed academic ability including those needing support
(additional learning needs). Differentiation will be a contributing factor when discussing
recommendations and utilising numeracy, literacy, appropriate sequencing and form of
assessment.
 Provide explicit instruction regarding the use of appropriate literacy reporting and
recording learnt information.
 Utilise numeracy strategies in order to improve student’s overall numeracy skills
and analytical thinking.
 Differentiate learning to cater for each individual in the class through means of
learning activities and assessment.
 Allow students with the opportunity to choose their own platform in which they can
display their range of skills and abilities.
 Progress the unit of work to adequately build students knowledge and skills across
each topic area.
 Work towards building confidence (personal and social capabilities) for student
success, expectations, stronger researching, teaching and learning standards,
threshold concepts and interdisciplinary relationships.

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Background Information

The original Unit titled ‘Being Active Now and Forever’ was created to suit the needs of 23
intermediate students who ranged in similar levels of ability (in theory lessons). Due to the
nature of the school (private) students are required to bring a laptop or equivalent Information
Communication and Technology (ICT) device into school. Therefore, almost every faculty
has a high level of ICT interaction in their unit programming. As a result, more ICT was not
required in the reconstructed unit. In class resources included an interactive whiteboard,
option for flip/combined class setting and students had access to the internet (therefore
making research tasks easy to conduct).
The reconstructed unit is designed for a more diverse range of students (significant range in
ability) therefore needing adaptations to various parts of the unit (as explained in the
recommendations section). This unit has been placed within the yearly scope and sequence so
as to ensure students build upon their prior knowledge from basic skills in health and their
understanding of their own health, to promoting health (‘being active now and forever’ to
‘promoting health and keeping safe’).

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Comparative Table
Area of Strengths of the area of Concerns of the area of Suggested changes to counteract Research support for the changes
consideration consideration consideration concerns suggested.

Literacy Throughout each week there Students needing additional Implement tasks involving peer Peer teaching is used to create a
is a substantial amount of support may find some of these teaching and collaborative learning more engaging environment
literacy in reading newspaper tasks too complex. in order to support students needing through group interaction allowing
articles, report writing and assistance. capable students to assist others
debates. needing support (Srivastava et al,
2015).
Numeracy Continuum presented in the Besides a continuum there are Implement tasks involving Adequate numeracy throughout
first week. no tasks incorporating elements numeracy through quantitative topics should be utilised at all
of numeracy. literacy such as statistics, levels of schooling to improve
percentages, relationships (calories future skill development (Goos et
in food) and peer evaluations. al, 2015).
Critical and Creative thinking is present in Critical and creative thinking are Utilise an inquiry-based teaching Inquiry-based teaching approach is
Creative at least three weeks of the present within the unit however approach whereby students are the a student-driven, interactive process
Thinking unit. it is at a basic level. Student’s investigators of their own learning. whereby knowledge is constructed
may need more tasks involving rather than transmitted and
demonstration rather than therefore more likely to be retained
recounting information in order Preston et al (2015).
to retain knowledge.
Personal and This unit has specific content Low amount of concern for this As mentioned above develop a By incorporating collaborative
Social directly relating to self- area, however, there can be range of collaborative learning learning and a strengths-based
Capabilities awareness, self-management changes in regards to more opportunities to engage students approach, students can not only
and social capabilities discussion and group who may not necessarily work well learn new information in differing
(communication, negotiation collaboration. on their own (strengths-based ways but also demonstrate their
and teamwork) approach). knowledge in chosen platforms or
contexts (Srivastava et al, 2015).
Understanding Clear evidence is present No set goals for the students or A pre-test or reflection can be Understanding by design has been
by Design within the unit to suggest that of the students before the unit implemented in order to set key influential for decades and enables
backwards mapping occurs as commences. Method of goals. Assessment set to identify teachers to set clear goals, align
there is a gradual progression assessment not clear or key traits of UbD (self-knowledge, lesson content with curricular needs
and build up of skills. explained. perspective, empathy, application, and appropriately assess students
interpretation and explanation). according to skill level (Roth,
2007)

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Recommendations – with persuasive, evidence-based reasoning and conclusion

The original unit outline had many strengths in only one or two areas, however, it lacked
essential components within literacy, numeracy, critical and creative thinking, personal and
social capabilities. The scope and sequence were elementary and did not give any indication
of key concepts. Additionally, the assessment task did not allow or cater for students who
ranged in ability nor gave a platform for students to display their skills adequately. Therefore,
differentiation techniques were used to reconstruct these elements to support a class ranging
in specific needs. The effective framework, Understanding by Design (UbD) was utilised in
order to successfully reconstruct this unit. Through assessment for learning and set activities,
it is clear that the three stages of UbD are in effect (desired results, evidence and learning
plan) (McTighe & Wiggins, 2011) within the reconstructed unit.

Peer teaching is highly recommended and utilised in this reconstructed unit, in a number of
ways to satisfy students’ needs according to literacy, numeracy and personal and social
capabilities. According to Srivastava et al (2015) peer teaching engages students in a manner
unlike ‘traditional’ learning, where students assist each other in group interaction. Retention
of knowledge is facilitated through this concept as students who pass on information to others
must first know the content in depth themselves. Not only does this encourage critical
thinking but also allows students of various abilities to teach others needing support. As
Whitman (1998) exclaims “to teach is to learn twice”. This is evident throughout the unit
outline as students are regularly given the opportunity to work in pairs/groups, participate in
think-pair-share tasks, expert group tasks and undergo peer assessments.

Inquiry-based teaching approach is a student-driven, interactive process whereby knowledge


is constructed by the students rather than material just being transmitted by the teacher and
therefore, students are more likely to retain this knowledge (Preston et al, 2015). This concept
is recommended throughout any teaching program in order to develop any means of critical
and creative thinking. Inquiry-based teaching directly links with the component critical and
creative thinking as students are required to answer questions by investigating evidence,
discuss and explain any possible answers and analyse conclusions (Deany et al, n.d.). Similar
to peer teaching there are elements throughout the unit outline which demonstrate this type of
framework and include various ICT research tasks, newspaper tasks and multimedia
presentations.

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It is highly recommended that students personal and social capabilities are tested and
explored in differing environments (Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting
Authority, 2018). The four general capabilities represented in this concept include self-
management, self-awareness, social awareness and social management. Within the Personal
and Social Capability learning continuum (ACARA, 2018) under ‘develop reflective
practice’ students are regularly asked to “reflect on feedback from peers, teachers and other
adults, to analyse personal characteristics and skill sets that contribute to or limit their
personal and social capability”. This is demonstrated on numerous occasions throughout the
unit in self-assessment principles, peer-assessments and teacher observations. By integrating
this into a unit outline and pedagogy, teachers can successfully build upon students’ self-
confidence ultimately allowing them to become more effective leaners.

Outlined in the executive summary and goals was the idea of differentiating learning to cater
for each individual in the class through the various learning activities. This concept needs to
be the underlying basis for every teaching program as it is a requirement from the Australian
Professional Standards for Teachers (2011) to “differentiate teaching to meet the specific
learning needs of students across the full range of abilities” (standard 1.5). Ultimately
differentiation is the process whereby teachers undergo a process of planning, instruction and
programming to facilitate appropriate strategies to teach varying levels of ability at a deep
level (NSW Education Standards Authority, 2017). This can be identified in the reconstructed
unit through its varying assessments of and for learning, varying in questioning (from outline
or list to discuss and analyse) and the platform in which students are able to demonstrate their
learning (a pamphlet, PowerPoint presentation, speech, blog, survey, report or letter to
community). This can also be identified in the attached assessment as there is a wide range of
marks allowed in the criteria (extended response).

As allowed in the first paragraph, understanding by design (UbD) is essential in


programming an educational unit such as this. Elmore (1979) presented the benefits of
utilising understanding by design and backward mapping in designing appropriate
assessments, purposeful pedagogy, clearly defined goals and matching content with curricular
guidelines. The arrangement of the scope and sequence has been changed from the original in
order to sequentially build basic skills in health and their understanding of their own health to
promoting health (‘being active now and forever’ to ‘promoting health and keeping safe’).

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This ensures that students are building their skills from prior knowledge. In order to satisfy
differing students (such as this diverse year 9 class) needs across literacy, numeracy, critical
and creative thinking, personal and social capabilities. Many frameworks (peer teaching,
collaborative learning and inquiry-based teaching) are needed in cooperation with
understanding by design to effectively create an appropriately sequential unit outline, scope
and sequence and assessment.

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Reconstructed Unit
Scope and Sequence

Key: Tables below in Blue are reconstructed from the original (shown in appendices) scope and sequence
Term 1
Unit Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Week 6 Week 7 Week 8 Week 9 Week 10
9.1 Being Active Now Major Outcomes: 5.4, 5.9, 5.10
and Forever (Theory) Contributing Outcomes: 5.13, 5.14, 5.15, 5.16
Key Concepts: Recreational activity, lifelong physical activity, individual, team, group activities, Initiative and challenge
activities, cultural significance, planning for regular physical activity, barriers to participation, roles and strategies to
enhance other people’s enjoyment and participation.
9.2 Gymnastics Major Outcomes: 5.4, 5.5, 5.9
(Practical) Key Concepts: Space, dynamics, rhythm, timing and relationships.

Term 2
Unit Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Week 6 Week 7 Week 8 Week 9 Week 10
9.3 You Are What Major Outcomes: 5.1, 5.6, 5.8
You Eat (Theory) Contributing Outcomes: 5.11, 5.12, 5.16
Key Concepts: Health Consumerism, the nature of health knowledge, factors influencing access to health information,
products and services by young people.
9.4 Athletics Major Outcomes: 5.4, 5.5, 5.9
(Practical) Key Concepts: Shotput, discuss, javelin, short and long-distance running, high jump and long jump.

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Term 3
Unit Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Week 6 Week 7 Week 8 Week 9 Week 10
9.5 Supporting Myself Major Outcomes: 5.1, 5.2, 5.3, 5.6, 5.7, 5.8.
and Others (Theory) Contributing Outcomes: 5.11, 5.15, 5.16
Key Concepts: Challenges, opportunities and strengthening resiliency.
9.6 Get Active Major Outcomes: 5.4, 5.5, 5.9, 5.13, 5.14
(Practical) Key Concepts: Body control and awareness, transfer of skill and concepts, absorbing and applying force.

Term 4
Unit Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Week 6 Week 7 Week 8 Week 9 Week 10
9.7 Promoting Health Major Outcomes: 5.6, 5.7, 5.8
and Keeping Safe Contributing Outcomes: 5.11, 5.12, 5.13,5.15, 5.16
(Theory) Key Concepts: Influences on health decision-making and risk behaviours and empowering individuals and communities.
9.8 Strike Out Major Outcomes: 5.4, 5.5, 5.9, 5.13, 5.14.
(Practical) Key Concepts: Striking, licking, throwing, catching, trapping, fielding and propelling balls.

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Concept Map

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Assessment Task and Marking Criteria

Key: Blue writing indicates elements of new design.

Student Name: _______________________

Year 9 PDHPE
‘Being Active Now and Forever’
Assessment Task
2018

General Instructions Total marks - 37


Section 1:
 Working time – 50 minutes
Multiple Choice – 10 marks
 Write using black or blue pen
 Allow 10 minutes for this section

Section 2:

Short and Extended Answer - 27 marks

 Allow 40 minutes for this section

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Section I
10 marks

Attempt Questions 1–10

Allow about 15 minutes for this section

Select the alternative A, B, C or D that best answers the question and indicate your choice with a cross (X)
in the appropriate space on the grid below.

If you make a mistake and fill in the wrong space, cross out the answer clearly and fill in the space that you
think represents the correct answer.

If you need to, write the word correct alongside the answer that you want if you think your correction is
not clear.

A B C D

10

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1 Non-competitive activities focus on?

(A) Winning at all costs


(B) Enjoyment and having fun at the same time
(C) Working together to achieve common goal
(D) Individual achievements

2 An example of a non-competitive activity

(A) Cycling
(B) 100m Sprint
(C) Soccer
(D) Rugby League

3 Tia Chi is an activity that is usually participated by

(A) Teams
(B) Groups
(C) Individuals
(D) Team or Groups

4 The game Rugby League is an example of what type of activity

(A) Individual
(B) Team
(C) Group
(D) All the above

5 Recreational Activities are…

(A) Things we participate in during our spare time


(B) Sports played on the weekend
(C) Things we do every now and then
(D) All the above

6 An example of recreational activity is

(A) Touch football


(B) Athletics
(C) Basketball
(D) Fishing

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7 Lack of physical activity can lead to _____________ diseases

(A) Unhealthy
(B) Lifestyle
(C) Contagious
(D) Chronic

8 Which of the following is not an example of a lifestyle disease

(A) Heart Disease


(B) The Flu
(C) Obesity
(D) Diabetes

9 Initiative and challenge activities require a combination of…

(A) Flexibility and Strength


(B) Speed and Ability
(C) Speed and Strength
(D) Brains and Physical Ability

10 What does the ‘M’ stand for in the SMARTER principle

(A) Maintain
(B) Money
(C) Measurable
(D) Majority

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Section II

27 marks

Attempt Questions 11–18

Allow about 40 minutes for this section

Answer the questions in the spaces provided. These spaces provide guidance for the expected length of
response.

Marks

11 Using examples, explain the difference between a competitive and non-competitive activity. 3

........................................................................................................................................
........................................................................................................................................
........................................................................................................................................
........................................................................................................................................

12 Explain what is meant by the term lifelong physical activity? 2

........................................................................................................................................
........................................................................................................................................

13 Identify THREE skills we need to prepare ourselves for life long physical activity at this stage of our
lives. 3

........................................................................................................................................
........................................................................................................................................
........................................................................................................................................
........................................................................................................................................

14 How might soccer or rugby related skills make it easier to learn and play gridiron or Gaelic
football? 2

........................................................................................................................................
........................................................................................................................................
........................................................................................................................................
........................................................................................................................................

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Marks

15 Evaluate the importance of regular physical activity on health. 2

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16 Evaluate the importance of regular physical activity on health. 3

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17 Discuss the importance of recreational activity. Using examples describe types of recreational
activities that may be suitable as lifelong activities 5

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Mark range Criteria


4-5 Identify issues and provide points for and/or against importance of reactional activity and uses two or
more examples of recreational activities that may be suitable as lifelong activities.
1-3 Recognises and names importance of recreational activity and uses one example of recreational activities
that may be suitable as lifelong activities.
0 Non-serious attempt or non-attempt.

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18 Students choose:

Option 1: Identify THREE barriers to participation that people may encounter when developing a
plan for regular physical activity. State possible ways these could be overcome.

OR
Option 2: Outline the SMARTER plan for establishing regular physical activity goals. 7
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Option 1
Mark range Criteria
6-7 Recognises and names at least three barriers to participation that people may encounter when
developing a plan for regular physical activity. States more than one possible way these could be
overcome.
4-5 Recognises and names at least two barriers to participation that people may encounter when developing
a plan for regular physical activity. States at least one possible way these could be overcome.
1-3 Recognises and names at least one barrier to participation that people may encounter when developing
a plan for regular physical activity. States at least one possible way these could be overcome.
0 Non-serious attempt or non-attempt.

Option 2
Mark range Criteria
6-7 Sketch in general terms; indicate the main features of six or seven concepts within the SMARTER plan in
establishing regular physical activity goals.
4-5 Sketch in general terms; indicate the main features of four or five concepts within the SMARTER plan in
establishing regular physical activity goals.
1-3 Sketch in general terms; indicate the main features of one to three concepts within the SMARTER plan in
establishing regular physical activity goals.
0 Non-serious attempt or non-attempt.

END OF EXAM

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Redesigned Unit Outline


Key: Blue writing indicates elements of new design.

School: St Dominic’s College Unit Title: Being Active Now and Forever Length: 10 weeks Year: 9

Major Outcomes Evidence of Learning


Adapts, transfers and improvises movement skills and concepts
5.4 A student:
to improve performance
 Answers a range of questions on the benefits of regular physical
Formulates goals and applies strategies to enhance participation activity, the lifestyle diseases linked to inactivity, the barriers to
5.9
in lifelong physical activity. participation and strategies currently in place that promote
Adopts roles to enhance their own and others’ enjoyment of regular physical activity.
5.10
physical activity.  Interprets relevant text to predict potential outcomes.
 Critically analyses leadership, teamwork, problem solving and
goal setting by answering a range of questions.
Contributing Outcomes  Identifies two traditional Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
games and outlines how it is played and the equipment used.
Adopts roles and responsibilities that enhance group cohesion  Completes the persuasive writing task, justifying their position.
5.13
and the achievement of personal and group objectives.  Identifies a range of barriers to participating in physical activity
Confidently uses movement to satisfy personal needs and and proposes ways to overcome these barriers.
5.14  Applies knowledge and understanding to complete the unit
interests.
specific ICT task.
Devises, justifies and implements plans that reflect a capacity  Outlines the advantages and disadvantages of knockout
5.15
to prioritise, think creatively and use resources effectively. competitions and round robin competitions.
Predicts potential problems and develops, justifies and  Designs a knockout tournament.
5.16
evaluates solutions.

Catholic Values

 The responsibility for personal and community development


 The valuing of God’s presence and grace in all human endeavours

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Students learn about: Students learn to:


 Lifelong physical activities  Participate in a range of physical activities that meet identified local needs and interests and
– competitive/non-competitive evaluate their potential as a lifelong physical activity
– individual/group/team
– recreational  Participate in challenging physical activities to develop life skills such as leadership, teamwork,
– health and fitness creativity, goal-setting and problem-solving
– initiative/challenge activities
– cultural significance

Key Competencies: Information and Communication Technologies:

Collecting, analysing and organising  Data entry/spreadsheet  PowerPoint presentation


information  Template design  Mail merge
Communication ideas and information  Ethical issues Word processing
 Movie editing software  Research - CD ROM
Planning
Research - Internet Desktop publishing
Working with others and in teams
Work mathematically
Solving problems
Work with and learn about a range of
technologies

Literacy Strategies:

Brainstorm Vocabulary building  Jigsaw


 Cloze passage Note taking  Structured Overview
Mind map  Paired listening activity  Venn diagram
 Word match  Scaffold/Text-type
Group discussion
 Glossary of terms
 Sequencing Think-pair-share
 Acrostic poem  Alphabet organiser Locating information

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Students learn about: Students learn to:


Numeracy Strategies:

 Measurement
 Sequencing Problem solving
Data analysis/sort
 Graph construction  Tables
 Use of percentages, ratios
 Questionnaire Money and budgeting
Statistical analysis

Resources

www.achper.org.au
www.ais.org.au
www.ausport.gov.au
www.aihw.gov.au

www.dsr.nsw.gov.au

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Knowledge and Assessment for Elements of


Understanding Suggested Teaching and Learning Strategies Learning Literacy and/or
Numeracy

Lifelong physical activities Week 1 - Lifelong Physical Activity


Students undergo a pre-test kahoot quiz and online questionnaire Pre-test. Continuum.
 Competitive/non- regarding the topics to assess prior learning.
competitive. Teacher observation: Research and read.
Students place a variety of sports on a competitive/non- Teacher will observe
competitive continuum individually or in pairs. Compare with students in activity Elements of time,
peers (or expert group activity). participation. repetitions and sets of
each activity.
Students research and read the Physical Activity Guidelines for
Australians and design a weekly physical activity program.
Implementing type, time, reps/sets of each activity.

Lifelong physical activities Week 2 - Individual, Group and Team Activities Teacher observation: Reading newspaper
 Individual/group/team. Students read a variety of newspaper articles on the benefits of Teacher will observe article.
team sports and the benefits of individual sports and discuss as a students’
class. After discussion create a mind map in groups of five. participation in Persuasive text.
debate activity.
Students will take part in a class debate.
“Playing team sports is more beneficial for children than playing
individual sports”. Teacher will allocate students a side of the
debate (either for or against). Students are to write your argument
down (half page to a full page in length). Teams will be allocated
evenly according to skill level. Selected students will read their
arguments out and the teacher will decide the winner of the
debate.

In pairs students research and make a list of sports/activities that


are suitable for elderly people.

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Knowledge and Assessment for Elements of


Understanding Suggested Teaching and Learning Strategies Learning Literacy and/or
Numeracy

Lifelong physical activities Week 3 - Recreational Activity Teacher observation: Research.


 Recreational. Students research, discuss and answer a variety of questions on through class
the different forms of recreational activities. discussion and Investigate and
contribution to the research.
Students investigate Camping as a recreational activity and blog.
research a school camping trip and what organisation is involved. Read.
Students read and discuss the poem ‘The Diver’ and answer
questions. Online blog writing.

An online class blog will be set up to discuss (students of low


ability can list or explain key ideas they found in the poem) these
answers.

Lifelong physical activities Week 4 - Health and Fitness


 Health and fitness. Think-pair-share activity where students use the internet and other Teacher observation:
resources to locate five (two for low-level students) health and how effectively
fitness opportunities in your local area. students work in pairs.
For each one state: Cost association.
 Location and contact details
 Cost
 Reasons for participating in this activity

Student activity:
The local council has approved the construction of five new
health and fitness activity resources. You have been appointed by
the council to decide on which resources will be built. In pairs list
the five resources below including: Presents information
in chosen format (all
 Benefits to the community
incorporating
 Groups that will benefit from this resource
literacy).
 Health benefits

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Knowledge and Assessment for Elements of


Understanding Suggested Teaching and Learning Strategies Learning Literacy and/or
Numeracy
With this information students choose to present it as a pamphlet, Assessment through Peer assessment
PowerPoint presentation, speech, blog, survey, report or letter to presentation and peer grading.
community. Peers will assess each other’s work in three assessment.
categories (presentation, information and overall effectiveness of
health and fitness resource).

Lifelong physical activities Week 5 - Initiative and Challenge Activities Teacher observation:
Students participate in a variety of Initiative Games, discuss as a
 Initiative Teacher will observe
class and answer questions. students’
In groups of four students create and design their own Initiative participation in
Game using any materials they need and present it involving the initiative activity.
class. Students must creatively incorporate an element of Elements of
numeracy in their game (examples include using dice, cards, numeracy and
time limit, measurement, scales, money and shapes). At the Peer assessment. marking ability in
conclusion of each activity students anonymously mark each different categories
other’s initiative activity. (/10).

Lifelong physical activities Week 6 - Cultural Significance Teacher observation:


 Cultural significance Students choose two activities played in Australia that Teacher will observe
originated in another country. Research how each one is played, students’
and the equipment used. With this information students choose participation in Literacy in
to present it as a pamphlet, PowerPoint presentation, speech, research activity presentation of
blog, survey, report or letter to community. information.

Students choose two traditional Aboriginal and Torres Strait


Islander games. Research how each one is played, and the
equipment used. Create a visual representation of these games
(draw picture).

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Evaluation of Unit

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References

ACARA. (2018). Personal and social capability learning continuum. Australian Curriculum.
Retrieved from https://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/media/1078/general-capabilities-
personal-and-social-capability-learning-continuum.pdf

Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority. (2018). Personal and social
capability. Australian Curriculum. Retrieved from
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