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Recycling

 Advanced
English

 With Removable Key 


 Third
Edition

Clare West

Cambridge University Press


978-0-521-14073-7 - Recycling Advanced English, Third Edition (With Removable Key)
Clare West
Table of Contents
More information
Cambridge University Press
978-0-521-14073-7 - Recycling Advanced English, Third Edition (With Removable Key)
Clare West
Table of Contents
More information

CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION 6

SECTION 1 GRAMMAR
1 Articles and uncountables 8
2 Present tenses 11
3 Modal verbs 14
4 The future 18
5 RECYCLING 20
6 Past tenses 23
7 Gerund and infinitive 26
8 Conditionals, wishes and regrets 29
9 Passives 32
10 RECYCLING 35
11 Reported speech 38
12 Linking words and discourse markers 41
13 Relative clauses 45
14 Adverbs 48
15 RECYCLING 51
16 Verb inversion 54
17 Comparison and similarity 57
18 Participles 60
19 Adjectives 63
20 RECYCLING 66
21 Prepositions 69
22 Difficult verbs 72
23 Transformation 75
24 Dependent prepositions 78
25 RECYCLING 81

SECTION 2 PHRASAL VERBS


26 Phrasal verbs with down 84
27 Phrasal verbs with after,  back and about 86
28 Phrasal verbs with off  88
29 Phrasal verbs with through,  for  and by 90
30 RECYCLING 92
31 Phrasal verbs with up 94
32 Phrasal verbs with out 96
33 Phrasal verbs with over,  apart and with 98
34 Phrasal verbs with on 100
35 RECYCLING 102

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978-0-521-14073-7 - Recycling Advanced English, Third Edition (With Removable Key)
Clare West
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36 Phrasal verbs with away,  across and around 104


37 Phrasal verbs with in and into 106
38 Three-part phrasal verbs 108
39 Phrasal verbs as nouns 110
40 RECYCLING 112

SECTION 3 VOCABULARY 
41 Email and the internet 114
42 The media and the arts 116
43 Success and fame 118
44 Animals and their rights 120
45 Language 122
46 Medicine and health 124
47 Danger and risk 126
48 The environment 128
49 Right and wrong 130
50 Money and finance 132
51 RECYCLING 134
52 UK government 136
53 Conflict and revenge 138
54 Technology and progress 140
55 Work and study 142
56 Different lifestyles 144
57 Belief and superstition 146
58 Time and memory 148
59 Travelling and transport 150
60 Books and reading 152
61 Law and order 154
62 RECYCLING 156

SECTION 4 WORD STUDY 


63 Humour, puns and jokes 160
64 Idioms 163
65 Proverbs and similes 166
66 Newspaper language 169
67 Borrowed words 170
68 Words with two or more meanings 172
69 Confusing words 174
70 Spelling and punctuation 176
71 RECYCLING 179

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Cambridge University Press
978-0-521-14073-7 - Recycling Advanced English, Third Edition (With Removable Key)
Clare West
Table of Contents
More information

72 Collocations 182
73 New language 185
74 Plural and feminine forms 188
75 Prefixes and suffixes 190
76 False friends and word pairs 192
77 Ways of walking, talking, looking and laughing 195
78 Ways of holding and pulling 198
Words for light, water and fire
79 RECYCLING 201

SECTION 5 WRITING
80 Formal letters 204
81 Informal letters 207
82 Articles 210
83 Reports 213
84 Proposals 215
85 Information sheets 217
86 Essays 219
87 Reviews 221
88 Set texts 223
89 Competition entries 226
90 Contributions to longer pieces 229
91 Help with writing tasks 231

 APPENDIX of grammar and model writing tasks 233

KEY   (removable) 241

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978-0-521-14073-7 - Recycling Advanced English, Third Edition (With Removable Key)
Clare West
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UNIT 1

Articles and uncountables

No article is used when generalising (with plural, abstract and uncountable nouns)
but the or a/an is used when talking about particular examples. The definite article
the is used when it is clear which noun we mean, whereas the indefinite article  a/an
is used when a noun is referred to for the first time.
Singular countable nouns must always have an article (or possessive), except in the
following cases: prepositions with home, school, college, university, church, work,
class, hospital, prison, bed, sea, breakfast, lunch, supper, dinner.
Note also:
 at night, on foot, by car/bus/tube etc. (means of transport), to/in/from town (when
referring to the town we live in, a local large town or the capital),  go to sleep and
 go home
Notice the difference between She’s in prison (she’s a prisoner) and She’s in the
 prison (she either works there or is visiting).
The article is also omitted in certain double expressions:
 from top to bottom, on land and sea, hand in hand, face to face
The indefinite article a/an is normally used to indicate someone’s profession:
       

A Complete the sentences 1 You remember my sister Jane? ____ one who has always been afraid
by putting the, a/an or no of ____ spiders?
article (–) into the spaces. 2 She’s been studying ____ architecture at ____ university for ____ last
three years.
3 At ____ moment she’s researching into ____ work of Le Corbusier.
Don’t you know him? He’s ____ well-known French architect.
4 She’s pretty busy in ____ daytime, but she finds she’s at ____ bit of
 ____ loose end at night, so ____ last year she joined ____ film club.
5 ____ club members can watch ____ films at ____ very low prices, in
 ____ disused warehouse on ____ other side of ____ town.
6 So when she gets home from ____ college, she usually goes straight
over there by ____ bike, and has ____ drink and ____ sandwich before
 ____ film starts.
7 One evening she was in such ____ hurry to get there that she had
 ____ accident.
8 She was knocked down by ____ car and had to spend two months in
 ____ hospital.
9 When I went to visit her, I was shocked to find her swathed in ____
bandages from ____ head to ____ toe.
10 But luckily her injuries looked worse than they really were, and she
managed to make ____ very speedy recovery.

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978-0-521-14073-7 - Recycling Advanced English, Third Edition (With Removable Key)
Clare West
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UNIT 1

The is also used with


a       the President   the North Pole
b       
c       the rich
d nationality adjectives, ships, geographical areas, most mountain ranges, oceans,
seas, rivers, deserts, hotels, cinemas, theatres, plural names of countries, island
groups, regions
e        the African elephant 
No article is used when talking about continents, most countries, towns, streets, etc.
(except    ), lakes, and the main buildings of a particular town:
    
The is not used with most except with the superlative:
 most people  the most incredible sight 

B Correct the sentences if 1 Tony had always wanted to explore the foothills of Himalayas.
necessary. Tick any which 2 So when he was offered an early retirement package by his firm, he
are already correct. decided to take advantage of the opportunity.
3 First he needed to get really fit, so he spent a month training in Lake
District.

4 When he could run up Buttermere Fell without stopping, he


considered he was ready.
5 He booked a trip with a well-known trekking company and flew out
to the Kathmandu, the capital of Nepal.
6 His group were planning to trek in Annapurna region, but
unfortunately Nepalese were beginning to get worried about the
amount of damage being done to their ancient mountains by the
constant pummelling of climbers’ feet.
7 So they temporarily suspended permission for foreigners to climb or
use the footpaths in the area.
8 Group leader was very apologetic, but he laid on rafting on River
Trisuli and sightseeing in the capital.
9 After a few days, the authorities lifted their ban, and Tony was
able to trek through some of world’s most beautiful scenery, with
breathtaking views of the Mount Everest and Kanchenjunga.
10 At night, group were accommodated in the simple village rooms and
ate with Nepalese.
11 Most of group were more experienced trekkers than Tony, and
several of them had visited Himalayas before.
12 All in all, Tony reckoned it was most exciting experience he’d ever
had, and vowed to return to the Nepal at very first opportunity.

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978-0-521-14073-7 - Recycling Advanced English, Third Edition (With Removable Key)
Clare West
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UNIT 1

The indefinite article a/an cannot be used with uncountable nouns. Most


nouns in English are either countable or uncountable, but the following may be
used countably or uncountably:
 cold, country, taste, wine, coffee, tea, cake, cheese, work, hair, life, death

C Decide whether the 1 I’ll have a coffee while I sort my papers out.


nouns in italics are being 2 It’s a matter of  life and death.
used countably (C) or
3 They’ve always dreamed of living in the country.
uncountably (U).
4 Celebrities and critics flooded into the West End to see Harold Pinter’s
latest work.
5 I like a bit of cheese after my main course.
6 The reason he’s so bogged down at work is that he’s had a heavy cold
for the last fortnight.
7 His death came as a terrible shock to his colleagues.
8 She’s furnished the flat with such taste, hasn’t she!

Note especially these uncountable nouns:


 furniture, luggage, news, information, progress, knowledge, research,
advice
Many and (a) few are used with countables, much and (a) little with
uncountables.

D Match the two halves of 1 Scientists have made little  A spanner, if I promise to return
the sentences correctly. it tomorrow.
2 It is doubtful whether we have B applicants for that job, are
enough there?
3 I don’t suppose there are many C news about my sister?
4 I can guarantee he’ll give you D progress in their research into
some the common cold.
5 The examiner asked both E natural gas for the next fifty
years.
6 I had to check every F the candidates to sit down.
7 I was hoping you could let me G excellent advice.
have a
        H hair out of place.
has a
9 He hasn’t got much I single connection, before
I found the fault.
10 Could you let me know if there’s J luggage, has he?
any

10

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