Sunteți pe pagina 1din 247

GAMES/CHESS

PLaying l.d4 The Indian Defences

GAMES/CHESS PLaying l.d4 The Indian Defences Playing 1 . d4 - The Indian Defences is part
GAMES/CHESS PLaying l.d4 The Indian Defences Playing 1 . d4 - The Indian Defences is part

Playing 1.d4- The Indian Defences is

part of an ambitious two-volume repertoire for White with 1.d4. This book covers all

lines except 1

d5.

Schandorff presents the ideas and information in an accessible and entertaining style. The repertoire is based on classical lines and inspired by Botvinnik's approach. White will dominate the centre and repel all Black's attempts to seize the initiative- only White is allowed to attack!

The repertoire is completed by Playing 1.d4 -The Queen's Gambit.

completed by Playing 1 . d4 - The Queen ' s Gambit . Lars Schandorff is

Lars Schandorff is a Danish Grandmaster who is renowned for his deep opening preparation.

Reaction to Schandorff's book on the Queen's Gambit:

"Lars, I want to play your book"- GM Boris Avrukh "Very well-written and an excellent choice for ambitious players"- Carsten Hansen

choice for ambitious players"- Carsten Hansen QUALITY CHESS www.qua I itychess.co.uk €24.99 ISBN

QUALITY CHESS

www.qua I itychess.co.uk

€24.99

ISBN 978-1907982-17-0

$29.95

QUALITY CHESS www.qua I itychess.co.uk €24.99 ISBN 978-1907982-17-0 $29.95 9 7 8 1 9 0 7

9 781907 982170

The Indian Defences - a grandmaster guide By Lars Schandorff Quality Chess www . q

The Indian Defences

- a grandmaster guide

By

Lars Schandorff

The Indian Defences - a grandmaster guide By Lars Schandorff Quality Chess www . q ualitychess.co.uk

Quality Chess www. q ualitychess.co.uk

First edition 20 12 by Qu ality Chess UK Ltd

Copyright© 20 12 Lars Schandorff

Playing l.d4- TheIndian Defences

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, electrostatic, magnetic tape, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without prior permission of the publisher.

Paperback

Hardcover ISBN 978- 1 -907982- 18-7

ISBN 978- 1 -907982- 1 7-0

All sales or enquiries should be directed to Quality Chess UK Ltd, 20 Balvie Road, Milngavie, Glasgow G62 7TA, United Kingdom Phone +44 141 333 9588 e-mail: info@qualitychess.co.uk website: www.qualitychess.co.uk

Distributed in North America by Globe Pequot Press, P.O. Box 480, 246 Goose Lane, Guilford, CT 06437-0480, US www.globepequot.com

Distributed in Rest of the Wo rld by Quality Chess UK Ltd through Sunrise Handicrafts, ul. Skromna 3, 20-704 Lublin, Poland

Typeset by Jacob Aagaard Proofreading by Andrew Greet & John Shaw Edited by Colin McNab Cover design by Adamson Design Cover photo by capture365.com Printed in Estonia by Tallinna Raamatutriikikoja LLC

Preface

This is the second book ofa two-volume repertoire for White with l .d4. The first volume offered

Now I complete the repertoire by covering everything

an ambitious repertoire against l

else! The major openings covered are the Indian defences, in particular the Nimzo-Indian, King's

Indian and Griinfeld Defences.

d5.

As in the first book, the repertoire is based entirely on big mainlines, which guarantees its reliability and strength. Firstly, you cannot expect to get anything against well-respected openings by trying a little sideline or just by playing safe. The main lines, on the other hand, have not become main lines by chance. They have slowly but surely evolved and proved their strength over the years, so by choosing main lines you gain reliable weapons. Secondly, the main lines are sharp and put the maximum pressure on the opponent, both theoretically and in practice. This corresponds perfectly with the philosophy behind this work, which is that White should strive for the initiative and show that moving first matters. Developing the pieces fluidly to active squares and trying to take the centre with pawns to seize space - these are key elements in the various White set-ups presented here.

was often to build up a space advantage by

achieving e2-e4. In this volume, playing e2-e4 is usually much easier since Black has declined to occupy the centre with a pawn. Black's general plan is to create counterplay against White's space

advantage. Thus the challenge in this book is to keep control and not let Black seize the initiative.

I will explain the details later, but in general I have chosen the lines in my repertoire so that White will be the one attacking - I don't like using the white pieces to grab a gambit pawn and then defend desperately for the next 30 moves.

In the first volume the challenge in meeting l

d5

I wish to repeat what I said in the first book. Playing White is like serving in tennis - with a good

serve you either win directly or, if the opponent manages to return the ball, at least you get the chance to take the initiative and dictate the rest of the duel. In this book I offer you an excellent first serve. But every tennis player knows that it is important to have a decent second serve as well. This may also be true in chess, especially in this computer age, so having a safe alternative is a good idea. Thus, throughout the book I offer hints of where you could devote some of your further investigations.

I am confident this repertoire will be an effective weapon now and for years to come. I hope it brings you many aces!

Lars Schandorff Denmark, August 20 12

55

137

147

Contents

Preface

3

Key to symbols used & Bibliography

6

Introduction

7

1 Nimzo-Indian

 

11

Follow the Patriarch

 

13

Various 4th Moves

17

The

4

b6 Variation

 

18

The

4

c5 Variation

31

The 4

0-0

Variation

36

The

Mainline:

6

�d6

40

The Mainline: 6

�e7

43

2 King's Indian

Various 4th and 5th Moves Various 6th Moves Panna Variation The New Panna Variation The Old Mainline The Samisch Gambit

3 Griinfeld Defence

Smyslov Variation Prins Variation Hungarian Variation The Positional 8.�e2 Modern Mainline: 7

tt:lc6

4 Modem Benoni

a6 or

tt:la6?

The

a6-line

5 Benko Gambit

43

53

58

66

68

80

100

104

107

116

119

126

134

141

The 5

ax:b5 Variation

148

The

5

g6

Variation

156

6

Old Indian

169

179

The 5

ltJc5

Variation

171

The 5

�e7

Variation

173

7 Dutch Defence

2

c5

180

2

d6

182

2

c6

183

2

d5

185

2

ltJf6

185

2

h6

186

2

c5

189

8 Minor Lines

196

A)

Rare Moves

197

B) Various Benonis

206

C)

The Budapest Gambit

215

D) 1 .e6 Systems

222

E)

The Modern Defence

231

Index

of Main Games

240

Index ofVariations

242

Key to symbols used

;!;

White is slightly better

+

Black is slightly better

±

White is better

+

Black is better

with compensation

+-

White has a decisive advantage

-+

Black has a decisive advantage

lXI
lXI

+t

equality

with counterplay

lXI

unclear

??

a weak move a blunder a good move an excellent move a move worth considering a move of doubtful value mate n'h match game with an attack with an initiative

!!

!?

?!

#

(n)

t

N

new move

Bibliography

Alterman: 1he Alterman Ga mbit Gu ide-

Avr ukh: Grandmaster Repertoire 2- 1.d4 Volu me Two, Quality Chess 2010. Avr ukh: Grandmaster Repertoire 8- 1he Griinfeld Defence Volume One, Quality Chess 2011. Barsky: 1he Modern Philidor Defence, Chess Stars 2010.

Black Gambits 1, Quality Chess 2011.

Bogdanov: Chess Exp lained- 1he Griinfeld, Gambit

Bologan: 1he King's Indian, Chess Stars 2009.

Bronznik: 1.d4- Beat the Guerrillas!, New in Chess 2011.

2009.

Cherniaev & Prokuronov: 1he New Old Indian, Everyman Chess 2011. Cherniaev & Prokuronov: 1he Samisch King's Indian Uncovered, Everyman Chess 2007. Dearing: Play the Nimzo-India n, Everyman Chess 2005. Delchev and Agrest: 1he Safest Griinfeld, Chess Stars 2011. Dembo: Play the Griinfeld, Everyman Chess 2007.

Golubev: Understanding the King's Indian, Gambit 2006. Johnsen & Bern: Win with the Stonewall Dutch, Gambit 2009. Kaufman: 1he Kaufman Repertoire for Black and White, New In Chess 2012. Khalifman: Op ening for White According to Kramnik 1. 4:Jj3 Volume 4, Chess Stars 2011.

McDonald: Play the Dutch, Everyman Chess 2010. Odessky: 1he En glish Defence, Russian Chess House 2008. Palliser, Emms, Wa rd & Jones: Dangerous Weapons: 1he Benoni and Benko, Everyman Chess 2008. Palliser, Williams & Vigus: Dangerous Weapons: 1he Dutch, Everyman Chess 2009. Palliser, Flear & Dembo: Dangerous Weapons: 1he King's Indian, Everyman Chess 2009. Pedersen: Play the Benko Gambit, Everyman Chess 2011. Pinski: 1he Benko Gambit, Quality Chess 2005.

Rowson: Understanding the Griinfeld, Gambit 1999.

Sokolov:

Vigorito: Attacking Chess-1he King's Indian Volume 1, Watson: Guide to the Modern Benoni, Gambit 2001.

1he Strategic Nimzo-!ndian Volume 1, New In Chess 2012.

Everyman Chess 2010.

Periodicals

ChessBase: Megabase, Corr Base, Opening Encyclopaedia and Magazine New in Chess: Yearbooks and Magazine Sahovski lnformator : Chess Informant and En cyclopaedia of Chess Op enings Chess Evolution

Introduction to the Re p ertoire

Chapter 1: Nimzo-Indian

l.d4 c!L!f6 2.c4 e6 3.c!L!c3 i.b4 The Nimzo-lndian is one of Black's most respected defences and we meet it by following the Patriarch with 4.e3. We will generally follow up with tt:lge2 and a2- a3, breaking the pin while avoiding any damage to our structure. Then White will starr increasing his grip on the centre.

8 7 6
8
7
6

a b

c

d

e

f

g

h

Chapter 2: King's Indian

l.d4 c!L!f6 2.c4 g6 3.c!L!c3 i.g7 4.e4 d6 The King's Indian can be a dangerous counterattacking system but with 5.£3, the Samisch Va riation, we support our centre and potentially prepare to expand. The only side likely to be doing any attacking on the kingside is White.

potentially prepare to expand. The only side likely to be doing any attacking on the kingside

a b

c

d

e

f

g

h

8

Playing l .d4 - The Indian Defences

Chapter 3: Griinfeld Defence

l.d4 ltlf6 2.c4 g6 3.ltlc3 d5 Against the Griinfeld Defence it is easy to achieve e2-e4; the trick is to do so while keeping control. We manage that with the Russian System: 4.ltlf3 i.g7 5.Wfb3 dxc4 6.Wfxc4 Of course e4 is on the way.

i.g7 5.Wfb3 dxc4 6.Wfxc4 Of course e4 is on the way. a b c d e

a

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

Chapter 4: Modern Benoni

l.d4 ltlf6 2.c4 c5 3.d5 e6 4.ltl c3 exd5 5.cxd5 d6 6.e4 g6 The Modern Benoni is another

opening where Black does not strive for dull equality; he wants to attack, but we will foil his

plans. With 7.ltl ge2 we have good chances to obtain a favo urable version of the in the King's Indian.

c5 variation

plans. With 7.ltl ge2 we have good chances to obtain a favo urable version of the

Introduction to the Repertoire

9

Chapter 5: Benko Gambit

l.d4 �f6 2.c4 c5 3.d5 b5 4.cxb5 a6 The dream of any Benko Gambit player is to sac a pawn for a never-ending initiative on the queenside. We decline the offer with 5.f3, preparing to build our traditional centre. In the main line, it will be White who sacrifices to seize the initiative.

it will be White who sacrifices to seize the initiative. Chapter 6: Old Indian l.d4 �f6

Chapter 6: Old Indian

l.d4 �f6 2.c4 d6 3.�c3 �bd7 The Old Indian can create some move order confusion, but not fo r us. After 4.e4 e5 5.d5 White secures a space advantage and arranges his pieces in a similar fashion as in Chapter 2.

e5 5.d5 White secures a space advantage and arranges his pieces in a similar fashion as

a

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

10

Playing l .d4 - The Indian Defences

Chapter 7: Dutch Defence

l.d4 f5 The Dutch stands apart from the Indian defences covered in the previous chapters, and

will

often lead to an open fight, in which White's lead in development and Black's airy kingside may take their toll.

the ensuing play may take on a totally different character. Our chosen system with 2

.

.ig5

8 7 6 5 4 3 2
8
7
6
5
4
3
2

a

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

Chapter 8: Minor Lines

Every repertoire book needs a hodgepodge chapter to cover all the stragglers and oddities. In this case some are fairly respectable, such as the Czech Benoni and Budapest Gambit. Others,

such as l

independent possibilities. I will refrain from listing the fu ll contents here, but rest assured that all the important bases are covered.

.g6, will sometimes transpose to mainstream systems but all offer

e6,

l

d6 and

l

8 7 6 5 4 3 2
8
7
6
5
4
3
2

Chapter 1

Nimzo-Indian

With the lights out, it's less dangerous Here we are now, entertain us

-Nirvana

less dangerous Here we are now, entertain us -Nirvana a b c d e f g

a

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

l.d4 tlJf6 2.c4 e6 3.tlJc3 �b4 4.e3

Follow the Patriarch

 

page 13

Va rious 4th Moves

page 17

The

4

b6

Var iation

 

page 18

The 4

c5

Variation

page 31

The

4

0-0 Va riation

page 36

The

Mainline:

6

�d6

page 40

The Mainline:

6

�e7

page 43

12

Playing l .d4 - The Indian Defences

4.e3

l.d4 ttlf6 2.c4 e6

This is by far Black's most popular choice in the whole Indians-complex and a very flexible system indeed. A lot of options are kept open while Black makes sure he doesn't show his

The real Nimzo. "Old School" some would

say, "Eternal" others might reply. It is certainly true that the line has been around for a long time. The move 4.e3 might look a bit modest, but you shouldn't be deceived. Behind it lies

hand prematurely. He can still play

d5

and

a deep strategic concept that actually creates

transpose to a Qu een's Gambit, or even

c5

a sharp positional struggle right from the

with a Modern Benoni. Most of the time though, he intends to play the Nimzo-Indian.

3.ttlc3

Which we allow! Please notice that the move 3.lt:lc3 is forced to make our repertoire coherent. If we instead opted for the choice of the majority of White players, 3.lt:lf3, then after

d5 we could no longer transpose to the

beloved Exchange Va riation from Playing

3

l. d4- The Queen's Ga mbit, at least not in the

version I like.

As an alternative to the Nimzo you definitely could consider the Catalan with 3.g3, where White strives for a small long-lasting positional pull.

3

ib4

we just take with 4.cxd5

and are happy! Then we are still in book, albeit not the one that you are holding in your hands right now. Another direct transposing move is

3 c5

on in this volume.

4.d5 with a Benoni. That is covered later

If Black plays 3

d5

8

7

6

5

4

3

2

1

That is covered later If Black plays 3 d5 8 7 6 5 4 3 2

beginning. Lately more forceful tries like 4.Wi'c2 and 4.lt:lf3 have been heavily debated, and the slightly bizarre 4.f3 has even appeared in a Wo rld Championship match. However when

these sharp lines have been exhausted people tend to return to the evergreen 4.e3. The reason

is easy to understand. The 4.e3 Nimzo-Indian

leads to a complicated manoeuvring game, where the better player wins. It is extremely difficult to play for both colours, so I will dwell on some of its distinct features.

Nimzo Features

The Nimzo-Indian is a so-called hypermodern opening where Black primarily uses his pieces

to

fight for the centre instead ofjust occupying

it

with pawns as in traditional openings such

as

the Queen's Gambit Declined or the Slav.

By pinning the knight Black prevents e2-e4.

Later, depending on how White reacts, Black will decide which pawn formation he will strive for.

The e4-square is very important. Black can

ib7

f5 as well. Despite all

launch a light-square strategy with

and often

these efforts a small white pawn move like f2 -

f3 can throw a spanner in the works and stop

the fun.

b6,

lt:Je4 and

Black has a simpler and more straightforward way to control e4 and take his share of the

d5

himself. Then the pawn structure is very dynamic and often will end up being quite

centre into possession - that is to play

Chapter 1 - Nimzo-Indian

13

similar to the Queen's Gambit Exchange variation examined in the other book in this series. Here is an example:

l.d4 tLlf6 2.c4 e6 3.tLlc3 J.b4 4.e3 0-0 5.J.d3 d5 6.cxd5 exd5 7.tLlge2 l3e8 8.0-0 id6 9.f3

8 7 6 5 4 3 2
8
7
6
5
4
3
2

a

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

The biggest difference between the Queen's Gambit and the Nimzo is the passive white bishop on cl. In the Queen's Gambit it is very active on g5; here it is restrained behind the pawns. Fortunately the dark-squared bishop has decent prospects of a bright future. If we for a moment forget about the hanging e3-pawn

in the diagram position, the bishop could be developed to b2 (after first b2-b3). Then later when Black attacks the white centre with the

White can simply take it with

typical

dxc5 and suddenly the bishop operates on a wonderful diagonal all the way towards the opponent's king. The other way to get the bishop out is the manoeuvre i.e l -d2-e l-g3/h4.

c5,

Finally the most characteristic feature of the

J.xc3

and White takes back with the b-pawn. Then White has the bishop pair, but also a somewhat shattered structure with double pawns on the

Nimzo-Indian arises after Black plays

c-file. Which is the more important depends on the exact position.

Follow the Patriarch

To deepen our understanding let's see a few games by the great masters. Just as in the

corresponding chapter on the QG D

Variation in my other book, we will have Botvinnik as our sturdy guide. The Patriarch was also one of the pioneers in the 4.e3- Nimzo.

Exchange

I<;AMEtl Botvinnik- Taimanov
I<;AMEtl
Botvinnik- Taimanov

Moscow (4) 1952

l.d4 tLlf6 2.c4 e6 3.tLlc3 J.b4 4.e3 tLlc6

A sideline. I have included the game mainly for two reasons.

5.tLlge2

8

7

6

5

4

3

2

1

the game mainly for two reasons. 5.tLlge2 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 a

a

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

This is the first! With this important knight move White prevents the doubling of his pawns on the c-file. Next he plans to play a2- a3 and question the black bishop.

5

d5

6.a3 ie7

J.xc3t

White just enjoys the pair of bishops.

Black withdraws. After 6

7.lt:lxc3

14

Playing l .d4 - The Indian Defences

7.c:xd5 exd5

The second reason. The pawn structure is similar to the QG D Exchange Variation.

g,c!!jf4 0-0

If Black had guessed what was coming he

could have tried 8

9

.

.te2

.tf5

j,f5

9.j,e2 '®d7.

he could have tried 8 9 . .te2 .tf5 j,f5 9.j,e2 '®d7. a b c d

a

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

10.g4!

Botvinnik was fond of this move. See the later game against Smyslov and check out the win over Petrosian from my other book.

10 .te6

l l .llJxe6 fxe6 12.0-0 '%Yd7 13.f4

Effectively stopping the freeing

e5 break.

13

17.'%Yf3

llJd8

14

.

.td3

Controlling e4.

llJf7 15.b4 aS 16.b5 llJd6

17

a4

18J�a2!

Planning to transfer the rook to the kingside. The bishop just stays on cl until a clear destination is found.

18 c6

llJfe8

19.bxc6 '%Yxc6 20J::tc2 '%Yd7 21 .g5

18 c6 llJfe8 19.bxc6 '%Yxc6 20J::tc2 '%Yd7 21 .g5 a b c d e f g

a

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

22.hh7t!

A spectacular bishop sacrifice. Many of Botvinnik's games started as really deep strategic exhibitions, but ended with a big combinational bang.

22 �xh7

25.g6!

23.%Yh3t �g8 24.llJxd5 .tds

bang. 22 �xh7 25.g6! 23.%Yh3t �g8 24.llJxd5 .tds a b c d e f g h

a

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

The key move in the combination. The

defensive move

black king is caught on g8.

'®fl

is prevented and the

25 llJf6

26.llJxf6t gxf6 27.g7?

27.d5! E:e8 28.j,b2 gives strong pressure.

29.E:xc8 lLlxc8 30.E:f2

tLld6 3 l.dxe6 E:xe6 32.f5 E:e8 33.E:d2! and the threat of E:xd6 decides.

For instance: 28

E:c8

Chapter 1 - Nimzo-lndian

15

8 7 6 5 4 3 2
8
7
6
5
4
3
2

a b

c

d

e

f

g

h

27

ge8?

\Mfxg?t

28.gg2 winning the queen, but misses

27

28.gg2t 'kflf7, when the king hides

Black returns the favour. He sees 27

1t7xg7!

36.i.b2 gb5 37.'.t>fl i.a5 3S.:ac2 gb3 39.Wfd7 :abe3 40.Wfxa4 gelt 41.'.t>fl i.c7

42.Wfxe8t

1-0

Here is another game from 1952. It may sound old, but the chess content is very fresh.

Botvinni.k - Smyslov
Botvinni.k - Smyslov

Moscow (5) 1 952

l.d4 ttl£6 2.c4 e6 3.ttlc3 i.b4 4.e3 c5 s.ttlge2

Here we have this key move again.

5

d5

6.a3 cxd4

on e7 or e8.

Exchanging

the

bishop with 6

.ixc3t

7.lt:lxc3 cxd4 8.exd4 dxc4 9

.

.ixc4

is more

2s.Wfhst '.t>f7 29.Wfh5t '.t>gs 3o.g82

Now it is over.

30

ttlf7

31.gf3

The next rook comes.

31

ga5

32.Wfh4 e5 33.gh3

8 7 6 5 4 3 2
8
7
6
5
4
3
2

a b

c

d

e

f

g

h

Threatening mate. Black must surrender his queen.

33

Wfxh3

34.Wfxh3

exf4

35.exf4

i.b6

common - see page 31 for more details.

7.axb4

Of course White takes the bishop.

7

dxc3

8.ttlxc3 dxc4

Now White gets a strong initiative in the

White answers 9.cxd5 with a positional plus.

ending. On 8

0-0,

exd5 1 O.b5! .ie6 11

.

.ie2

9.Wfxd8t '.t>xd8 10.i.xc4 ttlc6 l l.b5 ttle5 12.i.e2 '.t>e7 13.£4 ttled7

.ie6 11 . .ie2 9.Wfxd8t '.t>xd8 10.i.xc4 ttlc6 l l.b5 ttle5 12.i.e2 '.t>e7 13.£4 ttled7 a

a

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

16

Playing l .d4 - The Indian Defences

14.b3!

Not the optimal square for this knight.

The dark-squared bishop gets out via a3.

Better was 9

b6.

The knight may later go to

c6.

14 .• J�d8 15

.

.ia3t

cj;les 16

.

.id6

And immediately is the dominant figure on the whole board. Black is strategically lost already.

16

18

tLlb8

a6

17

.

.ic7

B:d7 18

.

.ib6

tLld5

1 9.bxa6 bxa6 20.�b5+-

19.tLlxd5 B:xd5 20.B:xa7 B:xa7 21 .ha7 tLld7

22.e4

1-0

Let's try an even earlier game!

Botvinnik- Keres
Botvinnik- Keres

The Hague/Moscow (10) 1 948

l.d4 tLlf6 2.c4 e6 3.tLlc3 .ib4 4.e3 0-0 5.a3

Borvinnik fancied this. Personally I prefer to develop with 5.tt'lge2, but that is another story. This game is important because it shows the typical Nimzo-Indian pawn structure.

5

9

8

7

6

5

4

3

2

1

the typical Nimzo-Indian pawn structure. 5 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 a

a

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

hc3t 6.bxc3 B:e8 7.loe2 e5 8.�g3 d6

.

.ie2

tLlbd7

10.0-0 c5 1 1 .£3

8

7

6

5

4

3

2

1

l l

d6 . .ie2 tLlbd7 10.0-0 c5 1 1 .£3 8 7 6 5 4 3 2

a

b

cxd4

c

d

e

f

g

h

I don't think Black should release the tension in the centre, but it is not easy to suggest a plan.

12.cxd4 tLlb6 13 .ib2

.

The slumbering bishop wakes up.

13

exd4

14.e4

14.�xd4 was simple and strong.

14 .ie6 15.B:cl B:e7?

15

J'k8 was necessary.

16.'1Wxd4!

The point of White's 1 4th move. Now there is maximum pressure along the long diagonal.

16

'1Wc7

17.c5!

Opening up the position and activating the rook.

17

dxc5

18.B:xc5 '1Wf4 19.i.cl '!Wb8 20.B:g5!

Going for the attack. Borvinnik finishes in style.

Chapter 1 - Nimzo-lndian

17

20

liJbd7

Chapter 1 - Nimzo-lndian 17 20 liJbd7 a b c d e f g h 21Jhg7t!

a b

c

d

e

f

g

h

21Jhg7t! 'kffxg7 22.ltJh5t 'kff g6 23.'l!*i e3

Black is mated.

1-0

By now it is quite clear that the potential of White's dark-squared bishop is very high. After these instructive games, let's move on to theory in the year 20 1 2. It is most likely that something has happened since Botvinnik's days.

Various 4th Moves

I.d4 liJf6 2.c4 e6 3.liJ c3 ih4 4.e3

Various 4th Moves I.d4 liJf6 2.c4 e6 3.liJ c3 ih4 4.e3 a b c d e

a b

c

d

e

f

g

h

The big mainline is 4

0-0,

but let's begin

with the other serious 4th moves from Black.

c5.

A good response to both systems is the already

familiar move 5.lt:lge2.

The two most important are 4

b6

and 4

The line 4

4

b6

is covered in Games 4-6, and

c5

in Games 7 and 8.

The rest of the chapter is dedicated to

4 0-0,

9- 1 2. Of course there are many other legal moves, but it is impossible to cover everything.

I will mention a few of them here though.

which is covered in depth in Games

For 4

tt'lc6

see Game 1 above.

4 d5

independent value. White could just answer 5.lt:lf3 if he plays that move in the mainlines. But we don't! So I'll recommend the promising

5.a3!, when we are suddenly in the last chapter

after

is quite often played, but it has little

of Playing

J.d4 -

The

Queen's Ga mbit,

l

.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.lt:lc3 i.b4.

4

d6

is too modest ro pose any problems:

5.i.d3 lt:lc6 6.lt:lge2 e5 and now just 7.d5±

with extra space and a pleasant position.

looks active, but could in fact just be

a waste of time: 5.�c2 f5 (5

i.e? 7.i.d3±) 6.i.d3 0-0 7.lt:lge2± Taking on e4 might work, but this is much simpler. We are ready to castle and then we can always play f2-f3 and maybe even e3-e4.

4 tt'le4

lt:lxc3 6.bxc3

4

Black does not even wait for White to play a2-a3, so basic logic tells us that this move cannot be good. 5.bxc3 d6 6.i.d3 0-0

7.lt:le2 lt:lc6, but the

position is closed and the exact move order

i.xc3t

More usual

is

6

c5

18

Playing 1 .d4 - The Indian Defences

is not that important. After 8.0-0 e5 9.e4 h6 1 0.h3 0-0 1 l .j,e3;1; b6 12.d5 lt:la5

-

Rodriguez Rey, corr. 2006, had reached a similar position to the Rubinstein game we are following. 7.e4 e5 8.lt:le2 �e8 9.f3 b6 10.0-0 lt:lc6 1 l .j,e3 j,a6 12.lt:lg3 lt:la5 1 3.'We2 c5 14.d5 'ii?h8 1 5.f4

lt:ld7 16.f5!

1 3.lt:lg3 j,a6 14.'We2 Ruiz Jarabo Pelayo

lt:ld7 16.f5! 1 3.lt:lg3 j,a6 14.'We2 Ruiz Jarabo Pelayo a b c d e f g

a

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

Taking space on the kingside.

16 f6

1 7.lLlh5 �e7 18.g4 'We8 19.g5

19 .�f3±, intending �h3 followed by g4-

g5, is the accurate way to proceed, denying Black any counterplay.

20.j,xc4 lt:lxc4 2l.gxf6 gxf6

would have enabled Black to

fight on.

19

j,xc4

lt:lxe3!

22.j,h6

White is back in control and crushes Black in style.

22 lt:lb2

25 .j,xg7t �xg7 26.�g1 t �h8 27.'Wxd3 'Wf7 28.�g3 �g8 29.�agl �xg3 30.�xg3 lt:lb8 3 l .'We2 a6 32.a4 'We8 33.h4 'Wf7 34.�g2 'Wf8 35.h5 h6 36.'Wg4 b5 37.axb5 axb5 38.'Wg6 lt:ld7 39.�f3 lt:lb6 40.�g1 lt:la4 4l .c4 1-0 Rubinstein - Colle, Liege 1930.

23.'ii?hl lt:ld3 24.lt:lg7 �xg7

The 4

b6

Variation

l.d4 �f6 2.c4 e6 3.�c3 i.b4 4.e3 b6

8 7 6 5 4 3 2
8
7
6
5
4
3
2

A typical interpretation. Black has no intention of occupying the centre with pawns and instead prepares to attack it with his pieces.

5.�ge2

Now Black has three interesting moves. That

we really live in post-modern times can be seen from the fact that the most obvious move,

5

j,b7,

isn't one of them! Let's briefly see why.

5

i.b7

6.a3 ie7

6 j,xc3t

7.lt:lxc3 gives White too easy

play: 7

0-0

8.j,d3 d5 9.cxd5 exd5 1 0.b4;1;

The bishop pair will tell in the long run. The guy on cl doesn't look that impressive at the moment, but eventually he will get out. In

c5 and

everything is exchanged there, then the bishop

will be strong on b2.

particular, if Black plays the counter

7.d5

Grabbing space - that's our style.

7

exd5 12.exd5 �a6 13.0-0 �c7 14.J.f3;t

White controls two thirds of the board and has a nice positional initiative.

c6 10.e4 cxd5 1 1 .cxd5

0-0 8.�g3 d6 9 .ie2

.

Chapter 1 - Nimzo-Indian

19

Aronian - lstratescu
Aronian - lstratescu

Antalya 2004

l.d4 tLlf6 2.c4 e6 3.tLlc3 �b4 4.e3 b6 5.tLlge2

.ia6

2004 l.d4 tLlf6 2.c4 e6 3.tLlc3 �b4 4.e3 b6 5.tLlge2 .ia6 a b c d e

a

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

Just like in many lines in the Queen's Indian Defence, this is the correct square for the

bishop. Black attacks c4 and is ready to follow

and maybe exchange the light­

squared bishops.

up with

d5

6.a3 hc3t

Black swaps off his bishop in order to avoid

demands

losing

careful consideration:

6

time.

The

alternative

also

ie7

7.lilf4 d5

consideration: 6 time. The alternative also ie7 7.lilf4 d5 a b c d e f g

a

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

This used to be regarded as tactically suspect, but a recent improvement has complicated the evaluation. 8.cxd5 ixfl Now it is worth considering a) 9.dxe6!? and

b)

9.<j;lxfl .

 

a)

9.dxe6!?

 

This tempting piece sacrifice is dangerous,

but it seems Black can weather the storm if

he

plays precisely.

9

ia6

1 0.exf7t mxf7 1 l .e4

 

In my first draft I was ready to end the analysis here, as it seemed to me that the threat of e4-e5 would practically guarantee

that White would win back his piece while keeping some initiative. However, the following improvement forced me to change my opinion:

 
 

1

l

ic4!

This key improvement was proposed by Ivan Sokolov, who analysed it thoroughly in his recent book. It received its first practical test

a short while later.

 

A

previous game continued l l

c5

1 2.e5

l'!e8 1 3.ie3 lt:Jc6 14.1M/b3t c4 1 5.'1Wa4 lila5

1 6.exf6 ixf6 1 7.0-0 1M/d6 1 8.lt:Jfd5 ib7

19.lilxf6 '<Mfxf6 20.d5

l'!ad8 2 1 .:1'\adl with

a clear extra pawn for White, Aronian - Medvegy, Germany 2004.

1

2.e5 lilc6 13.ie3 l'!e8! Now if White captures on f6 he will fa ce a strong counterattack in the centre.

20

Playing l .d4 - The Indian Defences

20 Playing l .d4 - The Indian Defences a b c d e f g h

a b

c

d

e

f

g

h

14.b3

The main alternative is 14.l''kl, after which

Sokolov demonstrates that 14 Black sufficient chances.

gives

g5!

1 5.exf6 ixf6 16.Wh5t \t>g8

17.'\Wd5t Wxd5 18 .tt:lcxd5 tt:lxd4 19.tt:lxf6t gxf6 20.0-0-0 tt:lxb3t 21 .\t>c2 tt:la5 22.:!:l:d7 ib5 23.:!:l:xc7 E:ac8

Flear -Terrieux, Calvi 20 1 2. Black has solved all his problems and is even a little better.

14 ia6

b) Unless White can find a significant

improvement in the above line, a calmer approach is needed. Once again we can travel

back more than half a century and look to Botvinnik for inspiration:

9.<thfl

Now there is a fu rther split between bl)

9

exd5

and b2) 9

tt:lxd5.

bl)

9

exd5

rther split between bl) 9 exd5 and b2) 9 tt:lxd5. bl) 9 exd5 a b c

a b

c

d

e

f

g

h

1 0.g4!

The familiar space-gaining move.

10 g5!

Black needs to fight back before he gets smothered on the kingside.

ll.g5 tt:lfd7 1 2.h4 id6 1 3.e4! dxe4

14.tt:lxe4± gave White everything he wanted

in Botvinnik - Smyslov, Moscow 1954. ll .tt:lh5! The most resolute reply. Now the critical continuation looks to be:

l l

12.gxh5 c6 1 3.1Wf3 tt:la6 14.e4 tt:lc7

10 c6

tt:lxh5

l l 12.gxh5 c6 1 3.1Wf3 tt:la6 14.e4 tt:lc7 10 c6 tt:lxh5   a b c
 

a

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

1

5.h4!

This energetic move gives White promising play.

15 gxh4

Instead of taking the pawn Black can defend

with 15

initiative regardless.

Wd7

but White has the

.f6 or

15

h6,

16.if4

dxe4

1 7.Wxe4

tt:ld5

1 8.:!:l:el

1 9.tt:lxd5 cxd5

regardless. Wd7 but White has the .f6 or 15 h6, 16.if4 dxe4 1 7.Wxe4 tt:ld5 1

a b

c

d

e

f

g

h

Chapter 1 - Nimzo-Indian

21

20.'1We5! f6

20.1:'!:ad1N

20 1:'!:g8?

2 I .i.g5! is a nice point.

21 .'1Wxf6 :!:'!:f8 22.'1Wxh4±

De Souza - Rodriguez Vila, Sao Paulo 2002.

After 20.ltk3 We7 2 1 .1:'!:adl E:ad8, Black was close to equal in Budnikov - Pavlov, Yuzhny

2010.

b2) 9

ltlxd5

Now White can proceed with or without

exchanging on d5.

20

1:'!:e8

20

23.bxc3 leaves Black in a troublesome endgame.

ltlxd5 21.1:'!:xd5 Wf6 22.'1Wc3! Wxc3

�·� 8 .�. �.� �-----�,r%""/.�,0 ,;.�,rd"" � r� - .-%� -,��
�·�
8
.�.
�.�
�-----�,r%""/.�,0
,;.�,rd""
r�
- .-%� -,��
�•r�i
,%�
1
,
,%-
6
"----�
5 �
� � � �
J'�®-��J
4
r{g;
3
� �--� .%�-- � - -' � ����% - --%�tiwfJ �
2

a b

c

d

e

f

g

h

2 1 .ltlc3 Wc7 22.1:'!:heU:

7.tlJxc3 d5 8.'i'f3

A very direct approach. White can also

stabilize the position and secure his bishop pair

with 8.b3.

·!•f''//.�-

8

0-0

9.g4!

This aggressive thrust defines the character of the game. White will use all means to grab

the initiative, as otherwise Black would have a perfectly sound position.

10.'1Wf3!?

10.ltlcxd5 exd5 1 1 .1lMh5 (This has been the main line, bur White has chances to achieve a slight plus by playing more patiently with

1 l .g3 or l l .i.d2.) l l

i.g5 12.ltle6 (Since this

aggressive lunge does not achieve anything, White could consider the calmer 12.ltld3N.)

12

g6

13.'1Wxg5 fxe6 Black is fine.

l l .g3 0-0 12.�g2 ltld7 13.e4 ltlxc3

14.'1Wxc3 c5 1 5.d5 i.f6 1 6.'1Wb3 exd5 1 7.ltlxd5

i.d4 1 8.i.e3 i.xe3 1 9.'1Wxe3 White keeps a nagging edge and can play for two results.

10 c6

19 ltlf6

Now the best continuation looks to be:

10 c6 19 ltlf6 Now the best continuation looks to be: a b c d e

a b

c

d

e

f

g

h

9

8

7

6

5

4

3

2

1

continuation looks to be: a b c d e f g h 9 8 7 6

a

i.b7

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

Securing e4 for the knight.

The alternative is to protect the d5-pawn with

when it makes sense for

White just to continue his development with

1 0.b3 ltlbd7 l l .i.b2. White can castle long and intensify the offensive on the kingside. Here

is a grandmaster example:

c5 1 3.g5 ltle8 14.0-0-0! :!:'!:c8 1 5.d5 Wxg5

1 2.bxc4

the more passive 9

c6,

ll

dxc4

22

Playing l .d4 - The Indian Defences

Bernasek - Stocek, Ostrava 20 1 0, and now 16.'Wh3!N 'We7 1 7.:1:1g1 g6 1 8 .dxe6 fxe6 19.tt:le4 gives White a promising attack.

10.g5 tfle4 n.tflxe4 dxe4 12.�g3 f5 13.i.d2

White has the bishop pair and the better pawn structure. Little by little he will catch up in development and take charge.

8 7 6 5 4 3 2
8
7
6
5
4
3
2

13

a

a5

13 tt:ld7

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

14.ic3 E1c8 1 5.0-0-0 'We7 1 6.h4

c5 1 7.d5± Peek - Huss, Hastings 2007.

14.h4 �d6

Seeking salvation in an endgame. Otherwise it was difficult to generate any active play, as shown by the game fragment above.

15.i.e2

An interesting decision. Aronian refuses to improve Black's pawn structure by taking on d6, but he still allows the queen exchange.

15 Jt:ld7

16.0-0--0 gae8 17.h5

Here he could seriously have considered

e5

17.'Wg2!? when play might continue: 17 18.ic3 exd4 19.:1:1xd4 'We?±

17

�xg3

18.fxg3 e5

Black needs some counterplay.

19.:1:1hfl!?

19 .d5 is also reasonable, but White prefers to keep the pawn structure more fluid.

19 .l3f7

20.i.c3 exd4 21 .exd4 tflf8 22.d5!±

8

7

6

5

4

3

2

1

.l3f7 20.i.c3 exd4 21 .exd4 tflf8 22.d5!± 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 a

a

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

Opening the diagonal for the mighty dark­ squared bishop. White's pawn majority on the queenside lays the foundation for a big offensive on that part of the board. The passive black pieces make it difficult to generate counterplay on the kingside.

22

i.a6

23.b4 axb4 24.axb4 g6 25.�c2

Preparing to take the a-file.

25

i.c8

26.:1:1al

The

rook

is

ready

to

invade

the

black

position. White is probably winning already.

26

h6

Desperation.

27.hxg6 tflxg6 28J:�hl! f4

28

hxg5

29.:1:1h6+-

29.Eixh6 f3

Aft er 29

if5 30 .g4 Black loses material.

30.E1xg6t �f8 31.b5

Threatening ib4t.

Chapter 1 - Nimzo-Indian

23

3L

:!�h7

32.:!3f6t @gs 33.La

There was nothing wrong with 33.ifl .

33

i.g6 37.:!3h4

exf3

34Jhf.3 i.g4 35.:!U4 i.h5 36.@b3

1-0

Conclusion: Black's original queenside play

was countered by active

play on the kingside. The move g2-g4 is especially noteworthy. We have seen Botvinnik

employ it, and now also Aronian.

with

b6

and

ia6

Ugge - R. Hall Correspondence 2003
Ugge - R. Hall
Correspondence 2003

lile4

8

7

6

5

4

3

2

1

l.d4 tLlf6 2. c4 e6 3. tLlc3 i.b4 4. e3 b6 5. tLlge2

a

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

Increasing the pressure on the c3-knight and clearing the way for the f-pawn. Black is striving for a kind of Dutch set-up.

6. i.d2

Speeding up development is of paramount importance.

The mainline is 6.'1Wc2 ib7 7.a3 ixc3t 8.lt:\xc3 lt:\xc3 9.'1Wxc3 0-0 1 0.b4 followed by

ib2. However, in my opinion Black has an okay position.

6

tLlxd2

7.'1Wxd2 0-0

It is too early to say where the light-squared

bishop should be. After 7

White shuts it off: 9.d5 0-0 10.g3 d6 1 l .ig2

l2Jd7 1 2.0-0 e5 1 3.f4;!; White has the upper

hand on the kingside. 13

1 5.lt:\xf4 ig5 1 6.exf5 E!:xf5 17.'1Wc2 E!:e5 1 8.lt:\e6± Jelen - Grosar, Slovenia 1992.

f5 ?! 14 .e4! exf4

8.a3 ie7

ib7

8.a3 i.e? 9. tLlf4 d6

1992. f5 ?! 14 .e4! exf4 8.a3 ie7 ib7 8.a3 i.e? 9. tLlf4 d6 a b

a

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

lO.i.d3!

The most ambitious. White wants to play 'Wc2 to inflict a weakness on Black's king position, and then maybe castle long. In the majority of games White has played l O.ie2, but I am not sure he is much better after

10

ib7

c6

1 1 .0-0 l2Jd7.

Black controls the d5-square and prepares to

counter with either

d5 or

e5.

The British

experimented with 10

star Michael Adams once

after

1 1 .'1Wc2 h6 12.ie4 E!:b8 13.lt:\b5!± he was in

big trouble, Chiburdanidze - Adams, Lucerne

1997.

lt:\d7,

but

24

Playing l .d4 - The Indian Defences

l l.�c2 f5

On l l

h6,

White just castles long.

12.g4!

at mobilize his whole army.

once

White

strikes

before

Black

can

8 7 6 5 4 3 2
8
7
6
5
4
3
2

12

a

b

c

d

e5 13;!tJg2 e4

e

f

g

h

Black must keep the position closed.

1 5.i.xf5 i.xf5 1 6.gxf5±

already spelled trouble in Ugge - Ponomarev,

e-mail 2005.

13

exd4

14.exd4 'it>h8

14.�e2 fxg4

Not exactly the move you want to play.

The problem was that Black could not keep

his centre together. 14 1 6.ltJxd5! lost immediately.

cxd5

d5

1 5.cxd5

15.ltlxe4 �f5 16.�d3 �d7 17.ltlf4 g5

Black must do something.

18.ltle2 d5 19.ltl 4c3 hd3 20.�xd3 21.cxd5 cxd5 22.�b5 gds 23.0-0-0

The position has stabilized and White has a serious advantage. The d5-pawn is weak and Black's kingside is loose as well.

�e6

is weak and Black's kingside is loose as well. �e6 a b c d e f

a b

c

d

e

f

g

23 i>h8

Not 25

24.gdgl h5 25.h4! gxh3

gxh4 26.lLlf4.

h

26.gg3 h4 27.ggxh3 i>g7 28.�d3

White's extra central pawn gives him some dynamic breaks with e3-e4 or f2-f4. Black has to seek the exchange of queens.

28

31.i>xd3 i>£7 32.£4!

�g6

29.i>d2

ltlc6

30.ggl

�xd3t

i>£7 32.£4! �g6 29.i>d2 ltlc6 30.ggl �xd3t a b c d e White wins material. 32

a b

c

d

e

White wins material.

32 g4

32

history.

gxf4

33.lLl xf4

and

33.gxg4 �f6 34.f5

f

the

g

h

d5-pawn

is

Chapter 1 - Nimzo-Indian

25

Freeing the f4-square for the knight. White continues to play actively in the following.

34 J�d7

�xf6 38.e4 dxe4t 39.�xe4t �xf5 40J�g5t

�e6 41.l3e5t �f7 42.l3f3t �g7 43.�£6

l3xd4t

35.�£4 �e7 36.�h5 l3h8 37.�xf6

43

l3c7 44.lLlh5t \t>g8 45.!:1g5t \t>h7

37.�xf6 43 l3c7 44.lLlh5t \t>g8 45.!:1g5t \t>h7 a b c d e f g h 46.!:1f6!

a

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

46.!:1f6! This is the type of variation you can work out in a correspondence game. White

!:1g8

48.lLlf6

47.l3f7t

has a winning attack, for instance: 46

\t>h8

(47

\t>hG

48.l3xg8)

l3xg5 49.l3h7#

44.�xd4 �c6t 45.�d5 �xe5 46.�xe5 h3

47.130

Stopping the pawn and winning easily.

48.�e4 l3h5t 49.�d4 l3h4 50.l3hl

�g6 51.�e5 l3h5t 52.�e6 h2 53.�d2 gh3 54.�0 ga 55.�xh2 gn 56.b4 l3a2 57.gglt �h5 58.�f3 l3xa3 59.gg5t �h6

60,gxb5

47 b5

. the bishop pair, but his lack of space is too high a price to pay.

Conclusion: After 5

6.id2 Black gets

S. Popov - Savic
S. Popov - Savic

Mararuska Banja 2007

l.d4 �f6 2.c4 e6 3.�c3 i.b4 4.e3 c5

Please pay attention to the different move orders that are possible - the line we consider

b6

in this game commonly arises from 4 5.lLlge2 c5.

5.�ge2 b6

in this game commonly arises from 4 5.lLlge2 c5. 5.�ge2 b6 a b c d e

a

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

The beginning of an avant-garde idea. To fully comprehend the reasoning behind it we have to see a little bit more.

Going into a technical rook ending; the black king is too far away.

6.a3 i.a5

The point. Black keeps the bishop on the board, at least for the moment refraining

60

J�xf3 61 .ga5 �g6 62,gxa7 gb3 63.gb7

from

ixc3.

It is somewhat annoying for

gb2 64.b5 l3bt 65.gbs �g7 66.b6 l3b2

67.�d6 �f7 68.�c6 l3c2t 69.�b7 �e7 70J�a8 �d7 7I.l3a6 gg2 72.�a8 ggst

73.�a7

White. After all, his lLlge2 was meant to get a definitive response from the black bishop,

either taking on c3 or withdrawing. Now we have something in-between, and this

1-0

knight is suddenly obstructing White's own

26

Playing l.d4 - The Indian Defences

pieces. But we can also look at the positive aspects - the bishop on a5 might get into trouble!

7J�bl

Threatening b2-b4.

7•••t!Ja6

7

.'1!!le7 8 .id2!

.

This is good for White. For instance

8 .ia6

8

Here White can initiate a favourable tactical sequence:

lt:Ja6

9.l0g3 .ib7 IO.d5!;!;

8 7 6 5 4 3 �=,��=�==��,/���h'""/ 2
8
7
6
5
4
3
�=,��=�==��,/���h'""/
2

a b

c

d

e

f

g

h

9.b4! cxb4 1 0.axb4 .ixb4 l l .:gxb4 W'xb4

1 2.lt:Jb5 W'e7 1 3.lt:Jc7t 'it>d8 1 4.lt:Jxa8 .ixc4

1 5.lt:Jc3 .ixfl 1 6.:gxfl d5 1 7.lt:Jb5 W'b7

.ixc4 1 5.lt:Jc3 .ixfl 1 6.:gxfl d5 1 7.lt:Jb5 W'b7 a b c d e f

a b

c

d

e

f

g

h

18 lt:Je8 1 9.l0ac7! lt:Jf6 20.'it>e2 a6 2 1 .l0xa6

l0xa6 22.W'a3 with a strong initiative for

White.

After the move played, Black has not only a vulnerable bishop, bur a knight on the rim as well! You might automatically think that this must be good fo r White. Well, it is not so simple. To begin with it is impossible to trap the bishop on a5. Secondly, White has to make some concessions to finish his development.

8

7

6

5

4

3

2

1

some concessions to finish his development. 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 a b

a

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

8.g3

It is not optimal that this allows Black to occupy the long diagonal first, but it does accomplish the development of the kingside, while keeping the knight on e2.

Another solution is 8

makes some sense now that the bishop is ready to take back on c3 and prevent the doubling

of the pawns. After lies ahead.

0-0 9.lt:Jg3. This

9

.

.id2

.ib7

a complex game

8

.ib7

8

cxd4

9.exd4 .ib7 IO.d5

Onischuk - Rogozenko, Skopje 2002.

This should be good for White, although

Now instead of settling fo r the repetition

some care is needed:

 

with 1 8.lt:Jd6, White should have gone for

10

.ixc3t

l l .l0xc3 :gc8 12

.

.ie2

exd5 13.cxd5

18.'\Wcl !N. From here Rogozenko gives

l0c7

Chapter 1 - Nimzo-Indian

27

Chapter 1 - Nimzo-Indian 27 a 14.0-0! b c d e f g h White can

a

14.0-0!

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

White can afford to leave the d-pawn hanging.

14

ltkxd5

14

0-0

1 5.�f3 gives White a stable edge.

1 5.l2'lxd5

Sokolov's suggestion of 1 5.lt:Jb5!? also looks promising.

15 �xd5

16.�a6 :gc6 17.�b7 :gxcl

0-0

1 8.�xc6 dxc6 with some, though not quite enough compensation for the exchange.

1 8.:gxcl �xb7 1 9.'Wd6! �d5 20.f4 h5 2l .:gfel t �e4 22.:gc7 h4 23.g4 h3 24.g5 1-0 Grachev - Salgado Lopez, Moscow 20 1 0.

Black should have settled for 17

8

7

6

5

4

3

2

1

20 1 0. Black should have settled for 17 8 7 6 5 4 3 2

a

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

9.d5 b5

Liberating the dark-squared bishop and trying to smash the white centre at the same time. However, with a temporary pawn

sacrifice White manages to hold it together and gain the upper hand.

After 9

with an edge.

exd5

1 0.�g2 White regains the pawn

lt:Je4 10.�g2 �xc3t 1 1 .llJxc3 lt:Jxc3

12.bxc3 Black forces the doubling of White's

pawns, but his position is cramped and the

knight is poorly placed on a6. 12

cJ:le7 14.0-0 lt:Jc7 1 5 .e4± Black's position is already difficult, and in the following top-level game it soon got worse:

d6 13.'Wa4t

With 9

top-level game it soon got worse: d6 13.'Wa4t With 9 a b c d e f

a

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

16.e5! lt>f8 17.:gd1!N (After 17.�f4

White eventually converted his advantage in

Gelfand - Aronian, Leon 20 1 0, but the text is

even stronger.) 17

a piece) 18.exd6 'Wxd6 19.�f4 'Wd8 20.cxd5+­ Black's pieces are hopelessly uncoordinated and he will soon suffer material losses.

18.d6 wins

15 :ge8?!

exd5

(17

dxe5

are hopelessly uncoordinated and he will soon suffer material losses. 18.d6 wins 15 :ge8?! exd5 (17

a

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

28

Playing l .d4 - The Indian Defences

10.i.g2 bxc4 1 1.0-0 0-0

 

The other significant option is 12

exd5,

Getting rid of the wayward bishop solves one problem, but creates even bigger ones:

which gives White a pleasant choice:

l l

.ixc3

12.lZlxc3

exd5

1 3.tLlxd5 tLlxd5

a)

Both 1 3.tLlxd5 and 13.exd5 look

slightly

'1Wg6!?N

is trickier, but White keeps the upper hand:

. 18.'1Wxd7t Wg8 19.'1Wxb7t) D. Bekker Jensen - Ivanov, Ballerup 2009. Now White should have played:

14

.

.ixd5

'1Wb6

15

.

.ixc4

.ixf7t

tLlc7

(15

1 6.f3! '!Wxbl 17

Wxf7 [17

We7

1 8.e4]

.ixf7t tLlc7 (15 1 6.f3! '!Wxbl 17 Wxf7 [17 We7 1 8.e4] a b c d

a

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

16.b4!N '1Wc6 17.e4 0-0 18.:B:e1 White has a clear plus.

8 7 6 5 4 3 2
8
7
6
5
4
3
2

a

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

12.e4 d6

14.'1Wa4)

. tLlc6 1 8 .'1Wxc4 .ib6 19 .tLlcd5± Wojtaszek - Granda Zuniga, Burguillos 2010.

:B:xf6 1 6.'1Wa4 tLlb8 1 7.tLlf4

14

12

:B:e8

1 3.dxe6! :B:xe6 (13

.

.ixf6

dxe6

.ig5

h6 15

better for White. In most cases he will win the pawn back on c4 (for instance by playing '1Wa4) and then have a nice space advantage, along with the fact that Black still hasn't proven that the bishop on a5 is an asset and not a handicap.

b) White can also consider 1 3.e5 tLlg4 as in

Malloni - Stromboli, Fano 20 1 1 , and here:

tLlg4 as in Malloni - Stromboli, Fano 20 1 1 , and here: 14 . a

14 .

a

.ixd5!N

b

c

d

e

.ic6! (After

f

14

g

h

.ixd5

1 5.Wxd5

White's chances remain higher.) 15

.

.if4

:B:e8

16

.

.ixc6

dxc6 17.'1Wa4 lZlxe5

18

.

.ixe5

:B:xe5

19.:B:fd1 '1Wb6 20.'1Wxc4 With ideas of :B:d7 and tLle4, White keeps a slight plus, as pointed out

by Watson.

13.i.g5

20.'1Wxc4 With ideas of :B:d7 and tLle4, White keeps a slight plus, as pointed out by

a

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

Chapter 1 - Nimzo-Indian

29

l3

exd5

Played by World Champion Anand. Black accepts that White will get piece control over the important d5-square.

The alternatives are worse:

14.�xf6 '1Wxf6 1 5.'1Wa4 �b6 1 6.dxe6

lkVxe6 17.lt:lf4 '1We5 1 8.'1Wxc4± Paramos Dominguez - Giorgadze, Mondariz 1997.

13 h6

13

lt:lc7

14.dxe6

14.e5!? is interesting, but does not promise

�xg2

�xc3

1 8.lt:lxc3 E:fd8= is also possible) 1 8.lt:lxd5 exd5 1 9.'1Wxd5 E:ad8 20.d7 e4 2 l.Wg1 '1We7= Vaisser - Zakhartsov, Aix-les- Bains 201 1.

14.lt:lf4 :i'!:b8 1 5.'1Wa4 was slightly better for White in Schandorff- Carstensen, Denmark 20 12.

an advantage: 14

dxe5

1 5 .d6

1 6.�xf6 '1Wxf6 1 7.Wxg2 lt:ld5 (17

14 fxe6

1 5.'1Wa4 �b6 1 6.E:bd 1

Black must tread carefully, as his central pawns are rather loose.

tread carefully, as his central pawns are rather loose. a b c d e f g

a

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

16

1 7.e5 ixg2 18.exd6 '1We8

19.'1Wxe8 lt:lcxe8 20.Wxg2 :i'!:d8 Krejci - G. Nagy, Medimont 20 1 1, and now White

gxf6

22.lt:lf4 W£7 23.lt:le4±) 22.lt:lf4 E:fe8 23.:1'!:fel W£7 24.E:e5± 1 7.f4 '1We8 18.1"i:xd6 '1Wxa4 19.lt:lxa4 lt:lxe4

e5

16 '1We7?!

should play: 2 l .�xf6N lt:lxf6 (2 1

20.�xe4 �xe4 2l .fxe5 :i'!:xfl t 22.Wxfl :i'!:f8t 23. \t>e 1 E:f5 De Velez - Pirrone, corr. 2009. 24.lt:lxb6N axb6 25.�d8 lt:lb5 26.1"i:xb6 lt:ld4

27.�c7

White keeps the better chances in the endgame.

14.c!Llxd5

14.lt:lf4 lt:lc7 1 5.ltlh5 lt:lce8 1 6.exd5 h6 1 7.lt:lxf6t lt:lxf6 1 8.�xf6 '1Wxf6 was fine for Black in Gelfand - Anand, Monaco (rapid) 201 1. However, White could have tried 1 5.'1Wa4 with chances for an advantage.

14 hd5

15.Lf6! '1Wxf6 16.Y;Yxd5

8

7

6

5

4

3

2

1

14 hd5 15.Lf6! '1Wxf6 16.Y;Yxd5 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 a b c

a

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

So White has managed to take on d5 with the queen. He will win the c4-pawn and keep piece control over the d5-square. Anyway, that's the plan.

16 Y;Ye6

:1'!:ab8

1 7 .'1Wxc4 lt:lc7 18 .lt:lf4± Bluvshtein - Va n der Werf, Wijk aan Zee 201 1, was similar to the

main game.

Trying to spoil White's plan. 16

17.Y;Yc6 .!Llc7 18 .!Llf4

20.Y;Ya4 i.b6 2I.Y;Yxc4

.

Y;Ye5 19.:1'!:fdl E:abS

30

Playing l .d4 - The Indian Defences

The position has stabilized and White has a small but eternal positional plus.

21

JUd8

22.b3 'i'e8 23.gd3

White may have missed the following activation of the black knight, but it doesn't spoil anything fundamentally.

35.e5

Forcing

the play. Maybe just 35 .

have been preferred.

35 dxe5

36Jhe5 'i'b5 37.'i'e4?

.ih3 should

37.gc4 kept the advantage.

 

37

f5

38.'i'el 'i'xb3 39.gbl 'i'xa3 40.'i'dl

23

lLlb5

24J;al lLld4 25.lLld5 i>fll 26.i>hl

'i'a2

lLlc6 27.f4

The bishop on b6 is truly horrible.

8

7

6

5

4

3

2

1

27.f4 The bishop on b6 is truly horrible. 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

abcde

f

g

h

27 �a5

lLld4 31.'Bd3 ti'b5 32.gc4! 'i'e8

28.'9'c2 gbc8 29.gc3 �c6 30.gdl

Both 32

%Yxb3?

33.1"1:xd4 and 32 .lt:Jxb3?

33.a4 cost Black his knight.

33.gel i>g8 34.gccl i>hs

8 7 6 5 4 3 2
8
7
6
5
4
3
2

a

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

In time trouble the tables have been turned completely. Now Black is material up and clearly better. However, the day is not over yet, but our opening investigation is!

8 7 6 5 4 3 2
8
7
6
5
4
3
2

a

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

41.gal '9'b2 42.gbl 'i'c2 43.'i'fl c4 44.lLle7 gc5 45.J.d5 h6 46.gbel i>h7?! 47.'i'h3 gcxd5 48.lLlxd5 gxd5?! 49.gxd5 lLlf3 50J3edl c3 51 .'i'g2 'i'e4 52.gd7 J.e3 53.gfl c2 54.gc7 lLld4 55.'i'xe4 fxe4 56.gel cl ='i' 57.gcxcl bel 58.gxcl e3 59.i>g2 a5 60.gc4 e2 6Li>f2 el ='i't 62.i>xel lLlf3t 63.i>e2 lLlxh2 64.f5 h5 65.gh4 lLlg4 66.gxh5t i>g8 67.i>f3 lLle5t 68.i>e4 lLlc4 69.ghl a4 70.gal a3 7Li>d4 lLld6 72.g4 i>f7 73.i>d5 lLlb5 74.i>c5 lLlc7 75.gxa3 i>f6 76.ga7 lLle8 77.ga6t i>g5 78.gg6t i>f4 79.i>d5 tLlf6t 80.gxf6 gxf6 81.i>e6 i>g5 82.i>f7

1-0

Chapter 1 - Nimzo-Indian

31

�; ::�::; l:: e;:� �; ; ,

::! a ad �;

settle fo r a small but lasting positional plus. That's also enough!

The 4

c5

Variation

l.d4 �f6 2.c4 e6 3.�c3 .ib4 4.e3 c5

8

7

6

5

4

3

2

1

l.d4 �f6 2.c4 e6 3.�c3 .ib4 4.e3 c5 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

a

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

Black strikes in the centre at once, but will he take on d4 or go for a closed set-up?

5.�ge2

Here it is again.

5.tt:lf3 tt:lc6 6.�d3 �xc3t 7.bxc3 d6 8.0-0 e5 is the so-called Hubner Va ri ation, which we prefer to avoid.

s cxd4

White was ready to play a2-a3 and force the exchange on c3. Now the bishop has an escape

route back to e7. Note that 5

playable and was featured in the previous game.

b6 is perfectly

6.exd4

 

Black

now

chooses

between

6

d5

and

6

0-0.

IGAME 7',1 Najer _ Mitenkov
IGAME 7',1
Najer _ Mitenkov

Moscow 1 996

l.d4 �f6 2.c4 e6 3.�c3 .ib4 4.e3 c5 5.�ge2

d5

All roads lead to Rome. The usual move

6.exd4 d5, although here

White has the extra option of 7.c5, cutting off the black bishop. However, the bishop is not in any danger - it can always take on c3

- and the c5-pawn is a target itself. A possible

order is

5

cxd4

8.�d2 tt:lxd2 9.Wxd2

a5 10.a3 �xc3 l l.tt:lxc3 a4 12.�d3 b6 13 .cxb6

Wxb6 14.�c2

with complicated play.

�d7 1 5 .0-0 0-0 16.l"i:fe l Ei:c8

continuation is 7

tt:le4

Therefore I advocate simply 7.a3, when Black can transpose to the current game

after 7

7

or the following game after

�xc3t,

�e7.

6.a3 Lc3t 7.�xc3 cxd4 8.exd4 dxc4 9.hc4

�c6 IO

.

.ie3

0-0 1 1.0-0

A typical, yet original IQP position. White's bishop pair and good development offer hope of securing the initiative.

A typical, yet original IQP position. White's bishop pair and good development offer hope of securing

32

Playing l .d4 - The Indian Defences

The most ambitious. Black wants to fianchetto his bishop and fight for control over the light squares.

The alternative is:

l l

h6 1 2.:B:cl COe7

With the idea of blockading the isolated pawn with a knight as soon as possible. Later the black bishop can be developed, either via b7 or d7-c6.

1 3.Wf3 C0ed5 14.Wg3

Threatening ixh6.

14

';!{h8

14 COxe3 1 5.fxe3;!;

14.Wg3 Threatening ixh6. 14 ';!{h8 14 COxe3 1 5.fxe3;!; a b c d e f g

a

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

1 5.C0xd5

Somewhat surprising, but White correctly judges that his lead in development will

assure him of a significant edge despite the simplification.

15 exd5

1 6.ixd5 looks anti-positional,

but White gets a serious initiative that is

only reinforced by the opposite-coloured

17.:B:c5 We4 1 8.id2

b6 19.:B:el Wxelt 20.ixel bxc5 2l .dxc5± Rezan - Hulak, Split 2008.

1 6.id3 id7 1 7.Wd6 ic6 1 8.Wxd8 :B:fxd8

1 9.f3 :B:ac8 20.if4;!; Onischuk - Ve kshenkov, Sochi 2004. The

bishops!

15 C0xd5

bishops:

16

Wxd5

l2.'�f3 ib7 13.id3

bishops! 15 C0xd5 bishops: 16 Wxd5 l2.'�f3 ib7 13.id3 13 13 a .'i!9'd7 :B:c8 b c

13

13

a

.'i!9'd7

:B:c8

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

This has been known to be risky since an exemplary Kasparov performance:

14.:B:adl :B:c7 1 5.Wh3 COe7 1 6.ig5 COg6

performance: 14.:B:adl :B:c7 1 5.Wh3 COe7 1 6.ig5 COg6 a b c d e f g

a

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

17.Wg3! :B:d7 1 8.d5! exd5

18 ixd5

tactics favour White, fo r instance: 19

20.ixf6 gxf6 21 .C0e4!±

is met by 1 9.ib5 when the

:B:d6

19.if5 :B:e7 20.h4 Wc7 21 .Wxc7 :B:xc7 22.:B:fel White has great positional compensation fo r the pawn.

22 :B:e7

23.C0b5 :B:fe8 24.:B:xe7 COxe7 25.ih3

ic8 26.ixc8 :B:xc8 27.COxa7 :B:c2 28.b4 �f8

<