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OBE IMPLEMENTATION

GUIDEBOOK

FACULTY OF ELECTRICAL & ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING

First Edition – 2010


Second Edition – 2012
Third Edition – 2014
Fourth Edition – 2018

Prepared by: OBE Committee, FKEE

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Contents

FOREWORD .................................................................................................................................................iii 
1. Outcome Based Education (OBE)...................................................................................................... 1
1.1   OBE Curriculum .......................................................................................................................... 4 
1.2   OBE in Engineering Course/ Program ................................................................................... 4 
1.3   Constructive Alignment ............................................................................................................ 7 
1.4  Learning Taxonomy – Bloom’s Taxonomy (revised)........................................................ 10 
2. PEO, PLO and CLO .............................................................................................................................. 17
2.1  Formulating PEO, PLO and CLO ............................................................................................ 18 
2.2  Formulation of PEO ................................................................................................................. 19 
2.3  Formulation of PLO .................................................................................................................. 21 
2.4  Formulation of CLO ................................................................................................................. 26 
2.4  Delivery of CLO ........................................................................................................................ 27 
3. Assessment .......................................................................................................................................... 28
3.1  Assessment Plan for PEO, PLO and CLO ............................................................................. 28 
3.2  Assessment of PEO.................................................................................................................. 29 
3.3  Assessment of PLO .................................................................................................................. 31 
3.4  Assessment of CLO ................................................................................................................. 33 
4. Evaluation and Continual Quality Improvement (CQI) .............................................................. 39
4.1  Evaluation of PEO, PLO and CLO .......................................................................................... 39 
4.2  CQI for CLO............................................................................................................................... 40 
4.3  CQI for PLO ............................................................................................................................... 41 
4.4  CQI for PEO ............................................................................................................................... 42 
APPENDIX A – PLO-CLO Mapping for BEV .......................................................................................... 43 
APPENDIX B – PLO-CLO Mapping for BEJ........................................................................................... 46 
APPENDIX C – CQI Process ................................................................................................................... 52 
C.1 CQI Process for CLOs................................................................................................................... 52 
C.2 CQI Process for PLOs ................................................................................................................... 53 
C.3 CQI Process for PEOs ................................................................................................................... 54 

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FOREWORD

It is indeed a great pleasure to be given this opportunity to write a foreword


for this Guidebook entitled OBE Implementation Guidebook. My heartiest
congratulations to all OBE Committee members of FKEE for their commitment
and effort to come up with this guidebook.

OBE Implementation Guidebook is an important reference material for all FKEE


staffs in implementing OBE in their daily tasks. Outcome-Based Education
(OBE) is currently preferred globally to promote educational revitalisation and
has been implemented in many countries such as Canada, the United States,
Australia, Hong Kong, and New Zealand. It is thus my heartfelt hope that the
existence of this guidebook will benefits all FKEE staffs.

I wish to thanks our readers for their helpful comments, which have
contributed their corrections and clarifications in the previous editions of OBE
Implementation Guidebook.

My compliments and best wishes to the authors.

Dean,
Faculty of Electrical and Electronic Engineering,
Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia.

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1. Outcome Based Education (OBE)

OBE is an approach of curriculum design and teaching that focuses on what


students should be able to do (attained) at the end of course/ programme.
Significant development of outcome based education approaches begins in
1960s by Carroll (1963), Bloom (1968), Spady (1988), among others.

William Spady (1994), a leading proponent of OBE, wrote


“Outcome-Based Education means clearly focusing and organizing
everything in an educational system around what is essential for all students
to be able to do successfully at the end of their learning experiences. This
means starting with a clear picture of what is important for students to be able
to do, then organizing the curriculum, instruction, and assessment to make
sure this learning ultimately happens”.

OBE is an approach to planning, delivering and evaluating education that


requires administrators, teachers and students to focus their attention and
efforts on the desired results of education—results that are expressed in
terms of individual student learning. Within the framework of the OBE, all
decisions about planning, teaching and assessment are guided by four simple
questions:
1. What do we want students to learn?
2. Why do we want students to learn these things?
3. How can we best help students to learn these things? and,
4. How will we know when students have learned?

As conceived by Spady, four essential principles underpin OBE. These


principles can be seen as an interesting mixture of philosophical stances:

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1. Clarity of focus
This principle means that everything teachers do must be clearly
focused on what they want learners to ultimately be able to do
successfully. Thus, when teachers plan and teach they should focus on
helping learners to develop the knowledge, skills and dispositions that
will enable them, ultimately, to achieve significant outcomes that have
been clearly expressed. This principle obligates teachers to make both
their short-term and long-term intentions for student learning clear to
the learners at every stage of the teaching process. It also obligates
teachers to focus all student assessment on clearly defined significant
outcomes.

2. Designing back
This principle is inextricably linked to the first principle. It means that
the starting point for all curriculum design must be a clear
definition of the significant learning that students are to achieve
by the end of their formal education. All instructional decisions are
then made by tracing back from this “desired end result” and identifying
the “building blocks” of learning that students must achieve in order to
eventually reach the long-term outcomes. This does not mean that
curriculum design is a simple linear process, but it does mean that all
planning, teaching and assessment decisions should be linked
directly to the significant outcomes that students are ultimately
to achieve.

3. High expectations
This principle posits that teachers must establish high, challenging
standards of performance in order to encourage students to
engage deeply with the issues about which they are learning.
Helping students to achieve high standards is linked very closely with
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the idea that successful learning promotes more successful
learning (Spady, 1994). When students experience success, it
reinforces their learning, builds their confidence and encourages them
to accept further learning challenges. One of the most important
reasons for using OBE is that it can help all learners to do difficult things
well. Intellectual quality is not something reserved for a few learners: it
is something that should be expected of all learners, and this is the link
to the fourth principle.

4. Expanded opportunities:
The fourth principle means that teachers must strive to provide
expanded opportunities for all learners. This principle is based on
the idea that not all learners can learn the same thing in the same way
and in the same time (Spady, 1994). However, most students can
achieve high standards if they are given appropriate
opportunities—what really matters is that students learn the things
that are important: not that they learn them in a particular way or by
some arbitrary point in time. It is obvious that traditional ways of
organising educational institutions do not make it easy for teachers to
provide expanded opportunities for all learners. However, the practical
difficulties of providing expanded opportunities must be weighed against
the long-term benefits of enabling all learners to be successful.

From these principles, it should be clear that OBE is not an “event” but
a total approach to education, and it is this total approach that forms one of
the attractions of OBE.

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1.1 OBE Curriculum

OBE requires implementation at all stages of curriculum design. Figure 1


shows an overview and decription of OBE flows.

OBE
(Education)

What the OBQI


OBC
student should (Quality
(Curriculum)
achieved? Improvement)

How to make OBLT


the student (Learning & Why the student
achieve the Teaching) cannot achieve
outcomes? the outcomes?

How to measure OBA


what the student (Assessment)
has achieved?

Figure 1: OBE flows and desciption

1.2 OBE in Engineering Course/ Program

Engineering courses in Malaysia are accredited by the Engineering


Accreditation Council (EAC) which is a division under the Board of Engineers
Malaysia (BEM). The BEM is a full-member of the Washington Accord since
2009; which is an international agreement among bodies responsible for
accrediting engineering degree programs. It recognizes the substantial
equivalency of programs accredited by those bodies and recommends that
graduates of programmes accredited by any of the signatory bodies be

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recognized by the other bodies as having met the academic requirements for
entry to the practice of engineering.
In addition to the EAC requirement, all engineering undergraduate
curriculum also need to comply with the requirement of:
• Malaysian Qualifications Framework of Malaysian Qualifications Agency
(MQA)
• Sector of Higher Education, Ministry of Education Malaysia

Figure 2: OBE in Education Engineering – Professional and Qualification Bodies


(Source: Dr. Kok Boon Ching, Centre for Academic Development and Training CAD, 20 Feb. 2014 from Slide
OBE@Program Mesra Perdana FKEE 2014)

Accreditation is an important elements in an engineering programme as it:


1. Assures that a programme has met quality standard set by the
profession.
2. Signifies that the graduate has adequate preparation for entry into
the engineering profession to employers, graduate schools, and
licensure, certification, and registration boards. Many of these groups
require graduation from an accredited program as a minimum
qualification.

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Quoted from www.washingtonaccord.org (2013):
Professional Engineers are able to perform functions because of their:
i. Knowledge,
ii. Skills, and
iii. Attitudes
Competence is developed by
i. Education,
ii. Training, and
iii. Experience
The Washington Accord Agreement recognises that:
"Accreditation of engineering academic programmes is a key foundation for
the practice of engineering at the professional level in each of the countries
or territories covered by the Accord."

The Washington Accord demands two major efforts among its member:
1. Improvement of procedures, documentation, criteria.
2. Genuine shift towards OBE in Malaysian Engineering Education
System.

As a result, the EAC has fully adopted OBE approaches in its accreditation
criteria. All engineering programmes accredited after 2009 will have to be
based on OBE. Two commonly used terms by the BEM;

 Graduate engineer – those who has successfully completed an


accredited engineering programme by the EAC.

 Professional Engineer – a graduate engineer who has obtained the


prescribed practical experience, passes the Professional Assessment

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Examination, and satisfied all other requirements of the Board of
Engineers Malaysia (BEM).

The OBE approach has many advantages:


1. Continuous monitoring of the qualities of the graduates produced, either
during the course of the programme, after completing the programme
and a few years after graduation.
2. Continual Quality Improvement (CQI) with input and feedback from
various constituencies or external stakeholders.
3. Students who are well informed and trained of the skills required out of
them.
4. Encourage more systematic, innovative and flexible teaching approach
or learning experiences.
5. Encourage more exposure to professional practice through Industrial
Training, site visits, industry-linked projects or assignments, industry
mentors, student dialogue with industry professionals or visiting
industry speakers.
6. Higher assurance of the delivery of the outcome capabilities in every
graduate.

1.3 Constructive Alignment

Constructive alignment (CA), a term coined by its originator, John Biggs, is


closely linked with OBE and starts with the notion that the learner constructs
his or her own learning through relevant learning activities. The
teacher's job is to create a learning environment that supports the
learning activities appropriate to achieving the desired learning
outcomes. The key is that all components in the teaching system - the

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curriculum and its intended outcomes, the teaching methods used, the
assessment tasks - are aligned to each other. All are tuned to learning
activities that address the desired learning outcomes.
CA has two aspects. The first aspect, the ‘constructive aspect’ is rooted
in the constructivist theory of learning and refers to the idea that students
construct meaning through relevant learning activities. That is,
meaning is not something passively imparted or transmitted from teacher to
learner, but is something learners actively have to create or construct for
themselves. Learning is therefore about meaning making. Teaching is simply
a catalyst for learning. To quote Shuell, (1986, p.429);

'If students are to learn desired outcomes in a reasonably effective


manner, then the teacher's fundamental task is to get students to engage in
learning activities that are likely to result in their achieving those outcomes.
It is helpful to remember that what the student does is actually more
important in determining what is learned than what the teacher does.'

The second aspect, the ‘alignment’ aspect, refers to what the teacher
does, which is to set up a learning environment that supports the
learning activities appropriate to achieving the desired learning
outcomes. The key is that the components in the teaching system, especially
the teaching methods used and the assessment tasks, are aligned with the
intended learning outcomes. The learner is in a sense 'trapped', and finds it
difficult to escape without learning what he or she is intended to learn.
Figure 3 shows the relationship between the three components of
constructive alignment.

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CONSTRUCTIVE ALIGNMENT

Intended Learning Outcomes

Teaching/ Learning Assessment Tasks


Activities

Figure 3 Constructive alignment

An aligned system needs three (3) set-ups


1. Specify the desired outcomes of our teaching in terms not only of topic
content, but in the level of understanding we want students to achieve.
2. An environment that maximises the likelihood that students will
engage in the activities designed to achieve the intended outcomes.
3. Choose assessment tasks that will tell us how well individual students
have attained these outcomes, in terms of graded levels of acceptability.

There are thus four major steps:


1. Defining the intended learning outcomes (ILOs);
2. Choosing teaching/learning activities likely to lead to the ILOs;
3. Assessing students' actual learning outcomes to see how well they
match what was intended;
4. Arriving at a final grade.

In principle, then, CA describes the relationship between three elements.

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1. The intentions of the teacher expressed as learning outcomes (what the
teacher intends the students will be able to do because of their learning).
2. The teaching and learning activities in which the teacher engages the
students to facilitate the desired learning.
3. The assessment tasks that test the student abilities in respect of the
learning outcomes.

CA thus can be described as an approach to course design which begins with


the end in mind (i.e. what should students know and be able to demonstrate
at the end of the course). It assumes that when learning objectives,
assessment methods, and teaching and learning activities are intentionally
aligned, that the outcomes of learning are improved substantially (Blumberg,
2009). The process of constructive alignment emphasizes that students are
central to the creation of meaning, and must be provided with opportunities
to actively select, and cumulatively construct their own knowledge (Biggs,
1996).

1.4 Learning Taxonomy – Bloom’s Taxonomy (revised)


The Bloom’s Taxonomy provides a useful way to look at categories (domain)
and levels of learning and as such, is widely used in the writing of learning
outcomes. The three (3) learning domains characterise by Bloom’s Taxonomy
and their respective levels of learning are:
1. Cognitive (6 levels)
2. Psychomotor (7 levels)
3. Affective (5 levels)

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Cognitive Domain
The revised Bloom’s Taxonomy for cognitive processes and its appropriate
actions verbs are summarised in Table 1. Action verbs are indicator of the
cognitive level but not necessarily guarantees the intended learning outcome
as the context has to be taken into account as well. The cognitive domain
reflects the intellectual level of the learning outcome, that is, it describes what
the students can do with what they have learned.

Psychomotor Domain
The psychomotor domain (Simpson, 1972) includes physical movement,
coordination, and use of the motor-skill areas. Development of these skills
requires practice and is measured in terms of speed, precision, distance,
procedures, or techniques in execution. The seven major categories are listed
in Table 2 from the simplest behaviour to the most complex.

Affective Domain
The Affective domain addresses interests, attitudes, opinions, appreciations,
values and emotional sets as listed in Table 3. This domain includes the
manner in which we deal with the things emotionally, such as feelings, values,
appreciation, enthusiasms, motivations and attitudes.

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Table 1: Cognitive domain
Elaboration of the six levels of thinking in Bloom’s Taxonomy (revised in 2001)
1  2  3  4  5  6 
Remembering  Understanding  Applying  Analysing  Evaluating  Creating 
Can the student  Can the student EXPLAIN ideas or concepts?  Can the student USE  Can the student  Can the student JUSTIFY  Can the student GENERATE 
RECALL the  the new knowledge  DIFFERENTIATE between and  an opinion, decision or  new products, ideas or ways 
information?  in another familiar  RELATE constituent parts?  course of action?  of viewing things? 
situation? 
Recognising  Interpreting  Summarising  Executing  Differentiating  Checking  Generating 
Locating  Changing from one  Drawing a logical  Applying knowledge  Distinguishing relevant from  Detecting inconsistencies  Coming up with alternatives 
knowledge in  form of representation  conclusion from presented  (often procedural) to  irrelevant parts or important  or fallacies within a  or hypotheses based on 
memory that is  to another.  information.  a routine task.  from unimportant parts of  process or product.  criteria. 
consistent with  Synonyms  Synonyms  Synonyms  presented material  Determining whether a  Synonyms 
presented   Paraphrasing   Abstracting   Carrying out  Synonyms  process or product has   Hypothesizing 
material.   Translating   Generalising   Measuring   Discriminating  internal consistency.   Proposing 
Synonyms   Representing   Outlining   Constructing   Selecting  Synonyms   Developing 
 Identifying   Clarifying   Precising   Demonstrating   Focusing   Testing   Engendering 
 Finding   Converting     Computing   Distinguished between   Detecting   Synthesising 
 Selecting   Rewriting  Inferring   Calculating   Separating   Monitoring   Providing Options 
 Indicating   Restating  Abstracting a general   Manipulating   (Sub)dividing   Concluding   
   Expressing  theme or major point   Operating   Examining   Assessing  Planning 
Recalling    Synonyms   Preparing   Relating   Appraising  Devising a procedure for 
Retrieving  Exemplifying   Extrapolating   Producing     Discriminating  accomplishing a task. 
relevant  Finding a specific   Interpolating   Drawing up  Organising   Determining  Synonyms 
knowledge from  example or illustration   Predicting   Practicing  Determining how elements fit     Designing 
long‐term  of a concept or   Concluding    or function within a structure.  Critiquing   Formulating 
memory  principle   Extending  Implementing  Synonyms  Detecting the   Combining 
Synonyms  Synonyms    Applying knowledge   Outlining  appropriateness of a   Compiling 
 Retrieving   Instantiating  Comparing  (often procedural) to   Structuring  procedure for a given task   Devising 
 Naming   Illustrating  Detecting  a non‐routine task.   Integrating  or problem.   Revising 
 Reproducing   Representing  correspondences between  Synonyms   (Re)arranging  Synonyms   Putting together 
 Recounting   Giving examples of  two ideas, objects, etc.   Using   Categorising   Judging   Suggesting 
   Showing  Synonyms   Estimating   Ordering   Questioning   
   Contrasting   Predicting   Deriving   Justifying  Producing 
Classifying   Matching   Solving     Defending  Inventing a product 
Determining that   Mapping   Changing  Attributing   Discussing  Synonyms 
something belongs to     Discovering  Determining the point of view,   Criticising   (Re)constructing 
a category (e.g.  Explaining   Explaining how  bias, values, or intent   Arguing   Composing 
concept or principle).  Constructing a cause‐and‐  Verifying  underlying presented material.   Including   Modifying 
Synonyms  effect model of a system.   Finding  Synonyms   Rating   Altering 
 Categorising  Synonyms   Deconstructing   Ranking   Building 
 Subsuming   Elucidating   Comparing   Valuing   Enlarging 
 Organising   Constructing models   Contrasting 
 Diagnosing 

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Table 2: Psychomotor domain
Action verbs which describe
Examples of activity or demonstration and evidence to
Level Category Description the activity to be trained or
be measured
measured at each level.
Use and/or selection of senses to absorb data for guided
movement
Awareness, the ability to use Examples: Detects non-verbal communication cues. Estimate
sensory cues to guide physical where a ball will land after it is thrown and then moving to the Chooses, describes, detects,
activity. The ability to use correct location to catch a ball. Adjust heat of stoves to correct differentiates, distinguishes,
1 Perception sensory cues to guide motor temperature by smell and taste of food. Adjusts the heights of feels, hears, identifies, isolates,
activity. This ranges from sensory the forks on the forklift by comparing where the forks are in notices, recognises, relates,
stimulation, through cue relation to the pallet. selects, separates, touches
selection, to translation
“By the end of the music theatre programme, students will be
able to relate types of music to particular dance steps.”
Mental, physical or emotional preparation before experience or
task
Example: Knows and acts upon a sequence of steps in a
Readiness, a learner’s readiness
manufacturing process. Recognise one’s abilities and
to act. It includes mental, Arranges, begins, displays,
limitations. Show desire to learn a new process (motivation).
physical, and emotional sets. explains, gets set, moves,
NOTE: This subdivision of Psychomotor is closely related with
2 Set These three sets are dispositions prepares, proceeds, reacts,
the “Responding to phenomena” subdivision of the Affective
that predetermine a person’s shows, states, volunteers,
domain.
response to a different situation responds, starts
(sometime called mind-sets).
“By the end of the physical education programme, students
will be able to demonstrate the proper stance for batting a
ball.”
Imitate or follow instruction, trial and error. Assembles, builds, calibrates,
Attempt. The early stages in Examples: Performs a mathematical equation as constructs, copies, dismantles,
learning a complex motor skill demonstrated. Follow instructions to build a model. Responds displays, dissects, fastens, fixes,
Guided that includes imitation and trial hand-signals of instructor while learning to operate a forklift. follows, grinds, heats, imitates,
3
Response and error. Adequacy of manipulates, measure, mends,
performance is achieved by “By the end of the physical education programme, student will mixes, reacts, reproduces,
practicing. be able to perform a golf swing as demonstrated by the responds, sketches, traces,
instructor.” tries.
Basic proficiency, the ability to
perform a complex motor skill.
Assembles, builds, calibrates,
Competently respond to stimulus for action.
completes, constructs,
This is the intermediate stage in Examples: Use a personal computer. Repair a leaking faucet.
dismantles, displays, fastens,
learning a complex skill. Learned Drive a car.
4 Mechanism fixes, grinds, heats, makes,
responses have become habitual
manipulates, measures, mends,
and the movements can be “By the end of the biology programme, students will be able to
mixes, organises, performs,
performed with some confidence assemble laboratory equipment appropriate for experiments.”
shapes, sketches.
and proficiency.

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Expert proficiency, the
Assembles, builds, calibrates,
intermediate stage of learning a
constructs, coordinates,
complex skill.
demonstrates, dismantles,
Execute a complex process with expertise. displays, dissects, fastens, fixes,
The skilful performance of motor
Examples: Manoeuvres a car into a tight parallel parking spot. grinds, heats, makes,
acts that involve complex
Operate a computer quickly and accurately. Display manipulates, measures, mends,
Complex movement patterns.
competence while playing the piano. mixes, organises, sketches.
5 Overt Proficiency is indicated by a
Response quick, accurate, and highly
“By the end of the industrial education programme, students NOTE: the key words are the
coordinated performance,
will be able to demonstrate proper use of woodworking tools same as Mechanism, but will
requiring a minimum energy. This
to high schools students.” have adverb or adjectives that
category includes performing
indicate that the performance is
without hesitation, and automatic
quicker, better more accurate
performance.
etc.
Alter response to reliably meet varying challenges.
Adaptable proficiency, a learner’s
ability to modify motor skills to fit Examples: Responds effectively to unexpected experiences.
new situation. Modifies instruction to meet the needs of the learners. Perform
Adapts, adjusts, alters, changes,
a task with a machine that was not originally intended to do
integrates, rearranges,
6 Adaptation Skills are well developed and the (machine is not damaged and there is no danger in performing
reorganises, revises, solves,
individual can modify movement a new task).
varies.
patterns to fit special
requirements. By the end of the industrial education programme, students
will be able to adapt their lessons on woodworking skills for
disabled students.”
Creative proficiency, a learner’s
ability to create new movement
patterns. Develop and execute new integrated responses and activities. Arranges, builds, combines,
Creating new movement patterns composes, constructs, creates,
7 Origination to fit a particular situation or Examples: Constructs new theory. Develops a new and designs, formulates, initiate,
specific problem. comprehensive training programme. Create new gymnastic makes, modifies, originates, re-
Learning outcomes to emphasize routine. designs, trouble-shoots.
creativity based upon highly
developed skills.

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Table 3: Affective domain levels
Level Category Description Examples Action verbs
The student passively attends to particular
phenomena or stimuli [classroom activities, Listens attentively, shows sensitivity to social
Attends, accepts, asks,
textbook, music, etc.]. The teacher’s concern problems.
chooses, describes, follows,
is that the student’s attention is focused. Listen to others with respect.
gives, holds, identifies, listens,
1 Receiving Intended outcomes include the pupil’s Listens for and remembers the name of newly.
locates, names, points to,
awareness that a thing exist. Emphasis is on
selects, selectively attends to,
awareness, willingness to hear, selected “By the end of the lesson, students will listen
replies, uses.
attention. attentively to ideas from their team members.”

Completes homework, obeys rules, participates


in class discussion, show interest in subject, and
The student actively participates. The pupil Acclaims, aids, answers,
enjoys helping others.
not only attends to the stimulus but reacts in applauds, approves, assists,
Gives a presentation. Questions new ideals,
some way. complies, conforms, discusses,
concepts, models, in order to fully understand
Emphasis is on active participation on the greets, helps, labels,
2 Responding them. Knows safety rules and practices them.
part of the learners. Learning outcomes may performs, practices, presents,
emphasize compliance in responding, reads, recites, reports,
“By the end of the lesson, students will be able
willingness to respond, or satisfaction in selects, tells, writes,
to perform a quick check on their team
responding (motivation). volunteers.
participation performance.”

Demonstrates belief in democratic processes, Assists, completes, debates,


appreciates the role of science in daily life, demonstrates,
shows concern for others' welfare, and denies, differentiates,
The worth a student attaches to a particular demonstrates a problem-solving approach. explains, follows, forms,
object, phenomenon, or behaviour. Ranges Is sensitive towards individual and cultural increases proficiency in,
from acceptance to commitment (e.g., differences (value diversity). Shows the ability initiates, invites, joins,
assumes responsibility for the functioning of to solve problems. Proposes a plan to bring justifies, proposes, protests,
3 Valuing a group). Attitudes and appreciation. about social improvement and follows through reads, relinquishes, reports,
Valuing is based on the internalization of a with commitment. selects, shares, studies,
set of specified values, while clues to these Informs management on strongly felt matters. supports, works.
values are expressed in the learner’s overt
behaviour and are often identifiable. “By the end of the program, students will be
able to demonstrate the scientific approach
when resolving physical issues.

Brings together different values, resolving Accommodates, adheres,


Recognizes the need for balance between
conflicts among them, and starting to build alters, arranges, balances,
freedom and responsible behaviour,
an internally consistent value system- combines, compares,
understands the role of systematic planning in
comparing, relating and synthesizing values completes, defends, explains,
solving problems; accepts responsibility for own
4 Organisation and developing a philosophy of life. formulates, generalizes,
behaviour. Explains the role of systematic
Organizes values into priorities by identifies, integrates, modifies,
planning in solving problems. Accepts
contrasting different systems. orders, organizes, prepares,
professional ethical standards. Creates a life
The emphasis is on comparing, relating, and relates, synthesizes.
plan in harmony with abilities, interests, and
synthesizing values

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beliefs. Prioritizes time effectively to meet the
needs of the organization, family, and self.

“By the end of the environmental studies


program, students will be able to organize the
conservation efforts of urban, suburban and
rural communities.”

Concerned with personal, social, and emotional


adjustment: displays self-reliance in working
independently, cooperates in group activities
(displays teamwork), maintains good health
At this level, the person has held a value
habits. Acts, discriminates,
system for a sufficiently long time to control
Uses an objective approach in problem solving. displays, influences,
his/her behaviour, has developed a
Internalising Displays a professional commitment to ethical interprets, listens, maintains
characteristic "life style." Behaviour is
values: practice on a daily basis. Revises judgments objectivity, modifies,
pervasive, consistent, predictable, and most
5 Characterisation and changes behaviour in light of new evidence. performs, practices, proposes,
importantly, characteristic of the learner.
by Value or Values people for what they are, not how they qualifies, questions, respects,
Instructional objectives are concerned with
Value Complex appear. revises, serves, solves, uses
the student's general patterns of adjustment
evidence, verifies.
(personal, social, emotional).
“By the end of the counselling program,
students will be able to objectively interpret
evidence presented by clients during a therapy
session.

16
2. PEO, PLO and CLO

Faculty of Electrical and Electronic Engineering (FKEE) offers two


undergraduate engineering programmes, namely
1. Bachelor of Electrical Engineering with Honours (BEV), and
2. Bachelor of Electronic Engineering with Honours (BEJ).

The first stage of OBE requires FKEE to formulate the objectives and outcomes
of the two engineering programmes. These are the Programme Educational
Objectives (PEO), Programme Learning Outcomes (PLO) and Course Learning
Outcomes (CLO). PEOs are broad statements that describe the career and
professional accomplishments that the programme is preparing graduates to
achieve and are measured 3 to 5 years after graduation. PEOs are formulated
based on inputs from various stake holders. PLOs are graduates attributes
that students shall attain after completing the programme and are based on
the graduate attributes that is expected of an engineering graduate as
required by the Washington Accord. The PLOs are supported by the CLOs, the
competency level expected of the student after completing an engineering
course. The alignment of PEO, PLO and CLO is shown in Figure 4.

Few years after graduation –


PEO 3 to 5 years

PLO Upon graduation

CLO Upon course completion 

Figure 4 Alignment of PEO, PLO and CLO

17
2.1 Formulating PEO, PLO and CLO

Industrial and societal demands play important roles in formulating the


learning outcomes of programme offered by Higher Education Institution
(HEI). FKEE has from time to time, gathers input from our respective
stakeholders, namely the BEM, KPM, MQA, External Examiner, Industrial
Advisory Panel, Adjunct Professor, Visiting Professors, alumni, employers,
staffs and students through events such as visits, meetings, town hall
meetings and survey.

INDUSTRIAL AND SOCIETAL


NEED & REQUIREMENT DEMAND
Industries, KPM, Professional bodies,
MQA, Parents, Alumni, Students, Univ. & others
Formulation
PE

PLO

CLO
Continual Quality Improvement Assessment

Analysis

Figure 5: Flow of Learning Outcomes Formulation and Implementation


(Source: Dr. Tan Lai Wai, Centre for Academic Development and Training CAD, 22 August 2013 from Slide
OBE@FKEE - FORMULATING AND ADDRESSING LEARNING OUTCOMES)

18
2.2 Formulation of PEO

Program Educational Objectives (PEO) are statements that describe the


expected accomplishments and professional status 3 to 5 years after
graduation. The formulation of PEOs for each programme was based on the
Vision, Mission, Philosophy and Objectives of the University, as well as the
Vision and Mission of the Faculty. The PEOs were designed to address the
requirements and expectation of various stakeholders. The mapping of the
PEOs, Faculty’s Vision and Mission and the Stakeholders’ requirements is
shown in Figure 6. It can be seen from the mapping that the PEOs are mapped
into the Vision and Mission of the Faculty as well as the stakeholders’
requirements. Table 4 shows the PEO for the BEV programme whilst Table 5
shows the PEO for the BEJ programme.

FKEE Vision &  Stakeholders’ 
Mission  Requirements 

VISION  Graduates have good 
Leading centre of  personality. 
excellence in the 
generation and 
Graduates have good 
application of 
communication skills. 
electrical and 
electronic 
engineering  Graduates have positive 
attitude. 
MISSION  Programme Objectives 
Produce dynamic, 
Graduates have good 
creative and ethical 
knowledge and/or soft 
graduates who will 
skills. 
lead in the application 
of electrical and 
electronic  Graduates capable in 
engineering for the  producing quality work. 
prosperity of
 
Figure 6 PEO Formulation

19
Table 4 PEO for Bachelor of Electrical Engineering with Honours (BEV)
PEO# Description PLO
competent in electrical engineering
PLO1, PLO4,
1 discipline and meet the needs of
PLO10 & PLO12
organization and industry.

practise electrical engineering profession PLO2, PLO8,


2
responsibly in organization and community PLO11 & PLO13

can communicate effectively and exhibit


PLO3, PLO5 &
3 good leadership in organization and
PLO9
community.

pursue continuous learning to upgrade


4 knowledge and competencies to be PLO6 & PLO7
competitive in the global arena.

Table 5 PEO for Bachelor of Electronic Engineering with Honours (BEJ)


PEO# Description PLO

PLO1, PLO2, PLO4,


able to build a career and become a leader PLO5, PLO7, PLO9,
1
in relevant electronic engineering fields; PLO10, PLO11, &
PLO12

recognised as professional electronic PLO1, PLO2, PLO3,


2
engineers; and PLO10, PLO13

actively participate in relevant activities for


the betterment of themselves and society PLO6, PLO8,
3
by exhibiting highest ethical and PLO12 & PLO13
professional standard.

20
2.3 Formulation of PLO
PLO are the knowledge, skills, and attitudes graduates should be able
to demonstrate at the time of graduation (i.e. upon completion of a
programme). The PLO for BEV and BEJ are constructed based on the
requirement set forth by the BEM in the Engineering Accreditation Council
(EAC) Accreditation Manual. The most recent Accreditation Manual was
released in September 2017 and is based on the graduate attributes required
by the Washington Accord (WA) as stated in the International Engineering
Alliance (IEA) Graduate Attributes and Professional Competencies document.
In addition, the PLOs for both programmes take into account the
requirement of other authorities such as, Institution of Engineers Malaysia
(IEM), Malaysian Qualification Agency (MQA) and Ministry of Education (MOE).
Furthermore, inputs from other stakeholders such as External Examiner,
Adjunct Professors, Visiting Professor/Lecturer, alumni and Faculty’s Industrial
Advisory Panel (IAP) are also consulted in establishing and reviewing the
programme outcomes.
The PLO for BEV is shown in Table 6 whilst the PLO for BEJ is shown in
Table 7.

21
Table 6 PLO for Bachelor of Electrical Engineering with Honours (BEV)
PLO Description Domain PEO

Acquire and apply knowledge of


mathematics, sciences and Knowledge
1 PEO1
engineering fundamentals to solve
problems in electrical engineering.

Apply appropriate techniques,


resources, hardware and related Practical Skills/
2 PEO2
software to solve complex electrical Modern Tool Usage
engineering problems.

Communicate effectively in writing


and orally about activities in
Communication
3 electrical engineering, not only with PEO3
Skills
fellow engineers but also with the
community at large.
Apply the critical thinking standards
in the process of application,
Critical Thinking &
analysis, synthesis, and evaluation
4 Problem Solving/ PEO1
in order to make informed decisions
Investigation
and solve electrical engineering
problems

Able to interact and collaborate


with others effectively, including in
5 Teamwork Skills PEO3
teams, in the workplace, and in
multi-disciplinary environments

Acknowledge the need for, have


preparation and able to practise
6 Lifelong Learning PEO4
lifelong learning to keep up with
technological change

Demonstrate entrepreneurship
Entrepreneurial
7 skills in developing viable business PEO4
Skills
plan

22
PLO Description Domain PEO

Demonstrate professional ethics Ethics and


8 and accountability in engineering Professionalism PEO2
practices. values

Demonstrate the ability to lead


effectively towards solving
9 engineering problems using Leadership Skills PEO3
engineering and management
principles.

Design safe and efficient solutions,


systems, and components to meet
10 Design PEO1
desired needs within realistic
constraints

Demonstrate mastery of associated


cognitive skills in the formulation of
a problem, data gathering and
11 PEO1
analysis, and interpretation of Problem Analysis
results to address practical
problems in electrical engineering

Understand the impact of


Environment &
12 engineering solutions to the society PEO2
Sustainability
and environmental sustainability

Apply engineering knowledge and


skills through professional and
13 Engineer & Society PEO2
personal activities to improve their
workplaces and communities

23
Table 7 PLO for Bachelor of Electronic Engineering with Honours (BEJ)

PLO Description Domain PEO

Apply knowledge of mathematics, science,


electronic engineering fundamentals and Knowledge PEO1
1
specialisation to the solution of complex PEO2
electronic engineering problems;

Create, select and apply appropriate


techniques, resources, and modern
Practical Skills/
engineering and IT tools, including prediction PEO1
2 Modern Tool
and modelling, to complex electronic PEO2
Usage
engineering problems, with an understanding
of the limitations;
Communicate effectively on complex
engineering activities with the engineering
community and with society at large, such as
being able to comprehend and write effective Communication
3 PEO2
reports and design documentation, make Skills
effective presentations, and give and receive
clear instructions;

Conduct investigation into complex electronic


engineering problems using research based Critical Thinking
knowledge and research methods including & Problem
4 PEO1
design of experiments, analysis and Solving/
interpretation of data, and synthesis of Investigation
information to provide valid conclusions;

Function effectively as an individual, and as a


5 member or leader in diverse teams and in Teamwork Skills PEO1
multi-disciplinary settings;

Recognise the need for, and have the


preparation and ability to engage in
6 Lifelong Learning PEO3
independent and life-long learning in the
broadest context of technological change;

Demonstrate enterpreneurship skills in Entrepreneurial


7 PEO1
developing viable business plan; Skills

24
PLO Description Domain PEO

Apply ethical principles and commit to Ethics and


8 professional ethics and responsibilities and Professionalism PEO3
norms of engineering practice; values

Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of


engineering management principles and
economic decision-making and apply these to
9 Leadership Skills PEO1
one’s own work, as a member and leader in a
team, to manage projects in multidisciplinary
environments;
Design solutions for complex electronic
engineering problems and design systems,
components or processes that meet specified
PEO1
10 needs with appropriate consideration for Design
PEO2
public health and safety, cultural, societal,
and environmental considerations;

Identify, formulate, conduct research


literature and analyse complex electronic
engineering problems reaching substantiated
11 PEO1
conclusions using first principles of Problem Analysis
mathematics, natural sciences and
engineering sciences;
Understand and evaluate the sustainability
impact of professional engineering work in the
Environment & PEO2
12 solutions of complex electronic engineering
Sustainability PEO3
problems in societal and environmental
contexts;
Apply reasoning informed by contextual
knowledge to assess societal, health, safety,
legal and cultural issues and the consequent Engineer & PEO2
13
responsibilities relevant to professional Society PEO3
engineering practice and solutions to complex
electronic engineering problems.

25
2.4 Formulation of CLO

Course Learning Outcomes (CLOs), also known as course outcomes (COs) are
statements indicating the knowledge, skills, and attitudes/predispositions a
student should be able to demonstrate upon completion of a course. In
addition, the CLO also indicates the level of mastery that is expected from the
student as well as the direct relationship between the CLO and the PLO. As
such, student attainment of the PLO can be directly measured by assessing
the attainment of CLO.
A course normally have between 3 to 5 outcomes which covers the 3
learning domains (i.e cognitive, psychomotor and affective domain), but there
are courses that covers more than 5 outcomes such as Industrial Training,
Design Course and Final Year Project. This is due to the fact that these courses
are suppose to integrate all knowledge, skills and attitude accumulated during
the course of the study.
A CLO should have three main components which are:
1. Verb – indicates the level of mastery and the learning domain. The
verb should clearly communicates the skill that learner should be able
to perform.
2. Condition – indicates the specific condition(s) the student should be
able to demonstrate. The condition helps in specifying the resources
needed and control the complexity of the task.
3. Standard/ criteria – defines acceptable performances where
appropriate.

Each CLO has to contribute to the attainment of the programme’s PLO.


As such, it is important that each PLO is adequately addressed during the
delivery of the programme. This is done by managing the number of times a
PLO being addressed in the CLO-PLO mapping. The CLO-PLO mapping for BEV
is shown in Appendix A, whilst Appendix B shows the mapping for BEJ.

26
2.4 Delivery of CLO

To ensure the attainment of the objectives and outcomes as stated in


the planning stage, proper and suitable delivery method is a must. Traditional
delivery methods include lecture, tutorial and laboratory work. However, these
methods has been found to be less effective in meeting the CLO (and later
PLO) with higher taxanomy levels. As such, lecturers are expected to explore
modern delivery methods which include student-centred learning (SCL) and
real world problem solving. In SCL, the onus is on the student to take control
of their learning and the lecturer’s role has shifted from giving lecture to
become a facilitator. Example of SCL include problem based learning (PBL),
project oriented problem based learning (POPBL), cooperative learning (CL),
case study, group discussion, demonstration and many more.
Student-centred learning puts students' interests first, acknowledging
student voice as central to the learning experience. In a student-centred
learning space, students choose what they will learn, how they will learn, and
how they will assess their own learning. This is in contrast to traditional
education, also dubbed "teacher-centred learning", which situates the teacher
as the primarily "active" role while students take a more "passive", receptive
role. In a teacher-centred classroom, teachers choose what the students will
learn, how the students will learn, and how the students will be assessed on
their learning. In contrast, student-centred learning requires students to be
active, responsible participants in their own learning and with their own pace
of learning.
In delivering the content of the course, it is important to ensure learning
activities match the level of mastery expected for the particular CLO, which is
an important aspect in constructive alignment. Student must be trained with
higher order thinking skills (HOTS) in order to be able to master higher level
taxonomies. These higher level competencies can only be attained with proper
learning activities that allow students to develop the knowledge and skills
required themselves.
27
3. Assessment

Assessment is the formative and/ or summative determination for a specific


purpose of the student’s competence in demonstrating a specific outcome. It
is also the processes that identify, collect, use and prepare data that can be
used to evaluate achievement.

3.1 Assessment Plan for PEO, PLO and CLO


The purpose of this plan is to guide the continuous improvement of
undergraduate engineering programmes at FKEE, UTHM. The focus of the plan
is on the following criterion:

Criterion 1. Programme Educational Objectives (PEOs)


Criterion 2. Programme Learning Outcomes (PLOs)
Criterion 3. Course Learning Outcomes (CLOs)

On-going FKEE’s programme and curriculum assessment can be


implemented with a balance of both direct and indirect assessment
techniques. The tools of direct assessment techniques are as follows:

i. Quiz, Test, Final Examination


ii. Assignments, Projects
iii. Final Year Project/ Design Project
iv. PBL/ POPBL
v. Laboratory Experiments
vi. Exit Interview/ Observations/ Peer Review

On the other hand, the tools of indirect assessment techniques are as follows:

i. Industrial Training
28
ii. Industrial Advisors
iii. External Examiner
iv. Student Exit Survey
v. Alumni Survey
vi. Employer Survey

In summary, the basic FKEE’s model of educational objective and


programme assessment can be viewed as requiring four different major
feedback systems, as shown in Figure 7. These feedbacks, obtained via proper
assessment methods, are essentials in determining subsequent actions that
need to be taken if the states objectives or outcomes are not met. In addition,
the feedback systems would also enable the Faculty to further improve the
learning experience in order to get the best out of the students.

Indirect Assessment Direct Assessment


Indirect Assessment Direct and Indirect Assessment
Input from
Programme Course Assessment of
Constituencies Educational
Learning Learning Student
and Evaluation Objectives
Outcomes Outcomes Learning
of Attainment
Feedbacks Feedbacks
Feedbacks Feedbacks
Figure 7: Model of Educational Objectives and Learning Outcomes
Assessment

3.2 Assessment of PEO


PEOs are identified and refined by the program in consultation with outside
constituencies and current students. This is a cyclical process, and the goal is
to keep the PEOs up to date with current needs by having a process which
identifies the requirements of the program’s various constituencies, critically

29
assess the attainment of graduates, and periodically reassesses and updates
of the objectives.
Although elements of this process are continuous in nature and will vary
among programmes, each programme has responsibility to assure a
documented cycle of activity such that PEOs, as well as their linkage to PLOs,
are re-evaluated at least every three years. Recognizing that different
constituents may have competing needs and expectations, each programme
will have a process in place to resolve potential conflicts while fulfilling as
many of the needs as practically as possible.
The PEOs of FKEE programmes can be assessed by using the following
assessment tools:
i. Report and minute of meeting with Industrial Advisors Panel
ii. Report and minute of meeting with External Examiner
iii. Alumni survey
iv. Employer survey
The alumni’s and employer’s survey contained five areas which defining
the PEOs. The five areas are: (1) Career, (2) Competency, (3) Competitive,
(4) Life-long Learning, and (5) Contribution. Data gathered through these
surveys will be accumulated and used as one key input to the PEOs as well as
the PLOs.
In summary, the PEOs assessment process and methods is shown in
Figure 8. In the figure, PEOs are assessed using only indirect methods. At the
moment, data on the achievement of the PEOs for both BEV and BEJ
programmes are being gathered for the first time for evaluation.

30
Panel of Industrial Employer
Advisors and
Indirect PEOs Indirect
Assessment Survey
External Examiner Assessment Assessment Alumni

Re-evaluate at least every three (3) years


Feedbacks
Evaluation Report (Career, Competency,
and Minute of CQI Competitive, Life-long
Meeting Learning, and
Contribution)
Figure 8: Programme Educational Objectives (PEOs) Assessment Methods

3.3 Assessment of PLO


Establishing and monitoring progress towards PLOs is an iterative process
taking place at two primary levels: Curriculum level and Course level.
Although success of students in accomplishing the PEOs is an indicator of
success in achieving the PLOs, progress towards PLOs can be most directly
evaluated during and at or near the time of completion of the formal
instructional/ learning process.
The PLOs of FKEE programme can be assessed by using the following
assessment tools:
a. Direct assessment
i. Quizzes
ii. Tests
iii. Final Examination
iv. Assignments
v. Projects
vi. Final Year Project
vii. Lab Experiments
viii. PBL/ POPBL

31
b. Indirect assessment
i. Report and minute of meeting with Industrial Advisors
ii. Report and minute of meeting with External Examiner
iii. Exit survey (during graduation)
iv. Industrial Training (employer survey)

Results may imply needed change in contents, the curriculum or the


PLOs. Figure 9 shows the suggestions for the appropriate inputs.

Figure 9: Programme Learning Outcomes (PLOs) Assessment Methods

In order to ensure a quality education, student’s PLO attainment for each


semester shall be presented and discussed at course management level to
identify any weaknesses that may occur during the implementation of the
curriculum. This would allow subsequent actions or interventions that would
address issues or concerns found.

32
3.4 Assessment of CLO
Course learning outcomes (CLOs) are statements that describe
significant and essential learning that learners have achieved, and can reliably
demonstrate at the end of a course. This means learning outcomes identify
what the learner will know and be able to do by the end of a course.
Course learning outcomes should be measureable and observable via
cognitive, psychomotor and affective learning domains. In other words,
course learning outcomes should reflect essential knowledge, skills and
attitudes and finally, represent the minimum performances that must be
achieved to successfully complete a course. CLOs are also used in the
determination of PLO attainment. Results may imply needed change in
contents, CLO, curriculum or the PLOs. Figure 10 shows some suggestions for
the appropriate inputs for CLO assessment

Quizzes,
Rubric Matrix
Tests,
(Psychomotor
Final
and Affective)
Examination

Assignments, Student
Projects, Direct CLOs Indirect Student Learning
Achievement Assessment Assessment
Final
Evaluation Assessment Evaluation
Year Projects

Lab
Re-evaluated at the end Peer-
Experiments,
of learning process assessment
PBL/POPBL Evaluation and Survey Data
(Course Content, Teaching
PLOs, CLOs, Soft Skills
and Learning, Feedback and
and Taxonomy
Achievement for each
CQI Assessment, Learning
Resources, Personal
Courses and Students
Development and CLOs and
Taxonomy Achievement)

Figure 10: Course Learning Outcomes (CLOs) Assessment Methods

33
Constructive alignment requires the instrument used for assessment to
match the type of CLO being assessed. For example, examination type
assessment is suitable for assessing cognitive domain, demonstration is more
suitable for psychomotor domain and observation of student attitude reflects
their affective value. In addition to the type of assessments, it is also
important that the assessment instrument used allows assessment according
to the level of mastery (taxonomy) expected.
On-going course learning outcomes assessment, with a balance of direct
and indirect assessment techniques will be the responsibility of the
departments and programmes. It is the responsibility of the lecturer for each
course to maintain a detailed course syllabus which carefully delineates both
the content and PLOs addressed by the course. The syllabus should also
contain course objectives, taxonomy levels, instructional techniques and
evaluation methods.
The CLO assessment is continuous starting from the first week until the
last week of lecture. The course learning outcome assessment is divided into
2 parts: after test 1 (week 7) and after final examination (week 14). At the
end of the course learning process and assessment, all the lecturers must do
the course evaluation in order to analyse the student achievement in terms of
PLO and Taxonomy Level.
The CLOs of FKEE course can be assessed by using the following but not
limited to, assessment tools:
a. Direct assessment
i. Quizzes
ii. Tests
iii. Final Examination
iv. Assignments
v. Projects
vi. Final Year Project
vii. Lab Experiments
34
viii. PBL/ POPBL
b. Indirect assessment
i. Rubric Matrix (Psychomotor and Affective)
ii. Peer-assessment

Assessment plan for all courses shall be explained to the student at the
beginning of the course. Each assessment instrument shall indicate the CLO
being address and the percentage of marks that is allocated for each
assessment. Table 8 shows an example of assessment plan for a particular
course. This plan shall be transferred into the Student Assessment System
(SAS) for the purpose of assessment management. A screenshot of the
Assessment Management in SAS is shown in Figure 11.

Table 8 Example of assessment plan

Nama Pentaksiran CLO Dinilai


Kaedah
(Assessment Name) (CLO %
(Method)
Assessed)
1. Tugasan 1 (Assignment 1) Report CLO4 10
2. Projek (Project) Technical
CLO1 5
Report
Technical
CLO2 5
Report
Demonstration CLO3 10
3. Ujian (Test) Test CLO1 20
4. Peperiksaan Akhir Final CLO2 30
(Final Examination) Examination CLO1 20
Jumlah (Total) 100%

In Table 8, CLO 1 for example, is assessed by three (3) methods, namely


a technical report, test and final examination and carries a total of 45% of the
total marks for the course. The mark obtained for the CLO contributes to the
total mark for the PLO. The attainment of CLO 1 in this example is calculated
from the formula:
marks obtained
% of CLO 1 attainment 100%
total CLO marks

35
Figure 11 Screenshot of the Assessment Management in the SAS system.

A student’s PLO attainment is the average PLO mark obtained from


many courses addressing the same PLO. In FKEE, all courses including
engineering and supporting courses are considered in arriving at the final mark
for the PLO.
Another important document in preparing the assessment plan is the
Table of Specification (ToS) which indicate the distribution of marks with
respect to the taxonomy level. This table is prepared for the final examination
to ensure students are assessed up to the level expected from the CLO and
using appropriate assessment instruments, thus ensuring that a fair and
accurate assessments are being presented to student. The ToS must contain
important information which include the question’s numbers, marks and their
relationship with CLO, PLO and Taxonomy Level. Figure 12 shows the TOS
template with example.

36
Figure 12: Table of Specification Template and Example

37
After the test and final examination are implemented, the student
achievement evaluation is conducted in order to assess and to analyse the
achievement of CLO for CQI purposes. Figure 13 shows the template of
student achievement evaluation that can be retrieved form Online Student
Assessment System (SAS) at http://tcis.uthm.edu.my

(a) Assessment Details for CLOs

(b) Course Summary Report based on Student

(c) CLO Graph


Figure 11: Student’s Achievement Evaluation Template and Example
38
4. Evaluation and Continual Quality Improvement
(CQI)

Evaluation process allows a detailed study of the assessment and later would
enable identification of actions that need to be taken to improve the delivery
and assessment process. This process, sometime known as Continual Quality
Improvement (CQI) would help identifying problem and solution to any
weakness as well as further improve the quality of the programme.

4.1 Evaluation of PEO, PLO and CLO


PEOs are statements indicating the objectives of the programme and are
measured 3 to 5 years after graduation. Surveys are normally conducted to
gain data on the achievement of the alumni. The result of the survey is used
to evaluate the success of the programme and actions that need to be taken
to further improve the programme.

The achievement of PEOs very much depend on the graduate that we


produce. A graduate should, by the time of graduation, have minimum
attainment of the PLOs stated. While PLOs are assessed at the end of their
study, the attainment of PLO is directly measured at the end of each semester
before cumulative average of the attainment is obtained. This continual
assessment stratergy allows the faculty to identify weaknesses and prepare a
continual quality improvement stratergy. The CQI process can be done at
curriculum level (review) or at course level.

At course level, attainment of the CLO is measured directly via various


tools as explained before. The responsibility of the lecturer is to identify
weaknesses in the planning, delivery and assessment processes.

39
Graduates’ attainments of POs are assessed throughout the course of the
study, and the results are accumulated towards the final attainment for each
of the POs. A student should attained minimum of 40% average mark for each
of the PLO to be considered as having minimum competency. In addition, KPI
targets are set for individual student The followings are the KPI targets
adopted by the programme:
(a) Individual
i. PLO attainment KPI for each course – 55% marks
ii. Cumulative average PLO attainment (each semester) – 55% marks

(b) Cohort
i. Course’s PLOs KPI (average) – 55% marks
ii. Cumulative average of Graduates PLO attainment– 60% marks

4.2 CQI for CLO

The CLOs attainment that uses direct and indirect measurement tools are
collected from the Student Assessment System (SAS) and Outcome Based
Education System (OBESys). The respective lecturer can do the analysis for
determining the achievement of related CLO. The analysis results will then
determine the appropriate actions for CQI. Appendix C.1 describes the CQI
process of CLO.
At course level, FKEE has decided to have 3 CQI forms for monitoring
purpose which are:
 
i. CQI-planning
For courses that have been offered before, the CQI planning is
done before the semester starts. It involves discussion between the
newly appointed and previous lecturers. Discussion is focused on how

40
to improve the course delivery and student’s performance, based on the
achievement of the previous semester. The HoD responsible for the
course will endorse outcome of the discussion.

ii. Mid-Term CQI


The Mid-Term CQI is done after the first major assessment of the
first half of the semester. It normally takes place between week 7 and
9, and this exercise would allow analysis of the student’s achievement
thus enabling immediate adjustment of the delivery method for the
remaining weeks of the semester in order to meet the expected outcome
of the course.

iii. Final CQI

The respective lecturer will analyse the overall CLOs performance


and propose ways to improve the course outcome to course coordinator.
The course coordinator will report to HoD by using CQI-03 form. This
document will be used as a reference for the course’s future lecture to
ensure future improvement of student’s attainment. HoD will also table
any issues regarding curriculum to the JKA.

4.3 CQI for PLO


In a direct measurement tool, since each course has its CLO mapped to a PLO
that has been set for each undergraduate academic programme, the data
obtained from SAS will be used as an input to measure the achievement of
PLOs. The indirect measurement tool is also carried out to students in their
graduating year. The analysis results form direct and indirect measurement
tools will then determine the appropriate actions for CQI. Refer Appendix C.2
for CQI process of PLO.

41
4.4 CQI for PEO
The measurement of PEOs is conducted through survey on alumni and their
employers for at least three to five years after their graduation. The analysis
results will then determine the appropriate actions for CQI. Appendix C.3
describes the CQI process of PEO.

42
APPENDIX A – PLO-CLO Mapping for BEV
LAMPIRAN 8

FAKULTI KEJURUTERAAN ELEKTRIK DAN ELEKTRONIK


MATRIK KURSUS & HASIL PEMBELAJARAN PROGRAM (PLO)
IJAZAH SARJANA MUDA KEJURUTERAAN ELEKTRIK DENGAN KEPUJIAN

Hasil Pembelajaran

Kemahiran Kerja

Analisa Masalah
Profesionalisma
& Penyelesaian
Pemikiran Kritis

Keusahawanan

Persekitaran &
Pembelajaran
Pengetahuan

Nilai Etika &

Rekabentuk
Kepimpinan

Masyarakat
Komunikasi

Kelestarian
Kemahiran
Kemahiran

Kemahiran

Kemahiran
Sepanjang

Jurutera &
Kumpulan
Praktikal

Masalah

Hayat
Matrik Kursus dan Hasil Pembelajaran

Bil. Kod Kursus Kursus Kredit PLO-1 PLO-2 PLO-3 PLO-4 PLO-5 PLO-6 PLO-7 PLO-8 PLO-9 PLO-10 PLO-11 PLO-12 PLO-13
K PS CS CTPS TS LL ES ET LS DS PA EVTS EGSC
C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A
KURSUS WAJIB UNIVERSITI
1 UHB10100 English for Higher Education 0 x x x
2 UHB20102 Essential Academic English 2 x x x
3 UHB30102 English for Technical Purposes 2 x x x
4 UHB40102 English for Occupational Purposes 2 x x x
5 UWB10x02 Foreign Language 2 x x x
6 UQI10302 *Islamic and Asian Civilisation x x x
2
7 UQI11102 **Civilizational Studies in Asia x x x
8 UQU10202 *Ethnic Relations x x x
2
9 UWB11002 **Malay Language x x x
10 UQI10102 *Islamic Studies x x x
11 UQI10202 *Moral Studies 2 x x x
12 UQI10902 **Islam in Malaysia x x x
13 UQU10103 *Nationhood and Current Development of Malaysia x x x
3
14 UQU10303 **Malaysia Studies and Culture x x x
15 UQ*1***1 Co-Curriculum I 1
16 UQ*1xxx1 Co-Curriculum II 1
17 BEE31202 Creativity and Innovation 2 x x x
Juml 21 13 3 8 0 5 7 0 6 3 0 0 0 0
KURSUS TERAS FAKULTI (SAINS & MATEMATIK)
16 BEE11303 Engineering Mathematics I 3 x x x
17 BEE11403 Engineering Mathematics II 3 x x x
18 BEE21503 Engineering Mathematics III 3 x x x
19 BEE31602 Engineering Mathematics IV 2 x x x
20 BEE31702 Engineering Mathematics V 2 x x x
KURSUS TERAS FAKULTI (SOKONGAN)
21 BEC10102 Computer Programming 2 x x x
22 BEE22302 Entrepreneurship 2 x x x
23 BEE30103 Engineering Management 3 x x x
24 BEE10202 Engineers and Society 2 x x x x
KURSUS TERAS PROGRAM
25 BEE12202 Occupational Safety and Health 2 x x x
26 BEE32205 Industrial Training 5 x x x
27 BEL20303 Digital Electronics 3 x x x
28 BEF12403 Electric Circuit Analysis I 3 x x x
LAMPIRAN 8

FAKULTI KEJURUTERAAN ELEKTRIK DAN ELEKTRONIK


MATRIK KURSUS & HASIL PEMBELAJARAN PROGRAM (PLO)
IJAZAH SARJANA MUDA KEJURUTERAAN ELEKTRIK DENGAN KEPUJIAN

Hasil Pembelajaran

Kemahiran Kerja

Analisa Masalah
Profesionalisma
& Penyelesaian
Pemikiran Kritis

Keusahawanan

Persekitaran &
Pembelajaran
Pengetahuan

Nilai Etika &

Rekabentuk
Kepimpinan

Masyarakat
Komunikasi

Kelestarian
Kemahiran
Kemahiran

Kemahiran

Kemahiran
Sepanjang

Jurutera &
Kumpulan
Praktikal

Masalah

Hayat
Matrik Kursus dan Hasil Pembelajaran

Bil. Kod Kursus Kursus Kredit PLO-1 PLO-2 PLO-3 PLO-4 PLO-5 PLO-6 PLO-7 PLO-8 PLO-9 PLO-10 PLO-11 PLO-12 PLO-13
K PS CS CTPS TS LL ES ET LS DS PA EVTS EGSC
C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A
29 BEF12503 Electric Circuit Analysis II 3 x x x
30 BEL10203 Analog Electronics 3 x x x
31 BEF25903 Mechanical Sciences 3 x x x
32 BEF22803 Transform Circuit Analysis 3 x x x
33 BEB20303 Electromagnetic Fields and Waves 3 x x x
34 BEH30603 Control System Theory 3 x x x
35 BEB30503 Digital Signal Processing 3 x x x
36 BEF33203 Utilisation of Electrical Energy 3 x x x
37 BEF23903 Electrical Measurements 3 x x x
38 BEF23401 Electrical Engineering Laboratory I 1 x x x
39 BEB31803 Electronic Communication Systems 3 x x x
40 BEF23803 Polyphase Circuit Analysis 3 x x x
41 BEF24002 Electronic Instruments and Measurements 2 x x x
42 BEF24103 Electrical Machines 3 x x x
43 BEF34503 Power Electronics 3 x x x
44 BEF24201 Electrical Engineering Laboratory II 1 x x x
45 BEF35703 Electrical Design Project 3 x x x x
46 BEE40602 Final Year Project I 2 x x x
47 BEE40704 Final Year Project II 4 x x x x
48 BEF43303 Power System Analysis and Protection 3 x x x
49 BEF36003 Power Generation, Transmission and Distribution 3 x x x
50 BEF35803 Electric Drives 3 x x x
51 BEF34701 Power Engineering Laboratory I 1 x x x
52 BEF44803 Power Quality 3 x x x
53 BEF44903 Industrial Power Systems 3 x x x
54 BEF35001 Power Engineering Laboratory II 1 x x x
55 BEF45101 Power Engineering Laboratory III 1 x x x
56 BEF45203 High Voltage Engineering 3 x x x
57 BEF45902 Instrumentation for Process Control 2 x x x
58 BEF45402 Power Engineering Laboratory IV 2 x x x
Juml 112 14 14 13 7 19 13 3 14 2 10 10 9 4
Jumlah Keseluruhan 133 27 17 21 7 24 20 3 20 5 10 10 9 4
APPENDIX B – PLO-CLO Mapping for BEJ
Lampiran 8
FAKULTI KEJURUTERAAN ELEKTRIK DAN ELEKTRONIK
MATRIK KURSUS & HASIL PEMBELAJARAN PROGRAM (PLO)
IJAZAH SARJANA MUDA KEJURUTERAAN ELEKTRONIK DENGAN KEPUJIAN

Hasil Pembelajaran

Pemikiran Kritis &

Kemahiran Kerja

Analisa Masalah
Profesionalisma
Keusahawanan

Persekitaran &
Pembelajaran
Penyelesaian
Pengetahuan

Nilai Etika &

Rekabentuk
Kepimpinan
Komunikasi

Masyarakat
Kelestarian
Kemahiran

Kemahiran

Kemahiran

Kemahiran
Sepanjang

Jurutera &
Kumpulan
Praktikal

Masalah
Matrik Kursus dan Hasil Pembelajaran

Hayat
PLO-1 PLO-2 PLO-3 PLO-4 PLO-5 PLO-6 PLO-7 PLO-8 PLO-9 PLO-10 PLO-11 PLO-12 PLO-13
Bil. Kod Kursus Kursus Kredit K PS CS CTPS TS LL ES ET LS DS EVTS PA EGSC
C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A
KURSUS WAJIB UNIVERSITI
1 UWB10100 ***Foundation English 0 x x x
2 UWA10302 Islamic and Asian Civilisation 2 x x x
3 UWB10102 Academic English 2 x x x
4 UWB20302 Technical Writing 2 x x x
5 UWS10202 *Ethnic Relations 2 x x x
6 UWB11002 **Malay Language
7 UWB10202 Effective Communication 2 x x x
8 UQ*1***1 Co-Curriculum I 1 x x x
9 UWA10102 Islamic Studies/ 2 x x x
10 UWA10202 Moral Studies
11 BEE31202 Creativity and Innovation 2 x x x
12 UQ*1xxx1 Co-Curriculum II 1 x x x
13 UWS10103 *Nationhood and Current Development of Malaysia 3 x x x
14 UWS10303 **Malaysian Studies and Culture
15 UWB10x02 Foreign Language 2 x x x
Jumlah 21 10 2 8 0 4 5 0 5 2 0 0 0 0
KURSUS TERAS FAKULTI (SAINS & MATEMATIK)
16 BEE11303 Engineering Mathematics I 3 x x x
17 BEE11403 Engineering Mathematics II 3 x x x
18 BEE21503 Engineering Mathematics III 3 x x x
19 BEE31602 Engineering Mathematics IV 2 x x x
20 BEE31702 Engineering Mathematics V 2 x x x
KURSUS TERAS FAKULTI (SOKONGAN)
21 BEC10102 Computer Programming 2 x x x
22 BEE20802 Entrepreneurship 2 x x x
23 BEE30103 Engineering Management 3 x x x
24 BEE10202 Engineers and Society 2 x x x x
KURSUS TERAS PROGRAM
25 BEE30304 Industrial Training 4 x x x
26 BEE12202 Occupational Health and Safety 2 x x x
27 BEH10102 Instrumentation and Measurement 2 x x x
28 BEE12401 Fundamental Electronics Laboratory 1 x x x
29 BEL10103 Electric Circuits 3 x x x
30 BEL10203 Analog Electronics 3 x x x
31 BEE10403 Electrical Technology 3 x x x
32 BEE10501 Engineering Practices 1 x x x
33 BEL20303 Digital Electronics 3 x x x
Lampiran 8
FAKULTI KEJURUTERAAN ELEKTRIK DAN ELEKTRONIK
MATRIK KURSUS & HASIL PEMBELAJARAN PROGRAM (PLO)
IJAZAH SARJANA MUDA KEJURUTERAAN ELEKTRONIK DENGAN KEPUJIAN

Hasil Pembelajaran

Pemikiran Kritis &

Kemahiran Kerja

Analisa Masalah
Profesionalisma
Keusahawanan

Persekitaran &
Pembelajaran
Penyelesaian
Pengetahuan

Nilai Etika &

Rekabentuk
Kepimpinan
Komunikasi

Masyarakat
Kelestarian
Kemahiran

Kemahiran

Kemahiran

Kemahiran
Sepanjang

Jurutera &
Kumpulan
Praktikal

Masalah
Matrik Kursus dan Hasil Pembelajaran

Hayat
PLO-1 PLO-2 PLO-3 PLO-4 PLO-5 PLO-6 PLO-7 PLO-8 PLO-9 PLO-10 PLO-11 PLO-12 PLO-13
Bil. Kod Kursus Kursus Kredit K PS CS CTPS TS LL ES ET LS DS EVTS PA EGSC
C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A
34 BEF25503 Power Systems 3 x x x
35 BEE20801 Electronic Engineering Laboratory I 1 x x x
36 BEB20303 Electromagnetic Fields and Waves 3 x x x
37 BEC20202 Multimedia Technology and Application 2 x x x
38 BEE20901 Electronic Engineering Laboratory II 1 x x x
39 BEB20203 Signals and Systems 3 x x x
40 BEC30503 Digital Design 3 x x x
41 BEH30603 Control System Theory 3 x x x
42 BEB31803 Electronic Communication System 3 x x x
43 BEL30403 Electronic Circuits Analysis and Design 3 x x x
44 BEE31001 Electronic Engineering Laboratory III 1 x x x
45 BEB30503 Digital Signal Processing 3 x x x
46 BEC30303 Computer Architecture and Organization 3 x x x x
47 BEC30403 Microprocessor and Microcontroller 3 x x x
48 BEE31101 Electronic Engineering Laboratory IV 1 x x x
49 BEE22002 Integrated Design Project I 2 x x x
50 BEE32102 Integrated Design Project II 2 x x x
51 BEE40602 Final Year Project I 2 x x x
52 BEE40704 Final Year Project II 4 x x x x
Jumlah 90 17 13 9 3 14 11 3 10 2 8 9 11 4
KURSUS PENGKHUSUSAN 20 0 3 1 7 1 1 1 2 2 4 1 4 1
Jumlah Keseluruhan 131 27 18 18 10 19 17 4 17 6 12 10 15 5

Pengkhususan Komunikasi (BEJB) 20 0 3 1 7 1 1 1 2 2 4 1 4 1


Pengkhususan Kejuruteraan Komputer (BEJC) 20 0 3 1 7 1 1 1 2 2 4 1 4 1
Pengkhususan Mikroelektronik (BEJD) 20 0 3 1 7 1 1 1 2 2 4 1 4 1
Pengkhususan Mekatronik (BEJH) 20 0 3 1 7 1 1 1 2 2 4 1 4 1
Pengkhususan Elektronik Perubatan (BEJU) 20 0 3 1 7 1 1 1 2 2 4 1 4 1
Lampiran 8
FAKULTI KEJURUTERAAN ELEKTRIK DAN ELEKTRONIK
MATRIK KURSUS & HASIL PEMBELAJARAN PROGRAM (PLO)
IJAZAH SARJANA MUDA KEJURUTERAAN ELEKTRONIK DENGAN KEPUJIAN

Hasil Pembelajaran

Pemikiran Kritis &

Kemahiran Kerja

Analisa Masalah
Profesionalisma
Keusahawanan

Persekitaran &
Pembelajaran
Penyelesaian
Pengetahuan

Nilai Etika &

Rekabentuk
Kepimpinan
Komunikasi

Masyarakat
Kelestarian
Kemahiran

Kemahiran

Kemahiran

Kemahiran
Sepanjang

Jurutera &
Kumpulan
Praktikal

Masalah
Matrik Kursus dan Hasil Pembelajaran

Hayat
PLO-1 PLO-2 PLO-3 PLO-4 PLO-5 PLO-6 PLO-7 PLO-8 PLO-9 PLO-10 PLO-11 PLO-12 PLO-13
Bil. Kod Kursus Kursus Kredit K PS CS CTPS TS LL ES ET LS DS EVTS PA EGSC
C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A
Pengkhususan Komunikasi (BEJB)
KURSUS PENGKHUSUSAN
53 BEB40102 Data Communication Network 2 x x x x
54 BEB30603 Applied Electromagnetics 3 x x x x
55 BEB41803 Digital Communication 3 x x x x
56 BEB41303 Optical Communication 3 x x x x
57 BEB41203 Wireless and Mobile Communication 3 x x x x
KURSUS PENGKHUSUSAN ELEKTIF
58 BEB41003 Antenna Theory and Design 3 x x x x
59 BEB40803 RF & Microwave Engineering 3 x x x x
60 BEB41503 Satellite Communication and Navigation 3 x x x x
61 BEB41603 Multimedia Communication 3 x x x x
62 BEB41703 Electromagnetic Compatibility 3 x x x x
63 BEB41903 Digital Audio and Video Broadcasting 3 x x x x
64 BEB42003 Wireless Sensor and Mobile Ad-Hoc Network 3 x x x x
Jumlah 20 0 3 1 7 1 1 1 2 2 4 1 4 1

Pengkhususan Kejuruteraan Komputer (BEJC)


KURSUS PENGKHUSUSAN
65 BEC20602 Data Structures and Algorithms 2 x x x x
66 BEC42203 Image Processing 3 x x x x
67 BEC41703 Embedded Systems Design 3 x x x x x
68 BEC41503 Artificial Intelligence 3 x x x x
69 BEC41303 Operating Systems 3 x x x
KURSUS PENGKHUSUSAN ELEKTIF
70 BEC41603 Computer System Engineering 3 x x x x
71 BEC41103 Advanced Microcontroller 3 x x x x
72 BEC41003 Computer Networks 3 x x x x
73 BEC42003 VLSI System Design 3 x x x x
74 BEC41803 Software Engineering 3 x x x x
75 BEC41903 Computer Security 3 x x x x
Jumlah 20 0 3 1 7 1 1 1 2 2 4 1 4 1
Lampiran 8
FAKULTI KEJURUTERAAN ELEKTRIK DAN ELEKTRONIK
MATRIK KURSUS & HASIL PEMBELAJARAN PROGRAM (PLO)
IJAZAH SARJANA MUDA KEJURUTERAAN ELEKTRONIK DENGAN KEPUJIAN

Hasil Pembelajaran

Pemikiran Kritis &

Kemahiran Kerja

Analisa Masalah
Profesionalisma
Keusahawanan

Persekitaran &
Pembelajaran
Penyelesaian
Pengetahuan

Nilai Etika &

Rekabentuk
Kepimpinan
Komunikasi

Masyarakat
Kelestarian
Kemahiran

Kemahiran

Kemahiran

Kemahiran
Sepanjang

Jurutera &
Kumpulan
Praktikal

Masalah
Matrik Kursus dan Hasil Pembelajaran

Hayat
PLO-1 PLO-2 PLO-3 PLO-4 PLO-5 PLO-6 PLO-7 PLO-8 PLO-9 PLO-10 PLO-11 PLO-12 PLO-13
Bil. Kod Kursus Kursus Kredit K PS CS CTPS TS LL ES ET LS DS EVTS PA EGSC
C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A
Pengkhususan Mikroelektronik (BEJD)
KURSUS PENGKHUSUSAN
76 BED40902 Photonic Devices 2 x x x x
77 BED20103 Semiconductor Electronic and Devices 3 x x x x
78 BED30303 VLSI Design 3 x x x x
79 BED40603 Micro Fabrication 3 x x x x
80 BED41003 Advanced Semiconductor Devices 3 x x x x
KURSUS PENGKHUSUSAN ELEKTIF
81 BED41103 IC Packaging 3 x x x x
82 BED40503 MEMS Design 3 x x x x
83 BED41303 Material Characterization 3 x x x x
84 BED41503 Nanoelectronic Devices 3 x x x x
Jumlah 20 0 3 1 7 1 1 1 2 2 4 1 4 1

Pengkhususan Mekatronik (BEJH)


KURSUS PENGKHUSUSAN
85 BEH41902 Vision Systems 2 x x x x
86 BEH31103 Industrial Automation System 3 x x x
87 BEH42003 Real Time Embedded Systems 3 x x x x
88 BEH41703 Robotic System 3 x x x x
89 BEH41803 Intelligent Control Systems 3 x x x x x
KURSUS PENGKHUSUSAN ELEKTIF
90 BEH41303 Manufacturing Process 3 x x x x
91 BEH42103 Process Control System 3 x x x x
92 BEH42203 Mobile Robotics 3 x x x x
93 BEH41103 Mechatronic Mechanism 3 x x x x
94 BEH41503 Digital Control Systems 3 x x x x
Jumlah 20 0 3 1 7 1 1 1 2 2 4 1 4 1
Lampiran 8
FAKULTI KEJURUTERAAN ELEKTRIK DAN ELEKTRONIK
MATRIK KURSUS & HASIL PEMBELAJARAN PROGRAM (PLO)
IJAZAH SARJANA MUDA KEJURUTERAAN ELEKTRONIK DENGAN KEPUJIAN

Hasil Pembelajaran

Pemikiran Kritis &

Kemahiran Kerja

Analisa Masalah
Profesionalisma
Keusahawanan

Persekitaran &
Pembelajaran
Penyelesaian
Pengetahuan

Nilai Etika &

Rekabentuk
Kepimpinan
Komunikasi

Masyarakat
Kelestarian
Kemahiran

Kemahiran

Kemahiran

Kemahiran
Sepanjang

Jurutera &
Kumpulan
Praktikal

Masalah
Matrik Kursus dan Hasil Pembelajaran

Hayat
PLO-1 PLO-2 PLO-3 PLO-4 PLO-5 PLO-6 PLO-7 PLO-8 PLO-9 PLO-10 PLO-11 PLO-12 PLO-13
Bil. Kod Kursus Kursus Kredit K PS CS CTPS TS LL ES ET LS DS EVTS PA EGSC
C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A C P A
Pengkhususan Elektronik Perubatan (BEJU)
KURSUS PENGKHUSUSAN
95 BEU40902 Medical Equipment Management and Safety 2 x x x x
96 BEU20103 Human Physiology 3 x x x x
97 BEU30203 Principle of Physiological Devices 3 x x x x
98 BEU40403 Medical Imaging 3 x x x x
99 BEU40503 Medical Instrumentation 3 x x x x
KURSUS PENGKHUSUSAN ELEKTIF
100 BEU41103 Biomaterial 3 x x x x
101 BEU41303 Biomedical Optics 3 x x x x
102 BEU40803 Telemedicine 3 x x x x
103 BEU41503 Biomedical Engineering and Applications 3 x x x x
Jumlah 20 0 3 1 7 1 1 1 2 2 4 1 4 1
APPENDIX C – CQI Process

C.1 CQI Process for CLOs


FLOW OF CQI PROCESS FLOW OF CQI PROCESS
FOR DIRECT FOR INDIRECT
MEASUREMENT OF CLO MEASUREMENT OF CLO

1 Current Lecturer of the Course 5a Current Lecturer distributes the Lecture


get the CQI from Previous Lecturer of
Faculty distribute Planning (RPP04)
the Course
syllabus of the course (Week 1)
(2nd week before the semester starts)
(Evidence: RPP04)
(Evidence: Form CQI-01)

2 Current Lecturer do the planning to 5b Student filled in Mid Course Survey


improve the performance of the course (Week 6 – Week 7)
(Evidence: Minute of Meeting / RPP04, (Evidence: Survey Questionnaires &
etc) Feedback/etc.)

3 Implementation of the planning


(Week 1 to Week 7)
(Evidence: Students’ Attendance/
Lecture Notes/ Tutorial / etc)

4 Evaluation Process (Week 1 – Week 7)


(Evidence: Test 1 / Lab Reports /
TOS / Vetting Report / Sample of
Student’s Answer / Questions /
Answer Scheme/ etc.)

5
Current Lecturer analyse the mid
performance and proposed Mid CQI
(Evidence: CQI-02)

6 Implementation of the mid CQI


(Week 8 – Week 14)
(Evidence: Students’ Attendance/
Activity Report / Questions /
Sample of Student’s Answer / etc)

7 Evaluation Process
(Week 8–Final Exam)
(Evidence: Test 2 / Lab Reports /
Final Exam / TOS / Vetting Report for
Test / Sample of Student’s Answer /
Questions /
Answer Scheme/etc.)

8
Current Lecturer analyse the overall
performance and proposed CQI
(Evidence: CQI-01)
C.2 CQI Process for PLOs

C.3 CQI Process for PEOs