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objectivism and the Future of Art Sandra Shaw

Objectivist Summer Conference 2008

Newport Beach, California

Lecture 1

Course outline

1. Introduction: art collapsed in the Modern Age, but it is now reviving.

2. The Nature and Purpose of Art:

Art embodies metaphysical values. Art concretizes the conceptual, so it provides perceptual access to the conceptual. The creation and experience of art are based on cognition and values.

3. The Fall of the Arts I—the18th Century:

Art of the Enlightenment grows emotionalistic under the influence of skepticism. Kant denies human cognition and value. The art world still advances until it is influenced by Kant.

Lecture 2

1. The Fall of the Arts II—the 19th and 20th Centuries:

19th-century artists relinquish values and cognition—they embrace Naturalism and, ultimately, Nihilism.

2. The Art World’s Response to the “New Arts”:

Dismissal, protest, and the argument from tradition do not defeat Kant.

Lecture 3

1. Post-Kantian nihilism dominates the art world today, yet realistic art is reviving.

2. The collapse of the intellectuals has enabled artists to revive pre-modern methods—for now.

3. Realistic arts today are naturalistic, irrational, or value-oriented—all are intellectually adrift.

4. Objectivism offers the alternative to today’s intellectual drift: a positive philosophy that rationally validates cognition and values.

objectivism and the Future of Art

Lecture 1:

slide list

Sandra Shaw

1.

“Anna,” oil, 36x48", by Jacob Collins (American, b. 1964), 2006. Location: NA.

2.

“Dora Maar au Chat,” oil, 51x38", by Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881–1973), c. 1941. Location: NA.

3.

“Adam,” detail from the Sistine Ceiling, fresco by Michelangelo Buonarroti (Italian, 1475–1564), c. 1508-12. Location: Sistine Chapel, Vatican City, Rome.

4.

“Venus of Willendorf,” stone, h: 4.4", Paleolithic, c. 30,000-20,000 B.C. Location: Museum of Natural History, Vienna.

5.

Menkaure trinity, green slate, h: 37.25", Dynasty IV, Old Kingdom, 2,680-2,565 B.C. Location:

Egyptian Museum, Cairo.

6.

“The Madonna of the Harpies,” oil, 5.8x6.8", by Andrea del Sarto (Italian, 1486–1531), 1517. Location: Uffizi, Florence.

7.

“The David,” marble, h: under 17', by Michelangelo Buonarroti (Italian, 1475–1564), 1502–4. Location: The Accademia, Florence.

8.

“The David,” detail.

9.

“Kneeling Youth,” marble, h: 30.75", by George Minne (Belgian, 1866–1941), 1898. Location:

Museum of Art History, Vienna.

10.

“The David” and “Kneeling Youth”.

11.

“Winged Victory,” (aka “Nike” of Samothrace), marble, h: c. 8', Hellenistic Greek, 3rd cent. BC. Location: Louvre, Paris.

12.

“The Astronomer,” oil, 19.4x17.75", by Johannes Vermeer (Dutch, 1632–1675), 1668. Location:

Louvre, Paris.

13.

“The Reader,” oil, 32.3x25.6", by Jean-Honoré Fragonard (French, 1732-1806), c. 1770–2. Location: National Gallery, Washington, DC.

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objectivism and the Future of Art

Sandra Shaw

14.

Ceiling fresco, Saint Johannes-Nepomuk (Asamkirche), Munich, by the Asam brothers (German, fl. 1725–50), 1733–46.

15.

Interior, church of the Virgin, Birnau, Germany, by Joseph Anton Feuchtmayr (German, 1696– 1770), 1748–50.

16.

“Pilgrimage to San Isidro’s Fountain,” oil, 55.1x172.4", by Francisco Goya (Spanish, 1746– 1828), c. 1820. Location: Museo del Prado, Madrid.

17.

“Saturn Devouring His Son,” oil, 57.5x32.5", by Francisco Goya (Spanish, 1746–1828), 1819. Location: Museo del Prado, Madrid.

18.

Blank

19.

“Leaving the Bath,” oil, 69.25x43.75", by Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida (Spanish, 1863–1923), 1908. Location: The Hispanic Society, New York City.

20.

“Hip Hip Hooray! Artists Celebrating at Skagen,” oil, size: NA, by Peder Severin KrØyer (Norwegian, 1851–1909), 1888. Location: Göteborgs Konstmuseum, Gothenburg, Sweden.

21.

“Carolus-Duran,” oil, 46x37", by John Singer Sargent (American, 1856–1925), 1879. Location:

Clark Art Institue, Williamstown, MA.

22.

“Mother Teaching Child,” marble, 40.75", by Sir Alfred Gilbert (British, 1854–1934), c. 1881–3. Location: Tate, London.

23.

“The Painter’s Honeymoon,” oil, 33x30.2", by Frederic Leighton (British, 1830–1896), c. 1863–4. Location: Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

24.

“Admiration,” oil, 58x78", by William-Adolphe Bouguereau (French, 1825–1905), 1897. Location: San Antonio Museum of Art, Texas.

25.

“The Prodigal Son,” bronze, h: 55", by Auguste Rodin (French,1840–1917), c. 1885–7. Location:

Musée Rodin, Paris.

26.

“Large Clenched Hand with Figure,” bronze, h: 17.5", by Auguste Rodin (French, 1840–1917), late 1890s–1907. Location: Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

27.

“Where Do We Come From? What Are We? Where Are We Going?” oil, 54.75x147.5”, by Paul Gauguin (French, 1848–1903), 1897. Location: Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

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objectivism and the Future of Art

Lecture 2:

Sandra Shaw

1.

“The Stone-Breakers,” oil, 5'5"x7'10", by Gustave Courbet (French, 1819–1877), c. 1849. Location: destroyed 1945.

2.

“Mowing,” oil, 37.5x27", by Newell Convers Wyeth (American, 1882–1945), 1907. Location:

Private Collection.

3.

“The Stone-Breakers,” oil, 5'5"x7'10", by Gustave Courbet (French, 1819–1877), c. 1849. Location: destroyed 1945.

4.

“The Omnibus,” oil, 49.6x34.6", by Anders Leonhard Zorn (Swedish, 1860–1920), c. 1892. Location: Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston.

5.

“L’Absinthe,” oil, 36.2x30", by Edgar Degas (French, 1834–1917), c. 1876. Location: Musée d’Orsay, Paris.

6.

“Shoes,” oil, 18x21.75", by Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853–1890), 1888. Location: Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

7 & 8.

Painting by Paul Bilhaud (French, fl. late-19th c.), 1882. Location: NA

9.

“Family Picture,” oil, 26x39.75" by Max Beckmann (German, 1884–1950), 1920. Location:

Museum of Modern Art, New York.

10.

Photograph of the building of the Statue of Liberty, Paris, 1886.

11.

“Large Bathers,” oil, 82x98", by Paul Cézanne (French, 1839–1906), c. 1898–1906. Location:

Philadelphia Museum of Art.

12.

“Blue Nude” (aka “Memory of Biskra”), oil, 36.25x55", by Henri Matisse (French, 1869–1954), 1907. Location: Baltimore Museum of Art.

13.

“An Eclogue” (“A Poem”), oil, 48x60.5", by Kenyon Cox (American, 1856–1919), 1890. Location: National Museum of American Art, Smithsonian, Washington, DC.

14.

“Evening,” marble, size: NA, by Frederick Wellington Ruckstull (American, 1853–1942), 1887 and 1891. Location: Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

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objectivism and the Future of Art

Sandra Shaw

15.

“Hound of Heaven I,” oil, size: NA, by Robert Hale Ives Gammell (American, 1893–1981), before 1956. Location: NA.

16.

“Portrait of Cpl. William Metcalf, VC. Metcalf,” oil, size: NA, by Kenneth Forbes (Canadian, 1892–1980), 1918. Location: Canadian War Museum, Ottawa.

17.

Blank

18.

Photograph of Daniel Chester French (American, 1850–1931) working in his Chesterwood studio, 1924.

19.

Photograph of unveiling of the “Chicago Picasso,” Daley Plaza, August, 1967.

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objectivism and the Future of Art

Lecture 3

Sandra Shaw

1.

Photograph of unveiling of the Chicago Picasso, Daley Plaza, August, 1967.

2.

“Chansons de printemps” (“Songs of Spring”), oil, 58.5x39.25" by William-Adolphe Bouguereau (French, 1825–1905), 1889. Location: NA.

3.

“Green Car Crash” (aka “Green Burning Car I”), silkscreen, 90x80" by Andy Warhol (American, 1928–1987), 1963. Location: NA.

4.

Photograph from “Miami Basel” art show.

5.

Blank

6.

“747,” photograph, size: NA, by Chris Burden (American, b. 1946), 1973. Location: Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago.

7.

“Freedom from Want,” oil, 45.75x35.5" by Norman Rockwell (American, 1894–1978), 1943. Location: Norman Rockwell Museum, Stockbridge, MA.

8.

“Model with Swan Decoy on Ladder,” oil, 50x34", by Philip Pearlstein (American, b. 1924),

2002. Location: NA.

9.

“Rose’s Bathroom,” graphite, size: NA, by Michael Grimaldi (American, contemporary), Contemporary. Location: NA.

10.

“Self-Portrait (with Plaids),” charcoal, 54x40", by Susan Hauptman (American, contemporary),

2004. Location: NA.

11. “Portrait of Stephen,” oil, size: NA, by Michael Sell (American, contemporary), Contemporary. Location: NA.

12. “D,” oil, 62.5x98.5", by Steven Assael (American, b. 1957), 1998. Location: NA.

13. “Lap,” oil, 60x60", by James Byrne (American, contemporary), 2003. Location: NA.

14. Blank

15. “Second Birth,” oil, 83x86", by Odd Nerdrum (Norwegian, b. 1944), 2004. Location: NA.

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objectivism and the Future of Art

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16.

“Scratching in the Dirt: Wisdom Series,” oil, 71x61.5", by Lisa Bartolozzi (American, contemporary), 2007. Location: NA.

17.

“Cockaigne,” oil, 112x153", by Vincent Desiderio (American, contemporary), 1993–2003. Location: Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden Washington, DC.

18.

“Please Leave When It Is Wise To,” oil (size: NA), by Cristina Vergano (American, contemporary), 2006. Location: NA.

19.

“IWannabeaballarina,” oil, size: NA, by Mikel Glass (American, contemporary), Contemporary. Location: NA.

20.

Blank

21.

“Nureyev,” bronze, over life-size, by Richard MacDonald (American, contemporary), Contemporary. Location: NA.

22.

“Figs,” medium and size: NA, by Jeffrey Ripple (American, b.1962), 1999. Location: NA.

23.

“Long Golden Day,” oil, size: NA, by Alice Dalton Brown (American, contemporary), Contemporary. Location: NA.

24.

“Expectations,” watercolor, 37x23", by Paul McCormack (American, b. 1962), 2007. Location: NA.

25.

“Vinalhaven Sunset,” oil, 36x70", by Jacob Collins (American, b. 1964), 2008. Location: NA.

26.

“Spring Night,” oil, 23x30", by Peter E. Poskas (American, b. 1969), 2007. Location: NA.

27.

“Penelope,” oil, 40x48", by David Ligare (American, b. 1945), 1980. Location: NA.

28.

“Three Stages of Youth,” oil, 55x27", by Huang Zhong Yang (Chinese-Canadian, b. 1949), 2000. Location: NA.

29.

“Reclining Figure,” oil, size: NA, by Jeremy Lipking (American, b. 1975), 2004. Location: NA.

30.

“Anna,” oil, size: 36x48”, by Jacob Collins (American, b. 1964), 2006. Location: NA.

31.

“The David” marble, under 17', by Michelangelo Buonarroti (Italian, 1475–1564), 1502–4. Location: The Accademia, Florence.

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objectivism and the Future of Art

references

Sandra Shaw

Behler, Ernst, ed., Immanuel Kant Philosophical Writings, New York: Continuum,1986.

Forbes, Kenneth, Great Art to the Grotesque, Toronto: Pitt Publishing Co., Ltd., 1972.

Gammell, R. H. Ives, Twilight of Painting: An Analysis of Recent Trends to Serve in a Period of Reconstruction, New York: G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 1946.

Goldwater, Robert, ed., Artists on Art: from the XIV to the XX Century, New York: Pantheon Books, 1972. (First published 1945)

Hartford, Huntington, Art or Anarchy? How the Extremists and Exploiters Have Reduced the Fine Arts to Chaos and Commercialism, NY: Doubleday & Co., 1964.

Herter Kendall, Christine, Defense of Art: A painter’s views on how to talk sensibly about art, New York:

W. W. Norton & company, 1982, (1938).

Hofstadter, Albert, ed., Philosophies of Art & Beauty: Selected Readings in Aesthetics from Plato to Heidegger, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1964.

Kammen, Michael, Visual Shock: A History of Art Controversies in American Culture, New York: Alfred

A. Knopf, 2006.

Morgan, Wayne H., Keepers of Culture: The Art-Thought of Kenyon Cox, Royal Cortissoz, and Frank Jewett Mather, Jr., Kent, Ohio: Kent State University Press, 1989.

Peikoff, Leonard, Objectivistm: The Philosophy of Ayn Rand, New York: Dutton, 1991.

Rand, Ayn, The Romantic Manifesto, New York: Signet, 1971.

Ruckstull, F. W., Great Works of Art and What Makes Them Great, New York: Garden City Publishing Co., 1925.

Spalding, Julian, The Eclipse of Art: Tackling the Crisis in Art Today, New York: Prestel, 2003.

Steiner, Wendy, Venus in Exile: The Rejection of Beauty in 20th-Century Art, New York: The Free Press, 2001.

Sures, Mary Ann, “Metaphysics in Marble,” The Objectivist, v. 8, Feb. 1969.

Turner, Frederick, The Culture of Hope: A New Birth of the Classical Spirit, New York: The Free Press, 1995.

Wolfe, Tom, The Painted Word, New York: Bantam Books, 1976. (First published 1975)

Other Sources:

Cooper, James, F., ed., “American Arts Quarterly,” Hastings-On-Hudson: The Newington-Cropsey Cultural Studies Center.

Edwards, Paul., ed. Encyclopedia of Philosophy, 8 v., New York: Macmillan, 1967.

Osborne, Harold, ed., The Oxford Companion to Art, Oxford: The Clarendon Press, 1970.

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