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September 26, 2018 | $1.50 Named the nation’s best small community weekly 2018 winner, General

September 26, 2018 | $1.50

Named the nation’s best small community weekly

2018 winner, General Excellence, National Newspaper Association 2014-2017 finalists, General Excellence, National Newspaper Association

Volume 46, Issue 39 | thearknewspaper.com

Backyard bees 10 great fall cookbooks HOME FALL 2018 STREAMLINED DESIGN Remodeled Strawberry home boasts
Backyard bees
10 great fall cookbooks
HOME
FALL 2018
STREAMLINED DESIGN
Remodeled
Strawberry
home
boasts
more space and
a modern,
open
feel while
still fitting
in with
the surrounding
neighborhood.

special section inside

also inside

Page 5

Peninsula abuzz with news of restaurant from star chef Mina

Locals weigh in on what they want for old Guaymas spot

dmccrohan@thearknewspaper.com ——— Con f rmation that Michelin-starred ce- lebrity chef Michael Mina will take over the waterfront restaurant space recently vacated by Guaymas has set Tiburon and much of the Bay Area abuzz with anticipation — even though no concept is publicly known and the opening date isn’t expected until late summer 2019. “This is so awesome!!” wrote Casey Rooney Mancl on The Ark’s Facebook page. “My heart be still!!” wrote Emily Sanders Elam. “Fantastic!” wrote Rebec- ca Winston. Rumors had been swirling but careful- ly denied since May, but in an exclusive announcement to The Ark on Sept. 17, Mina’s restaurant team, the Mina Group, said the executive chef would be opening his f rst Marin restaurant in downtown Tiburon at 5 Main St. The news was ———

See

State Parks to suspend bidding process for Tiburon-Angel Island ferry service

dmccrohan@thearknewspaper.com ——— California State Parks is pausing its ef- forts to secure a long-term ferry operator between Tiburon and Angel Island after the state Lands Commission raised concerns about the contract — a move that suggests

current operator and Tiburon resident Capt. Maggie McDonogh may be making strides in her fght to retain the service. State Parks spokeswoman Gloria San- doval said Sept. 21 the agency will comply with a demand by the Lands Commission to suspend the formal bidding process intend- ed to award a 20-year contract for a ferry

operator to shuttle visitors between Tiburon and the island’s Ayala Cove. The pier, dock, moorings and other im- provements at Ayala Cove are on tide and submerged lands managed by the Lands Commission and leased to State Parks. The ———

See

Kids’ day at the Tiburon Challenger

The ——— See Kids’ day at the Tiburon Challenger learns that balance is important as he

learns that balance is important as he participates in the U.S. Tennis Associa- on Sept. 22 at the Tiburon Peninsula Club. The event, which - tive games, a chance to meet and talk to pros and a special ex- Challenger men’s pro tennis circuit tourna- ment. The tournament continues through this weekend at the club, with main-draw matches through tomorrow, Sept. 27; quarterfinal matches Sept. 28; semifinals Sept. 29; and finals visit tiburonchal- lenger.com.

ELLIOT KARLAN / FOR THE ARK

Country-style fair returns to Tiburon this weekend with Blackie’s Hay Day

dsmith@thearknewspaper.com ——— For the past several years, the annual Blackie’s Hay Day country-style fair has included the Blackie’s Bake-O f contest, in which kids 18 and younger can bake a sweet treat, with or without their parents’ help, and

have it judged by a panel that awards prizes to the standouts in each age group. Alicia Bell, the Belvedere-Tiburon Library’s children’s services librarian, is often one of those judges. It’s a job she enjoys — but one that also requires moderation, she says. ———

See

Tiburon settles lawsuit from 2012 police motorcycle crash for $200,000

mhose@thearknewspaper.com ——— Tiburon has agreed to a $200,000 set- tlement for a wrongful-injury lawsuit in which a former resident accused a police ofcer of negligently driving his motorcy- cle and crashing into her car in 2012.

Plainti f Cheryl Jordan’s case against the town was dismissed Sept. 19 as a result of the settlement, which will be covered by the town’s insurance policy with the Associa- tion of Bay Area Governments. The town won’t face any out-of-pocket payments this ———

See

Tiburon 7 | Belvedere 8 | Sports 10 | Education 11 | Police Logs 13 | ArkBeat 17 | Classifieds 19

Weekend Weather | H Friday 68° 59° | H Saturday 68° 55° | H Sunday 68° 53°

59° | H Saturday 68° 55° | H Sunday 68° 53° Recently Sold 108 Lyford Drive,

Recently Sold

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3 Beds | 4.5 Baths

Views of the Golden Gate Bridge, Downtown SF and open space

Views of the Golden Gate Bridge, Downtown SF and open space Sherry Ramzi 415.902.7344 sherry.ramzi@sothebysrealty.com

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2 S E P T E M B E R

26, 2018

thearknewspaper.com

KATHLEEN BRADY & BRYAN BEAVER

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Ranch Road in Corte Madera Listed for $11,500 per month PRIVATE COUNTRY OASIS IN CORTE MADERA!
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    SINCE NOVEMBER 15, 1972       415-435-2652 415-435-1190 Capt. Maggie,

 
 

SINCE

NOVEMBER

15,

1972

 
   

415-435-2652

415-435-1190

Capt. Maggie, family have long been of service to the community

Dear Mitchell Green, You are either a newcomer to Tiburon-Belvedere or you don’t learn or care about history (“Letters: Ferry captain has showed true colors,” Aug. 19, pg. 3). Capt. Maggie McDonogh took the business over from her father, a man that employed a lot of Tiburon teenagers to work the boats in the beginning when the railroad was still here and there was no way to get to the island. The island had been for sale but no one wanted to buy it because it did not have water or an easy way to get there. Then the California Department of Parks and Recre- ation took it over, and Mr. McDonogh created the way for schools and private people to enjoy the island. He worked hard, and it was a hard business to start. I as a teacher en- joyed the service for many years even before State Parks took the island over. I enjoyed the service for many classes, even for overnights with kindergarten children, and was

grateful for his kindness. That was before the public could stay on the island overnight. Then the railroad left in 1968, and it was very important for this peninsula to have a way to get out of Tiburon in case of an earthquake or any other disaster. Everyone in this town can tell you that the only person that got up in the middle of the night to ferry all the f refghters over to Angel Island when the island was on f re was the kind and helpful Maggie McDonogh. There was no other way, there was no Blue & Gold that would have come and been too late. What would the island have looked like if Maggie had not been here? Shame on you to even mention all the reasons for Maggie not keeping her business. Why do we have to put all the private businesses out of existence just for corporate proft? Before anyone that is so blind as you put it in the Ark letter, you should inform yourself better by talking to long- time Tiburon-Belvedere citizens. Maybe you’ll learn some- thing from the history, and it is an interesting one. — Annelies Atchley, Tiburon

5 p.m. Wednesday; camera-ready, noon Thursday

AMMI Publishing Co. Inc. Alison T. Gray and Arthur H. Kern Henriette Corn, hcorn@thearknewspaper.com Executive Editor Kevin Hessel, editor@thearknewspaper.com Emily Lavin, elavin@thearknewspaper.com Diana Goodman, calendar@thearknewspaper.com Leigh Pagan, lpagan@thearknewspaper.com Deirdre McCrohan, dmccrohan@thearknewspaper.com Matthew Hose, mhose@thearknewspaper.com Contributing writers Michelle Aschwald, Joan Bekins, Carol Benet, Marybeth Bond-Sheppard, Hillary Don, Gretchen Lang, Heather Lobdell, Diane Lynch, Ann Mizel, Rosine Reynolds, Cynthia Shaver, Diane Smith, Robin Scott Wray Elliot Karlan, Jocelyn Knight, Diane Smith The Ark is an adjudicated newspaper of general circulation by the Marin County Superior Court on Dec. 19, 1973, case No. 69007. Published and delivered by mail on Wednesdays. All rights reserved. Copyright © 2018 AMMI Publishing Co. Inc.

The Ark welcomes letters to the editor. They should be 350 words or fewer and submitted electroni- cally. The Ark reserves the right to edit all letters for clarity and will not knowingly publish those containing false or misleading informa- tion. Legally objectionable letters, those of a commercial nature or news announcements will be rejected. Letters should be sent only to The Ark, must be original, and they must include your f rst and last name as you are known in the community, your city of residence, occupation if relevant and a telephone number for verif cation. The deadline is noon on the Friday preceding Wednesday’s publication. Email your letter to editor@thearknewspaper.com or submit it online at thearknewspaper.com under the “Contact” tab.

The Ark (USPS012310) is published weekly on Wednesdays and is delivered by postal mail for $69.50 one year, $129.50 two years (outside the 94920, 94941 and 94925 ZIP code areas $84.50 one year, $154.50 two years) by AMMI Publishing Co. Inc., 1550 Tiburon Blvd., Ste. D, Tiburon, CA 94920. No refunds. Periodical postage paid at the Belvedere-Tiburon Post Office, Tiburon, CA 94920. Send address changes to The Ark, P.O. Box 1054, Tiburon, CA 94920.

Public meetings

Strawberry Recreation District board of directors: 7 tonight, Sept. 26, f rst-foor meeting room, Strawberry Rec- reation Center, 118 E. Strawberry Drive.

Southern Marin Fire Protection District board of directors: 7 tonight,

Sept. 26, Strawberry f re station, 308 Reed Blvd. Tiburon Planning Commission:

7:30 tonight, Sept. 26, council chambers, Tiburon Town Hall, 1505 Tiburon Blvd. Strawberry Design Review Board:

7:30 p.m. Oct. 1, f rst-foor meeting room, Strawberry Recreation Center, 118 E. Strawberry Drive.

Tiburon Town Council: 7:30 p.m. Oct. 3, council chambers, Tiburon Town Hall, 1505 Tiburon Blvd. Tiburon Design Review Board: 7 p.m. Oct. 4, council chambers, Tiburon Town Hall, 1505 Tiburon Blvd. Belvedere City Council: 6:30 p.m.

———

AMMI Publishing Co. Inc. reserves the right to relicense, re- produce, reprint and republish without compensation to the author and/or submitting party, all or any part of submitted works including, but not limited to, articles, letters, notices, artwork, images, photographs and advertisements submitted to The Ark. AMMI Publishing Co. Inc. shall have the absolute right to use the above-mentioned works in any form, in any medium and for any purpose whatsoever, including without limitation, any distribution, publication or use on the Internet, or any other written, electronic broadcast, or other use or distribution at all. Additionally, the works may be used in whole or in part in any medium that may be accessed by third parties.

See

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4 S E P T E M B E R

26, 2018

COLDWELL BANKER

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| TOP PENINSULA NEWS

5

cecilia abbott: 1945–2018

The Cove at Tiburon apartments wraps $50 mil luxury renovation

Strawberry woman fought for educational rights of special-needs students

ELLIOT KARLAN / FOR THE ARK

ELLIOT KARLAN / FOR THE ARK

dmccrohan@thearknewspaper.com ——— The Cove at Tiburon apartment complex is celebrating the unofcial

dmccrohan@thearknewspaper.com ——— Cecilia Vivian “Chita” Brun del Re Abbott, a prominent

fgure in Marin education circles in the 1980s and 1990s, died Sept. 14 after an 18-month battle with mesothelioma. She was 73. The Marin County School Ad- ministrators Association named the Strawberry resident its Citizen of the Year in 1989 in recognition of her active role in parent-teacher associations and as an advocate for the educational rights of chil- dren with special needs.

Mrs. Abbott was spurred by

associations and as an advocate for the educational rights of chil- dren with special needs. Mrs.

completion of a $50 million renovation

of

its 283 units, which began in 2014.

Ownership f rm Maximus Real Es- tate Partners, which bought the com- plex in 2013 for $138 million, threw a grand-opening party on Sept. 13, al- though the f nal improvements to the most pricey section of the complex, The Pointe at Cove, won’t be f nished until the end of October, according to Brandon Elliot, Maximus’ vice presi- dent of operations. The Cove apartments, as locals calls them, are a complex of some 32 build- ings on Salt Landing, Captain’s Land- ing, Seadrift Landing and Barbaree Way, four private streets that branch of Greenwood Cove Road in unincor- porated Tiburon, across Tiburon Bou- levard from The Cove Shopping Center. Maximus markets The Cove at

 

Abbott

 

her own experience as a mother. At age 1, her daughter Lauren had become deaf after con- tracting meningitis. Mrs. Abbott turned her attentions to advocating for her daughter and ensuring Lauren had ac- cess to all the educational opportunities available to other children. Mrs. Abbott chaired four major fundraisers for her children’s schools in Mill Valley and served as president of the Mill Valley Council of Parent-Teacher Associations and the Tamalpais High School Parent-Teacher Associa- tion. While on those boards, she served as representative of its health and welfare, community concerns and legisla- tion committees. In 1986, Mrs. Abbott organized and helped spearhead

———

Final touches are still in progress Sept. 20 at The Cove at Tiburon apartment complex as

Tiburon as a residential resort with the units as part of a “luxury community” with “resort-style living.” Before the renovation, apartments

three-bedroom units. Now, one- to three-bedroom apart- ments, which range in size from 595

there went for $1,900-$2,200 for a small one-bedroom unit and up to $4,800 for

square feet to 1,500 square feet, start at ———

See

Yacht club discovers bones during Regatta Center excavation

 

mhose@thearknewspaper.com ——— The San Francisco Yacht Club hit

See

CORRECTIONS

The Ark strives to be accurate, fair and complete in its coverage, and it is our policy to correct errors of fact and to clarify potentially confusing statements. Request corrections or clarif cations by contacting Executive Editor Kevin Hessel at editor@theark- newspaper.com or at 415-435-2652.

a snag during construction of its new

Regatta Center when contractors dis- covered small bone fragments while dig- ging out a pipe. As of The Ark’s Sept. 24 press dead- line, the Marin County Coroner’s Ofce had not yet confrmed whether the three bone fragments, discovered about 11:30 a.m. Sept 20, were human or animal re- mains. As part of its approval to build the

$6 million two-story, 6,805-square-foot Regatta Center at 98 Beach Road, the yacht club is required to work with an archaeological monitor. If any potential historic resources are found, work has to stop within the immediate vicinity of the fnd until ofcials have concluded whether they are historic. Ed Lynch, a spokesman for the yacht club, said the bones are likely not prehis- toric remains, as the area has been dug out previously to put in the sewerage line. “I would be very surprised to fnd out they’re human bones,” Lynch said.

Lynch said the project does not in- volve a large amount of excavation be- cause the yacht club will actually have to import soil to build the site up. The area where the yacht club sits is identifed as one of fve prehistoric shell mound sites in Belvedere, according to a 2009 historic resources study for the city. The study notes the 3-foot-tall Coast Miwok shell mound was discovered while ofcials were excavating for the Belvedere Hotel more than a century ago. Several artifacts from the mound were apparently stolen after being dis- covered, according to the study.

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6 S E P T E M B E R

26, 2018

thearknewspaper.com

THE ADDRESS IS MARIN COUNTY THE EXPERIENCE IS A IN PINEL BELVEDERE $4,995,000 BOLINAS $2,850,000
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from page 3

tion of the environmental impact report for the Tiburon Peninsula Club’s proposed junior tennis center and court lighting project at 1600 Mar West St. and vote on conditional use permit. for remainder of year.

Runners will hit the streets on Sunday for Tiburon Half Marathon

levard as runners pass between 7

———

Oct. 8, council chambers, Belvedere City Hall, 450 San Rafael Ave. Strawberry Recreation Dis- trict board of directors: 7 p.m. Oct. 9, f rst-foor meeting room, Strawberry Recreation Center, 118 E. Strawberry Drive. Tiburon Fire Protection Dis- trict board of directors: 6:30 p.m. Oct. 10, f re station 11, 1679 Tiburon Blvd. Tiburon Planning Commis- sion: 7:30 p.m. Oct. 10, council chambers, Tiburon Town Hall, 1505 Tiburon Blvd. Belvedere Planning Com- mission: 6:30 p.m. Oct. 16, council chambers, Belvedere City Hall, 450 San Rafael Ave.

Belvedere Planning Commission tentative agenda

Hundreds of runners will take to the streets and local bike path Sept. 30 for the ffth annual Tiburon Half Marathon, 10K & 5K. Staggered starts for the lollipop course begin with the half mara- thon at 7 a.m. from Juanita Lane at Tiburon Boulevard. The course takes runners up the Old Rail Trail and around the Strawberry Penin- sula — depending on the length of the race — and back to downtown Tiburon, ending at Beach Road ad- jacent to The Boardwalk Shopping Center. Road closures include:

Street and Tiburon Boulevard, from 6 to 11 a.m.

and 10 a.m.

Boulevard as runners pass between

along Shoreline Park from 6 to 8

7 and 10 a.m.

The Belvedere Planning Com- mission meets at 6:30 p.m. Oct. 16 in council chambers at Belvedere City Hall, 450 San Rafael Ave. The following items are on the tentative agenda:

conditional use permit and mitigated negative declaration for waterfront improvements at 121 Belvedere Ave. The proposal includes a new private pier, dock, boatlift, platform lift, access stairs, hillevator and above- grade deck. The pier is approximate- ly 876 square feet of new area over the water, is proposed in the middle of the home’s shoreline frontage and avoids natural rock outcroppings. Owner: David McClosky. exception to total foor area and ex- cess lot coverage variance applica- tions for a 404-square-foot addition, interior remodel and conversion of the existing carport into a garage

Registration for the race is open through Sept. 29. Entry fees are

a.m.

from the Paradise Drive round-

about to Mar West Street from 6 to 8 a.m.

$110 for the half-marathon, $55 for the 10K, $50 for the 5K and $30 for the kids’ half-mile. For more information, visit tibu-

- ronhalfmarathon.com.

sures for up to 10 minutes at a time

Proceeds from the race beneft The Painted Turtle camp and event

organizer Belvedere-Tiburon Recre-

Tiburon Planning Commission agenda

The Tiburon Planning Commis- sion meets at 7:30 tonight, Sept. 26, in

as runners pass about 7, 7:30 and 8 a.m.

- ation. — Deirdre McCrohan

 
 

council chambers at Tiburon Town Hall, 1505 Tiburon Blvd. The follow- ing items are on the agenda:

- struct a 600-square-foot, one-story building for storing McKegney Green maintenance equipment and materials behind the restrooms at 3 Brunini Way, south of Blackie’s Pas- ture.

Family biking event, student walk-and-roll day set for October

The town of Tiburon and in- structors from Marin County Bi- cycle Coalition’s Safe Routes to School program are sponsoring a free family biking event Oct. 6, just ahead of International Walk to

controlled environment — and go for an optional group bike ride. New riders will be able to learn how to handle their bicycles and develop their riding skills. All rid- ers will learn the rules of the road

own bicycles and wear helmets. Advance registration is encour- aged for the 11 a.m. group ride. For more information, visit arkn. ws/TibBike2018 or contact Peggy Clark at peggy@marinbike.org.

on the property located at 5 Golden

School Day Oct. 10, an event that encourages students to walk, bike or ride a scooter to class. At the biking event, set for 9:30 a.m.-noon in the rear parking lot of Tiburon Town Hall, families can participate in a bicycle rodeo skills course — taught by certi fed bicy- cle instructors and held in a safe,

and the importance of efective communication and proper equip- ment. Strider balance bikes will be available for kids ages 6-8 to practice balanced riding without pedals. All ages are welcome, but kids must be accompanied by a parent and all cyclists must bring their

The Oct. 6 biking event will be followed by International Walk to School Day on Oct. 10. The global event promotes phys- ical activity and raises awareness about the need for safer streets by asking students to take to the side- ———

meeting.

Gate Ave. Owners: James Mersfelder and Amy DeVincentis. exception to total foor area and vari-

ance for a 260-square-foot roof cover- ing at the rear patio on the property located at 313 San Rafael Ave. Own-

whether to recirculate the draft en- vironmental impact report for the Tiburon Peninsula Club’s proposed junior tennis center and court light- ing project at 1600 Mar West St.

- ers: John and Monique Adams.

See

 

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8

NEWS

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S E P T E M B E R

26, 2018

thearknewspaper.com

Richardson Bay waters closing to all boats, kayaks through March

The Richardson Bay Audubon Center and Sanctuary will close 900 acres of its sanctuary waters to motorized and human-powered watercraft, efective Oct. 1. The annual closure, which runs through March 31, 2019, protects tens of thousands of migrating birds that spend their winters in Richardson Bay, fattening up and conserv- ing energy. Even a single kayak paddling slowly through can fush hundreds of birds, ofcials say. The ban, mandated by the Richardson Bay Regional Agency, covers a roughly triangular area extending south

to the tip of Strawberry Point, east to Belvedere and north to Blackie’s Pasture. The boundaries are marked by buoys and permanent pilings, and the ban includes all watercraft, including kayaks and stand-up paddleboards. For more details about the sanctuary, visit richardsonbay.

audubon.org.

— Kevin Hessel

Chamber of Commerce mixer set for tonight at The Boardwalk

This month’s free Tiburon Peninsula Chamber of Com- merce mixer is set for 5:30-7 tonight, Sept. 26, at The Board- walk Shopping Center’s courtyard, at 1550 Tiburon Blvd. The event is hosted by the Boardwalk’s owner, Belvedere Land Co., and its property manager, Bayside Management. Also on hand will be the chamber’s new executive director, DeAnn Biss. The gathering of local business people will include hors d’oeuvres, wine, soda and mineral water and a business- card ra fe. Admission is typically $10 for chamber mem- bers, $15 for nonmembers but is free this month. For more information, visit tiburonchamber.org.

Biking, continued from page 7 ———

walks and bike paths when they set of for school. The local event is organized by the Tiburon task force of Safe Routes to School Marin County. Safe Routes is still f nalizing meeting times and routes; look for f nal details in the Oct. 3 edition of The Ark. Reed Elementary School students who want to continue biking after Oct. 10 can join the weekly Friday morning bike train, a convoy of students and adult escorts who meet at 7:45 a.m. on Old Rail Trail near Blackie’s statue and ride to- gether to the school. The bike train leaves at 8 a.m. — Deirdre McCrohan

Belvedere council opts against tough enforcement of public-land licenses

mhose@thearknewspaper.com ——— Despite passing stricter rules intended to stop residents from building garages and fences on city land, the Belve- dere City Council in two recent cases proved reluctant to reclaim public spaces that have already been closed of.

The council voted 4-0 at its Sept. 10 meeting to let a Bella Vista Avenue homeowner demolish and replace a dilapi- dated garage, part of which sits over the property line on public space.

It also decided not to make a Cli f Road homeowner tear

down a fence that lies on city property across more than 200 feet of the Bayview Avenue street frontage.

Councilmember Marty Winter was absent from the votes.

The two decisions shed light on how the council will interpret new rules concerning revocable licenses, which are licenses the city gives out that let residents use public spaces for things like driveway entries, walkways or land- scaping.

In exchange for receiving a license, the homeowner takes

on liability to maintain the improvements they make, and the city retains the right to reclaim its land at any point.

The council codi fed rule changes earlier this year that require there be some sort of public beneft when it grants the licenses. In making the changes, councilmembers also reiterated their distaste for seeing permanent structures built on city land, efectively privatizing the space. But, even as the council decided not to make the Bella Vista Avenue and the Cli f Road homeowners remove a ga- rage and a fence from public land, Mayor Bob McCaskill said moving forward he wants to form a process to begin

Some months ago this council decided that it was going to be a very rare occasion where

we would ever approve again … building on public land … and here we are getting ready to do it.”

— Mayor Bob McCaskill

leasing the land in those circumstances rather than giving it away for free. He said in an interview the issue would be a major topic of discussion at the city’s annual retreat Oct. 9. The f rst case the council heard concerned a project at 300 Bella Vista Ave., a property that slopes steeply down- ward from the street above. The $380,000 project from homeowners Denise and Steve Bauer would tear down a dilapidated 410-square-foot garage that lies on top of an accessory dwelling unit of the same size. The current structure is adjacent to the street and sits 14 feet, 5 inches over the property line. The garage and the second unit, which were built around the 1920s or ’30s, aren’t usable, according to a sta f report. Bauer said the garage doesn’t ft modern cars, and they have to leave their car sticking halfway out to park in it. The homeowners would then build a new garage and second unit of the same size, pushing the structure back about 3 feet. That means it would still be more than 11 feet over the property line. ———

See

Hear experts talk Lyme disease during benefit lunch in Belvedere

A panel of experts will discuss Lyme disease at a Bay

Area Lyme Foundation fundraising luncheon set for Oct. 11 at the Corinthian Yacht Club. The speakers at the luncheon, which runs from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., include Colorado State University re- searcher Dan Salkeld, chronic-illness expert Dr. Sunjya Schweig and Marin business owner and Lyme patient Kirsten Stein. ABC-7 news anchor Cheryl Jennings will serve as moderator.

Tickets are $125 per person or $1,000 for a table of eight. Sponsor tables, which include your name or f rm’s name on the goody bag, are $1,600. Proceeds from the event beneft Lyme disease research. For more information or to purchase tickets, visit bay- arealyme.org/events. The Belvedere yacht club is accessible via its Tiburon parking lot, at 43 Main St.

— Deirdre McCrohan

For sale by owner: Sold as is: $675,000 READY FOR SKI SEASON

For sale by owner: Sold as is: $675,000

READY FOR SKI SEASON

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9

Land, from previous page ———

Project architect Phoebe Holscher said it would be di fcult to move the garage back behind the property line on the steep lot without creating a massive structure, and

she noted there are numerous public benefts

to allowing the garage to stay on city land.

She said it would replace an outdated struc- ture with a new one that better matches the overall feel of the 19th-century home. Additionally, the new structure would allow for two parking spots inside the ga- rage along with three spots in the driveway, taking away the need to park on the street. McCaskill said he thought it was obvious the design was good and noted he didn’t want to force the homeowner to keep a ga- rage in poor condition because of the city’s new policy. “I don’t think there’s any question that this is a vast improvement that benefts neighbors, the city, everyone and something that we want to happen,” McCaskill said. But he noted the project presented a “per- fect storm” of troubling facts because of its timing relative to the city’s new rules.

“Some months ago this council decided that it was going to be a very rare occasion where we would ever approve again a ga- rage on city land … or build a building on public land,” McCaskill said. “So I think that certainly gave some of the councilmembers some heartburn that we no sooner agree we aren’t going to do something and here we are getting ready to do it.” He said the city should begin requiring people to sign leases for the property they are using for those structures. He said there’s precedent for that, as the city makes residents sign dock leases when they want

to use the city’s tide lots to build docks.

“There’s no logical explanation for why you treat (docks) one way and (garages) the other,” McCaskill said in an interview. Justin Faggioli, a former mayor and Golden Gate Avenue resident, said during

a public-comment portion of the hearing

the city doesn’t currently have a process for

leasing its land and that he thought it would be “capricious” to single out this project as a policy test without a process already being

in place.

Vice Mayor Nancy Kemnitzer agreed with that sentiment, saying the council should have more discussions about the issue but shouldn’t delay the project and force the homeowners to be the “guinea pig” for the city’s policy. She noted there were a substantial num- ber of public benefts in the application pre- sented. Councilmember James Campbell pointed out the structure has been there for almost a century.

“It’s sort of there,” Campbell said. “It is what it is.”

The second hearing, concerning a prop- erty at 2 Cli f Road, involves a fence that’s about 6 feet tall and lies across more than 200 feet of the street frontage on Bayview Avenue, above the home. In August, the new homeowner, listed only

as Cli f Partners LLC, went to the council to

ask for a change to the revocable license that

would allow them to convert a small part of the fence into a gate to access some new elec- trical equipment. The rest of the fence would have remained as it currently stands. However, during that August hearing, McCaskill wondered why the council should allow the fence to remain standing at all, noting it could be blocking views of the bay from the street. The council delayed further discussions on the project to gather more in- formation. Afterward, Elizabeth Suzuki, the architect for the homeowner, withdrew the request for the change to the revocable license, but the council held a hearing this month anyway to determine whether or not it should allow the fence to stay up. Suzuki said the homeowner bought the home thinking the fence was part of the property, and the fence is part of a larger pe- rimeter fencing around the home. “This has all just come quite out of the blue for him,” Suzuki said. San Rafael Avenue resident Harry Somer- feld said he saw “no compelling reason” for the fence to be removed and questioned why the council was discussing the issue at all. “I don’t understand why it’s before you, and it’s been there as long as I can remember and I don’t see any reason why it should be removed,” Somer feld said. McCaskill pointed out it made sense to talk about the fence, because the property recently changed hands and the new home- owner is going through a major $525,000 remodel on the home. “My view was that this was an appropri- ate time the city should enforce a rule,” Mc- Caskill said in an interview. But Campbell said he didn’t see a reason to ask the owner to remove the fence when they’re not proposing any changes to that part of the property. “I think it would be a strange precedent to ask them to remove it because they’re doing work on some other part of the house,” Campbell said. City sta f noted in a report before the Sep- tember meeting there is dense vegetation behind the fence that would likely need to be trimmed back to open up views if the fence was removed. Campbell added without views being opened up from removing the fence, he didn’t see what the beneft would be to the city in taking the fence down and putting more burden on Public Works to maintain the area. Kemnitzer said even if the fence remained in place, she wanted to send out a notice to the owner the fence and the land behind it are in a “serious state of disrepair,” creat- ing a f re hazard. She said the homeowner should be noti fed they are in violation of conditions of the license requiring mainte- nance of the area, and the situation should be recti fed. The council took no action on the revoca- ble license other than a f rming Kemnitzer’s assertions. McCaskill said in an interview although he wanted to see the fence come out, he was satisfed with Kemnitzer’s motion.

Reporter Matthew Hose covers the city of Belvedere, as well as crime, courts and public safety issues on the Tiburon Penin- sula. Reach him at 415-944-4627 and on Twitter at @matt_hose.

Friday

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MAIN

September 28

September 28

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10 NEWS

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S E P T E M B E R

26, 2018

thearknewspaper.com

Tiburon survivors to be featured in fashion benefit for breast cancer

Two Tiburon breast-cancer survivors will walk the runway Sept. 29 as part of the 23rd annual Stepping Out To Celebrate Life fun- draiser and fashion show to raise money for nonproft To Celebrate Life Breast Cancer Foundation’s Bay Area grants program. A 5:30 p.m. cocktail reception and silent auction at the Marin Center Exhibit Hall in San Rafael is followed by a 7 p.m. dinner and fashion show featuring 36 cancer-survivor models, plus a live auction and dancing with music by Vybe Society. Models will be escorted on the runway by local breast-cancer physicians. Among the models are Stef ney Crawford of Tiburon, who was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2016 and underwent chemotherapy, a double mastectomy and then radiation, reconstruc- tion and hormonal therapy to beat the dis- ease over the next eight months. Also modeling is Doreen Davis-Owen of Tiburon, who was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2017 and completed her treatment the same year. Working behind the scenes is Kathy Niggemen of Belvedere, who was f rst diag- nosed in October 2001 and who f rst modeled in 2002. As a volunteer, she has coordinated the doctor escorts, helped organize the live auction and twice co-chaired the event. Martha Auld of Tiburon was diagnosed with breast cancer in September 1996 and ovarian cancer in 2012. Last year, Auld received the foundation’s f rst Lifetime Achievement Award for service. She’s been a

ELLIOT KARLAN / FOR THE ARK - tions on the Tiburon Peninsula.

ELLIOT KARLAN / FOR THE ARK

- tions on the Tiburon Peninsula.

volunteer for more than 18 years, has served on the board of directors and has been the foundation treasurer. The foundation was formed by Tiburon event producer Brenda “BB” Bernheim and nine breast-cancer survivors — including

Belvedere’s Janice Still and Tiburon’s Kath- ryn Servino — who then organized a com- mittee and produced the f rst fashion show in 1996. The foundation has since raised and granted more than $5 million to fund emer- gency and direct services and f nancial as-

sistance for breast-cancer patients. Tickets for the Stepping Out beneft are $275, and there are opportunities to sponsor model walks on the runway. For more infor- mation visit tocelebratelife.org/stepping-out. — Kevin Hessel

visit tocelebratelife.org/stepping-out. — Kevin Hessel SCOTT BEAUCHAMP - - St. Hilary CYO kicks off

SCOTT BEAUCHAMP

- -

St. Hilary CYO kicks off volleyball season with memorial tournament

St. Hilary CYO volleyball started its fall season with the second annual Tori LaRoc- ca Memorial Volleyball Tournament, honor- ing the former St. Hilary School student and Corte Madera teen who died in June 2017 after falling more than 300 feet of a cli f

while hiking at Land’s End in San Francisco. Eleven of the 14 teams in the league, which serves girls in grades 5-8, participated in the intramural tournament, held Sept. 8 at St. ———

See

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from previous page ———

Hilary School. The tournament led into the f rst games of the season, which were held Sept. 9. LaRocca played volleyball at St. Hil- ary and at St. Ignatius College Prep in San Francisco, the high school the then- 17-year-old was attending when she died, said Scott Beauchamp, St. Hilary volley- ball director. The tournament included a 15-min- ute memorial to LaRocca, during which LaRocca’s father, Nick, spoke about his late daughter, Beauchamp said.

Though the girls currently playing in the CYO league didn’t know Tori LaRoc- ca, Beauchamp said, they’ve come to un- derstand her passion for volleyball and the positive impact she had on her friends and family.

A common refrain, Beauchamp said,

is: “Play like Tori. Play with heart. Play

with passion.”

“I think the girls realize the reason

we’re memorializing her is because she was special and was one of those players they should all aspire to be,” Beauchamp said.

The teams, which come up with their own names for the tournament, scrim- mage each other in bracket play, leading to a f nal match, Beauchamp said. The division winners included the f fth-grade Arctic Blobfsh, the sixth- grade Purple Turnips, the seventh-grade Pucketeers and the eighth-grade Seniors. — Emily Lavin

Sampling sour suds - ples Sour Wench, a tart black- Sept. 22 during the Tiburon

Sampling sour suds

- ples Sour Wench, a tart black- Sept. 22 during the Tiburon Taps Beer Festival in Shoreline Park. Event admission included - staples Sierra Nevada and La- and Australia’s Little Creatures Tiburon Recreation’s scholar- seniors.

ELLIOT KARLAN / FOR THE ARK

Two Tiburon students named merit scholarship semifinalists

At least two local teens are among the semi f nalists for a National Merit Scholar- ship. Redwood High School seniors Greg Dachtler and Lex Von Klark, both of Tiburon, are among the 16,000 teens na- tionwide who are still in the running for the

scholarship program. Students qualify based on their scores on the PSAT, a standardized test they take during their junior year. To become a semi f nalist, entrants must have a consistently high academic record, obtain a letter of recommendation, write an essay and earn SAT scores that con f rm

their performance on the PSAT. About 90 percent of semi f nalists will become f nalists for the 7,500 scholarships, worth more than $32 million. Those f nalists will be announced in February, with win- ning merit scholars named March through June. — Deirdre McCrohan

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12 S E P T E M B E R

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Tiburon police log

U up? 12:48 a.m. Sept. 12, a Turtle

Rock Court caller reported receiving three phone calls from an unknown person who said they were with an air-duct company. The caller thought

it was strange and that they might be

calling to see whether the caller was home. Advice was given. Shhh: 6 a.m. Sept. 13, a St. Gabri- elle Court caller reported hearing what sounded like two people talking quietly and clipping something in the yard next to him. The caller thought they might be trying to start a f re and wanted of- fcers to check the area. O fcers were unable to locate anyone in the area. Sign pollution: 9:49 a.m. Sept. 13,

a Comstock Drive caller was upset a construction company had placed a sign on the street in front of her home and wanted to speak to an ofcer about having the sign moved. O fcers de- termined Public Works had already spoken with the caller and advised her nothing could be done. The caller did not need any further police help. Curses! 12:31 p.m. Sept. 13, a Tiburon Boulevard caller reported a man in a brown work jacket was sitting on a bench yelling obscenities. O fcers contacted and identi fed the man, who moved along from the area. Fender bender: 7:40 a.m. Sept. 14,

a Tiburon Boulevard caller reported seeing a two-car accident near a gas

station, possibly with injuries. O fcers determined the cars had been moved out of the roadway, and there were no injuries. The California Highway Patrol took over the scene. Crouching tiger, hidden intrud- er: 10:04 a.m. Sept. 14, a Circle Drive caller reported looking at her home- security cameras and seeing someone

in the house who looked like they were

crouching on the ground. The caller thought the person came in through the front door and said it looked like someone had opened the closet door in the front hallway. O fcers checked the home. There were no signs of entry or a crime, and it was unknown what acti- vated the camera. Fuming: 2:57 p.m. Sept. 14, a Del

disaster preparedness tip

Have a “go bag” near an exit or in your car including personal items like medications you would need should you have to evacu- ate and be away from home for a period of time. — Laurie Nilsen, Tiburon-Belvedere emer- gency services coordinator. Get more tips and training at getready94920.org.

Mar Drive caller reported someone was using a gas-powered leaf blower. O f-

cers contacted a gardener using the leaf blower and advised him of a municipal code banning the devices. Bomb the hill: 4:45 p.m. Sept. 14,

a Gilmartin Court caller reported four juveniles were skateboarding down

a hill at the end of Gilmartin Drive

without helmets. O fcers contacted a group. The ofcers did not witness any skateboarding, but the juveniles were admonished. In tongues: 7 p.m. Sept. 14, a Marsh Road caller reported a man who had been camping in some bushes wouldn’t leave the area, and he was screaming and speaking in gibberish. O fcers contacted the man and determined he had not committed a crime. He was warned on his behavior and given a courtesy ride to the highway. Just keep spinning: 8:26 p.m. Sept. 14, a Mar West Street caller re- ported two trucks were doing donuts in

a parking lot, almost hitting the caller’s

car. The caller was concerned because kids would likely be coming out of a club nearby. O fcers were unable to lo- cate the trucks. The horror, the horror: 2:05 p.m. Sept. 15, an Acacia Drive caller request- ed an ofcer speak to a resident who takes her trash cans out on Thursday for Monday’s pickup. The caller said there had been an ordinance put in place to ban that activity. O fcers con- tacted the subject, who said it wouldn’t happen again after that week’s pickup. Bad cocktail: 8:57 p.m. Sept. 15,

a caller in Tiburon reported several people were inside his residence harass- ing him. O fcers determined it sounded like the subject had been mixing medi- cations and alcohol, and the caller ad-

mitted to having delusions. A little bit softer now: 10:32 p.m. Sept. 15, a Tiburon Boulevard caller reported a party with ampli fed music had been going on for the previous few hours on Gilmartin Drive. O fcers ad- vised the homeowner of the complaint, and he said he would quiet it down. Hates math: 9:15 a.m. Sept. 16, a Vistazo West Street caller reported an unknown person overnight destroyed a sign at the entrance to her condomini- um that showed the numbers for her address. A report was taken. In heat: 1:17 p.m. Sept. 16, a Main Street caller reported a dog was pant- ing inside a car that had its windows rolled up in the full sun. O fcers were able to enter the car and help the dog, and the owner and Marin Humane were contacted. Fled the scene: 2:19 p.m. Sept. 16, a bicyclist on Tiburon Boulevard re- ported a driver swerved into the bike lane and swiped the caller, then put his hands up and drove away. The caller did not want medical attention. O fcers left a voicemail for the caller. On the lam: 7:49 p.m. Sept. 16, an Audrey Court caller reported getting home to f nd a neighbor’s two un- leashed dogs barking outside. O fcers found the two dogs running around the area. Marin Humane was called, and a report was taken. Played yourself: 8:03 a.m. Sept. 18 a Paradise Drive caller had gotten a quote from a person he had hired to f x his deck, but then the man started try- ing to charge more money. The caller reported he received a text message the previous night from the worker written in Spanish and was not intended for him saying the worker was pushing for the caller to pay more money. The caller felt he couldn’t trust the employee and wanted a civil standby to f re him. Of- fcers helped with a civil standby, and the employee was terminated. Locked out: 8:16 p.m. Sept. 18, a woman came into the Tiburon Police Department to report her husband had locked her and their infant out of their

———

See

Marin Transit director to talk tax renewal Oct. 4 in Tiburon

The Marin County Commission on Aging is sponsoring a free community education forum, “Making Sense of Transportation Taxes on the Ballot,” at 10 a.m. Oct. 4 in council chambers at Tiburon Town Hall, 1505 Tiburon Blvd. Dianne Steinhauser, the executive di- rector of the Transportation Authority

of Marin, is scheduled to speak at the forum. On Election Day, Nov. 6, Marin vot- ers will decide whether to approve Mea- sure AA, a renewal of a half-cent sales tax that currently generates about $27 million annually for transportation and transit programs. Steinhauser will talk about those programs.

The commission’s regular monthly meeting follows at 11:15 a.m. For more information, contact the county of Marin’s Aging and Adult Services ofce at 415-473-7118. To learn more about the commission or upcoming events, visit marinhhs.org/ boards/commission-aging. — Deirdre McCrohan

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14 NEWS

|

S E P T E M B E R

26, 2018

thearknewspaper.com

Reports, continued from page 13

———

room after the couple had argued. O fcers determined the fght was not physical, and when they used a key to get into the room the man was not inside. A report was taken.

Belvedere police log

Whoops: 10:59 a.m. Sept. 12, a Madrona Avenue caller reported an older driver hit the caller’s car, damaging the right rear side, and left the scene. O fcers determined the sub-

ject did not realize they hit the caller’s car. A report was taken. Gurgle gurgle: 5:28 a.m. Sept. 13, a Ma- drona Avenue caller reported white noise coming from some outdoor speakers at a neighbor’s house. O fcers determined the noise was from a water feature that sounds like white noise. They noted they would have day-shift ofcers contact the residents about securing the water at night. Let it fy: 10:42 a.m. Sept. 14, a Madrona Avenue caller reported someone was in- tentionally blowing dirt on the back of the caller’s fence. O fcers determined there was nobody working at the fence line, and they were unable to locate any issue. Fooling with the fag: 6:59 p.m. Sept. 14,

a Teal Road caller reported about two weeks earlier someone had bent a fag holder mount- ed on her garage, and then several days later

a diferent fag on her property was tampered

with. The caller thought she knew who did

it but didn’t have any proof. O fcers deter-

mined the only visible damage was a tab torn of an American fag. The caller did not request anything other than documentation. Loud hounds: 7:31 p.m. Sept. 14, a West Shore Road caller reported two dogs had been

barking for an hour. O fcers noted dogs were barking throughout the time they were on-

scene, but they could not contact the owners.

A voicemail and a business card were left. Oh, deer: 10:54 p.m. Sept. 14, an Oak Av-

enue caller reported there was a large buck

in the driveway, and two girls were afraid it

would charge at their car. O fcers were able

to get the deer to move along without inci-

dent. Hot lava: 12:14 a.m. Sept. 17, a Belvedere Avenue caller reported there were people with a torch light on the vacant Lava House property. O fcers did not f nd any people but located a small, enclosed campf re on the cement deck at the property. They extin- guished it, and there was no smoke and no heat at the time of their departure. Shower time: 4:20 p.m. Sept. 18, a Bel- vedere Avenue caller reported a grill had set of their sprinkler system, and they couldn’t turn the water of. Assistance was rendered.

Scream therapy: 9:19 p.m. Sept. 12, a Paradise Drive caller reported hearing shout- ing from a man who was possibly walking down Paradise Drive. The caller thought the man might be drunk or mentally unstable.

Deputies contacted a representative of a sci- ence center, who said a woman had brought

a man there to wander around and yell be-

cause he had some issues. The representative wanted them to be given a trespassing warn- ing. Deputies checked the area and contacted the woman, who was given a trespassing warning. Not what it looks like: 9:53 p.m. Sept. 13, a Redwood Highway frontage road caller reported seeing two people trying to open

a car door with a coat hanger, one of whom

had a hood on his head and was holding a fashlight. Deputies contacted the subjects and determined one of them owned the car, and they had locked the keys inside. They did not request any assistance. Phantom f ght: 10:21 p.m. Sept. 13,

a Barbaree Way caller reported hearing

what sounded like a physical altercation in

an apartment below hers. The caller said it kept escalating until the caller banged on the wall, after which the neighbors closed the doors and went inside. Deputies spoke

to people in two units below the caller. Each

unit was occupied by a man who was alone, and neither one of them had heard any yell-

ing. The caller said she would call back if she heard anything again. Thanks but no thanks: 10:24 a.m. Sept. 14, a Carlotta Circle caller reported she thought someone had possibly stolen her identity, as she kept getting packages from Amazon with her name and address, though she did not order them. The caller said the credit card used for the purchases was not hers and was not opened under her Social Security number. The caller was advised

to notify Amazon of the activity and to call

them back if she located fraudulent accounts

on her credit report.

Carried away: 1:36 p.m. Sept. 15, a South Knoll Road caller reported somebody stole her car’s front license plate. A report was taken. For free? 6:46 p.m. Sept. 16, a North Knoll Road caller reported a piece of furni- ture worth $300 was taken from outside their apartment door. Deputies determined the property had been abandoned in the hallway, and it was returned by a neighbor. From the creators of the Millennium Tower: 2:30 p.m. Sept. 17, a Great Circle Drive

caller reported some glass panels on the side of his house had been smashed sometime over the weekend. Deputies determined the damage was not vandalism, and the caller thought it might be a structural issue. Cut down: 7:27 p.m. Sept. 18, a Captain’s Landing caller reported between 4 and 6 that afternoon someone cut a cable lock and stole

a $1,700 women’s bike hanging from some

rafters in the caller’s carport. A report was taken.

Leaky light: 9:37 a.m. Sept. 16, person- nel responded to a report of water leaking around a ceiling light on Leeward Road. On arrival, crews shut the water of at the meter and isolated electrical issues at a subpanel. The resident was advised to contact a repair service. Short-circuit: 12:08 p.m. Sept. 18, a

Tiburon Boulevard caller reported an electri- cal issue in which they could smell burning near a panel on a wall. Crews determined

it was an electrical short. The breaker was

shut of, and an electrician was en route to the scene.

Struck a line: 9:35 a.m. Sept. 14, a Bel- vedere Drive caller reported a construction crew hit a half-inch gas line, causing a small leak. The street was shut down to tra fc, and Paci fc Gas and Electric Co. crews took over the scene.

Compiled by Matthew Hose. Police & Fire Reports includes items of note from public records and does not ref ect all activity. Noth- ing in these reports should be construed as a f nding of guilt.

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| NEWS

15

Sausalito News, Sept. 28, 1918

50th Anniversary

A notable gathering of the Masonic frater- nity will meet here the evening of October 15th to attend the f ftieth anniversary of Marin Lodge No. 191, F. & A. M. Freemasonry is the largest fraternal order in the world, with the original guild re- stricted to stonecutters. Sixteen freemasons organized to help improve themselves and the city of San Rafael in 1868 and formed the 191st Masonic lodge in California. Opposition to freemasonry comes from either religious or political reasons. The Roman Catholic Church has banned Catho- lics from membership of freemasonry. One of the persistent Catholic criticisms is that freemasonry advocates a naturalist view of creation. The tenet of free trade is one of the political aspects of freemasons that elicits political opposition. The element of secrecy in the organization is a common cause of opposition. As its charter was granted on Oct. 15, 1868, Lodge 191 is approaching its 150th anniversary on Oct. 15, 2018.

Bullock Touched

Conductor Edward Bullock of the electric

service on the Northwestern Paci fc Rail- road, was standing in the doorway of his home in San Rafael at an early hour last Thursday evening. when a stranger ap- proached him in a very plausable (sic) and pleasing manner and engaged him in conver- sation and was f nally invited into the house. He passed through one of the bedrooms and upon his return to the front door after an absence of some minutes, resumed his con- versation with Mr. Bullock, discussed the war and congratulated Mr. Bullock on being a war veteran like himself. He bid Mr. Bull- ock good night and disappeared down the street. Mrs. Bullock on going into the bed- room discovered that a diamond ring valued at $100 and several other pieces of jewelry were missing. The thief is still at large.

Over a hundred runners have entered the Fourteenth Annual Dipsea race of the Olym- pic Club of San Francisco from Mill Valley to Stinson beach tomorrow, Sunday forenoon. The f rst seventy-fve runners to f nish will receive the silver Dipsea pin given by the Olympic club. In addition, there are fourteen other prizes to be awarded. All contestants will take the 8:15 a.m. boat

from San Francisco, making connections with the Mill Valley train. An excellent program with plenty of ex- cellent talent will be given by the Olympians at Stinson Beach in the afternoon. David Sullivan of Sausalito is one of the commit- teemen. The 14th Dipsea race was won by a dark horse, 20-year-old Percy Gilbert, with a time of 56 minutes, 56 seconds. A newspaper heading the evening before the race read:

“The Kaiser cannot stop the Dipsea Indi- ans.” The f rst Dipsea Cross Country Race organized under the auspices of the Dipsea Indians of the Olympic Club was held on Sunday, Nov. 19, 1905, from Mill Valley to Dipsea by the Sea, actually Stinson Beach. At that time, of cers of the Dipsea Indians included Grand Chief T.L. Fitzpatrick and Chief Robert McArthur. This information is taken from the program of the f rst Dip- sea Race on page 1 of Barry Spitz’s 1993 book “Dipsea: The Greatest Race.” The race, and most subsequent ones, were received enthusiastically by the news- papers and citizens of the Bay Area, being hailed as a monumental run over an excit- ing and outstandingly attractive course.

Women could not participate, as the American Athletic Union banned women from competing in long-distance races until 1971 because it was thought to be injuri- ous to women’s health, particularly to their reproductive organs. When the ban was lifted, Fran Conley became the f rst of cial female f nisher of the 61st Dipsea race in 1971, with a time of 1 hour, 1 minute and 18 seconds, only 15 minutes behind the best men’s time.

In compliance with the notice sent by Dis-

trict Attorney Butler, Tiburon, El Campo, Homestead, Manzanita and Pine Station are dry as they are within the fve mile zone af (sic) a milntary (sic) reservation. … Many of the saloon men anticipating this order, disposed of most of their goods. On Monday night, liquor wakes were held in some of the Tiburon saloons.

Contributor Hillary Don, a Tiburon-Belve- dere historian, began writing this column May 7, 1992 — and he hopes to one day include history from his birth year, 1932. Contact him at hdon@thearknewspaper. com.

Abbott, continued from page 5 ———

the Marin County coalition for the California Movement for Educational Reform, a state- wide group that lobbied state legislators to provide more money for public education. In 1989, she was named to the Marin County Child, Adolescent and Parent Health board. When Mrs. Abbott was named Citizen of the Year, Mill Valley School District Super- intendent Pat McDonough said in an Ark interview: “In the years I have known Chita as a parent volunteer, she has directly moti- vated and inspired other parents to dedicate time and efort in both leadership roles and smaller commitments to better the Mill Val- ley School District, Marin County and the state. “Her dedication to school state funding has inspired others to stay focused on the larger issues,” McDonogh said. “Cecilia Ab- bott’s strongest commitment is for quality and equal education for all children in the state of California.”

Mrs. Abbott also campaigned for Mill Valley’s Measure C parcel tax to provide more money for Mill Valley schools. She was born April 3, 1945, to Italian im- migrants in the Little Italy neighborhood of Baltimore. She was named the Maryland representa- tive in the 1962 Miss High School America pageant before earning a bachelor’s in ap- plied science and completing her registered- nurse training at the University of Maryland at College Park. She then moved to Wash- ington, D.C., to become a surgical nurse at George Washington University Hospital, where she met her husband of 47 years, Rich- ard L. Abbott, who was in medical school. Married on the rim of the Grand Canyon, the two started their careers in Los Angeles and then moved to Gallup, N.M., to work for the Indian Public Health Service, which had put out a call for nurses and doctors on the Navajo Nation reservation. After two years there, they moved to San Francisco. Her husband returned to the East Coast for further training, but they moved

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back to the Bay Area and bought a house in Strawberry in 1978. Mrs. Abbott had two professional careers following her early nursing career. For 25 years, she was a wardrobe stylist for Doncaster Designs at Tanner Compa- nies. She had a studio in her home, where she did client fttings. She also owned and operated a 55-bed facility, St. Raphael’s Home in Berkeley, for those with Alzheimer’s and dementia. In Strawberry, she raised funds for im- proved lighting and landscaping. She served on the board of The Redwoods senior com- munity in Mill Valley from 1994 to 2000. She was an early advocate of organic foods and sound nutrition, as well as a chemical-free environment, which became her passion. She was active in the Marin County chapter of the World Organization for Reha- bilitation and Training, a nonproft Jewish organization that promotes education and training globally. Despite having been raised with di ferent

religious traditions — she was raised as a Catholic and her husband Jewish — she shared with her husband an open-minded- ness and ecumenical philosophy about the world. “If you asked Chita about religion, she

would say, ‘Really, I’m everything,’” Richard Abbott said. “She was beautiful and graceful, inside and out,” he said. In addition to her husband, Richard Ab- bott of Strawberry, and daughter Lauren Maucere of Burbank, Mrs. Abbott is sur- vived by son Galen Abbott of San Francisco, daughter Alison Chassin of Amsterdam and her fve grandchildren, Daniela, Gianni, Elle, Ethan and Andrew.

A celebration of her life is planned for late

October. Donations in her memory may be sent to the Cecilia B. Abbott Environmen- tal Fund, established by her family to con- tinue advocating for healthy living through organic foods and a chemical-free environ- ment, via gofundme.com/cecilia-b-abbott- environmental-fund.

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16 NEWS

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S E P T E M B E R

26, 2018

thearknewspaper.com

Blackie’s, continued from page 1 ———

“Everything is always so good, I forget how many entries there are and start out by taking big bites,” she says. “But by the end of the judging, I start to feel sick from all the sugar and take smaller and smaller bites. It happens every year.” The bake-of is just one of a slew of family-friendly activi- ties to enjoy at the 13th annual fair, which runs from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., with early VIP admission at 9 a.m., on Sept. 29 at Blackie’s Pasture in Tiburon. This year’s event will also have carnival games, a petting zoo, bounce houses, extreme air bungee, T-ball and a rock-climbing wall, as well as pony rides, crafts and gold mining. For the youngest fairgoers, there’s Tot Town, with a card- board jail, hotel, bank, barn and Old St. Hilary’s Landmark, and a “quiet room” where the children can go to escape the commotion and listen to stories read by Bell. Anyone who wishes to enter the bake-of must bring their entries to the judges by 10:30 a.m. on the day of the fair. On-stage entertainment scheduled for the day-long festival includes Mr. Horsefeathers, a clown with comedy, magic and juggling, and the popular Fur, Scales and Tails Animal Show,

if you go

Blackie’s Hay Day runs 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sept. 29 at Blackie’s Pas- ture in Tiburon. Parking in the surrounding neighborhoods is free but limited, and walking and biking is encouraged. There will be a secured bike valet on the premises. $15 per person, free for ages 2 and younger. Activity tickets are $1 each or $50 for an unlimited activity bracelet. Gen- eral admission and activity tickets will be available at the event entrance. blackieshayday.org.

a watch-and-touch show with all sorts of live critters. Also performing are DJ JD and Young Performers International. A variety of food will be available for purchase, including snow cones, ice cream and pizza, as well as soft drinks. For the adults, there will be a wine and beer booth. Blackie’s Hay Day is hosted by Bookmarks, an auxiliary of the Belvedere-Tiburon Library Foundation, with proceeds from the event going toward the library’s children’s and teen programs and services. When the f rst Hay Day was held 13 years ago, Bookmarks was brand new and largely comprised a group of mothers with young children who wanted to help the local library

move from its small, one-room building next to the local post ofce to a larger facility. After the current library was built, Bookmarks turned its focus to raising funds for children’s and teen programs. In addition to Blackie’s Hay Day, which now typically at- tracts about 2,500 people from across Marin County, Book- marks holds two other annual fundraisers: February’s Teddy Bear Tea party and a wreath auction in December. Of the three fundraisers, Blackie’s Hay Day is by far the most extravagant, requiring more than 250 volunteers and 15 special committees that operate under the direction of this year’s event co-chairs, Pam Goldman, Karen Ripenburg, Whitney Lee and Emilie Trimble. Those volunteers include current and former Bookmarks members as well as community residents, parents and grand- parents. Also volunteering are teens who loved Hay Day as young kids and now want to help it continue. “This is our biggest fundraiser of the year,” Goldman says, “but, in our eyes, it’s also a great community-building event.”

Diane Smith has been contributing to The Ark since 1980, writing and taking photos on everything from personalities to events.

Renovation, continued from page 5 ———

$3,120 for a one-bedroom, $4,480 for a two- bed and $7,065 for a three-bedroom unit. Rent is $16,000 per month for the exclusive four-bedroom, 2,610-square-foot unit atop The Pointe. That compares with an average San Fran- cisco one-bedroom renting for $3,261, two- bedroom for $4,377 and three-bedroom for $5,142, according to real-estate tracker Yardi Matrix. Keverne Denahan, 54, was among the residents ofered by Maximus to speak with media. She moved into one of the renovated two- bedroom units with her husband and dog in May 2017 after years in San Francisco. They wanted to live in Tiburon, she said, and The Cove — which features a private marina with 50 slips — was the f rst hit on the Google search. “I was in the city a really long time, and the city has changed,” Denahan said. “I wanted a healthier lifestyle and a quieter environment. I liked the marina because we have a sailboat.” She declined to say how much her rent is, but said the rent for this type of unit in the complex is $5,000. “It’s the smartest thing we’ve ever done,” she said. “You get more amenities here. I like amenities.”

Few stayed through renovation

Of the nearly 300 units, however, Elliot said just 10-15 of the tenants under lease be- fore the renovation still live at the complex. Maximus was willing to connect The Ark with just one of them, 70-year-old Fred Fox. After going through a divorce 14 years ago, he moved downhill from the Tiburon Highlands subdivision on Upper Cecilia Way just across Tiburon Boulevard, where he had lived for 10 years. When he f rst moved into The Cove, Fox’s rent was $2,200. By the time renovations began, rent had risen to $2,800. Rents for units like his now go for about $5,000 per month. “It’s a lot of money but, for now, consid- ering the market, I’m getting value for the money,” he said. Fox’s apartment is right on the water. He says he likes the fact that, as a cyclist, he can ride right out the door to Greenwood Cove Road and to Blackie’s Pasture and Old Rail Trail.

Cove Road and to Blackie’s Pasture and Old Rail Trail. ELLIOT KARLAN / FOR THE ARK

ELLIOT KARLAN / FOR THE ARK

A renovated dining and living room are seen Sept. 20 at The Cove at Tiburon apartment complex.

He says he likes the feeling that he’s liv- ing at a resort. There’s free use of kayaks and paddleboards, swimming pools, a gym, an exercise room and several lounge areas, while a full-time activities director manages events and classes for adults and kids and a dedicated sailboat and captain can be char- tered by residents. Though Fox was one of the few to stay, many more left, either evicted or priced out of the market.

‘I decided not to stay’

In the years leading up to the renovation, families who were not able to a ford a home in Tiburon enjoyed The Cove complex be- cause the units are in the Reed Union School District, close to Bel Aire Elementary School, and kids living there could ride their bicycles to school, the store and Strawberry Recre- ation Center. Seniors liked them because they didn’t have to deal with maintenance issues and because they could walk or drive easily to The Cove Shopping Center or Blackie’s Pasture. Still others liked them because the complex is close to Highway 101 and ofers a quick drive to San Francisco. When the renovation was f rst announced in 2013, Maximus’ property manager, Sutro Management Group, began mailing out evic- tion notices. Other tenants were ofered tem- porary accommodations in the newly vacant units while the work on theirs was going on. Many alerted The Ark at the time, but most didn’t want their names or identifying

information — including their rent — to be published. Tenants, particularly those with children in the Reed district, worried about where they could live and stay in the school dis- trict. Some were worried about whether they would be able to a ford the new rents, which they were told would be brought up to mar- ket rates. Maximus ofered some residents who couldn’t a ford to stay the opportunity to move to its Serenity at Larkspur complex near the Larkspur Ferry Terminal — out of the local school district. “I decided not to stay,” said former Tiburon Mayor Joan Bergsund, who moved to The Cove for several years after moving back to the Tiburon Peninsula after a period in So- nora. “I left because I didn’t want to go through the chaos of moving in and out, and because the rents were going to be so high,” she said. “I also didn’t like the way the property was being managed.” Bergsund says she’s now happy in her apartment in Belvedere. Tenant Dean Myers didn’t stay, either. “The construction noise was so bad from the renovations, and then I learned what my rent was going to be after my unit was ready, which I couldn’t a ford.” He moved to a smaller apartment in Green- brae before retiring to Redondo Beach in Southern California. “It was very sad for people who had been there for so long,” Myers said of the renova-

tion evictions and rent spikes. “It was all about the bottom line. There was no compas- sion.” Another longtime tenant, Terry Graham, protested back in 2013 about how shabbily the new ownership company treated the longtime tenants, especially some of the el- derly, in the period leading up to the start of renovations. Disabled herself, she agreed to move temporarily to another unit, but the management company moved her to a unit with stairs and other accessibility problems. The Ark was unable to reach her for this report, but Myers said he appeared as a wit- ness in her court case against Maximus over disability access, which he said she won.

Elliott, however, said his company is proud of how they handled the transition. “We worked very hard to maintain great relationships with tenants through the con- struction phase,” he said. And the renovations weren’t minor. Elliot noted Maximus made major improvements to the buildings, infrastructure and facilities at The Cove over 10 phases, including:

- tems. hardwood foors, stainless-steel kitchen ap- pliances and in-unit washers and dryers. paned windows throughout. which also houses the leasing ofce. Further, the 11 luxury residences in The Pointe at Cove section boast waterfront loca- tions on the Richardson Bay Audubon Sanc- tuary, with a private beach, views of the city and Richardson Bay, outdoor f replaces and overhead heat lamps on the balconies. “(The Cove) was a diamond in the rough when we acquired it, but we immediately saw the potential of the location and the opportunity to imagine what The Cove at Tiburon could become,” Elliott said. “We be- lieve we have created something very special that captures the best of living in Marin.”

Deirdre McCrohan has reported on Tiburon local government and community issues for

more than 30 years. Reach her at 415-944-

4634.

SEAN HAGWELL discuss memoir The Dominican University Leadership Lecture Series will host Sally Field to
SEAN HAGWELL
discuss memoir
The Dominican University Leadership Lecture Series
will host Sally Field to talk about her memoir, “In Pieces,”
at 1 p.m. Sept. 29 at Angelico Hall, 50 Acacia Ave., San
Rafael. In the book, Field talks about her abusive child-
hood, the escape she found as an actress and her career
of more than 50 years, from TV’s “Gidget” to her on- and
of-screen relationship with Burt Reynolds and her work
in comedies such as “Mrs. Doubt f re” and “Soapish” and
dramas “Norma Rae” and “Places in the Heart,” for which
she won Oscars. Tickets are $40 and include a signed
copy of the book. Info: 415-927-0960 or bookpassage.com.
The last of the summer’s free Friday Nights on Main
street events will run from 6 to 9 p.m. Sept. 28. The eve-
ning’s theme is the Firefghters’ Dance, sponsored by
the Tiburon Volunteer Fire Department. Main Street in
Tiburon will be shut down to auto tra fc to allow for al
fresco dining, mingling and dancing to the party band
The Fundamentals. The nine-piece band, which has previ-
ously performed at the street fair and Belvedere’s Concerts
in the Park, plays upbeat R&B and soul including Motown
hits by Stevie Wonder through recent hits by Lady Gaga
and Maroon 5. Info: 415-435-5633 or tiburonchamber.org.
John Oates, half of the best-selling duo Hall &
Oates, will play at the Sweetwater Music Hall, 19
Corte Madera Ave., Mill Valley at 8 p.m. Sept. 27.
Oates co-wrote hits such as “Maneater,” “I Can’t
Go For That,” “She’s Gone” and “You Make My
Dreams.” He was named to the Songwriters Hall
of Fame in 2004 and the Rock ’n’ Roll Hall of Fame
in 2014. Oates has released fve studio albums as a
solo artist, and his memoir, “Seasons of Change,”
was released last year. Opening the show will be
Matt Ja fe. Tickets are $47-$72. Info: 415-388-3850
or sweetwatermusichall.com.

FREE MUSEUMS: Take advantage of First Tuesday Free Days at a variety of San Francisco

FREE MUSEUMS: Take advantage of First Tuesday Free Days at a variety of San Francisco museums Oct. 2 with times as follows:

9:30 a.m.-5:15 p.m., de Young Museum,

50 Hagiwara Tea Garden Drive, 415-750-

3600 or deyoung.famsf.org; 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Conservatory of Flowers, 100 John F. Kennedy Drive, 415-831-2090 or conservatoryofowers.org; 9:30 a.m.-5:15 p.m., Legion of Honor, 100 34th Ave.,

415-750-3600 or legionofhonor.famsf.org;

11 a.m.-6 p.m. Yerba Buena Center for

the Arts, 701 Mission St., 415-978-2700 or ybca.org; and 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Contem- porary Jewish Museum, 736 Mission St., 415-655-7800 or thecjm.org. Surcharge still required for premier exhibits.

NIGHT: See the group show “From Dusk ’til Dawn,” artists’ roundtable 4

p.m., opening reception 5:30-7:30 p.m. Oct. 2, exhibit 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Tuesdays-Fridays,

10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturdays through Oct. 25.

Free. O’Hanlon Center for the Arts, 616 Throckmorton Ave., Mill Valley. Info: 415-388-4331 or ohanloncenter.org

MYSTERY: Listen to writers discuss their whodunnits and more as part of the Mystery Writers Confer- ence, Sept. 27-30.

IMMIGRANTS:

Hear Jose Antonio Vargas discuss “Dear America:

Notes of an Un- documented Im- migrant,” 7 p.m. Sept. 30.

All events are free, un- less noted. Book Pas- sage, 51 Tamal Vista Blvd., Corte Madera. Info: 415-927-0960 or bookpassage.com

COUPLE: Watch “The Wife,” star- ring Glenn Close and Jonathan Pryce, 3:45 p.m. and 7 p.m. Sept. 26-27.

THRILLER: See “A Simple Favor,” with Anna Kendrick and Blake Live- ly, 4:15 p.m. and 7:15 p.m. Sept. 26-27.

MAGIC: Watch “The House with a Clock in Its Walls,” 4 p.m. and 6:45 p.m. Sept. 26-27.

$7.50-$10.50. Call for additional dates and showtimes. Tiburon Playhouse, 40 Main St., Tiburon. Info: 415-435-1251 or arkn.ws/tiburonplayhouse

ROMCOM: Watch “Crazy Rich Asians,” 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m. and 10 p.m. Sept.

ROMCOM: Watch “Crazy Rich Asians,” 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m. and 10 p.m. Sept. 26. $8-$12.50. Call for additional dates and showtimes. Century Cinema, 41 Tamal Vista Blvd., Corte Madera. Info: 415-924-6506 or arkn.ws/centurycinema

RICH: Watch “Crazy Rich Asians,” 4:20 p.m. Sept. 26-27 and 7:20 p.m. Sept. 26.

RACE: See “BlacKkKlansman,” di- rected by Spike Lee, 4 p.m. Sept. 26-27 and 7 p.m. Sept. 26.

$8.75-$12.25. Call for additional dates and showtimes. CinéArts Sequoia, 25 Throckmorton Ave., Mill Valley. Info: 415-388-1190 or arkn.ws/cinesequoia

THEATER: Watch Ian McKellen in “King Lear,” 6:30 p.m. Sept. 27 and Oct. 3. $12-$30. Lark Theater, 549 Magnolia Ave., Larkspur. Info: 415-924-5111 or larktheater.net

DOC: Learn about the life of

Gilda Radner in “Love, Gilda,”

6:30 p.m. Sept. 26-27 and 8:30 p.m. Sept.

26.

COLD WAR: See vintage shorts about nuclear war at screening of a restored copy of “The Atomic Cafe,” with flm- maker Jayne Loader in person, 7:30 p.m. Sept. 29.

$8.50-$11.75, except where noted. Call for additional dates and showtimes. Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St., San Rafael. Info: 415-454-1222 or rafaelf lm.org

ITALIAN: Watch movies at the Italian Film Festival, with “It’s All About Karma” 5:30 p.m. and 7:45 p.m. Sept. 29, and “From Naples with Love,” 4 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Sept. 30. $16 each, or $120 for the series. Marin Showcase Theater, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael.

Info: 415-473-6800 or marincenter.org

FAIR: Play games at Blackie’s Hay Day country fair, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sept. 29. $15. Blackie’s Pasture, Tiburon. Info: blackieshayday.org

OCEAN: Listen to the talk “Examin- ing the Natural and Anthropogenic Drivers A fecting Host-Parasite Interactions in Marine Systems,” part of the Rosenberg Institute Seminar Series, 3:30 p.m. Oct. 3. Free. Estuary and Ocean Science Center at Romberg, 3152 Paradise Drive, Tiburon. Info: 415-338-3700 or eoscenter.sfsu.edu

JAZZ: Enjoy the Black Market Trust, 8 p.m. Sept. 28. $20-$35. Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave., Mill Val- ley. Info: 415-383-

9600

or throckmorton-

theatre.org

FESTIVAL: Hear Elvin Bishop, Tommy Castro and more at Whistlestock, benefting Whistlestop senior services, 11:30 a.m. Sept. 29. $150. Marin Fairgrounds, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. Info: 415-473-6800 or marincenter.org

SOUL: Hear Lydia Pense and Cold Blood, 6 p.m. Sept. 30. $18-$24. Sweet- water Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave., Mill Valley. Info: 415-388-3850 or sweetwatermusichall.com

VOLUNTEER: Help improve Aram-

Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave., Mill Valley. Info: 415-388-3850 or sweetwatermusichall.com VOLUNTEER: Help improve Aram-

Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave., Mill Valley. Info: 415-388-3850 or sweetwatermusichall.com VOLUNTEER: Help improve Aram-

buru Island with Audubon and Marin County Parks, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Sept. 29. Free; RSVP required. Richardson Bay Audubon Center, 376 Greenwood Beach Road, Tiburon. Info: 415-388-2524 or marincountyparks.org

RESTORATION: Join the monthly volunteer team for the Ring Mountain Grassland Restoration Project, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Sept. 29. Free; bring water, work gloves and sturdy shoes. Gate at the end of Taylor Road, Ring Mountain Open Space Preserve, Tiburon. Info: 415-473-3778 or marincountyparks.org

PIE: Compete in the eighth annual Pie Baking Contest, 10 a.m. Sept. 29. Free. Marin Country Mart, 2257 Lark- spur Landing Circle, Larkspur. Info: 415-461-5700 or marincountrymart.com

Larkspur. Info: 415-461-5700 or marincountrymart.com TENNIS: Watch tennis pros from around the world at the

TENNIS: Watch tennis pros from around the world at the Tiburon Challenger tournament, through Sept. 30. $25 Sept. 28, $35 Sept. 29-30. Tiburon Penin- sula Club, 1600 Mar West St., Tiburon. Info: 415-789-7900 or tiburonchallenger.com

RACE: Cheer on the Tiburon

Half Marathon, 10K & 5K, 7 a.m. Sept. 30. Tiburon Boulevard and Beach Road and along Old Rail Trail. Info: tiburonhalfmarathon.com

AMAZON: Watch “The River Bride,” 7:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and 2 p.m. select Sundays through Oct. 14. $10-$20. Studio Theatre, College of Marin, Sir Francis Drake Boule- vard and Laurel Avenue, Kent feld. Info: 415-485-9385 or pa.marin.edu

PEACE: See the political thriller “Oslo,” 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays-Saturdays and 2 p.m. weekends through Oct. 21. $25-$60. Marin Theatre Co., 397 Miller Ave., Mill Valley. Info: 415-388-5208 or marintheatre.org

SHAKESPEARE: See “Twelfth Night” by the Ross Valley Players, 7:30 p.m. Thursdays-Saturdays and 2 p.m. Sundays through Oct. 21. $10-$27. The Barn Theatre, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd., Ross. Info: 415-456-9555 or rossvalleyplayers.com

Oct. 21. $10-$27. The Barn Theatre, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd., Ross. Info: 415-456-9555 or rossvalleyplayers.com
Oct. 21. $10-$27. The Barn Theatre, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd., Ross. Info: 415-456-9555 or rossvalleyplayers.com

October highlights include exhibit by Tiburon artist laureate

By CAROL BENET

cbenet@thearknewspaper.com

———

T he art scene’s fall schedule shows no signs of slow- ing down in October, as the month boasts enough new concerts, exhibits and plays to keep any arts-

lover busy.

Theater

Showcase Theater: This Marin Center venue presents Brian Copeland’s “The Best of the SF Solo Series,” which brings six of the Bay Area’s most critically acclaimed solo shows from San Francisco’s The Marsh to the theater be- tween October and March. This month catch Copeland’s “The Waiting Period,” about Copeland’s lifelong struggle with depression, on Oct. 14. Info: arkn.ws/marincenter or 415-473-6800. San Francisco Playhouse: The troupe is now stag- ing the world premiere of Christopher Chen’s “You Mean to Do Me Harm,” in which an innocuous comment at a dinner between two interracial couples leads to an exploration of personal relationships and Chinese and American foreign relations. Info: sfplayhouse.org or 415-677-9596. Marin Theatre Co.: Continuing through Oct. 21 is “Oslo,” a political thriller that tackles the true story of how Norwegian diplomat Mona Juul and her husband orches- trated the secret meetings between Israel and the Palestine Liberation Organization that led to the 1993 Oslo Accords. The play was written by J.T. Rogers and is directed by Jas- son Minadakis. Info: marintheatre.org or 415-388-1217. Cal Performances: Berlin’s acclaimed Schaubühne theater presents a revised adaptation of Henrik Ibsen’s 1882 drama “An Enemy of the People” Oct. 12-13. The play, performed in German with English supertitles, focuses on the perils of democratic capitalism, a subject the country is newly debating.

capitalism, a subject the country is newly debating. KEN LEVIN and race. Info: calperformances.org or

KEN LEVIN

and race.

Info: calperformances.org or 510-642-9988.

San Francisco Opera: Puccini’s “Tosca,” featuring star soprano Carmen Giannattasio, runs Oct. 3-30. Richard

Strauss’s “Arabella,” with Ellie Dehn, Brian Mulligan and Heidi Stober, opens Oct. 16. These are two shows that stay popular in the San Francisco Opera’s repertoire. ———

See

Analyzing value characteristics helps price Indonesian textiles

cshaver@thearknewspaper.com

———

I recently f nished writing a 57-page

charitable-contribution appraisal report

for the donation of approximately 65 tex-

tiles and fve ethnographic properties. The

clients were Michael Gaworski and Wanda Warming, authors of the 1981 book “The World of Indonesian Textiles.” I was f rst contacted in early June to write the appraisal report. The authors had gifted their textiles to the Herbert F. John- son Museum of Art at Cornell University.

My challenge was deciding how to organize the appraisal to make the most efective use of my time and stay within a given time limit. I decided I would organize the appraisal by type of property and separate the most valuable. I would discuss those pieces one

by one, and then link the other like proper- ties to those most valuable properties. I asked the owners to identify the most valuable 15 properties. With that list, I started researching the value character- ———

See

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES

Classified ads are $25, up to four lines, for the first two-week insertion; $10 for each additional week. Additional lines are $5 per week. The deadline for the next issue is 3 p.m. Thursday.

Call us at 415-435-2652 or email classifieds@thearknewspaper.com to place your ad today!

BOOKKEEPER/ASSISTANT

BOOKKEEPER/ASSISTANT Experience with excellent local references. Call

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PRIME DOWNTOWN TIBURON LOCA- TION 966 square feet next to the Post F

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HOUSING WANTED

MAN SEEKING AN ESTATE CARETAKER POSITION I am a Native Californian with 31 yrs. of experience repairing and main- taining homes. As a master electrician and carpenter, I have a current electrical license and a general licence. In addition, I have a Bachelors in Business Admin. and I am studying to become a Naturopathic Doctor. I have business and professional references, a resume, proof of liability insurance and licensing available. My name is Clay. Call 510-325-7462

lenges without the huge cost of housing pressures. I am personable, reliable, kind, intelligent, respectful, thoughtful, neat, clean, 50 yr. old woman who is very quiet. Basically, I am a good housemate/tenant who creates a minimal footprint. I have impeccable local references & excellent credit! If you know of a possible space, please call Ellie at 650-245-1450

HOUSE CLEANING

ANNA’S HOUSECLEANING & ORGANIZ- ING Many year’s experience. Excellent

HOUSE SITTING

STUDENT WOULD LIKE TO HOUSESIT Responsible, neat, student would like to housesit. Will clean, animal care and/or elderly care in exchange for room. Previ- ous Belvedere resident. If interested call

415-259-1059

elderly care in exchange for room. Previ- ous Belvedere resident. If interested call 415-259-1059 PERSONAL ASSISTANT

PERSONAL ASSISTANT

For information on children’s programs, contact chil- dren’s librarian Alicia Bell at 415-789-2662 or jdesk@ beltiblibrary.org. Children’s Storytimes and Read-alongs: Baby Bounce, toddler and preschool story times and afternoon Cocoa Hour for ages 7 and older. Call, email or visit beltibli- brary.org/kids for more information. Foreign Language Storytime: French for ages 5 and younger 10:15 a.m. Tuesdays; Spanish 11 a.m. Wednesdays; Mandarin for ages 5 and younger 3 p.m. Thursdays and for ages 6 and up 3:30 p.m. Thursdays. Blackie’s Hay Day: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sept. 29. An annual country fair for children of all ages.

For information on teen programs, for grades 6-12, contact teen librarian Rebecca Jung at 415-789-2663 or rjung@beltiblibrary.org. Teen Lounge: 3-5 p.m. Tuesdays in the Founders Room. Students can hang out for snacks, games, homework and socializing throughout the year, except during school holidays.

Community Service: Volunteer at the library Wednes- day and Thursday afternoons to earn community-service credit for school. Knitty Gritty: 3:30-4:30 p.m. Fridays. A knitting and crochet club. All ages welcome, but children should be ac- companied by an adult. Drop in at the teen desk and bring yarn and other supplies. Tiburon CoderDojo: 3-5 p.m. Sept. 28. A free com- puter-programming club for young people ages 8-17. Learn basic programming, play with robots or work on your own project. Meets on the last Fridays of the month. Teen Volunteers for Blackie’s Hay Day: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sept. 29. Two-hour shifts are available throughout the day. Sign up on the web at arkn.ws/18haydayvolunteer.

For information on adult programs, contact Library Director Deborah Mazzolini at 415-789-2656 or dmazzo- lini@beltiblibrary.org. Chess Club: 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays. All ages and skill levels. Learn to play chess or develop your game; boards will be provided. To sign up, call 415-789-2661. Weekly foreign-language conversation groups:

French noon-1 p.m. Tuesdays; Spanish noon-1 p.m. Thurs-

days; Italian 1-2 p.m. Thursdays. Google Drive Essentials, Part 2: 6:30-8 tonight, Sept. 26. Google Drive is secure cloud storage that gives you access to all your f les anywhere from any smartphone, tablet or computer. Trivia Night with Janis Luft: 7:30 p.m. Sept. 27. Marin Harmony Chorus: 7-8 p.m. Oct. 2. A chorus with almost 20 years’ experience specializing in doo-wop, pop and jazz arrangements. Aging with Style — Avoiding Scams, Fraud and Identity Theft: 12:15-2 p.m. Oct. 3. The Marin Financial Abuse Specialist Team (FAST) will enlighten and educate on how to protect older adults against common f nancial scams. Shop Smart with Consumer Reports: 6:30-8 p.m. Oct. 3. Research purchases and companies, avoid scams and make smart f nancial decisions. Board Game & Pizza Night: 6-8 p.m. Oct. 4. Play new and classic board and card games with friends and family. Pizza and refreshments provided.

Submitted by Belvedere-Tiburon Library Director Debo- rah Mazzolini. Reach the library, located at 1501 Tiburon Blvd., at beltiblibrary.org or 415-789-2665.

LEGAL NOTICE ADVERTISING RATES

Fictitious business name statements are $65 for one business and one registrant, $5 each additional name, for four weeks; name changes are $120. Trustee sales start at $170. The deadline for the next issue is 3 p.m. Thursday.

Call 415-435-2652 or email legals@thearknewspaper.com for additional pricing and to place your notice today!

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT NO. 2018145139 Notice: This statement expires on 8/8/2023. A new FBN statement must be filed no more than 40 days from

expiration. The following person is doing business as:

CITY HALL RECORDS RUNT

101 GLACIER PT. SUITE C

SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901

ROBIN D. COHN, INC.

101 GLACIER PT. SUITE C

SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901 This business is conducted as a corpo-

ration /s/ Grace B. Cohn, CFO

101 Glacier PT. Suite C

San Rafael, CA 94901 FILED: August 8, 2018 Richard N. Benson Marin County Clerk By: J. McGough Ark Legal 3131 Sep 5, 12, 19, 26, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT NO. 2018145152 Notice: This statement expires on 8/9/2023. A new FBN statement must be filed no more than 40 days from expiration.

The following person is doing business as:

DUVA SMOG

251 SHORELINE HWY

MILL VALLEY, CA 94941 STANLEY CHANGEUX

505 HICHBORN STREET APT. A

VALLEJO, CA 94590 This business is conducted as an indi- vidual /s/ Stanley Changeux

251 Shoreline Hwy

Mill Valley, CA 94941 FILED: August 9, 2018 Richard N. Benson Marin County Clerk By: J. Mannion Ark Legal 3133 Sep 12, 19, 26, Oct 3, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS

NAME STATEMENT

NO. 2018145305

Notice: This statement expires on 8/31/2023. A new FBN statement must be filed no more than 40 days from expiration. The following person is doing business as:

PHOOD FIGHT

105 E. STRAWBERRY DR.

/s/ Peter Hood, CEO/CFO 105 E. Strawberry Dr. Mill Valley, CA 94941 FILED: August 31, 2018 Richard N. Benson Marin County Clerk By: J. Mannion Ark Legal 3134 Sep 12, 19, 26, Oct 3, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT NO. 2018145273 Notice: This statement expires on

8/28/2023. A new FBN statement must

be filed no more than 40 days from expiration. The following person is doing business as:

LMC CONSULTING

16 SIR FRANCIS DRAKE BLVD.

ROSS, CA 94957 LISA CONVERSE

16 SIR FRANCIS DRAKE BLVD.

ROSS, CA 94957 This business is conducted as an indi- vidual /s/ Lisa M. Converse P.O. Box 401 Ross, CA 94957 FILED: August 28, 2018 Richard N. Benson Marin County Clerk By: J. McGough Ark Legal 3135 Sep 12, 19, 26, Oct 3, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT NO. 2018145125 Notice: This statement expires on 8/7/2023. A new FBN statement must be filed no more than 40 days from expiration.

The following person is doing business

as:

CLEANSEMARIN CLEANSE MARIN 1100 SIR FRANCIS DRAKE BLVD. SUITE 3 KENTFIELD, CA 94904 SAN FRANCISCO COLONICS, INC.

1218 PACIFIC AVENUE

SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94109 This business is conducted a corporation

/s/ Lauren E. O’Neill

1100 Sir Francis Drake Blvd. Suite 3

Kentfield, CA 94904 FILED: August 7, 2018 Richard N. Benson Marin County Clerk By: J. McGough Ark Legal 3136 Sep 12, 19, 26, Oct 3, 2018

be filed no more than 40 days from

expiration. The following person is doing business as:

EDGE REALTY

60 GRANDE PASEO

SAN RAFAEL, CA 94903 KYUNG H. CHUNG

60 GRANDE PASEO

SAN RAFAEL, CA 94903

This business is conducted an individual /s/ Kyung H. Chung

60 Grande Paseo

San Rafael, CA 94903 FILED: August 13, 2018 Richard N. Benson Marin County Clerk By: L. Vawter Ark Legal 3137 Sep 19, 26, Oct 3, 10, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

NO. 2018145358 Notice: This statement expires on 9/10/2023. A new FBN statement must be filed no more than 40 days from

expiration. The following person is doing business as:

VENICE GOURMET DELICATESSEN & PIZZARIA

625 BRIDGEWAY AVE.

SAUSALITO, CA 94965 CHRIS H. HONTALAS

34 BRET HARTE RD.

SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901

This business is conducted an individual /s/ Chris H. Hontalas

625 Bridgeway Ave.

Sausalito, CA 94965 FILED: September 10, 2018 Richard N. Benson Marin County Clerk By: C. Sanchez Ark Legal 3138 Sep 19, 26, Oct 3, 10, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINES

NAME STATEMENT

NO. 2018145393

Notice: This statement expires on 9/13/2023. A new FBN statement must be filed no more than 40 days from expiration. The following person is doing business as:

MARIN HOME HEALTH CARE 1610 TIBURON BLVD. #201 TIBURON, CA 94920 MARIN SENIOR CARE LLC

131 JAMAICA STREET

TIBURON, CA 94920 This business is conducted a limited li- ability company

Marin County Clerk By: J. Mannion Ark Legal 3139 Sep 19, 26, Oct 3, 10, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT NO. 2018145352

Notice: This statement expires on 9/7/2023. A new FBN statement must be filed no more than 40 days from

expiration.

The following person is doing business as:

MADDI BOO BOOKS

11 SAN BENITO WAY

NOVATO, CA 94945

DEBRA LUCILLE SCHMALJOHANN

11 SAN BENITO WAY

NOVATO, CA 94945 This business is conducted an individual /s/ Debra Schmaljohann 936-B Seventh Street #233 Novato, CA 94945 FILED: September 7, 2018 Richard N. Benson Marin County Clerk By: J. Mannion Ark Legal 3140 Sep 19, 26, Oct 3, 10, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT NO. 2018145299

Notice: This statement expires on

8/31/2023. A new FBN statement must

be filed no more than 40 days from expiration.

The following person is doing business as:

LESS STRESS CLEANING

115 SHORELINE HWY #103

MILL VALLEY, CA 94941 ASHLEY FERGUSON

115 SHORELINE HWY #103

MILL VALLEY, CA 94941 This business is conducted an individual /s/ Ashely Ferguson, Owner

115 Shoreline Hwy #103

Mill Valley, CA 94941

FILED: August 31, 2018 Richard N. Benson Marin County Clerk By: L. Vawter

Sep

10,

17, 2018

Ark

Legal

3141

26, Oct

3,

CITY OF BELVEDERE NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTE: This is not an agenda. The agen- da will be posted/available the Friday before the meeting. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on Tuesday, October 16, 2018 at 6:30 p.m., the Planning Commission of the

Conditional Use Permit and Mitigated Negative Declaration for waterfront improvements at 121 Belvedere Avenue. The proposal includes a new private pier, dock, boat lift, platform

lift, access stairs, hillavator and above grade deck. The pier is approximately 876 square feet of new area over the water and is proposed in the middle of 121 Belvedere’s shore line front- age and avoids natural rock outcrop- pings. Applicant: LAK Associates, Sean Kennings; Property Owners: David McClosky.

2. Design Review, Exception to Total

Floor Area and Variance application for

an addition, interior remodel and the conversion of the existing carport into

a garage on the property located at

5 Golden Gate Avenue. The proj- ect requires an Exception to Total Floor Area; the allowed floor area is 2,194

square feet, the existing house is 2,598 square feet and the project proposes 3,240 square feet. The project also requires a Variance for lot coverage. The allowable lot coverage is 30 percent and the project proposes 35 percent. Property Owner: James Mersfelder and Amy DeVincentis; Applicant: Kyle Thayer, Thayer Architects.

3. Design Review, Exception to Total

Floor Area and Variance application for

an addition of a 260 square feet roof

covering at the rear patio on the property located at 313 San Rafael Avenue. The project requires an Exception to Total Floor Area, the allowed floor area

is

1,980 square feet, the existing house

is

2,345 square feet and the project

proposes 2,643 square feet. The project also requires a Variance for lot coverage.

The allowable lot coverage is 30 percent

and the project proposes 45 percent. Property Owner: Mr. and Mrs. John Adams; Applicant: Mohamad Sadrieh. NOTICE IS HEREBY FURTHER GIVEN that at the above time and place, all letters received will be noted, and all

interested parties will be heard. Please

note that if you challenge in court any

of the matters described above, you

may be limited to raising only those

issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice,

or

in written correspondence delivered

to

the Planning Commission at, or prior

to,

the above-referenced public hearing

[Government Code Section 65009(b) (2)]. Correspondence will be received up to the start of the meeting. Please submit any correspondence by October 8, 2018 for inclusion in the staff report distributed to the Commission before the meeting. Items will not necessarily be heard in the above order or, because of

possible changes or extenuating condi-

COURTESY NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING TIBURON PENINSULA CLUB EXPANSION PROJECT; 1600 MAR WEST STREET, TIBURON, CA NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Planning Commission of the Town o Tiburon will hold the following meeting:

EIR Recirculation Determination:

Wednesday, October 10, 2018 at 7:30 P.M. Town Council Chambers, 1505 Tiburon Boulevard, Tiburon, CA

The Planning Commission will make a

determination as to whether recirculation

is required for the Draft Environmenta

Impact Report (DEIR) for the Tiburon Peninsula Club Junior Tennis Cente

& Lighting Project located at 1600 Mar West Street and 1601 Mar Wes Street; CUP2015004; Assessor Parce Numbers 058-171-17, 058-171-76, and

058-171-84.

Project Description

The project calls for the construction o

a Junior Tennis Center that would be

used to expand the current TPC junio clinic program and provide lessons fo club members and non-members. The

project proposes installation of pole lights

to light six existing courts. The proposed

lighting would include eight (8) lamps pe court mounted on 22-foot high poles Lighting would be used from Septembe 8th to April 14th only, and no later than 7:45 p.m. A 550-square foot, one-story structure would be constructed adja- cent to the north side of the existing

lower tennis courts that would include

bathrooms and tennis-related storage Adjacent to and east of the proposed entry area would be a 1,340-square foo screened outdoor area to accommodate the temporary maintenance and stor- age structures on the site. This facility would be screened but not covered. The proposed project is located at 1600 Mar West Street. The project would be located on Marin County Assessor’s Parcel Nos. 058-171-17, 058-171-76 and 058-171-84.Questions regarding

this item should be directed to Sung H Kwon, Planning Manager, at (415) 435- 7393 or skwon@townoftiburon.org. The preliminary response to comments may

be viewed after 5 P.M. on Wednesday,

September 26, 2018 on the Town’s web

site at www.townoftiburon.org.

Mailed on or before: September 26,

2018

Ark Legal 3142 Sep 26, 2018

CITY OF BELVEDERE SUMMARY OF PROPOSED ORDINANCES NOTE: This is not an agenda. The agenda will be available at least 72 hours before the meeting

Preview, continued from page 19 ———

Info: sfopera.com or 415-864-3330. San Francisco Symphony: Under the baton of Austrian conductor Manfred Honeck, cellist Truls Mørk will perform Dvorák’s “Symphony No. 8” and Prokofev’s “Sinfonia concertante” with the symphony Oct. 11-13. On Oct. 14, acclaimed Russian classical pianist Evgeny Kissin will play Beethoven and Rachmaninof. Conductor Pablo Heras-Casado and pia- nist Javier Perianes will join the symphony Oct. 18-20 to perform works including Ravel’s “Alborado del gracioso” and “Boléro” and Bartók’s “Piano Concerto No. 3.” The Russian Mariinsky Orchestra plays Stravin- sky with conductor Valery Gergiev on Oct. 21 and violinist Ray Chen will play music by Richard Strauss and Lalo’s “Symphonie espagnole” Oct. 25-27. Info: sfsymphony.org or 415-864-6000. Marin Symphony: Alasdair Neale will conduct the symphony’s “Masterworks 1:

Brilliant” concert, which will feature violin- ist Dylana Jenson. The all-Russian program includes Tchaikovsky’s “Violin Concerto” and Shostakovich’s “Symphony No. 10.” Info: marinsymphony.org or 415-473-

6800.

College of Marin: The college will participate in “Leonard Bernstein at 100,”

a two-year global celebration of Bernstein’s life and career, with an Oct. 31 advanced

voice recital featuring the composer’s music. Info: pa.marin.edu/music or 415-485-

9460.

Cal Performances: The Jerusalem Quartet will be joined by husband-and- wife duo Pinchas Zukerman and Amanda Forsyth on Oct. 13 for a program of string sextets including Strauss’ “Capriccio” and Tchaikovsky’s “Souvenir de Florence.” Also on Oct. 13, the Grammy-winning Soweto

Gospel Choir will perform renditions of Zulu, Xhosa, and Sotho folk and gospel music and more in a dozen diferent languages. Info: calperformances.org or 510-642-

9988.

Modernism: Charles Arnoldi’s paint- ings are on display through Oct. 27 at this Tenderloin gallery. Arnoldi is a Southern

California abstract artist who paints lively and colorful works. Info: modernisminc.com or 415-541-

0461.

San Francisco Museum of Modern Art: Donald Judd’s “Speci fc Furniture” continues in October. The exhibit focuses on his original furniture, including some of his chairs that visitors may try out. “René Mag- ritte: The Fifth Season” closes Oct. 28. Info: sfmoma.org or 415-357-4000. Oakland Museum of California:

“The World of Charles and Ray Eames” opens Oct. 13, showcasing the work of these two in fuential 20th-century designers through multimedia installations, flms, rare prototypes, photography, furniture, toys and products, as well as personal letters, draw- ings and artwork. Info: museumca.org or 510-318-8400.

Dominican University of California:

Tiburon Artist Laureate Richard Rozen has a solo exhibit of his paintings, “Abstract Narratives,” showing through February at the university’s Alemany Library Commu- nity Gallery. Rozen was named to the four- year volunteer artist laureate post in June. Info: arkn.ws/domlibgallery Museum of the African Diaspora:

“Second Look, Twice” features the print- making of 15 contemporary artists of African descent, including Glenn Ligon, Martin Puryear and Kara Walker. Also on display is “Ficre Ghebreyesus: City with a River Running Through,” containing more than a dozen of Ghebreyesus’ works. The late Eritrean-American artist fed his home country and made his life in the U.S. as a political refugee. Info: moadsf.org or 415-358-7200.

Arts writer Carol Benet, a Belvedere resi- dent since 1969, earned a Ph.D. in compar- ative literature from UC Berkeley. She has been contributing to The Ark since 1975.

Appraiser, continued from page 19 ———

istics of the textiles. I could adjust as to quality, rareness and condition within like properties. Those elements of value included thick, strong cotton thread rather than thin and weak thread, the di fcult weaving technique of ikat or supplementary weft rather than a simple weave structure and strong natural dyes instead of the wide range of chemical dyes. Naturally, some of the textiles were published in their book, and this factor always adds value to a property. The own- ers collected in the feld in the early 1970s

and purchased for a university museum

in Tokyo. The textiles selected refected informed choices made from 1972 to 1976.

It is this collection that was donated to

Cornell. The research involved contacting deal- ers of Indonesian material and comparing like properties. Over the last 10 years, I have done four appraisals that included Indonesian textiles. I checked the values I analyzed years before. The price range for one particular type of Indonesian textile ranges from $3,000 to $60,000. The sales listed were private between collector and museum, and con fdentiality was without question. The value characteristics a fect-

ing this particular textile were the depth of the color red, the crispness at the ikat weaving, the di fculty of the design and the f neness of the cotton thread, among other factors. Indonesian textiles are unique in that cloth is considered currency. Very simply stated, the weaver, often chosen for this occupation by divine right, dreams a pat- tern and weaves by spiritual guidance. The materials used in dyeing and weaving are also held sacred. Cloth can be payment. Batiks have been traded and dyed for hun- dreds of years. The geographical location of Indonesia along the maritime trade routes between Europe and Asia ensured the trade

of designs, materials and ideas. Any mari- tal union traditionally would also involve displaying wealth by a stack of cloth. I found a range of values from $250 to $4,500 for the textiles. The property was in the top 25 percent of all Indonesian mate- rial. Many well-known universities have stellar Asian textiles, both as study pieces and for exhibition. As has been common, the West is slow to acknowledge the impor- tance and value of cloth. College collections help to improve this perception.

Contributing columnist Cynthia Shaver has been an appraiser of Asian art for more than 20 years.

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CAR CONCIERGE

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ELECTRICAL

COMPLETE ELECTRIC - References & proof of liability insurance available on request Lic. #966283 415-992-2874 (cell)

TIBURON’S FAVORITE ELECTRICIAN For 34 Years. Since 1982 Over 1,085 Tiburon Clients Speedy Repairs – Free Advice John Blythe 415-435-8686 Lic. #749897. Insured. Bonded

HAULING

LOCAL FIREMAN HAULING Large & small dump runs. Garage, Home, Yard, etc. Fast Dependable Service We recycle & donate all we can Jeff 415-310-2551

415-332-1013

& donate all we can Jeff 415-310-2551 415-332-1013 HOUSE CLEANING TWICE AS CLEAN 2 Experienced House

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TWICE AS CLEAN 2 Experienced House Cleaners Using traditional & non-toxic products Please Call Mercedes 415-518-4516 (cell) or

415-454-3155

LANDSCAPING

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WARREN DESIGN Landscape Maintenance & Irrigation David Marshall 415-724-8861 warrendesignlandscaping.com

NAIL CARE

MARIN NAILS Home call or in the evenings at salon. Long-term and new clients appreciated. Skin care License #Z99726 655 Redwood Hwy Suite 105 Mill Valley Please call Sandy Nguyen

415-381-0629

Suite 105 Mill Valley Please call Sandy Nguyen 415-381-0629 PAINTING CONTRACTORS HOFFMIRE PAINTING & CONST. On

PAINTING CONTRACTORS

HOFFMIRE PAINTING & CONST. On the Peninsula Since 1977 Lic. #615309 Bonded & Insured Steve 415-302-7248

PLUMBING

AMESOS PLUMBING Experienced. Very reasonable. Lic. #814542 Insured.

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TILE & GROUT WORK

THE GROUT GUYS Local Refs available Lic. #901411 Mark Torres 510-427-4254 or email thegroutguys@yahoo.com www.californiafinish.com

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