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Divine entity, supreme being and principal object of faith

This article is about the concept of a supreme "God" in the context of monotheism. For the general
concept of a being superior to humans that is worshiped as "a god", see Deity and God (male deity). For
God in specific religions, see Conceptions of God. For other uses of the term, see God (disambiguation).
Many religions use images to "represent" God in icons for art or for worship. Here are some examples of
representations of God in Christianity and various branches of Hinduism.

The monad, an ancient symbol for the metaphysical Absolute. Early science, particularly geometry and
astrology and astronomy, was connected to the divine for most medieval scholars, and many believed
that there was something intrinsically "divine" or "perfect" that could be found in circles.[1][2]

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God

General conceptions[show]

Agnosticism

Apatheism

Atheism

Deism

Henotheism

Ietsism

Ignosticism

Monotheism

Monism

Dualism

Monolatry
Kathenotheism

Omnism

Pandeism

Panpsychism

Panentheism

Pantheism

Polytheism

Theism

Transtheism

Specific conceptions[show]

Creator

Demiurge

Deus

Father

Form of the Good

Great Architect

Monad

Mother

Summum bonum

Supreme Being

Sustainer

The All

The Lord

Trinity

Tawhid
Ditheism

Monism

Personal

Unitarianism

In particular religions[show]

Abrahamic

Judaism

Christianity

Islam

Bahá'í

Mormonism

Indo-Iranian

Hinduism

Buddhism

Jainism

Sikhism

Zoroastrianism

Chinese

Tian

Shangdi

Hongjun Laozu

Attributes[show]

Eternalness

Existence
Gender

Names ("God")

Omnibenevolence

Omnipotence

Omnipresence

Omniscience

Experiences

Practices

[show]

Belief

Esotericism

Faith

Fideism

Gnosis

Hermeticism

Metaphysics

Mysticism

Prayer

Revelation

Worship

Related topics[show]

Euthyphro dilemma

God complex

God gene

Theology
Ontology

Problem of evil (theodicy)

Religion

philosophy

texts

Portrayals of God in popular media

In monotheistic thought, God is conceived of as the supreme being, creator deity, and principal object of
faith.[3] The conceptions of God, as described by theologians, commonly include the attributes of
omniscience (all-knowing), omnipotence (all-powerful), omnipresence (all-present), and as having an
eternal and necessary existence. Depending on one's kind of theism, these attributes are used either in
way of analogy, or in a literal sense as distinct properties. God is most often held to be incorporeal
(immaterial).[3][4][5] Incorporeality and corporeality of God are related to conceptions of transcendence
(being outside nature) and immanence (being in nature) of God, with positions of synthesis such as the
"immanent transcendence". Psychoanalyst Carl Jung equated religious ideas of God with transcendental
aspects of consciousness in his interpretation.[6]

Some religions describe God without reference to gender, while others or their translations use sex-
specific terminology. Judaism attributes only a grammatical gender to God, using terms such as "Him" or
"Father" for convenience.[7]

God has been conceived as either personal or impersonal. In theism, God is the creator and sustainer of
the universe, while in deism, God is the creator, but not the sustainer, of the universe. In pantheism, God
is the universe itself. In atheism, there is an absence of belief in God. In agnosticism, the existence of
God is deemed unknown or unknowable. God has also been conceived as the source of all moral
obligation, and the "greatest conceivable existent".[3] Many notable philosophers have developed
arguments for and against the existence of God.[8]

Monotheists refer to their gods using names prescribed by their respective religions, with some of these
names referring to certain cultural ideas about their god's identity and attributes. In the ancient Egyptian
era of Atenism, possibly the earliest recorded monotheistic religion, this deity was called Aten,[9]
premised on being the one "true" Supreme Being and creator of the universe.[10] In the Hebrew Bible
and Judaism, Elohim, Adonai, YHWH (Hebrew: ‫ )יהוה‬and other names are used as the names of God.
Yahweh and Jehovah, possible vocalizations of YHWH, are used in Christianity. In the Christian doctrine
of the Trinity, God, coexisting in three "persons", is called the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit. In
Islam, the name Allah is used, while Muslims also have a multitude of titular names for God. In
Hinduism, Brahman is often considered a monistic concept of God.[11] In Chinese religion, Shangdi is
conceived as the progenitor (first ancestor) of the universe, intrinsic to it and constantly bringing order
to it. Other religions have names for the concept, for instance, Baha in the Bahá'í Faith,[12] Waheguru in
Sikhism,[13] Sang Hyang Widhi Wasa in Balinese Hinduism,[14] and Ahura Mazda in Zoroastrianism.[15]

The many different conceptions of God, and competing claims as to God's characteristics, aims, and
actions, have led to the development of ideas of omnitheism, pandeism,[16] or a perennial philosophy,
which postulates that there is one underlying theological truth, of which all religions express a partial
understanding, and as to which "the devout in the various great world religions are in fact worshipping
that one God, but through different, overlapping concepts".[17]