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Course Number CHSC-6307 Term and Year: Winter 2019

Course Name: Science and Philosophy of Total Credit Hours: 4


Vertebral Subluxation Complex
Course Director: Dana Hollandsworth, DC Total Contact Hours: 60
Email: dhollandsworth@parker.edu
Phone number: (972) 438-6932 ext. 7306
Office: #222, Academic Suite, East Building
Office Hours: Lab Hours Per Week: n/a
Hours: Location:
Mon & Wed: 12:00-1:00 E222
Tues: 11:00 - 1:00 N200 (FSTT lab)
Thurs: 11:00 - 1:00 E222
Lab Contact Hours: n/a

Instructor Contact Information Lab Director/Instructor Contact Information


See course director above n/a

COURSE PREREQUISITES: Chiropractic Principles and Philosophy; Physiotherapy I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Science and Philosophy of Vertebral Subluxation Complex presents a well-rounded approach to


understanding concepts in philosophy and the science of vertebral subluxation complex that supports
Parker University, College of Chiropractic’s mission of creating leaders who promote Chiropractic
wellness. This course will present the current hypotheses and theories of chiropractic, the basis of
chiropractic health care, the causes and effects of subluxation, the mechanism of visceral and somatic
symptoms and dysfunctions related to subluxation, and information relative to complications and
contraindications to the use of chiropractic adjustments.

It is important the Chiropractor understand the theories behind the adjustment and the science and
philosophy of which these theories are based. The deeper the level of understanding, the more effective
the Chiropractor can communicate with other healthcare providers and patients the reasons behind the
chiropractic approach to care. In this course the student is asked to synthesize material from other
courses and apply it in new ways. This course supports the student’s ability think both clinically and
academically about chiropractic concepts.

REQUIRED MATERIALS:

TEXTBOOK(S): Leach, R. A. (2004). The Chiropractic Theories: A Textbook of Scientific Research


(4th ed.). Baltimore: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
*** You will need this textbook by Tuesday of week 3 of the trimester, as it will be utilized
extensively for in class quizzes and other assignments. Please do not delay in purchasing this
textbook.

REQUIRED SUPPLIES: none

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RECOMMENDED MATERIALS:
Principles Recommended Textbooks (NBCE required textbooks for Part II Chiropractic
Principles):
• Bergmann, T. F., & Peterson, D. H. (2011). Chiropractic Technique: Principles and Procedures
(3rd ed.). St. Louis: Mosby.
• Gatterman, M. I. (Ed.) (2005). Foundations of Chiropractic: Subluxation (2nd ed.). St. Louis:
Mosby.
• Haldeman, S. (Ed.) (2005). Principles and Practice of Chiropractic (3rd ed.). New York:
McGraw-Hill Medical.
• Redwood, D., & Cleveland, C., III (2003). Fundamentals of Chiropractic. St. Louis: Mosby.
LABS: None

LEARNING OUTCOMES: At the completion of this course, the student should be able to:
Learning Outcome Bloom’s Parker CCE Meta- Parker NBCE
Taxonomy University Competency Goals
DCP SLO
1. Analyze and evaluate C4 4.a, 4.b, 4.c, 2.d, 2.e, 7.1, 2.a, 2.b, 2.c Part II: NMS DX; 3, 4
the chiropractic (Analysis) 4.d, 5.a, 5.e, 7.2, 7.3, 7.5 PRI; 1, 2, 3, 4
theories. 5.f PRA; 1
Part III: 2, 3, 6, 7, 8
1.e, 2.g, 2.h, Part IV: DIM; 2 Case
2.j, 4.f MGMT; 1,2
2. Analyze information C4 4.a, 4.b, 4.c, 2.a, 2.c, 2.d, 1.a, 1.b, Part II: NMS DX; 3, 4
presented within the (Analysis) 4.d, 5.a, 5.e, 7.1, 7.2, 7.3, 1.c, 2.a, PRI; 1, 2, 3, 4
lectures, presentation, 5.f 7.5 2.b, 2.c, 2.d PRA; 1
and readings to be able Part III: 2, 3, 6, 7, 8
to communicate 1.e, 2.g, 2.h, Part IV: DIM; 2 Case
chiropractic theory to 2.j, 4.f MGMT; 1,2
their peers and patients
using the appropriate
terminology for each.
3. Synthesize information C5 4.a, 4.b, 4.c, 2.d, 2.e, 7.1, 1.a, 1.c, Part II: NMS DX; 3, 4
by creating (Synthesis) 4.d, 5.a, 5.e, 7.2, 7.3, 7.5 2.a, 2.b, PRI; 1, 2, 3, 4
informational student 5.f 2.c, 2.d PRA; 1
interactivities. 1.e, 2.g, 2.h, Part III: 2, 3, 6, 7, 8
2.j, 4.f Part IV: DIM; 2 Case
MGMT; 1,2
4. Assess evidence and C6 4.a, 4.b, 4.c, 2.a, 2.b, 2.c, 1.a, 2.a, Part II: NMS DX; 3, 4
apply critical thinking in (Evaluation) 4.d, 5.a, 5.e, 2.e, 7.1, 7.2, 2.b, 2.c, 2.d PRI; 1, 2, 3, 4
case scenarios and 5.f 7.3, 7.5 PRA; 1
other written Part III: 2, 3, 6, 7, 8
assignments. 1.e, 2.g, 2.h, Part IV: DIM; 2 Case
2.j, MGMT; 1,2
4.f

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PHILOSOPHY OF TEACHING: My professional mission is to inspire, in others, the desire to become a
lifelong learner and to assist in the professional development of competent and confident future
Doctors’ of Chiropractic. I will use a variety of teaching methods and strategies to provide content in
many different formats. I believe everyone can accomplish their goals however the journey to those
accomplishments looks different for each individual.

STUDENT RIGHTS:

1. To be informed in writing of the specific requirements of the courses in which he/she is


enrolled at the beginning of the term, and to expect that course requirements will not be
changed without notice.
2. To have clear indication of his/her educational progress in those courses in which he/she is
enrolled, and to know how the various assignments are weighted.
3. To have his/her grades kept private from other students, and to have final examinations
held at the appointed times.
4. To find his/her instructors available during posted office hours or by special appointment.
5. To have his/her instructors arrive for classes punctually.

INSTRUCTOR RIGHTS:

1. To control conduct in the classroom. An instructor may prohibit students from disrupting
class and may expect student conduct to be professional and courteous.
2. To ask a student who is late to leave and to expect him/her to leave without disrupting the
class. The student may be counted absent for that day.
3. To request disruptive students to discontinue disruptive conduct or to leave the classroom.
4. To report disruptive or unprofessional conduct so that disciplinary action can be taken.
5. To expect all students to complete assignments and examinations with absolute honesty.
6. To expect students to sign roll sheets honestly.
7. To limit the opportunities for cheating.
8. To gather evidence of academic dishonesty.
9. To report academic dishonesty so that disciplinary action can be taken.

COLLEGE GRADING SCALE: The College grading scale will apply in this course.

GRADE NUMERICAL VALUE GRADE POINT AVERAGE INTERPRETATION OF ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT


A 89.5 – 100 4.0 EXCELLENT
B 79.5 – 89.49 3.0 ABOVE AVERAGE
C 69.5 – 79.49 2.0 SATISFACTORY
F 69.49 or Below 0.0 UNACCEPTABLE

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GRADING PROCEDURES:
ASSESSMENTS Total Weight of Each Category
1. (5) Mock Board Quizzes (3% each) 15%
2. (6) In-class/Open Book Quizzes (2% each) 12%
3. Student Interactivity 1 10%
4. Student Interactivity 2 8%
5. Exam 1– Chiropractic Principles (short answer, m/c, T/F, 20%
matching format) (Individual Written Assessment #1)
6. Exam 2 – Chiropractic Principles (short answer, m/c, T/F, 20%
matching format) (Individual Written Assessment #2)
7. Final Exam (m/c, T/F, matching format) (Individual 15%
Written Assessment #3)
Total 100%

ASSESSMENT:

Tests and Grading Procedures


1. Exam 1 @ 20% of the total grade.
2. Exam 2 @ 20% of the total grade.
3. Final Exam Comprehensive @ 15% of the total grade.
These assignments are designed to achieve student learning outcome #4, demonstrate the ability to
assess evidence and apply critical thinking in the form of clear, evaluative statements in the case
scenarios and other written assignments. The exams will also achieve student learning outcome #1,
students will analyze and evaluate the chiropractic theories.
Description
The format for Exam 1 and Exam 2 will consist of objective measures, such as multiple choice and
true/false questions and also short answer and essay questions. A more detailed breakdown will
be provided to the student before the exam.
Assessment
Grades for individual tests and your final grade will be assigned according to the DCP grade schema
listed above.
Post-Exam Review Period
Students will have two (2) weeks, from the date exam grades are posted to blackboard, to review
and discuss their exam with the instructor.
4. Two student interactivities for 18% total (see above)
These assignments are designed to achieve student learning outcome #2, students will be active and
engaged participants in discussions by analyzing information presented within the lectures,
presentation, and readings. It will also achieve student learning outcome #3, students will
demonstrate the ability to synthesize information by creating informational student interactivities.
And student learning outcome #4, demonstrate the ability to assess evidence and apply critical
thinking in the form of clear, evaluative statements in the case scenarios and other written
assignments.

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Description
The format for the interactivities is group projects, such as presentations and writing a study guide.
A description and instructions for the activities will be provided in class.
Assessment
Grades for the interactivities will be assigned according to the DCP grade schema listed above.
Post-Interactivity Review Period
Students will have one (1) week, from the date interactivity grades are posted to blackboard, to
review and discuss their interactivity with the instructor.

5. Five Mock Board quizzes @ 3% each of the total grade. (15% total)

These quizzes will be given at the start of the first hour of class on the date listed in the class
schedule. The quizzes will also achieve student learning outcome #1, students will analyze and
evaluate the chiropractic theories.
Description
The format for the quizzes is multiple choice and is designed to review the material presented in
class as well as drawing from student’s cumulative knowledge from their previous classes from
Tri’s 1-5, in the DCP program. The questions will be based off the format used for the NBCE Part II
Principles exam.
Assessment
Grades for the quizzes will be assigned according to the DCP grade schema listed above.
Post-Quiz Review Period
Students will have one (1) week, from the date quiz grades are posted to blackboard, to review and
discuss their quiz with the instructor.

6. Six in-class/ open book quizzes @ 2% each of the total grade. (12% total)
These quizzes will be given during the 50 minute class period. The quizzes will also achieve student
learning outcome #1, students will analyze and evaluate the chiropractic theories. Description
The quizzes will be multiple choice, fill-in the blank, true/false, or short answer. They will focus on
the learner getting information out of the required textbook that supplements the lecture notes.
Students will use the course textbook to complete the in-class quizzes. No electronic or on-line
resources are allowed during the in-class quizzes.
Assessment
Grades for the quizzes will be assigned according to the DCP grade schema listed above.
Post-Quiz Review Period
Students will have one (1) week, from the date quiz grades are posted to blackboard, to review and
discuss their quiz with the instructor.
INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES: Among many teaching strategies, here are few that will be utilized in
class.
• Polling – using socrative or kahoot for interactive quizzes, thumbs up or down, show of hands
• Think‐Pair‐Share – students are given time to think of the issue on their own and then pair with
another to share ideas and then report to the large group
• Case Based Learning- reading or taking case histories which demonstrate the real world
application of the different chiropractic theories

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• Application Cards – at the end of instruction, students write a real world application for the
knowledge on a small card and submit the card to the instructor
• Pass the question – each student writes a question on the top of a piece of paper, the paper is
then passed on to several other students who can provide answers to the question. Each
student needs to provide an answer that has not already been given. The paper is then passed
back to the original question asker.

ADDITIONAL LEARNING RESOURCES: A review will be held in class prior to the midterm and final exams.

ACADEMIC ASSISTANCE:
Parker University, through the Peer Tutoring Program, provides assistance to students seeking additional
support outside the classroom. Student receive tutoring from their peers who have demonstrated high
academic achievement in their courses. The program is managed by the Center for Teaching and
Learning and it affords students with specific instructional needs the opportunity to obtain extra
academic assistance at no cost.

A variety of learning resources are also available through the Center for Teaching and Learning. For
information on face-to-face tutoring, online tutoring, course-specific resources, general learning
resources, or the Learning and Study Strategies Inventory (LASSI), please visit
http://bit.ly/StudentLearningResources.

ACCOMMODATIONS:

Parker University is committed to providing reasonable and appropriate accommodations for all
students with disabilities. According to the Americans with Disabilities Act, “The term ‘disability’ means,
with respect to an individual — (A) a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more
of the major life activities of such individual; (B) a record of such an impairment; or (C) being regarded as
having such an impairment.”
If you are seeking accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Act, you are required to
register with The Office of Student Success and provide appropriate documentation. The Office of
Student Success is located in S209 and questions may be directed to the Assistant Director of Student
Success at 972-438-6932 ext.7156 or via e-mail at amount@parker.edu. Additional information and
forms, including a description of what constitutes appropriate documentation, can be found on the
MyParker campus life webpage under Disability Services.
ACADEMIC POLICIES:
The current College Catalog is the authoritative source for academic policies. This course will be
conducted in accordance with College policies, particularly those related to attendance and grading.

The College attendance policy provides that a student’s grade is lowered by one full grade point when
s/he has missed 20% of the class. For this course, more than 12 missed meetings would result in a grade
being lowered.

If a student has to miss an exam or lab practical, s/he should notify the course director/instructor prior to
the exam unless extenuating circumstances make such notification impossible. When circumstances
prohibit notification of the course director/instructor prior to missing the exam, the student must notify

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the instructor within 72 hours of the missed exam in order to be eligible for a make-up examination.
Written documentation of extenuating circumstances must be submitted with a request for a make-up
examination. The course director/instructor will evaluate the circumstances resulting in the missed
exam/lab practical and determine whether a make-up examination/practical will be available. The time,
location and format of the make-up examination are set by the course director/instructor.

PROFESSIONAL CONDUCT:

The current Student Handbook is the authoritative source for student conduct expectations. This course
will be conducted in accordance with Parker’s policies on student conduct.

Evidence of plagiarism or other forms of academic dishonesty will result in appropriate disciplinary
action being taken. If plagiarism occurs in a group project ALL members of that group will receive a
grade of zero (0) on the project.

Students shall show respect for a diversity of opinions, perspectives and cultures; accurately represent
their work and acknowledge the contributions of others; participate in and commit to related
opportunities; aim to gain knowledge and contribute to the knowledge base of others; understand the
Parker University Student Code of Conduct; represent their profession and the program; and strive to
incorporate and practice disciplinary ideals in their daily lives.

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Overview of the 7 Trimester Capstone Project

The capstone project is an integrated curricular program designed to enhance student preparation for
the clinical experience so that the student will be “clinic ready” at the end of Trimester 7. Here is the
overview of the project to demonstrate how each trimester fits into the preparation for Trimester 7.