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Cold room calculations Product Storage Requirements RefrigerationLoad Calculations PaSe 1 1 Wall Heal Gain 2
Cold room calculations Product Storage Requirements RefrigerationLoad Calculations PaSe 1 1 Wall Heal Gain 2
Cold room calculations Product Storage Requirements RefrigerationLoad Calculations PaSe 1 1 Wall Heal Gain 2
Cold room calculations Product Storage Requirements RefrigerationLoad Calculations PaSe 1 1 Wall Heal Gain 2
Cold room calculations Product Storage Requirements RefrigerationLoad Calculations PaSe 1 1 Wall Heal Gain 2
Cold room calculations Product Storage Requirements RefrigerationLoad Calculations PaSe 1 1 Wall Heal Gain 2
Cold room calculations Product Storage Requirements RefrigerationLoad Calculations PaSe 1 1 Wall Heal Gain 2
Cold room calculations
Product Storage Requirements
RefrigerationLoad Calculations
PaSe
1
1
Wall Heal Gain
2
Air Change Load
2
Product Load
2
Product Temperature Reduction
2
Product
F reex l ng
.2
Product Respiration
3
Heat Equivalent of Occupaw
3
Lighting Load
3
MlscelhneousLoads
3
Cooler Fan Load
3
Example
4
Product Storage Data
5
K Values for Common InsulationMaterials
7
Average Number of Air Cham per 24 hours
for Storags Rooms due to Omr Owing and infiltration
Removed in Cooling lo Air StorageConditims
Equivalentof Occupancy
8
Heat
8
a
Heat
8
Heat
Equivalmt of
Electric Motors
.
8
Allowance for Solar Radiation
Physieal Promties of Materials
9
9
Equipment seiection
Rapid Selection Tables
Piang
Piang

Relrigerant Piping Sektion Oata Corrmtion Factw Tables EquivalentStraight Pipe Lengths in Mtres fw Refrigerant Line Valves and Fittings

in Mtres fw Refrigerant Line Valves and Fittings Suction LineSizes RI2 Suction LineSizes R22 Suction
Suction LineSizes RI2 Suction LineSizes R22 Suction LineSizes R502 Suction Line Sizes R717 (NH31 Liquid
Suction LineSizes RI2
Suction LineSizes R22
Suction LineSizes R502
Suction Line Sizes R717 (NH31
Liquid Line Siz~R12, R22, R502, R717 {NH31
Delivery Line Sizes R12, R22. RW, R717 INH3)
Minimum Capacities to Carry Oil Up Piping
Weight of Refrigerant Pipelines
Liquid Line Subcwling
Weight of Refrigerant Pipelines Liquid Line Subcwling Pipe layout Refrigerant Pipework byout Expndon Valve PMat
Pipe layout Refrigerant Pipework byout Expndon Valve PMat and External Equaliw location Dellwry Lines Condenser
Pipe layout
Refrigerant Pipework byout
Expndon Valve PMat and External Equaliw location
Dellwry Lines
Condenser to Receiver Pipitq
Liquid Line Piping
Suction tine- Liquid Line Heat lntereharrgerr
Temperature Conversion
Conl~rsionFactors
Whilst every care has been taken in cmpil ing this manual. the company cannot be
Whilst every care has been taken in cmpil ing this manual.
the company cannot be reg#onsiblefor its interpretation

-

Acknowledgmmts to ASHRAE Guide
Acknowledgmmts to ASHRAE Guide
taken in cmpil ing this manual. the company cannot be reg#onsiblefor its interpretation - Acknowledgmmts to
taken in cmpil ing this manual. the company cannot be reg#onsiblefor its interpretation - Acknowledgmmts to
taken in cmpil ing this manual. the company cannot be reg#onsiblefor its interpretation - Acknowledgmmts to
PRODUCTSTORAGE REQUIREMENT ', " -Table 1 shows recommended storage cxlmditions for a wide variety of
PRODUCTSTORAGE REQUIREMENT
',
"
-Table 1 shows recommended storage cxlmditions for a wide variety of products. Most fresh fruit and
vegetables are best stored just above their freezing point. Some varieties of fruit and vegetables howaver are
susceptible to cold and freezing injury. Commoditieswhich are highly susceptible to injury are denoted*'A'
in the Table, whilst those commodities which are moderately susceptible are denoted '0'.
General!y, fruit and vegetables are best stored at 8595% relative hurnidity; but there are exceptions, such
as onions, garlic and winter squash where lower humidities are required. Unwrapped fresh and froze0 mat
should be stord at high humidity to avoid excessive weight loss during starage.
frozen produce temperatures are generally shown as -18'C
in the Table, hmwer,it can be reckoned that
food would deteriorate two t~ threa times as slowly at -28" C and two to three times as quickly at 4 C.
Most meat and meat products are excellent for freezing, and it is difficuIt to detect any difference between
fresh and frozen meat after freezing, provided care has been taken over freezing and thawing. Meat should
be frozen as smn as possible after slaughtering and conditioning to rninimise rancidity. This particular1y
applies to pork and bacon.
Most vegetables which are subsequently cooked, freeze well. They should however be correctly blanched
Most vegetables which are subsequently cooked, freeze well. They should however be correctly blanched

prior to freezing to prevmt enzymatic action which would othwwise cause undesirable chemiml changes in the frozen vegetable. Vegetableswhich are eaten raw are not generally satisfactory forfrsezing. Many fruits are satisfactory for freezing but a suitable variety must be chosen in each case.

but a suitable variety must be chosen in each case. ' ere detailed information regarding the

' ere detailed information regarding the dorage of fruit and vegetables can be obtained through the

'stry of Agriculture Devetopment and Advisory Services, Information about mat storage can mined from the
'stry of Agriculture Devetopment and Advisory Services, Information about mat storage can
mined from the Meat Research Institute.
TEMPERATURE
DIFFERENCE DEG. F.
Meat Research Institute. TEMPERATURE DIFFERENCE DEG. F. A Gum to Room Rakilva Huditk tw Vubw YmmpzIwa
A Gum to Room Rakilva Huditk tw Vubw YmmpzIwa Olffrmc+land Ew~th Tmpm~ra(Bad w taled Morm
A Gum to Room Rakilva
Huditk tw Vubw YmmpzIwa
Olffrmc+land Ew~th
Tmpm~ra(Bad w taled Morm
with rtady 0m4thp mnditknr)

&

-

-

'

In pracriw it b sntremsly difficult to pd413, mimain or mearue tb relative humidity wilHn
In pracriw it b sntremsly difficult to
pd413, mimain or mearue tb
relative humidity wilHn s c~Ldstore.
Many wrying fecto~lsuch as
opanlngs, cornpasor running tlm,
mrdmnringp.~,~plratiq
tonppra~uredifferma, at&, dimlly
dfwt ~hsrelativa humidity.
at&, dimlly dfwt ~hsrelativa humidity. I 5f$A PER CENT RELATIVE TEMPERATURE DIFFERENCE HUMIDITY
I 5f$A PER CENT RELATIVE TEMPERATURE DIFFERENCE HUMIDITY AT STEADY
I
5f$A
PER CENT RELATIVE
TEMPERATURE DIFFERENCE
HUMIDITY AT STEADY
DEG.C STATE CONDITIONS
DEG.C
STATE CONDITIONS
DIFFERENCE HUMIDITY AT STEADY DEG.C STATE CONDITIONS REFRIGERATlOPl LOAD CALCULATIONS The following loads must
REFRIGERATlOPl LOAD CALCULATIONS The following loads must be calculsted when aserring cooling rquiremenU for refrigerated
REFRIGERATlOPl LOAD CALCULATIONS
The following loads must be calculsted when aserring cooling rquiremenU for refrigerated cold room:-
1) Wall, floor and ceiling heat gain due to conduction of haat through cold room walls.
2) Air change load due to ingress of freshair through infiltrationand door opening.
31 Product load required to cool incoming product down to storage room tempratwe, plus where applicable
the load to freeze the product or to cater for the heat of respiration.
4) Hat equivalent of occupancy of cold room operatives.
4) Hat equivalent of occupancy of cold room operatives.

51 Lighting load,

6) Any other miscellaneous loads imposed by other appliances operating in the cold room, 7)Cooler
6) Any other miscellaneous loads imposed by other appliances operating in the cold room,
7)Cooler fan load.
* I - : q r I $i 4 1 \ All the following loads
* I - : q r I $i 4 1 \ All the following loads
* I - : q r I
*
I
-
:
q
r
I

$i

4

1

\

All the following loads must be assessed and added together after which suitably sized equipment
All the following loads must be assessed and added together after which suitably sized equipment can be
dected. It is normal practice to select equipment so that it has enough capacity to cope with the daily
load without runhing continuousl~.This leaves time for def rating. In the case of high temperature rooms
using natural, ar off cycle, defrosting, a 16 hour running time is aimed at.
0.
=
Total extemal surfacearea ma
=
Temperature difference across wall ' C
.I 1 With forced defrost systems, an 18 hour running time is satisfactory. 1. WALL
.I 1
With forced defrost systems, an 18 hour running time is satisfactory.
1. WALL HEAT GAIN
WallHeatGain
=
KxAxTD
I
=
C&fficientofthermalconductivityforaspecificthick&afwatlw/m1
"C
(see Table 2).

I

NOTE:

For cold rooms having sunlit walls the TD needs to be increased in accordance with
For cold rooms having sunlit walls the TD needs to be increased in accordance with table 7.
This allows for eflmnof solar radiation.

I

2. AIR CHANGE LOAD
2. AIR CHANGE LOAD
- Room ' Heat Removed per . Number of Air X Air Volume (m3) Cubic
- Room
'
Heat Removed per
.
Number of Air
X
Air
Volume (m3)
Cubic Metreof Air
(Table 4)
-
ChangesperDay(Table3)
Load (W)
86.400
86.400

----

The average number of air changesper day for various wlum~of cold room is shown in
The average number of air changesper day for various wlum~of cold room is shown in Table 3. '
The figure of 86,400is the number of seconds in a day. This is introduced to convert from jou lss pw day to
watts.
The amount of heat to bq rernpvd'in cop ling a cubic'metre of air from ambient duwn to the room
*
L
I.
condition is shown in Table 4.
3. PRODUCT LOAD
Product load can be divided into four types
Product temperaturq reduction above freexing Product freezing Product temperature reduction below freezing Product
Product temperaturq reduction above freexing
Product freezing
Product temperature reduction below freezing
Product respiration bad

11 '

I

below freezing Product respiration bad 11 ' I Weight of Product ProductTemperature Product Specific
Weight of Product ProductTemperature Product Specific " = LoBdedpeiDayIkg) Reduction ("C) Heat ( kJ/kg OC)
Weight of Product
ProductTemperature
Product Specific
"
=
LoBdedpeiDayIkg)
Reduction ("C)
Heat ( kJ/kg OC) (Table 11
load (W)
4
.-*
86,400
Heat ( kJ/kg OC) (Table 11 load (W) 4 .-* 86,400 / 3 . 2 PRODUCT

/

3 . 2 PRODUCT FREEZING

Weight of Product Latent Heat of Product = Loaded ~r Day (kg) Freezing (kJ/kgJf able
Weight of Product
Latent Heat of
Product
= Loaded ~r
Day (kg)
Freezing (kJ/kgJf able 1)
Load IW)
86,400
MOTE:
It may be specified that the product is to be frozen over a period of less then a day, in which mse
the load will need to be increased accordingly.
The heat load of any product packing material must be included, also any handling equipment such as
trolleys.
The heat load of any product packing material must be included, also any handling equipment such
The heat load of any product packing material must be included, also any handling equipment such
C. r -- pt;;,&< . 65- * a& * - ,! 7 bL4. - :'

C.

r

--
--
pt;;,&< . 65- * a& * - ,! 7 bL4. - :' . . .
pt;;,&< .
65- *
a&
*
- ,! 7 bL4. - :'
.
.
.
a
L.,3.3 PRODUCT RESPIRATION
Fresh fruits and vegetables in storage ace alive, consequently their heat of respiration must be included in
'
5
load calculations.
0.

Product

( W ) (W)

Total Weight of Heat of = Product in Room (kg) Respiration (kJ/kp)(Table 1)
Total Weight of
Heat of
=
Product in Room (kg)
Respiration (kJ/kp)(Table 1)

86,400

* 5. Table 1 shows specific heat, latent heat and heat of respiration for a
*
5.
Table 1 shows specific heat, latent heat and heat of respiration for a wide variety of produce.

Z

4, HEAT EQUIVALENT OF OCCUPANCY
4, HEAT EQUIVALENT OF OCCUPANCY
Operatives working in cold rooms will produce a heat load. shown in Table 5 at
Operatives working in cold rooms will produce a heat load. shown in Table 5 at different cold store
temperatures. The number of operatives working in the room, and hours per day that they are actually
in the room differs with each application and has to be estimated on a common sense basis.
Number of Number of Hours of Occupancy Heat Equivalent per Occupant (W) (Table 6)
Number of
Number of Hours
of Occupancy
Heat Equivalent
per Occupant (W) (Table 6)
of Occupancy Heat Equivalent per Occupant (W) (Table 6) 24 I 5. LIGHTfNG LOAD Lighting levels

24

I

5. LIGHTfNG LOAD Lighting levels vary in different stores,but when information is not available it
5. LIGHTfNG LOAD
Lighting levels vary in different stores,but when information is not available it is reasonable to assume an
intensity of 10 watts per square metre of floor area. Lights would normally be operated by a door switch
so the number of hours per day during which lights are on can tx taken to be the same as the occupancy.
Lighting Hours of Lighting er Power (W1 X Operation Load IW) 6. MISCELLANEOUS LQADS When
Lighting
Hours of
Lighting
er
Power (W1
X Operation
Load IW)
6. MISCELLANEOUS LQADS
When the equipment load is intermittent calculate as follows
When the equipment load is intermittent calculate as follows - 4- + ,siiscellaneous Loads (W) Equiphent

-

4-

+ ,siiscellaneous

Loads (W) (W)

Equiphent Hours of X' = Output {W1 Oper&ion
Equiphent
Hours of
X'
= Output {W1
Oper&ion

,

If this load,is high in relation to the others it is advisable to consider it
If this load,is high in relation to the others it is advisable to consider it as continuous in which case
MISCELLANEOUS LOAD
=
Equipment Watts

"

7. COOLER FAN LOAD

LOAD = Equipment Watts " 7. COOLER FAN LOAD this bad is continuous and Motor Heat
this bad is continuous and Motor Heat shown in the relevant catalogue must be included.
this bad is continuous and Motor Heat shown in the relevant catalogue must be included.
-- Running Total Load x 24 Time ihra) System Capacity
--
Running
Total Load x
24
Time ihra)
System Capacity
THE SUMMATION OF ALL LOADS GIVES THE TOTAL LOAD; IT CAN BE COMPARED WITH THE
THE SUMMATION OF ALL LOADS GIVES THE TOTAL LOAD; IT CAN BE COMPARED
WITH THE SELECTED SYSTEM CAPACITY TO GIVE DAILY RUNNING TIME.

-

OF ALL LOADS GIVES THE TOTAL LOAD; IT CAN BE COMPARED WITH THE SELECTED SYSTEM CAPACITY
OF ALL LOADS GIVES THE TOTAL LOAD; IT CAN BE COMPARED WITH THE SELECTED SYSTEM CAPACITY
OF ALL LOADS GIVES THE TOTAL LOAD; IT CAN BE COMPARED WITH THE SELECTED SYSTEM CAPACITY
EXAMPLE REFRIGERATION LOAD CALC.VLAJ)ON. . . . . . , ,-- +. Appliesliwr MiwU usgetah
EXAMPLE REFRIGERATION LOAD CALC.VLAJ)ON. . . . . . , ,-- +. Appliesliwr MiwU usgetah
EXAMPLE
REFRIGERATION LOAD CALC.VLAJ)ON.
.
.
.
.
.
,
,--
+.
Appliesliwr
MiwU usgetah stor-
Prducl ~t~ingat Mc,100 kglday
OutsideAmbieht
Rmm Tmmqmmtwr
RoomDimnsiom
bngth 226m Wdth 2.Sm Hdaht 2,2m
lntml
Ertrrnd
Lngvh 2.4m
Width Z.&n
H&g?tt2.3m
Rwm Volum
2.25
n 2.66 r
2.2m
f3.tma
I
Lrke Arm
4
*
Outri& w8II8
(2.4 +2.0)
x 2 u 2.36
24.44nr'
floor and Culling
2.4 n 26 x 2
13.44m1
Totrl her =
37.88d
lnulrtion
80mm Foaned hlyurlthan
IC Value
0.24 w/mZ 'C
80mm Foaned hlyurlthan IC Value 0.24 w/mZ 'C $. Alr Cm Lord I- Rrrom Volurm 13.lm3
$. Alr Cm Lord I- Rrrom Volurm 13.lm3 Wumber of Chmw of Air D.y 28.4
$. Alr Cm Lord
I- Rrrom Volurm
13.lm3
Wumber of Chmw of Air
D.y
28.4
.
hat Rmimd plr Cubic Mm of Air
70.6 kJ
Lard
1X 1 x 70,W x
28.4
80,400 +
80,400
+
Mm of Air 70.6 kJ Lard 1X 1 x 70,W x 28.4 80,400 + 3.3 HctdRrpkrtbnbd
Mm of Air 70.6 kJ Lard 1X 1 x 70,W x 28.4 80,400 + 3.3 HctdRrpkrtbnbd
Mm of Air 70.6 kJ Lard 1X 1 x 70,W x 28.4 80,400 + 3.3 HctdRrpkrtbnbd
3.3 HctdRrpkrtbnbd Weipht d all Prduct Storad lieat of Respiration
3.3
HctdRrpkrtbnbd
Weipht d all Prduct Storad
lieat of Respiration
w
w
Weipht d all Prduct Storad lieat of Respiration w 4. Hrl Equlvlknt oirOc#i#n~y Mat Equhlait par
Weipht d all Prduct Storad lieat of Respiration w 4. Hrl Equlvlknt oirOc#i#n~y Mat Equhlait par
4. Hrl Equlvlknt oirOc#i#n~y Mat Equhlait par hrrm Nu& of Persons )lour of Oeeulmc~ Lond
4. Hrl Equlvlknt oirOc#i#n~y
Mat Equhlait par hrrm
Nu&
of Persons
)lour of Oeeulmc~
Lond
6.WU~S Liphuno- Horn d illumination w
6.WU~S
Liphuno-
Horn d illumination
w
of Oeeulmc~ Lond 6.WU~S Liphuno- Horn d illumination w 16 hr running PA ELIMINARY SELECTION TO
of Oeeulmc~ Lond 6.WU~S Liphuno- Horn d illumination w 16 hr running PA ELIMINARY SELECTION TO
16 hr running PA ELIMINARY SELECTION TO MATCH A DUTY OF la7 IS KBH48 UNIT
16 hr running
PA ELIMINARY SELECTION TO MATCH A DUTY OF la7 IS KBH48 UNIT
P
. 7. Fmlnputhwr (KBH491
180W -
klam plr Day Owration
16
j
6-
Lw
1BO r
24
16
.
Totet Lord =
I67B.7W
FIMAL SELECTION TO MATCH THE DUTY OF 1679.7W is KIH65, TD 4B0c
, -
6- Lw 1BO r 24 16 . Totet Lord = I67B.7W FIMAL SELECTION TO MATCH THE
6- Lw 1BO r 24 16 . Totet Lord = I67B.7W FIMAL SELECTION TO MATCH THE

-

.-

UPROXIMATL WCCIFIC PRODUCT ST OR^^ nELaTIvt HKHCS~ WECIFIC L&ltr~ HIAT OT I&K~ yv. HULHDIW ITORA~C
UPROXIMATL WCCIFIC PRODUCT ST OR^^ nELaTIvt HKHCS~ WECIFIC L&ltr~ HIAT OT I&K~ yv. HULHDIW ITORA~C
UPROXIMATL
WCCIFIC
PRODUCT
ST OR^^
nELaTIvt
HKHCS~
WECIFIC
L&ltr~
HIAT
OT
I&K~
yv.
HULHDIW
ITORA~C
r REEZ~WG
24-1
*g~t
HEAT MLW
HRAT
~UI~ATIW
C
%
LlCC
PqIMT
f AEtZlWO
lllLtZlUO
C
Wg'C
klMwC
URI
um
MEAT AND MEAT PRODUCTS
Bacun-Fresh
1.1 -4.4
85
2-6
weeks
-2
1.83
1.1
60
Frozen
-18
90-95
4-6
months
Beef -
Fresh
0-1.1.
88-92
.
1-6 w-mks
-2
3.2
1.67
231
,
Frozen
-18
90-95
9-t2months
Ham -
Fresh
011
85-90
7-12
days
-2
2.53
1.46
167
Frozen
-18
90-95
6-8 months
Lamb - Fresh
Frozen
11
85-90
5-12dayr
-2
3.0
1,86
216
-18
90-95
8-10 months
Lard
7
24-95.
4-8 months
2.09
1.42
210
-18
90-95
12-14
months
-2
Liven - Froxan
-18
90-95
3-4 months
Pork -
0-
1
85-80
3-7 days
2.13
1.3
.
128
Fresh
Frozen
-18
90-95
4-6 months
-2.7
Poultry- Fmsh
0
85-80
33
1.76
246
Frozen
-18
90-96
1 week
8-1 2 months
1.67
228
Rabbit- Fresh
01.1
90-96
1-5dap
3.1
Frozen
-18
90-95
0-6
manth
234
216
Samager-Frsh
0-1.t
85-90
3-12 days
-2
3.72
Frozen
-18
90-95
2-6 months
Veal -
Fresh
0-1.1
90-96
5-10days
-2
3.08
1.67
223
From
-18
90-95
8-10rnonrhs
- PRODUCT STORAGE DATA
- PRODUCT STORAGE DATA

c. *.

'

,-

C'

-

,

,

\.
\.
5-10days -2 3.08 1.67 223 From -18 90-95 8-10rnonrhs - PRODUCT STORAGE DATA c. *. '
.
.
5-10days -2 3.08 1.67 223 From -18 90-95 8-10rnonrhs - PRODUCT STORAGE DATA c. *. '
I PRODUCT R-ARKI LWt I I I C I I I I 1 FRUIT 4
I PRODUCT R-ARKI LWt
I
PRODUCT
R-ARKI
LWt
I PRODUCT R-ARKI LWt I I I C I I I I 1 FRUIT 4 Apples
I I I C I I I I 1 FRUIT 4 Apples -1.1-3,3 90 1-45
I
I
I
C
I
I
I
I
1
FRUIT
4
Apples
-1.1-3,3
90
1-45
months
-1.5
3.64
1.88
281
1.92
B-
same A
Apricots
-0.6-0
.
90
1-2 weeks
-1.05
3.63
1.92
284
Avocados
72-13
85-90
2-4 weeks
-0.3
3.01
1.67
219
25.6
A
,
'
Bananas
t3.3-15
90
5-lodays
-0.8
3.35
1.76
251
A'
Bladtberries
-0.6-0
95
3 days
-0.8
3.68
1.92
284
Cherries
-0.6-0
90-95
2-3 weeks
-1.8
3.64
1.88
280
1.8
Coconuts
7
80-85
I-2mmths
-0.8
2.43
1.42
156
Crankrrier
2.2-4.4
90-95
2-4
mmths
-0.8
3.77
1.93
288
1.1
B
Currants
-0.6-0
9&95
10-14days
-1.0
3.68
1.88
280
Deter
Dried
-18orO
Below75
6-12months
-16.7
1.51.
1.08
67
Figs
Dried
0-4.4
50-60
9-12 months
1.63
1.
80
Goosbrries
-0.6-0
90-95
2-4
weeks
-1.1
3.77
1,93
293
Grapefrult
10-16
85-90
4-6 weeks
-1.1
3.81
1,93
293
3.6
B
Gram
-1-0
85-90
1-6monthr
-2.2
3.60
1.84
270
0.4
B
Lemons
14.4-15.686-88
1-6monchs
.-1.4
3.81
1.93
296
4.24
A
Oranges
0-9
85-90
3-12
-0.8
3.77
1.92
288
1.68
3
Peaches
-0.6-0
90
2-4
wwks
-0.94
3.77
1.92
288
1.34
8'
,
Pears
-1.75
O,B 90-95
2-7 weeks
-1.5
3.60
1.88
274
0.93
3
Pineapplm
Mature Green 10- 13
06-90
3-4 waeks
-1.0
3.68
1.88
283
Ripe
7.2
85-90
2-4
weeks
-1.1
3.68
1.88
283
Plum
-0.&0
00-95
2-4
weeks
-0.83 3.63
1.88
274
0.64
B
n
Pamegranates
0
90
2-4
weeks
-3.0
Raspberries
-0.&O
811-95
2-3
days
-0.6
3.56
1.86
284
5.47
Strawberries
-0.6-0
90-95
5-7
days
-0.8
3.85
1.76
300
3.78
Tmgeriner
0-3.3
96-90
2-4wwkr
-1.05
3.77
1.03
290
Tmgeriner 0-3.3 96-90 2-4wwkr -1.05 3.77 1.03 290 FISH Fish-Fresh 0.6-2.0 90-95 5-115 days Fish-Smoked
FISH Fish-Fresh 0.6-2.0 90-95 5-115 days Fish-Smoked 4.4-10 WM) 6-8 months Fish-Brine salted 4.4-1 0
FISH
Fish-Fresh
0.6-2.0
90-95
5-115 days
Fish-Smoked
4.4-10
WM)
6-8 months
Fish-Brine salted
4.4-1 0
90-95
tk12 months
Fish-
Mild curd
-2.2-1.7
75-90
4-8
months
Fish-Frozen
-18
90-95
6-1 2 months
Shell Fish-Fresh
.I -1.1-0.6
85-95
3-7
days
Shell Fish-Frozen
-18 to-29
90-95
3-8 manths
3-7 days Shell Fish-Frozen -18 to-29 90-95 3-8 manths i Bumr 04.4 80-85 2 months I
3-7 days Shell Fish-Frozen -18 to-29 90-95 3-8 manths i Bumr 04.4 80-85 2 months I
3-7 days Shell Fish-Frozen -18 to-29 90-95 3-8 manths i Bumr 04.4 80-85 2 months I
i Bumr 04.4 80-85 2 months I Butter-Frozen -18 70-85 8- 12 months Cheese -1.f-1.7
i Bumr
04.4
80-85
2 months
I Butter-Frozen
-18
70-85
8-
12 months
Cheese
-1.f-1.7
66-70
Cream
-18
-
2-3 months
Lw Cream
-18
-
1-2
months
-.
Milk-F luid
Pasteurized
0.6
-
7 days
-
Conden&
4.4
several months
Evaporated
Rmmtemp
1 year
Milk-Dried
Whole Milk
7-1
3
low
few months
Non fat
7-13
low
several month
Eggs-shell
-1 -7-0
86-90
5-6 manth
-
Eggs-whole
liq.
0
1
year
YISCE LLANEOUS
Bmr-UK
12.2
3-6 weeks
'
Bred
-18
4-6 rnmh
Honey
Below 10
1
year
HOPS
-1.6-0
several months
-
log
-4
Mushroom
Spawn-Manure
1.t
8 months
Grain
0-4.4
2
weeks
Nwrery stock
0-2
3-6
months
Salad dl
2
t year
Margarine
2
1
year
1.t 8 months Grain 0-4.4 2 weeks Nwrery stock 0-2 3-6 months Salad dl 2 t
TABLE 2 K VALUES FOR COMMON INSULATION MATERIALS W/deg C MATERIAL DENSITY INSULATION THICKNESS mm
TABLE 2 K VALUES FOR COMMON INSULATION MATERIALS W/deg C MATERIAL DENSITY INSULATION THICKNESS mm
TABLE 2
K VALUES FOR COMMON INSULATION MATERIALS W/deg C
MATERIAL
DENSITY
INSULATION THICKNESS mm
-
kg/m3
20
40
MI
80.
(&I20
140
160
180
200
0.37 0.31
Cork -baked slab
112
1.8
0.925 0.62 0.46
0.26
0.23
0.2
0.18
144
2.7
1.05
0.70
0.52
0.42
0.35
0.m
0.26
0.23
0.21
Cork - baked slab wet
Cork - raw granulated
192
2.45
1.22
0.82
0.61
0.49
0.41
0.35
0.31
0.27
0,24
80-1 12
2.45
1.22
0.82
0.61
0.49
0.41
0.35 0.31
0,27
0.24
Cork- baked granulated
80-96
1.95
0-97,
0.65
0.49
0.39 0.32
0.28
0.24
0.22
0.19
Glass wool- white
80
1
0.82
0.55
0.41
0.33
0.27
0.24
0.21
0.18
0.16
48-80
1.65
0.82
0.55
Glass wool- bitumen bonded
0.41
0.33
-0.27
0.24
0.21
0.18
0.16
Kapox
16
1
0.80
0.53
0.40
0.32
0.26
0.23
0.20 0.18
0.16
Polystyrene
24
1.65
0.82
0.55
0.41
0.33
0.27
0.24
0.21
0.18
0.16
32
1.50.
0.75
-0.50
0.37
0.30
0.25
0.21
0.19
0.17,.0.15
64
1-65
0.82
0.53
0.41
0.33 0.27
0.24 0.21
0.18
0.16
88
1.75
0.87
0.58
0.44
0.35 0
025
0.22
0.19
0.17
'- Polyurethane- Foamed ,
@
0.95
0.47
0.32
P.24.
6.7$
0.16
0.14
0.12
0.10
0.10
Polyurethane - cellullar
Slag wool felted
48
1.90
0.95
0.63
0.47
0.38 0.32
0.27
0.24
0.21
0.19
136
1
0.84
0.56
0.42
0.34
0.28
0.24
0.21
0.19 0.17
Stag wool loose
Walt: board insulating
Wood wool slabs
176
1.82
0.91
0.61
0.45
0.36 0.30
0.26 0.23
0.20
0.18
320
2.9
1.45
097
0.72
0.58 0.48
0.41
0.36
0.32 0.29
480
4.7
2.35
1.56
1.17
0.94
0.78
0.67
0.57
0.52 0.47
TABLE 3 AVERAGE NUMBER Of AIR CHANGES PER 24 HOURS FOR STORAGE ROOMS DUE TO
TABLE 3
AVERAGE NUMBER Of AIR CHANGES PER 24 HOURS FOR STORAGE ROOMS DUE TO WOA OPENING AND
1NFlLTRATlON
HOURS FOR STORAGE ROOMS DUE TO WOA OPENING AND 1NFlLTRATlON . ROW AIRCHANGE ROW ,AIRCHANGE ROW
. ROW AIRCHANGE ROW ,AIRCHANGE ROW VOLUME PER 24 HRS VOLUME PER 24 HRS VOLUME
.
ROW
AIRCHANGE
ROW
,AIRCHANGE
ROW
VOLUME
PER 24 HRS
VOLUME
PER 24 HRS
VOLUME
AIRCHANGE
PER 24 HRS
ROW
VOLUME
AIRC~~ANGES
PER 24 HRS
ABOVE OOC
2.6
70 20
22
100
9 6W
3.2
3.0
63
25
19.5
15Q
7
800
28
4.0 .
53
30
17.5
200
'6
tOOO
2.4
5.0
47
40
15.0
250
5.3
1500
I35
7.5 38
50
13.0
300
4.0
20QO
1-66
10.0
32
80
4w
12.0
4.1
2500
1.45
1SD
.
80
10.9
26
500'
3.6
3000
1.3
N.B.
for heavy usage multiply the above values by 2
For long storage multiply the atiovo values by 0.6
.
.
TABLE 4
cmmnms
HEAT REMOVED IN COOL~NGAIR to STORAGE R-
Wlo joule per eubi marl (k~lrn']
WT$tE AIR CONDITION
tnse an.
m% ae.
B% me.
70%flH
80WH
WWH
WH BoKRH
60MH
-
-
2-77
7.0
18.a
23.3
la5
13.8
la6
B.O
30.87
37.5
228
26.2
333
43.7
50.5
349
37.8
4R8
46.4
W9
62.8
44.6
482
51.2
%8
68.4
73.6
56.8
5a4
61.4
&I
77.0
84.2
64.5
68.2
71.3
76.1
07.2
94.6
734
77.1
80.4
853
M.6
104x3
629
808
80.1
1
107.0
1140
92.6
96.5
99.8
lax)
117.0
125.0
1020
10&0
IlOa
Il5.0
127.0
IS0
113.0
Ill0
121.0
126.0
138.0
147.0
TABLE 5 .
HEAT EQUIVALENT OF OCCUPANCY
AOOPA
HEAT EQUlVALENT
TEMPERATURE *C
PER PERSON
TABLE 6
10"c
210 W
HEAT EQUIVALENT OF ELECTRIC MOTORS
5°C
240 W
WAO FAeTOR MOfOR LOSS FACTOR
O*C
270 W
PERUNlTWAn
PERUNlTWAn
-5'c
3wW
MOTOR AATING
IN REF. SPACE
OUTSIDE REF. SPACE
- 1oOc
mw
-
50W - 375W
1.67
1
-15'~ .
36OW
375W - 2.2 kW
1.45
1
-20°c
390W
2.2 kW-
15kW
1.16
1
-25'~
420 W
- 50W - 375W 1.67 1 -15'~ . 36OW 375W - 2.2 kW 1.45 1 -20°c
- 50W - 375W 1.67 1 -15'~ . 36OW 375W - 2.2 kW 1.45 1 -20°c
. TABLE 7 -
. TABLE 7
-
+
+

ALLOWANCE FOR SOLAR RADlATlON "C To be added to T.D. in wall heat gain calculation to compensate for run effect. Not to be used forsair

conditioning design.
conditioning design.
TYPE OF SURFACE East Wall South Wall West Wall Flat Rw Dark coloured surfaces such
TYPE OF SURFACE
East Wall
South Wall
West Wall
Flat Rw
Dark coloured surfaces such as slate roofing, tar
4,4
2.8
"
4.4
11
.
rwfing, black paints.
Medium coloured surfaces, such as unpainted wood,
3.3
3.3
8.3
brick, red tile, dark cement, red, grey or green
paint.
Light coloured surfaces such as white
stone, cobured
2.2
1 -0
2.2
5
cement, white paint.
stone, cobured 2.2 1 -0 2.2 5 cement, white paint. TABLE 8 PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF MATERIALS
TABLE 8 PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF MATERIALS
TABLE 8
PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF MATERIALS
Specific PRODUCTS Density Hsat kdm' kJ/kg mlC 1 Aluminium Bakelite laminated ' 0rass Brickwrk r
Specific
PRODUCTS
Density
Hsat
kdm'
kJ/kg mlC
1
Aluminium
Bakelite laminated '
0rass
Brickwrk r
,,
Concrete
Copper
-
Cork
Baked slab
J
011s
- crown
Flint
Pyrex
Iron
- Grey Cast
Wrought
Lead
11328
0.12
Nickel
8880
0.42
928
1.34
paw
Polythene
958
2.3
Polystyrene
1048
t .26
Rubber
I504
2.00
Steel
7808
0.50
fin
7328
0.21
Wood
- Fir
400
2.72
Oak
752
2.39
Pine
544
2.80
Zinc
7088
0.38
I504 2.00 Steel 7808 0.50 fin 7328 0.21 Wood - Fir 400 2.72 Oak 752 2.39
TABLE 9
TABLE 9
TABLE 9 RAPID SELECTION TABLES +Z'C COLD ROOM wmaE ROOM INSIDE ROOM now TOTAL COOLER

RAPID SELECTION TABLES +Z'C COLD ROOM

wmaE ROOM INSIDE ROOM now TOTAL COOLER
wmaE ROOM
INSIDE ROOM
now
TOTAL
COOLER
COLD ROOM wmaE ROOM INSIDE ROOM now TOTAL COOLER DtMENSIONS DIMENSIONS VOLUME LOAD SELECTION mLxWxH
DtMENSIONS DIMENSIONS VOLUME LOAD SELECTION mLxWxH ~LxWXH m3 W 1.2xl.Bx2.15 1,05x1,46x2.0 3.0 700 SU21
DtMENSIONS
DIMENSIONS
VOLUME
LOAD SELECTION
mLxWxH
~LxWXH
m3
W
1.2xl.Bx2.15
1,05x1,46x2.0
3.0
700
SU21
SELECTION DATA
1.2xZOx2.15
1.05~1.86~2.0
29
770
SU28
AMBl ENT
30'~60% RH
f.6x t,8 n2.15
1.45,~1.45~20
4.2
800
SU28
INSULATION
FOAMED POLYURETHAK
1.6~20a2.15 1,45x 1BSx2.0
5.4
915
SU28
THICKNESS
75 mrn
1.8~2,4~2,16 1.45~2.26~2.0
86
loOO
SU35
PRODUCT LOAD
16 kg PER CUBIC
2.0~2.0~2~351.86~1.85~2.2
7,6
1100
SU35
METRE PER DAY COOLEL
2.0 M 2.4 x 2.35
1.85~2.25 x 2.2
9.2
1140
sU36
THROUGH 6-c
2.4x2.4x2.35
2.25~2,26%2,2
11.1
1230
SV35
PROOUCTSPECIFICHEAT
38kJ/kgdegC
2.4
x 2.0 x 2.35
226x
2.65
x 2.2
13.1
1420
K6H46
LIGHTINGLOAO
t0Wlrn2 FLOOR AREA
2.4
n 3.2x 2.55
2.25 x 3.05 x 2.4
16.5
1620
K6H45
RUNNING TIME
76 HOURS
2.8 * 3.2x
2.55
265
x
3,05
x
24
19.4
.t 720
K6H45
2.8
x BB x 2.68
2.65 x
3.46 x
2.4
22.0
1840
K6H45
3.2
x 4.0 x 2*65
305 x
335 x 2.4
28.2
2100
K6H65
3.2 ~t4.4 x 2.95
3.05
x 4.26 x
2.8
76.3
2360
KIHGS
3.2~6.2~2.85 3.06xS.d5~2.8 43.1
2910
KBHHb
3.8 x 5.6 x 2.95
3.45 x 5.45 x 2.8
52.6
3210
KW8b
3.6x7.2x2.95
3.45~7.05~2.8
BB.1
3670
K6H86
3210 KW8b 3.6x7.2x2.95 3.45~7.05~2.8 BB.1 3670 K6H86 SELECTION DATA AMBIENT 30°c WRH INSULATION FOAM=
3210 KW8b 3.6x7.2x2.95 3.45~7.05~2.8 BB.1 3670 K6H86 SELECTION DATA AMBIENT 30°c WRH INSULATION FOAM=
3210 KW8b 3.6x7.2x2.95 3.45~7.05~2.8 BB.1 3670 K6H86 SELECTION DATA AMBIENT 30°c WRH INSULATION FOAM=
3210 KW8b 3.6x7.2x2.95 3.45~7.05~2.8 BB.1 3670 K6H86 SELECTION DATA AMBIENT 30°c WRH INSULATION FOAM=
3210 KW8b 3.6x7.2x2.95 3.45~7.05~2.8 BB.1 3670 K6H86 SELECTION DATA AMBIENT 30°c WRH INSULATION FOAM=
3210 KW8b 3.6x7.2x2.95 3.45~7.05~2.8 BB.1 3670 K6H86 SELECTION DATA AMBIENT 30°c WRH INSULATION FOAM=
3210 KW8b 3.6x7.2x2.95 3.45~7.05~2.8 BB.1 3670 K6H86 SELECTION DATA AMBIENT 30°c WRH INSULATION FOAM=
3210 KW8b 3.6x7.2x2.95 3.45~7.05~2.8 BB.1 3670 K6H86 SELECTION DATA AMBIENT 30°c WRH INSULATION FOAM=
3210 KW8b 3.6x7.2x2.95 3.45~7.05~2.8 BB.1 3670 K6H86 SELECTION DATA AMBIENT 30°c WRH INSULATION FOAM=
3210 KW8b 3.6x7.2x2.95 3.45~7.05~2.8 BB.1 3670 K6H86 SELECTION DATA AMBIENT 30°c WRH INSULATION FOAM=
3210 KW8b 3.6x7.2x2.95 3.45~7.05~2.8 BB.1 3670 K6H86 SELECTION DATA AMBIENT 30°c WRH INSULATION FOAM=
3210 KW8b 3.6x7.2x2.95 3.45~7.05~2.8 BB.1 3670 K6H86 SELECTION DATA AMBIENT 30°c WRH INSULATION FOAM=
3210 KW8b 3.6x7.2x2.95 3.45~7.05~2.8 BB.1 3670 K6H86 SELECTION DATA AMBIENT 30°c WRH INSULATION FOAM=
3210 KW8b 3.6x7.2x2.95 3.45~7.05~2.8 BB.1 3670 K6H86 SELECTION DATA AMBIENT 30°c WRH INSULATION FOAM=
3210 KW8b 3.6x7.2x2.95 3.45~7.05~2.8 BB.1 3670 K6H86 SELECTION DATA AMBIENT 30°c WRH INSULATION FOAM=
3210 KW8b 3.6x7.2x2.95 3.45~7.05~2.8 BB.1 3670 K6H86 SELECTION DATA AMBIENT 30°c WRH INSULATION FOAM=
3210 KW8b 3.6x7.2x2.95 3.45~7.05~2.8 BB.1 3670 K6H86 SELECTION DATA AMBIENT 30°c WRH INSULATION FOAM=
3210 KW8b 3.6x7.2x2.95 3.45~7.05~2.8 BB.1 3670 K6H86 SELECTION DATA AMBIENT 30°c WRH INSULATION FOAM=
SELECTION DATA AMBIENT 30°c WRH INSULATION FOAM= POLYURETHANl THICKNESS PRODUCT LOAD 76 mm 16 kg
SELECTION DATA
AMBIENT
30°c WRH
INSULATION
FOAM=
POLYURETHANl
THICKNESS
PRODUCT LOAD
76 mm
16 kg PER CUBIC
METREPER DAY COOLEE THROUGH BOC a.
METREPER DAY COOLEE
THROUGH BOC
a.
PRODUCT SPEC1FIC HEAT t.8 kJlkg dsg C LIGHTlMG LOAD 10~lrn~FLOOR AREA DEFROSTHEAT
PRODUCT SPEC1FIC HEAT t.8 kJlkg dsg C
LIGHTlMG LOAD
10~lrn~FLOOR AREA
DEFROSTHEAT

RECKQNEDASW OF HEATER LOAD FOR

2 HOURS PER DAY
2 HOURS PER DAY
RUNNING TIME 18 HOURS
RUNNING TIME
18 HOURS
OF HEATER LOAD FOR 2 HOURS PER DAY RUNNING TIME 18 HOURS SELECT16N DATA AMBIENT 300~60%RH
OF HEATER LOAD FOR 2 HOURS PER DAY RUNNING TIME 18 HOURS SELECT16N DATA AMBIENT 300~60%RH
SELECT16N DATA AMBIENT 300~60%RH INSULATION FOAMED FOLYURETHAN: THtCKNESS 100 rnm PRODUCT LOAD 16 kg PEH
SELECT16N DATA
AMBIENT
300~60%RH
INSULATION
FOAMED FOLYURETHAN:
THtCKNESS
100 rnm
PRODUCT LOAD
16 kg PEH CUBIC
METRE PER DAY COOLEL

THROUGH ~OC PRODUCTSPECFFtC HEAT 0.t 8 kJlkg dq C

LIGHTINO LOAD 1OW/mq FLOOR AREA DEFROST HEAT RECKONED AS SO?6
LIGHTINO LOAD
1OW/mq FLOOR AREA
DEFROST HEAT
RECKONED AS SO?6
OF HEATER LOAD FOR 2
OF HEATER LOAD FOR
2

HOURSPER DAY 18 HOURS

RUNNING TIME '
RUNNING TIME '
LOAD 1OW/mq FLOOR AREA DEFROST HEAT RECKONED AS SO?6 OF HEATER LOAD FOR 2 HOURSPER DAY
LOAD 1OW/mq FLOOR AREA DEFROST HEAT RECKONED AS SO?6 OF HEATER LOAD FOR 2 HOURSPER DAY
REFRIGERANT PIPING SELECTION DATA -The tables of refrigerant piping selections are based on the following
REFRIGERANT PIPING SELECTION DATA -The tables of refrigerant piping selections are based on the following
REFRIGERANT PIPING SELECTION DATA -The tables of refrigerant piping selections are based on the following
REFRIGERANT PIPING SELECTION DATA
-The tables of refrigerant piping selections are based on the following conditions:-
Liquid temperature entering evaporator 38"C 40"C ' '
Liquid temperature entering evaporator
38"C
40"C
'
'

Condensingtemperature Suction temperature for liquid line and delivery lineselection tables

-15°C

liquid line and delivery lineselection tables -15°C The selection should give the following maximum

The selection should give the following maximum refrigerant equivalent temperature drops in the lines. Suctionand delivery ling

la) R12, R22, R602 (bl R717 1NH3).
la) R12, R22, R602
(bl
R717 1NH3).
Llquid lines R 12, R22, R502, R717(NH3)
Llquid lines R 12, R22, R502, R717(NH3)
(bl R717 1NH3). Llquid lines R 12, R22, R502, R717(NH3) The columns headed C/R an the
(bl R717 1NH3). Llquid lines R 12, R22, R502, R717(NH3) The columns headed C/R an the
The columns headed C/R an the liquid line charts are reoomnaencled sizes for condenser to
The columns headed C/R an the liquid line charts are reoomnaencled sizes for condenser to receiver
connections. They will give a maximum refrigrant velocity
of 0,s mis. On at1 the tables the figure
shown
in the WATTS column represent the eveporator duty at the specified conditions. For any other
conditions, the system evaporator duty must%bemultiplied by the relevant correction factor More using
the table.
GORRECTION FACTOR TABLES 1. TABLE 10 Suction tine Sizes LIQUID TEMPERATURE TO EVAPORATOR 'C XI
GORRECTION FACTOR TABLES
1. TABLE 10 Suction tine Sizes
LIQUID TEMPERATURE
TO EVAPORATOR 'C
XI
30
40
50
60
CORRECTION
R12,
R22, R502
0.83
0.92
1.O2
1.I 3
126
i
FACTOR
R717{NH3)
0,92
0,97
1-02
1.06
1-09
TABLE 11 Delivery Line Sizes
(2) R12, R22, R502
(b) Ammonia R717(NH3)
LIQUID TEMPERATURE 'C
20
30
4Q
50
5
1.35
I,l2
0.92
0.78
0
-5
1.42
1.10
0.96
2
.O.&l
1
-15
1.48
1.23
1.00
0.82
c 2
<
-25
1.54
1.27
1.03
0.84
zc
-35
1.58
1.30
1.06
0.86
3.
TABLE 12
Liquid Line Sizes
(a) R12, R22, A502
(b)Ammonia R717(NH3)
LIQUlD TEMPERATURE 'C 20 30 40 50 80 v 5 0.77 0.84 0.93 1.05 1.18
LIQUlD TEMPERATURE 'C
20
30
40
50
80
v 5 0.77
0.84
0.93
1.05
1.18
-5
0.79 0.87 0.98
1.10
1.24
O2
9
Z
-5
0.82
0.91
1.03
1.16
1.31
.- E g
-25
0.86
0.95
1.07
1.21
1.36
5 k
mk
-35
0.91
0.99
1.15
1.28
1.45
LIQUIDTEMPERATURE "C 20 30 40 50 5 0.87 0.89 0.98 1.05 0 i -5 0.88
LIQUIDTEMPERATURE "C
20
30
40
50
5
0.87
0.89
0.98
1.05
0
i
-5
0.88
0.94
1.00
1.07
1
5
0.89 0.95
1.00
1.08
1g
-5
90
0.96
1.02
1.10
mj-
-35
0.91
0.97
1.03
1.11
i -5 0.88 0.94 1.00 1.07 1 5 0.89 0.95 1.00 1.08 1g -5 90 0.96
1, m m -. F %89RRRmo$88Z8%88-88RR LO 0 -+7r 7 7 7 7 m mmo
1, m m -. F %89RRRmo$88Z8%88-88RR LO 0 -+7r 7 7 7 7 m mmo
1, m m -. F %89RRRmo$88Z8%88-88RR LO 0 -+7r 7 7 7 7 m mmo
1, m m -. F %89RRRmo$88Z8%88-88RR LO 0 -+7r 7 7 7 7 m mmo
1,
m
m
-.
F
%89RRRmo$88Z8%88-88RR
LO
0
-+7r
7
7
7
7
m
mmo
- - 7
- 7
7
N I
8EZaHRRm.m,$8883%8888
7
REEEa3R%mmoS88E%%888v
mrno
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s4+----- ~$$MU7rC)rnO~,,,,~~~%~~,

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s4+----- ~$$MU7rC)rnO ~,,,,~~~%~~, S3~----m~w#?#%3385?~%8% ""-"m*waa%W38%g%8S:w(P - ~8$ii8#8~88~~~~ -LRRU
TABLE 15 SUCTION LINE SIZES R22 Multiply Evaporator Duty by Correction F&~MTable 10 bfors using
TABLE 15
SUCTION LINE SIZES R22
Multiply Evaporator Duty by Correction F&~MTable 10 bfors using fable
SUCTION TEMPERATURE *C
TOTAL EQUIVALENT LENGTH- METRES
WATTS
10 20 30 40 50110 20 30 40 60110 2Q 30 40 50110 20 30 40 50110 20 30 40 50
TABLE 16 \ SUCTION LINE SIZES R502 Multiply Evaporator Duty by Cormion Factw Table 10
TABLE 16
\
SUCTION LINE SIZES R502
Multiply Evaporator Duty by Cormion Factw Table 10 before using Table
SUCTION TEMPERATURE "C
I
-
I
+5
-5
-1 5
-25
-35
TOTAL EQUIVALENT LENGTH - METRES
WATTS
10
M
30
40
50110
20
30 40 50
10
20
30 40
SO
10 20 30 40
50
1020
30 40
50
800
10
12 I2 12 12 10
12 12 12 12 12
12 12 15
15
12 15 15
15 15
t5 15 18 18 18
lo00
10 12 12 12 12
.I2 12 12
15 15
12 12 15 15 15
15 15 18 18 18
15 I8 .18 22
22
1200
12 12 12 12 12
12
-12 '15
I5 15
12
15
15
15
18
15 18 18
I8 22
18
18
22
22 22
1500
12
12
12
15
15
12' 15
15 15 15
12
15
15
18
18
15
18
18
22 22
18 22
22
28 28
18
2000
18 22
12
22 22
12
15
15
15
12
15 15 18 18
15
18
18
18
22
22
22
28
28
28
2500
1.2 15 15 15
18
15
15' 18
18 18
15
18
18 22
22
18
22
22
28
28
22 28 28
28 28
3000
12
15 15 18 18
I5 18
18
22 '22
18
18
22
22
22
18
22
28
28 28
22 28
4500
15 18 18 18 22
18
22 22
22
28
18
22
28
28
28
22
28 28 28
35
28 35
28 36 35
35 35 40
6000
18
18 22 22
22
18 22
22
28
28
22
28
28
28
28
28
28 35
35 35
28
35
35 40 40
8000
18
22
22
28
28
22
28 28
28-28
28
28 28 35 35
28
35
35 40
3540 40 50 50
10,000
22 22 28
28
28
22
28
28 .35
35
28
28 35 35 35
28
35 40 40
40
35 40 50 50
50
22 28 28 28 28 28 28 28'35 35
12,000
28
35 35 35 40
35 4040 40 50
4040 50 50 50
22 28 28 35 35
28 28 35 35 35
28
35 40 40 40 35 4040 50 50
4050 50 50 50
15,000
28
28 35 35 35
28 35 35 40 40
35
40 '40 50
50
40 50 50
50 50
50 = 50
66 65
20,000
3540~403540~505040
65
6565
25,000
2835352540
35
50505050
5050
500666680
30.000
2835354040
354040~5040405050505050506565
45,000
35
40 40 50 50
40 50 50 50 50
40 50 50 €6 65
50
6566
65 80
6565 80 80 100
404050SO5040~SO506540SO65~~50~808080
€680100100100
60,000
80,000
40 50 50 50 65
50 50 65 65 65
50 66 65 80 80
65
80 80 80 IOO
80 100100 100
100
100,000
50 50 50 65
65
60 65 65 65
80'66 65 80
80 80
65
80100100100
80 100100100 125
.' , TABLE 19 DELIVERY LINE Slf ES ,RIP, R22, RM12, R717 (NH3) - Multiplq
.' , TABLE 19 DELIVERY LINE Slf ES ,RIP, R22, RM12, R717 (NH3) - Multiplq
.' , TABLE 19 DELIVERY LINE Slf ES ,RIP, R22, RM12, R717 (NH3) - Multiplq
.' , TABLE 19 DELIVERY LINE Slf ES ,RIP, R22, RM12, R717 (NH3) - Multiplq
.'
, TABLE 19
DELIVERY LINE Slf ES ,RIP, R22, RM12, R717 (NH3) -
Multiplq Evaporator Duty by ,Correction Factol Table 11 before usingTables
.
1
REFRIGERANTS
L
C
I
R12
R22 -
RSM
R717(NH3)
r
I
1
TOTAL EQUIVALENT LENGTH - METRES
11 before usingTables . 1 REFRIGERANTS L C I R12 R22 - RSM R717(NH3) r I
11 before usingTables . 1 REFRIGERANTS L C I R12 R22 - RSM R717(NH3) r I
11 before usingTables . 1 REFRIGERANTS L C I R12 R22 - RSM R717(NH3) r I
11 before usingTables . 1 REFRIGERANTS L C I R12 R22 - RSM R717(NH3) r I
11 before usingTables . 1 REFRIGERANTS L C I R12 R22 - RSM R717(NH3) r I
11 before usingTables . 1 REFRIGERANTS L C I R12 R22 - RSM R717(NH3) r I
11 before usingTables . 1 REFRIGERANTS L C I R12 R22 - RSM R717(NH3) r I
11 before usingTables . 1 REFRIGERANTS L C I R12 R22 - RSM R717(NH3) r I
11 before usingTables . 1 REFRIGERANTS L C I R12 R22 - RSM R717(NH3) r I
11 before usingTables . 1 REFRIGERANTS L C I R12 R22 - RSM R717(NH3) r I
TABLE I8 LIQUID LINE SIZES R12, R22, RW2, R717(NH3) Multlply Evaporator Duty by Cormtiam Factar
TABLE I8
LIQUID LINE SIZES R12, R22, RW2, R717(NH3)
Multlply Evaporator Duty by Cormtiam Factar Table 12 Mare using Tables

REFRIGERANT

by Cormtiam Factar Table 12 Mare using Tables REFRIGERANT I 1 R12 R22 R502 R717(NH31 TOTAL
I 1 R12 R22 R502 R717(NH31 TOTAL EQUIVALENTLENGTH- METRES 10 rO 30 a0 50 C/R
I
1
R12
R22
R502
R717(NH31
TOTAL EQUIVALENTLENGTH- METRES
10 rO 30
a0
50 C/R
10
-20
30
40
50C/R
10 20 30
40
SO
C/R10.
20
30
40'50WR
WA~
800 66610tb66866666666106888888
loo0
6 6101010'6
8
6
6
6
6
6
6
6101010
6
6
1200
6
10 10 10 10
6
6-
6 10 10
6
6
6
tO 10
10
10
1500
6
10
10
10
10
10
'6 6
10
10
tO
6
6
10
10
10
10
10
MOO
10
10
10
10
10
10
6
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
2500
10
jO
10
10
10
10
6
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
3000
10
10
10
12
12
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10,
12
12
10
4m
10 12
12
12
12
12
10
10
10
12
12
12
10
12
12
12
12
12
10
12
12
12
12
12
10
10
12
12
12-
12
10
I2 12 12
5
15
8000 '
12 , 12
15
15- 15
15-
10
12
12
12 '12
12
12
12
12
15
16
15
10,000'
12
12
15
15
15
1.6
12
12
12
12
15
15
12. 12
15. 15
15
18
.
12,000
12
15
15
15
18
18 -
12
12
12
15
15
15
12
15
16.
15
18
18
,*
15 (318 18
15.000
15
;5
'15
18
18
18-
12
12
15 15 15 18
12
22
,
!,5
t5
18
18 22 22-
12+,15I5 15 18 22
16'18.18 18"~~:-28
20,MK)
15 18 18 22 22 28
25.000
15
18
22
22 22
28
15
15
18
18 18 22
'
30,WO
18
18
22
22
28
28
15 15 18 18 12 18
18
18
22 22 22
28
8
8
8
8
8
8
3 28 28 35
45.000 22 22
15
18
22
22
22
28
18 22
18
la
18
35
8
8
8
8
8
10
60,000
22
28
28
28
35 35
18
Z2 28
28
28
35
22
28
28
28
28
35
8
8
8
8
8
1.5
8
10
10 10
10
76
80,000
28
28
35 35 36 38
22
28
28
28
28
38
22
28
28
35
35
50
1W.000
*
36 35 35 35 50
22 B 28 36 35 38
28
28
35
35
35 50
8
10
10
10
10
15
128

I

TABLE 20 MINIMUM CAPACITIES TO CARRY OIL UP PIPING - CAPACITIES ARE IN KW R22Suction
TABLE 20
MINIMUM CAPACITIES TO CARRY OIL UP PIPING - CAPACITIES ARE IN KW
R22Suction Lines
R22 Delivew Lines
.
-
Pipe Size
EVAPORATING TEMPERATURE "C
mni
-35
-25
-15
-5
5
12
0.68
0.72
0.77
0.82 087
15
1.29
1.37
1.47
1.56
1.66
18
1,96
2.08
2.22
2.33
252
22
3,OS
3.25
3.46
3.M
3.92
28
5.48
5.82
6.20
6.61
7.03
35
9.78
10.4
11.1
.
11.8
I26
32
13.1
13.9
14.9' 15.9
16.8
40
17.9
19.0
20.3
21.7
23.0
'
50
34.3
36.3
38.7 41.3
44.0
65
64.5
68.4
73.0
78.0
82.6
80
99.4
105
113
120
127
100
198'
211
225
239
256
125
340
361
385
41 1
437
150
517
549
586
624
664
Liquid Temperature OC
20
30
40
50
60
Correction Factor
1.16
1.07
0.98
0.89
0.80
- - 4
-
-
4

-

R12 Suction Lines Pipe Sixe EVAPORATING f EMPERATURE 'C Pipe Size mm -35 -25-15-5 5
R12 Suction Lines
Pipe Sixe
EVAPORATING f EMPERATURE 'C
Pipe Size
mm -35
-25-15-5
5
-
mm
12
12
15
I5
18
18
22
22
28
28
35
35
32
32
40
40
50
50
65
80
100
125
126
150
.
150
-

-.

I Pipe Size
I Pipe Size
12 15 I5 18 18 22 22 28 28 35 35 32 32 40 40 50
ti 1d! t'IPELINES DURING b TABLLL~ OPE RAT^^‘ , I :802, R717 (NH3)- kg per
ti 1d!
t'IPELINES DURING
b
TABLLL~
OPE RAT^^‘
,
I :802, R717 (NH3)- kg per 100 METRES
TABLE 22 LIQUIDLINES Amwnt of subcooling rsquird to ~~npematmfor liquid Mis Amrunt of sdxooIing requird
TABLE 22
LIQUIDLINES
Amwnt of subcooling rsquird to ~~npematmfor liquid Mis
Amrunt of sdxooIing requird isexp&
as 'C
per meke of lift.
REFfllGERANT LlOUlO TEMPEAATWRE "C R 12 0.818 0.650 0523 0.423 0.345 R22 0.466 0.364 0.293
REFfllGERANT
LlOUlO TEMPEAATWRE "C
R 12
0.818
0.650
0523
0.423
0.345
R22
0.466
0.364
0.293
0,202
R502
0.475
0.370
0.298
OZ4'0.245
0.1 97
Ammonia
0217
0.168
0.135
0.106
-
R22 0.466 0.364 0.293 0,202 R502 0.475 0.370 0.298 OZ4'0.245 0.1 97 Ammonia 0217 0.168 0.135
' * .REFRIGERANT PIPEWORK LAYOUT - (a) Suction Lines Suction lines should be arranged so
' * .REFRIGERANT PIPEWORK LAYOUT
- (a)
Suction Lines
Suction lines should be arranged so as to prevent:-
(1)
Oil or liquid csrryover from evaporator affectingexpansion valve phiah
(2)
Oil trapping in an idle evaporator in a multiple installation.
(3)
Refrigerantflow from one valve in a multiple imtallation affecting the phial of another one,
(4)
Liquid drainage into compressor.
- ,b
5'
a Compressor above evaporator
he trap ensures that liquid refrigerant and oil drain away from expansion valve phial. Make trap as short
as possible to minimise the amount of oil.
The loop prevents liquid from draining back to compressor. This can be eliminated if system has automatic
pump down.
-
.,
(c) Multidection evaporator Comptm blow
Flow from upper evaporator can not affect valve phial of lower evaporator,
- ., (c) Multidection evaporator Comptm blow Flow from upper evaporator can not affect valve phial

I

Id) Multi saction waporator, Compressor abow Fit double pipe risw if necessary. (e) Multiple waporators
Id) Multi saction waporator, Compressor abow
Fit double pipe risw if necessary.
(e) Multiple waporators at different Ievds, Compressor atma
The inverted traps at the main suction prevent oil drawing into an idle evaporator.
1
-
(f) Multiple evaporators at different levels, Compressor below
'
,
Eliminate loops if automatic pump down is used.

-.

-

.

.

evaporators at different levels, Compressor below ' , Eliminate loops if automatic pump down is used.

Multiple

Multiple , HORIZONTAL SUCTION LINES SHOULD BE PITCHED TOWARDS COMPRESSOR DOUBLE PIPE RISER Table 21 gives
, HORIZONTAL SUCTION LINES SHOULD BE PITCHED TOWARDS COMPRESSOR DOUBLE
, HORIZONTAL SUCTION LINES SHOULD BE PITCHED TOWARDS COMPRESSOR DOUBLE

PIPE RISER Table 21 gives minimum loadings on suction and delivery lines, to ensure oil return ui vertical piping. Should there be a possibility that under partial loading, the capacity of the pipelins is too great to return the oil, then a double pipe riser shw Id be installed

oil, then a double pipe riser shw Id be installed The double pipe riser consists of
The double pipe riser consists of two risers of different diameters, operating in parallel, with
The double pipe riser consists of two risers of different diameters, operating in parallel, with an oil trap
between the two legs. The capacity of the rikrsshould be such that the combined capacity is equal to the
maximum system ldad add the capacity of the smaller risers should be sized so as to return oil under minimum
load conditions.
b
Under part load conditions the gas will pass up both risers until such times as
Under part load conditions the
gas will pass up both risers until such times as the trap fiHs with oil. Gas will
then,onty go up the small riser. On return to full duty, the pressure drop up the small rim will be so great
that the
oil in the trap will be
forced up the large riser by the pressure difference across it It will flow , .
,
into the main suction and the system is now back to normal operation.
pressure difference across it It will flow , . , into the main suction and the
CW~AN619rhlVALVE PHML AND E~RR~LgQU&tllrbb ~MYh~ldbl~ I' Ifkmflf/#~~!bexprnionv8lvephlarkcurm3f/ylocated,
CW~AN619rhlVALVE PHML AND E~RR~LgQU&tllrbb ~MYh~ldbl~ I' Ifkmflf/#~~!bexprnionv8lvephlarkcurm3f/ylocated,
CW~AN619rhlVALVE PHML AND E~RR~LgQU&tllrbb ~MYh~ldbl~
I'
Ifkmflf/#~~!bexprnionv8lvephlarkcurm3f/ylocated, 1oen&f8h0v&#IOmWdhwr&%#y. h
rather than upstream. This eliminatesthe effect of any leakage of liquid refrigerant from the valve along
the equaliser

should be located so that it is not influencd by any chilled oil droplets, or liquid refrigerant carryover from - the coil. This implies that itmust bclocated out of the path normally taken by such influences. The external equaliser connection, where fitted. should normally be located a few inches downstream of the phia I,

be located a few inches downstream of the phia I, a '/ DELIVERY LINES Delivery lines
a
a
be located a few inches downstream of the phia I, a '/ DELIVERY LINES Delivery lines

'/

DELIVERY LINES Delivery lines should be selected for a practical pressure drop, but must not be oversized to the extent wherk

drop, but must not be oversized to the extent wherk oil will not be carried up
oil will not be carried up defivery line riwrs. If the system is to operate
oil will not be carried up defivery line riwrs. If the system is to operate under partial load, and designing
,
delivery lines to carry oil up riser at minimum loading means that pressure drop would be excessive ,
under full load, then either an oil Varator or a double pipe riser should be fitted
. , $ Whenever the condenwr is located above the compresor, the delivery line should
.
,
$
Whenever
the condenwr is located above the compresor, the delivery line should loop towards the ffaor,

-

immediately aftar the cmp~,before risingto the condenser. This preventsany refrigerant which has wndenkd in the
immediately aftar the cmp~,before risingto the condenser. This preventsany refrigerant which has
wndenkd in the delivery line from draining back to the compressor head,
Horizontal pipes should be pitched in the diration af flow to help circulate the oil around the system.
If the condenser is located in a position where the ambient can be higher than
If the condenser is located in a position where the
ambient can be higher than at the compwssor, a
check valve should be installed in the deliwry lins
close to the condenser to prevent refrigerant
boiling off in the condenser and condensing in the
delivery line and compressor during the off
cycte,
CONDENSER TO RECEIVER PlPiNG
'
Liquid piping from condenser to receiver should allow free draining of liquid. Pipe runs should be as short
as possible, and sized for a maximum of 0.5mls refrigerant velwity. Pipes should be pitched towards the
, receiver with a minimum slope of mmm per metre.
Liquid lines must be sized for a practical pressure drop and precautionsmust b taken to prevent flash gas
forming.
Liquid lines normally run through areas which are cooler than the liquid, so flashing due to heat gain in the
liquid llne and should present noproblems.
'
,
Liquid leaving air cooledcondensers normally has about 3°C subcooling, so provided pressuredrop due to
.
friction isnotexcessiveandthere isonly asmallliquidlift, then theliquidshouldarriveat theexpansion
,
j
valve slightly subcooled.
If however, there is a large lift, then the liquid has to have additional sub-cooling either by fitting a
I-'
,
.
sub-cooling section at the condenser or by installing a suction line/liquid line heat exchanger.
fitting a I-' , . sub-cooling section at the condenser or by installing a suction line/liquid
k - - SUCTION LINE - LIQUID LINE HEAT INTERCHANGERS - The advantages of incorporating

k

- - SUCTION LINE - LIQUID LINE HEAT INTERCHANGERS - The advantages of incorporating a
-
-
SUCTION LINE - LIQUID LINE HEAT INTERCHANGERS
- The advantages of incorporating a suction Iinelliquid line heat exchanger are as follows:-
1. Subcooled liquid o
1. Subcooled liquid
o

:

a)Eliminatesflashinginliquidlinecausedbyexcessivepressuredropduetofrictionorliquidlik

b) Reduce amount of flash gas after expansion valve leaving more liquid available for cooling.

c) Ensure that expansion valve performs at full capacity and reduces wear on valve seat.
c)
Ensure that expansion valve performs at full capacity and reduces wear on valve seat.
,

u

2 Superheated Suction Gas, -2 a)
2 Superheated Suction Gas,
-2
a)

Permits lower expansion valve superheat setting due to fact that any liquid carry over wilt be vaporised in tRe heat emhanger. This results in improved cooler performance as more of the coil surface is effective

for cooling work.
for cooling work.
b) Superheating suction gas could eliminate the need for insulating suction line. c) Superheating the
b) Superheating suction gas could eliminate the need for insulating suction line.
c) Superheating the sqction gas will improve thevolumetric efficiency of 612, R22, and RM12

compressors.

It can be reckoned that system performances can be increased by approximately 1% for each
It can be reckoned that system performances can be increased by approximately 1% for each 1°C of

subcooling.

n. '.
n. '.
It can be reckoned that system performances can be increased by approximately 1% for each 1°C
It can be reckoned that system performances can be increased by approximately 1% for each 1°C
It can be reckoned that system performances can be increased by approximately 1% for each 1°C

f

-

I

. * - ,- *- TlWeRATURE COW ERSlaN **:-*-F\ I * c 'C F' 'c
.
* -
,-
*-
TlWeRATURE COW ERSlaN
**:-*-F\
I
*
c
'C
F'
'c
F
F'
'C
'F
-
-273
-27.2
17
1.1
14.4
58
I=
'=\,
5&l
133
2fi.4
-2118
-m
-26.7
-18
12
15.0
SS
1382
517
134
273.2
-262
-uO
-XI
-15
5.0
1R6
90
ldO.0
57.Z
136
275.0
-
-367
-m
-25.6
14
6.0
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centre column. read right to
centre column. read right to

convert

Centigrade to
Centigrade to

Fahrenheit,

column. read right to convert Centigrade to Fahrenheit, . 'I f , ;4 :& *, I

.

'I

f

, ;4 :& *,
,
;4
:&
*,

I

8.-

-

L,

a? ,; Find the known temperature in vefi F~hrqnheit - , -. -- .I -r*.
a?
,;
Find the known temperature in
vefi F~hrqnheit
-
, -.
--
.I -r*. r -
"
.-
.7---
.'
the known temperature in vefi F~hrqnheit - , -. -- .I -r*. r - " .-
the to
the
to

Centigrade.

1 c
1
c
the known temperature in vefi F~hrqnheit - , -. -- .I -r*. r - " .-

-.

the known temperature in vefi F~hrqnheit - , -. -- .I -r*. r - " .-
--'7 c.- ' TABLE 24 ' k , CONVERSION FACTORS 4 S.1. Unit Quantity Metric

--'7

c.-'

TABLE 24
TABLE 24
--'7 c.- ' TABLE 24 ' k , CONVERSION FACTORS 4 S.1. Unit Quantity Metric Unit

'k,

CONVERSION FACTORS 4 S.1. Unit Quantity Metric Unit Imperial Unit - Metre (m) Length m
CONVERSION FACTORS
4
S.1. Unit
Quantity
Metric Unit
Imperial Unit
-
Metre (m)
Length
m xl.0
Foot x 0.305
Millimetre Imm)
mm x 1.0
Inch x 25 4
mi
Area
rn'
x 1.0
Square feet x 92.9 x70"
m3
Volume
x 1.0
ft3 x 28.3 x
Litre 11)
Seconds (sl
Time
Volume flow rate
Smonds
Ga Ilon x 4.55
Seconds
m31s
mJ/min x 1.67 x 10-I
ft3/min x 0.472 x lo-'
Gal/min x 75.8 x
h
Kilcgramme (kg)
Mass
.
kg x 1.0
Pound x 0.454
Newton (N) = kg m/s2
Force
kgf x 9.807
Ib force x 4.45
N/m7
Pressure
mm w.g x 9.807
Ib force/inz x 6.9 x 10'
kgf/cm2 x 9.807 x 1O4
in water x 249
m/s
Velocity
m/s x 1.0
Kg/m'
Density
kglm3 x 1.0
ft/min x 5.08 x lo-'
Ib/ft3 x 16
Kg/s
Mass flow rate
kds x 1.0
Ib/h x 0.126 x lo-"
degCaT
Temperature diff.
"CATX1.0
OF x 0.555
Joule {J)
Energy
kcalh x 4.187 x 103
Btu x 1.055 x f03
Watt (W)
Heat Flow
kd/h x 1.!63
Btulh x 0.2931
Horse power x 745.7.:
Ton refrigeration x 3.517
(kcallh x 1.163)
Wlrn deg C
Thermal conductivity
Btu in/h/ftf degF x 0.144
W/mz deg C
Heat trans coeff.
kcal/h/m°C x 1.163
kal/h/m2 OC x 1.163
J/kg
Specific enthatpy
kcallkg x 4.187 x 103
Btu/h/ft2 dqE x 5.678
Btdb x 2.326 x 10"
Jlkgdeg C
+
Specific heat,
x
kcal/kg°C x 4.187 x 10'
Jlkg
.
Latent heat
kcal/kg x 4.187 x lo3
Btullb deg F x 4.187 x 10'
Btullb x 2.326 x lo3
*
x 4.187 x 10' Jlkg . Latent heat kcal/kg x 4.187 x lo3 Btullb deg F
x 4.187 x 10' Jlkg . Latent heat kcal/kg x 4.187 x lo3 Btullb deg F
x 4.187 x 10' Jlkg . Latent heat kcal/kg x 4.187 x lo3 Btullb deg F
x 4.187 x 10' Jlkg . Latent heat kcal/kg x 4.187 x lo3 Btullb deg F