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STG-1000-01

Rev -

System Training Manual


Table of Contents
Overview................................................................................................................................................................................. 5

Chapter One: Introduction to CCC Systems .......................................................................................................................... 6


Section 1: Overview of CCC Systems........................................................................................................................ 7
1.1.1 Switch panels...................................................................................................................................... 7
1.1.2 Touch-screens..................................................................................................................................... 7
1.1.3 Audio/video ........................................................................................................................................ 8
1.1.4 Lighting and relay controllers............................................................................................................. 8
1.1.5 System maintenance .......................................................................................................................... 9
Section 2: System Basis ............................................................................................................................................ 9
CCC systems rely upon digital signals to transmit data. ............................................................................... 9
1.2.1 Analog signals .................................................................................................................................... 9
1.2.2 Digital signals ..................................................................................................................................... 9
1.2.3 C-Stream ............................................................................................................................................. 9
Questions .................................................................................................................................................... 10
Section 3: Common Features in CCC Devices ........................................................................................................ 11
1.3.1 Temperature protection ................................................................................................................... 11
1.3.2 Hold-up ............................................................................................................................................. 11
1.3.3 Useful diagnostics ............................................................................................................................ 11
1.3.4 C-Stream addressing ........................................................................................................................ 12
1.3.5 Rotary-switch-style devices .............................................................................................................. 12
1.3.6 DIP-switch-style devices ................................................................................................................... 13
1.3.7 Important note in addressing devices .............................................................................................. 13
Questions .................................................................................................................................................... 14

Chapter Two: Hardware ...................................................................................................................................................... 15


Section 1: C-Stream Network Manager ................................................................................................................. 15
2.1.1 What is the C-Stream Network Manager? ....................................................................................... 15
2.1.2 What are its functions? .................................................................................................................... 15
2.1.3 Important diagnostics ...................................................................................................................... 16
2.1.4 C-Stream and Ethernet networks ..................................................................................................... 16

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Section 2: CSNM Connectivity ................................................................................................................................ 17
2.2.1 C-Stream and Ethernet network connectivity .................................................................................. 17
2.2.2 C-Stream Router ............................................................................................................................... 17
2.2.3 C-Stream Router diagnostics ............................................................................................................ 18
2.2.4 Ethernet Switch and Wireless Access Point (WAP)........................................................................... 18
Section 3: Other Devices on C-Stream and Ethernet ............................................................................................ 19
2.3.1 Audio and Video Switchers ............................................................................................................... 19
Experiments................................................................................................................................... 19
2.3.2 Media Clients and Monitors ............................................................................................................. 20
2.3.3 Relay Controllers (high and low current classes) ............................................................................. 21
2.3.4 Solid State and Low-Side PWM Controllers ...................................................................................... 23
2.3.5 All devices ......................................................................................................................................... 23

Chapter Three: Software Tools ........................................................................................................................................... 24


Section 1: Device Manager..................................................................................................................................... 24
Experiments ................................................................................................................................................ 26
More Experiments ...................................................................................................................................... 27
Section 2: System Manager.................................................................................................................................... 31
Experiments ................................................................................................................................................ 32
Questions .................................................................................................................................................... 32

Chapter Four: Documents ................................................................................................................................................... 33


Section 1: Controller Block Diagram ...................................................................................................................... 33
4.1.1 Sections of the CBD .......................................................................................................................... 33
4.1.2 How to read diagrams in the CBD .................................................................................................... 33
4.1.3 When is this document needed/used? ............................................................................................. 34
Section 2: Switch Block Diagram ............................................................................................................................ 35
Section 3: Acceptance Test Procedure.................................................................................................................. 36
Important Note: Use these Documents! .............................................................................................................. 37

Chapter Five: Troubleshooting............................................................................................................................................ 38


Section 1: General Issues....................................................................................................................................... 39
Section 2: Audio/Video Issues............................................................................................................................... 42

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Section 3: Lighting Issues....................................................................................................................................... 49
Section 4: Miscellaneous ....................................................................................................................................... 51

Appendix ............................................................................................................................................................................... 53
Section 1: Determine IP address of a CSNM, Blu-Ray, SkyShow unit, IDC Touch-screen ........................................ 53
Section 2: Connect to the CSNM using UltraVNC from a laptop ............................................................................. 53
Section 3: Connect CCC to Maintenance Laptop for upgrades and troubleshooting.............................................. 54
Section 4: Back up the system................................................................................................................................. 54
Section 5: Database recovery ................................................................................................................................. 55

Revision Information ............................................................................................................................................................ 56

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Overview

The overall intent of this manual is to help familiarize users with the Custom Control Concepts (CCC) Cabin
Management Systems (CMS) and In-Flight Entertainment (IFE) and improve their understanding in maintaining
and troubleshooting these systems. In addition, it can be a supplement for various forms of instruction in CCC
system functionality, communication, interface, testing and troubleshooting. These forms of instruction could
range from simple one-on-one coaching to a full course in system integration provided by CCC personnel.

Each chapter of this manual is divided into sections, which contain the lesson broken down to a fundamental
level and in some sections, a series of questions which require research of the corresponding lesson to answer
and experiments to try with the equipment and software tools. Each lesson should be read thoroughly,
questions answered and experiments performed in order to properly retain the given information.

The level of detail in this manual is intended for avionics teams, flight engineers and customer representatives
who prefer to gain a general understanding of the CCC system before and/or after delivery of the aircraft.
Please note that Chapter One: Introduction to CCC Systems may be used simply as an introduction or as a
stand-alone chapter for those who would prefer a quick overview of CCC Systems. After completing the first
chapter, more detailed information is provided about CCC documentation in Chapter Four: Documents and
using the CCC tools in Chapter Three: Software Tools. Information on devices and their diagnostics are
described in Chapter Two: Hardware and in their associated Technical Specifications.

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Chapter One: Introduction to CCC Systems
CCC devices are designed specifically for customized control of VIP aircraft cabins. To achieve this control, CCC
designs each device with a unique set of functions which are added by downloading programmable control
software to them. These devices are interconnected to form a system network, which provides a custom
solution based on approved customer requirements. CCC designs various types of devices including switch
panels, touch-screens, audio/video source equipment, amplifiers, speakers, monitors, light controllers, lights,
relay controllers and more. Together, these devices can control every aspect of an aircraft cabin.

Figure A: Sample of basic system.

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Section 1: Overview of CCC Systems
1.1.1 Switch panels

CCC designs switch panels programmed to control many features of the aircraft cabin. They mount in seats for
individual control and/or install in the bulkhead for room control purposes. They vary in size, shape and
number of buttons according to customer specification. For appearance, CCC uses a variety of materials to
create a clean, polished look. For functionality, CCC provides custom control for each button, each of which
interface to the call system, lighting, audio/video, heat, shade controls, and more.

Figure 1.1.1: Two sample switch panels.

1.1.2 Touch-screens

Touch-screens are a part of many CCC systems. In general, CCC controls features of the cabin with these, and
the graphics vary according to customer specification. They install in seats and the bulkhead, where ever
convenient for the user. Wireless remotes to control the system are also available.

Figure 1.1.2a: Sample 10.4” touch-screen and interface.

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Figure 1.1.2b: Sample 3.7” touch-screen with switch panel buttons.

1.1.3 Audio/video

CCC audio and video source equipment supports playback from CD, DVD, Blu-Ray, iPod and more. CCC has
also supported playback of older media formats such as cassette and VHS. Also, if an external source is
desired, CCC provides auxiliary ports for RCA, HDMI and VGA inputs to be converted for output through the
system.

CCC also features an Audio Video on Demand (AVOD) system, which varies in size, consisting of one to
hundreds of media clients and a media loader to load content. These devices store and play back a varied
number of media files depending on the capacity of the system.

CCC all-digital audio and video output devices produce clean, high-definition sound and superior video image
quality. CCC manufactures surround sound processors, amplifiers, speakers and various sizes of standard
definition and high definition LCD monitors to achieve the ultimate entertainment experience.

1.1.4 Lighting and relay controllers

CCC also designs lighting controllers, which control various types of lights throughout the aircraft cabin. Some
of these lights include, for example, monochrome and colored wash lights, and various dimmable “dome” and
“can” lights. CCC features variable dimming of these lights, achieved through solid state relays controlled by
pulse-width modulation. Relay controllers are also available for simple discrete control of electrically switched
devices such as cabin reading lights, threshold lights, window shades and more. These relay controllers also
feature discrete inputs for displaying status on touch-screens or to provide switching interfaces external to the
system.

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1.1.5 System maintenance

Each CCC system features hardware diagnostics, software tools and a set of documents for integration and
maintenance purposes. The user should refer to these, as they are helpful in assisting with any necessary
troubleshooting of the system components. In addition, a maintenance laptop is provided with each system
to monitor software diagnostics and connect a CCC support representative to the aircraft for remote support
purposes. More detailed discussions of these features appear in Chapters 2 – 4 and the appendix of this
manual.

Section 2: System Basis


CCC systems rely upon digital signals to transmit data.

1.2.1 Analog signals

An analog signal is a waveform which is created by a varying a voltage over time, involving two conductors for
each transmission line. Analog signals have been used in communication since the 1800s; however, they can
pick up noise traveling long distances through wires and from neighboring wires in a bundle. Therefore,
analog signals can be troublesome to maintain, and filtering these signals can be impractical.

1.2.2 Digital signals

A digital signal is a discrete waveform in which there is a limit on how high the voltage will increase or
decrease, reliably allowing the states to be easily distinguishable as high and low, even in the presence of
noise. In addition, background noise induced by neighboring wires and aircraft emissions can be canceled out
due to the common mode rejection capability of controllers in the digital realm. A complete digital
distribution system almost completely eliminates “ambient noise” in audio and video data transmission over
distances up to 300 feet. For these reasons, we use digital signaling in all CCC devices, to provide a much
better data delivery scheme.

1.2.3 C-Stream

What is C-Stream? C-Stream is CCC’s digital proprietary network communication protocol which is a serial
data bus used to interconnect CCC devices. It consists of shielded or unshielded twisted pair cable which
connects each device, with a free-topology transceiver, to the C-Stream control network. C-Stream is typically
connected from channel 1 on the C-Stream Network Manager (CSNM) to C-Stream routers, which split the
network into channels. Each channel allows C-Stream connections for up to 64 devices. For systems which

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consist of fewer than 64 devices, it is not necessary to split the network into channels, and need only consist
of channel 1. Please refer to Figure 1.2.3 for C-Stream topologies.

Figure 1.2.3: Example C-Stream router configuration with sample C-Stream topologies.

Questions

1. True or False. C-Stream must be connected to each C-Stream device for complete system functionality.
2. True or False. It is normal to connect 75 devices to C-Stream Channel 1.
3. True or False. Some CCC devices do not communicate on the C-Stream serial bus.

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Section 3: Common Features in CCC Devices
Each CCC device features common functions and useful diagnostics.

1.3.1 Temperature protection

CCC devices feature a shut-down function in the event of high internal temperatures. Specifically, if a device
reaches a temperature of 158 °F (70 °C), it will temporarily shut down to prevent hardware damage. If the
ambient temperature is such that it allows for cooling during this shut-down, then the device will restore
power when it reaches 140 °F (60 °C). Even so, it is important to provide proper cooling for each device, to
ensure smooth operation of the system while it is in service.

1.3.2 Hold-up

Some of the system devices also feature power hold-up, which will allow devices such as touch-screens, media
source equipment, Ethernet switches and the CSNM to remain powered in situations where power is lost, such
as power transfers.

1.3.3 Useful diagnostics

Each CCC device features useful diagnostics which should be used to assist in determining the state of a
device. These LEDs and buttons are located on the face of every CCC unit and to avoid repetition will only be
listed here.

These diagnostics include (refer to the Appendix or device technical specifications for more details):

• LOCATE – If this AMBER LED is flashing, then the unit is not commissioned. It is accompanied by a small
black rubber button, which is used to send a message to the CSNM to commission the unit. If the unit
has multiple nodes, then LOCATE will be accompanied with labels such as A, B, 1 and 2.
• RESET – This RED LED should never be on. It is accompanied by a small black rubber button, which can
be used to reset the unit. If the unit has multiple nodes, then RESET will be accompanied with labels
such as A, B, 1 and 2.
• 28VDC PWR – This RED/GREEN LED should be lit GREEN if the polarity of 28V is correct. It will be RED if
the polarity is reversed.
• FUSE – When power to the unit is on, this GREEN LED should always be lit.
• 5VDC, CHASSIS – These GREEN LEDs should be lit when power is applied to the unit.

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• DEVICE ADDRESS – Most units in the system have this, to show the address dialed in by the rotary
switches below it. When the address is changed, the display will blink until the unit has been able to
establish the new dialed-in address.

See appropriate technical specification for each device as needed for more information.

1.3.4 C-Stream addressing

Most CCC devices feature a C-Stream address, which allows the network to identify and communicate with
specific devices in the system. Each device in a system will have a unique address, which is set by changing the
positions of dials called “rotary switches” or slide-style switches called “DIP switches.” Depending on the
device, each will contain one of these two types of switches.

1.3.5 Rotary-switch-style devices

The rotary-switch-style devices will often feature four rotary switches, organized from left to right, for setting
the thousands, hundreds, tens and units digits, respectively. Some will only have three, for setting hundreds,
tens and units digits, respectively. So, for example, if the C-Stream address of a specific device is “0961,” start
with the right-most rotary switch and set it to “1.” Moving left, set the next rotary switch to “6,” and the next
to “9,” leaving the final rotary switch set to “0,” if there is one. Some devices will have a four-character
display to indicate the device address, which is usually located directly above the rotary switches. An
important thing to note is that the “0” position of each rotary switch will be on the left, if the user holding the
device has it correctly oriented.

Figure 1.3.4: Sample rotary switch configuration of address “0159” on a CCC Device. Note the positions of
each switch (arrow-pointer carved into the switch adjuster points at a number) and their corresponding
positions in the device address display.

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1.3.6 DIP-switch-style devices

The DIP-switch-style devices offer 256 unique combinations and are typically one or two-button switch panels.
DIP switches have eight slide-style switches, each of which represents one of the eight bits in a byte. When
changing the address of these devices, one could use a calculator to convert decimal to binary, and then
accordingly set the switches. For example, if the C-Stream address of the device is “0084,” “84” could be
entered into a calculator and converted to “0101 0100.” Each “1” in the string refers to a bit or slider on the
DIP switch, which should be in the “on” or “up” position. Each “0” in the string refers to a bit or slider on the
DIP switch which should be in the “off” or “down” position.

Figure 1.3.5: DIP Switch with slider switches. Bit 1 on the left is the most significant bit and Bit 8 on the right
is the least significant bit. This figure represents a 0101 0011 configuration, which translates to a decimal
address of 0083.

1.3.7 Important note in addressing devices

It is absolutely crucial to make sure each device is addressed correctly, before proceeding. If even one device
is not addressed correctly, system faults can occur. Since CCC systems are shipped to the completion center in
a commissioned state, it is often unnecessary to re-address devices during the integration process.

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Questions

1. True or False. The “A” node of a device is commissioned when the “LOCATE A” LED is flashing.
2. True or False. The “FUSE” LED on a device is OFF. This means the internal fuse is not faulty.
3. True or False. Video on all monitors in the cabin blanks out periodically, for 15 minutes each time.
During this “fault,” the red “TEMP” LED on the Video Switcher is ON. The cooling for the device is
insufficient.

Experiments (CAUTION: These should never be conducted on a completed system! SILs and integrations,
only!)

1. Try addressing some rotary-switch-style and DIP-switch-style devices.


a. Address a single-button switch panel to address “163.”
b. Address an audio switch panel (has a headphone jack on it) to address “0617.”
c. Address a Video Switcher to address “0456.”
2. Change the address of a device while power is on. What happens to the diagnostic LEDs after 10-15
seconds, particularly the RESET and LOCATE?
3. Try pressing the RESET A and/or RESET B buttons. What happens?
4. Try pressing the LOCATE A and/or LOCATE B buttons. Watch for a moment. What happens?

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Chapter Two: Hardware
This chapter describes pertinent communicative devices in a CCC system and informs the user of their useful
diagnostics. The idea is to supply the reader with a general idea of the equipment; therefore, for simplicity
purposes, this chapter will not contain a description for every existing CCC device. However, all units are
covered in detail by their Technical Specifications and Mechanical Drawings. These documents can be
referenced in the case where additional information is required.

Section 1: C-Stream Network Manager


2.1.1 What is the C-Stream Network Manager?

The C-Stream Network Manager (CSNM) is basically a computer that runs an embedded operating system, and
is the heart of every CCC system. Essentially, it conducts tests and records diagnostics for all devices on the C-
Stream network. By serving as a bridge between the C-Stream and Ethernet networks, the user and/or a CCC
representative can remotely access the system and conduct external monitoring, diagnostics and embedded
control updates via the CSNM’s built-in Ethernet ports. Supplying audio/video out, diagnostics and monitoring
can be performed on any screen tied into CCC’s IFE system.

The CSNM is designed with a hold-up circuit that keeps power on the device in the event of a power transfer.
The advantage is avoiding interruption of touch-screen control when power is cycled.

Figure 2.1.1: CSNM IV (left), CSNM III (middle) and CSNM II (right).

2.1.2 What are its functions?


The CSNM is a gateway into any device connected in the system. It acts as a:

• tool for updating and changing system functionality


• serial controller for external devices
• tool for internal and external system maintenance
• chime unit
• touch-screen communication server

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2.1.3 Important diagnostics

The CSNM features important diagnostics for analyzing system behavior. The common diagnostics are located
on the face of the unit, but will not be listed here.

• 16-character display – this scrolling display lists the results of device tests done by the CSNM.
• ETN – flashes sporadically when an Ethernet connection is present.
o 0 – indicates the presences of a valid connection on P2
o 1 – indicates the presences of a valid connection on P1

Figure 2.1.3: Top face of the CSNM III unit.

2.1.4 C-Stream and Ethernet networks

The CCC system is split into two networks which communicate with the CSNM: C-Stream and Ethernet. As
stated above, the CSNM acts as a bridge between the two.

The C-Stream network protocol communicates between embedded controls programmed into each of the
system devices. The devices in the network only need to be connected to C-Stream and power in order for
this to happen. However, to allow the system to function as a whole, all devices in the system that are
required to be on C-Stream must be connected.

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The Ethernet network connects the CSNM to the touch-screens through Ethernet switches, to supply the
touch-screens with the necessary communication tunnel for data packet transmission. Without the CSNM, the
touch-screens likely display “Network Unavailable,” as the system needs a tool called System Manager to be
running to make the touch-screens available for use.

Together, both of these networks communicate to allow touch-screens to control various aspects of the
system, and the system to provide statuses to the touch-screens over the CSNM’s Ethernet/C-Stream Bridge.

Section 2: CSNM Connectivity


2.2.1 C-Stream and Ethernet network connectivity

How does the CSNM connect to the system and communicate with it? The CSNM is on the C-Stream base
channel or “Channel 1,” and branches out extra channels if they are needed, through the C-Stream Router.
Devices connected to the C-Stream router can be connected in a free topology (refer to Chapter 1, Figure 1.2.3
for examples of this). The CSNM also connects to the Ethernet Switch(s), which connect(s) all units with an
Ethernet port, to form the Ethernet Network.

2.2.2 C-Stream Router

The C-Stream Router branches up to four separate smaller C-Stream “networks” or channels from the base
channel, and isolates the data traffic to increase bandwidth of the entire system. These units are needed in
systems of 64 or more devices, since one separate C-Stream channel can only support up to this number of
devices connected to it. It is best to branch C-Stream into multiple channels to optimize performance of the
system.

Figure 2.2.2: C-Stream Router.

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2.2.3 C-Stream Router diagnostics

The C-Stream Router features diagnostics which show the health of the unit and how it is behaving.

• LOCATE 1 – 4 A and B – These GREEN LEDs will flash if the corresponding C-Stream channel is not
online. LOCATE 1 corresponds to C-Stream Channel 2, LOCATE 2 corresponds to C-Stream Channel 3,
and so on. These LEDs should not flash during normal operation of the system.
• 5VDC – Will be on during normal operation of the system.
• PACKET – Will flash quickly and sporadically to show traffic through the channel.

Figure 2.2.3: Top face of the C-Stream Router unit.

2.2.4 Ethernet Switch and Wireless Access Point (WAP)

The Ethernet Switch connects every unit with an Ethernet port to the Ethernet network, and the WAPs allow
the user to access the CCC network with a remote device to control it, and/or a laptop to do maintenance.
Example units that connect to the Ethernet network are Media Clients, IDC Monitors, Touch-screens, CSNM,
iPod controllers, etc. The CCC System communicates through the Ethernet network on a static assigned IP
subnet, which isolates the CCC Network from other Ethernet networks on the aircraft or hangar in which the
aircraft is held.

The Ethernet devices in the network are designed with a hold-up circuit that keeps power on the device in the
event of a power transfer. The advantage is avoiding interruption of streamed movies and touch-screen
control when power is interrupted.

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Figure 2.2.4: Ethernet Switch (left) and WAP (right).

Section 3: Other Devices on C-Stream and Ethernet


The devices outlined in previous sections of this chapter are required for nearly every system, and crucial for
efficient operation of the system. Other devices in the CCC system handle the specific operation of the CMS
and IFE portion aboard the aircraft.

2.3.1 Audio and Video Switchers

To handle multiple audio and video sources, CCC designs switching units that allow for up to 32 unique
sources to be routed to 32 unique units that display video or output audio. The diagnostics on these devices
are useful in determining which inputs are routed to specific outputs. Try an experiment with one of these
devices. Refer to the CBD for assignment of sources to inputs and output devices to outputs.

Experiments

1. Press the SELECT button on the unit. See figure below, for location of button.

Figure 2.3.1a: AV Switcher buttons.

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2. The 8-character display on the unit will change to read similar to “in01 o01,” which means that input 1
is routed to output 1. Sometimes an A or V will appear in the window, indicating that the user has
selected Audio (A) or Video (V), in the case where the unit switches both Audio and Video. See figure
below, for example of screen readout.

Figure 2.3.1b: Changed display.

3. Using the arrow keys, the outputs can be scanned to determine which inputs are routed to them.
4. Scroll to output 12 or “o12.” What input is currently routed to it? Locate the source assigned to the
input number in the CBD. This source is currently routed to the device connected to output 12.

This is a useful strategy in determining possible issues that lie in making sure sources are connected correctly,
in the event that a selection is made and the wrong source or no source is neither heard nor seen.

2.3.2 Media Clients and Monitors

Most of the earlier CCC Systems come with Media Clients, which source touch-screen graphics to touch-
screens and handle playback of the Audio Video on Demand (AVOD) feature. These units are similar to the
CSNM, in that they have an internal computer that runs on the Ethernet network, but run different tools and
contain different hardware. They each have two hard-drives, depending on the generation of the Media
Client, which store the media loaded into the AVOD system.

With the later systems, these units have been integrated into the monitors. These newly designed units are
called “Integrated Display Controllers” (IDC), which now all require a connection into the Ethernet network.

Media Clients and IDCs have a few useful diagnostics for the user. Please refer to the Technical Specification
for the specific part number of the unit in question if more information is needed.

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Figure 2.3.2: Media Client III.

2.3.3 Relay Controllers (high and low current classes)

Nearly all CCC Systems contain Relay Controllers, for on-off switching control of systems such as lighting, call
systems, cockpit enunciators, flush circuits and more. These controllers also feature discrete inputs to notify
the CCC System of the status of external units, or control the system with external switches. These statuses
can be displayed on touch-screens to let the user know how a specific external device is behaving. For
example, a request to have power outlets disabled when a switch in the cockpit is toggled to the “off” position
can be granted by connecting the switch to a GND or 28V, and then to a specified control input on the relay
controller. CCC would then program the controller to send a message to disable the control of power outlets
when the cockpit switch is toggled on to activate the control input. Another example would be displaying
“outlets in use” on a touch-screen by connecting the active signal of each outlet to a control input on the relay
controller. CCC would program the controller to interface with the touch-screen GUI and display a status
when the control input is active.

The control inputs feature pull-down or pull-up circuits, depending on the input type—GND or 28VDC for an
active signal.

See Figure 2.3.3 and locate the twelve control input LEDs and the sixteen relay LEDS.

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Figure 2.3.3: Top face of the Low Current (Relay) Controller unit.

These units have very useful diagnostics for determining issues that may arise. Refer to Figure 2.3.3 for easy
reference to LED labels.

• Control Inputs 1 – 12 – These AMBER LEDs will be illuminated if their corresponding input is active. If
the input is an ACTIVE LOW, then the LED will be illuminated when it receives a GND. If the input is an
ACTIVE HIGH, then the LED will be illuminated when it receives 28VDC. If there is an issue with an
indication on a touch-screen or enunciator in the cabin, it is best to make sure the LED for the
corresponding input to which the indication is connected is illuminated. If not, then the Relay
Controller unit is not receiving the GND or 28VDC signal that it needs to activate the input.
• Relay Status 1 – 16 – These AMBER LEDs will be illuminated when their corresponding relays are
closed, or have their wiper connected to the normally open (NO) contact, connecting the circuit
between COM and NO. It is best to check these LEDs when there is an issue with a corresponding
circuit. For example, if a Reading Light is connected to Address 358, Relay 5, and the Reading Light is
not turning on when its assigned button is pressed, then it is best to find the controller assigned to
address 358, and make sure the AMBER LED that corresponds to Relay 5 is illuminated when the
button status is active. Switching the button to its “off” status and back to its “on” status repeatedly
while watching the Relay LED is often a good troubleshooting trick to make sure the Relay is closing as
it should.

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2.3.4 Solid State and Low-Side PWM Controllers

Systems that require control of dimmable lights require the use of Solid State and/or Low-Side PWM
Controllers. These controllers use pulse width modulation to vary voltage sent to their outputs. Lights such as
monochrome dome and wash lights are dimmed using these controllers.

Figure 2.3.4: Top face of the Solid State Controller unit.

Valuable diagnostics on these controllers are the channel intensities, as listed below. Refer to Figure 2.3.4 for
easy reference to LED labels.

• Channel Active 1 – 6 – The intensity of these AMBER LEDs indicates the level of the corresponding
output. These are best to use when determining if an output is active or not.
• CH(1 – 6) >0 <50 – These AMBER LEDs will be illuminated if the corresponding output is a level
between 1 and 100 percent.
• CH(1 – 6) >50 <100 – These AMBER LEDs will be illuminated if the corresponding output is a level
between 50 and 100 percent.

These diagnostics are useful in determining whether lights connected to the corresponding outputs should be
on or not.

2.3.5 All devices

The important thing to remember is that all of the CCC devices have most of the common diagnostics listed in
Section 1.3.2, and unique diagnostics that help immensely with troubleshooting issues that may arise either in
integration or during service. There are more detailed descriptions of all attributes of the CCC devices in their
corresponding technical specifications and mechanical drawings, which are available upon request. Send an
email to support@custom-control.com for these requests.

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Chapter Three: Software Tools
In this chapter, the applications or “software tools” running on the CSNM will be described in more detail.
These software tools are necessary for the system to operate correctly during its service, and also help
troubleshoot hardware and software issues that may arise.

Named “Device Manager” and “System Manager,” these software tools monitor and manage the system.
There are other applications that must run on the CSNM for normal operation of the system, but knowledge of
these two is important in understanding the configuration of the system, how the system works and in
addition, troubleshooting possible issues.

WARNING: Most CCC Systems are supplied with a Primary CSNM and a Secondary CSNM. The tools
mentioned in this chapter can ONLY RUN ON ONE CSNM AT A TIME! If the tools are not running on one
CSNM, make sure they are not running on the other CSNM before launching them on the first.

Section 1: Device Manager


The basis of Device Manager is to monitor, manage and update devices in the C-Stream Network. Loading
software configuration onto devices is its primary role in the system, and this process is called
“commissioning.”

Basically, commissioning just reloads the custom configuration, located on the CSNM for the aircraft, to the
selected device. This is needed when a new device is installed into the system, or a repaired device is
returned from the CCC Facility.

A re-commission of a device can be done when the user simply wants to reload the device to restore defaults.
This has been known to correct some minor issues with the operation of a device.

Device Manager will be running, so it will be located in the Windows taskbar. Maximizing Device Manager will
allow the user to see more information, and is convenient for extra scrolling area. In this tool, across the top,
there are tabs as follows: Devices, Routers, Events, New Devices and Changed Devices. The user should only
be concerned with using the Devices and Events tabs.

On the Devices tab, a list of all devices in the system will appear. There are six columns to this tab, which are
as follows:

• Address – Six-digit C-Stream address of the listed device. First four digits are the address, and the last
two identify the node. For example, 020301 is Address 203, node B. 345200 is Address 3452, node A.
• Node ID – Device specific signature. No two devices have the same ID.
• Ch – C-Stream channel number.
• Test – Pass or fail?

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• Software – Software ID, for internal purposes.
• Name – Device name given by Systems Engineer who configured the system. This usually includes the
device part number with some descriptive name.

The Events tab displays a list of all functions carried out during the current session of Device Manager. It is
useful in tracking error messages and monitoring update/commission processes. The Events tab of Device
Manager is also useful for testing the C-Stream communication between a device and the CSNM.

Figure 3.1a: Using UltraVNC, which is a remote access program, the user can “remote” into the CSNM to
control it. Here, Device Manager is in the upper-left corner, on this virtualized CSNM Desktop view.

Note: Device Manager error types are described in Chapter 5: Troubleshooting.

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Experiments

Access the CSNM using UltraVNC, on the laptop. Refer to Appendix, Section 2 for a procedure on this.

Locate Device Manager, which will be running in the taskbar with several other applications.

This experiment will show how the Events tab can be useful in testing C-Stream communication between a
device and the CSNM.

1. Click on the Events tab.


2. Un-check the “Locate Btn Commission” and “Locate Btn Recommission” checkboxes on the lower part
of Device Manager.
3. Press the LOCATE button on the device five times consecutively.
4. Did all five “Service Pin” messages come through? Figure 3.1b shows these Service Pin messages listed
in the Events tab.
5. A check of C-Stream wiring to that device is required if even some of the messages are not seen after
pressing the LOCATE button.

Figure 3.1b: Events tab of Device Manager.

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More Experiments

Commissioning a device using Device Manager:

1. Select any device in Device Manager. See Figure 3.1c below.

Figure 3.1c: Select a device.

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2. Press the “Commission” button.

Figure 3.1d: “Commission” button.

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3. When you press the “Commission” button, a dialog may appear. Sometimes it will ask you if you want
to replace it, if the unit is already commissioned. Click “Yes” if you want to continue.

Figure 3.1e: Dialog that may appear after pressing the “Commission” button.

4. Select the “Press the locate button” radio button, and go press the LOCATE button on the device to
commission.

Figure 3.1f: “Press the locate button” radio button.

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5. Note the message at the bottom of Device Manager. It will display “Ready” when it is idle, and will
indicate its current operation if it is carrying out a command. See below.

Figure 3.1g: Device Manager process status.

6. Commissioning will generally take about 10-75 seconds, depending on the device chosen. On average,
expect to wait about one minute. One important thing to remember is that Device Manager is a single-
threaded application, meaning it can only do one thing at a time. Please wait until commissioning is
finished before doing anything else with Device Manager. It will display “Ready” in the lower-left
corner when it has finished.
7. If after the commission is complete, and “Pass” does not show in the Test column for the device, then
try commissioning again, with “Force reload of device application” checked. Press the LOCATE button
on the device. Note what happens.

Figure 3.1h: “Force reload of device application” checkbox.

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8. When pressing the “Recommission” button, Device Manager will use the last known node ID (just a
signature specific to the device installed). Commissioning will begin when you confirm your decision
on the next prompt.
9. Try decommissioning a device. What does it do? Be sure to re-commission the device before
proceeding to the next step.
10. Document how the system reacts when trying various methods of commissioning, for future reference.
If there are questions, please contact support@custom-control.com for assistance.

Section 2: System Manager


System Manager is an important application and needs to be running for normal operation of the touch-
screens in the system. It works as a bridge between the C-Stream Network and the Ethernet Network,
transmitting and receiving packets to and from both networks. Without System Manager running, the
“Network Unavailable” pop-up page on the touch-screens may appear.

System Manager hosts components of the system for communication with systems such as Satellite TV, GSM
and XMRadio. It needs to be running to support of the CCC controls such as advanced Programmable Lighting
scenarios and Call Queue control.

Figure 3.2: Note “CCC System M…” in the taskbar. This is System Manager. Its components, CCC CPort Bridge
Lib, CCC XMRadio Lib and CCC Generic Lib are running specifically on the unit from which screenshots were
taken.

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Experiments

Access the CSNM using UltraVNC, on the laptop.

1. Locate System Manager in the taskbar. If it has an “Open Project” dialog over it, contact
support@custom-control.com.
2. Close it and note what happens to the touch-screens on the aircraft.
3. Locate CCC Launch Pad in the taskbar.
4. Select System Manager in CCC Launch Pad.
5. Click the “Start App” button.
6. Note what happens to the touch-screens when “INFO - CPort client ‘CPort UDP’ added” in System
Manager is displayed.
7. Be careful not to try launching an application when it is already running in the taskbar. Also, take heed
to the warning at the beginning of this chapter in regard to launching applications.

Important: As Device Manager and System Manager are the only applications mentioned in this chapter,
there are others that must be running in order for the system to function, properly. These are “Network
Database Manager,” “User I/O” and “CCC Launch Pad.” In addition, other applications such as “iPadServices”
may be running to support iPad and/or iPod remote control of the system. Please do not ever close these
applications.

Questions

1. For what purpose is Device Manager running on the CSNM?


2. For what purpose is System Manager running on the CSNM?
3. How many CSNMs can run these tools?
4. You log in to the CSNM and find that no tools are running other than CCC Launch Pad and User I/O.
You then bring up CCC Launch Pad and begin launching tools. Was this the correct thing to do?
5. You log in to the CSNM and find that System Manager and/or Device manager has an “Open Project”
dialog on top of it. What should you do?
6. What does the commissioning process do to a device?
7. What does the decommission function do?

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Chapter Four: Documents
Important note: You should ALWAYS check the following documents and cross reference them with the
completion center wiring diagrams before doing any troubleshooting. If you do not have these documents,
please contact CCC for copies.

Section 1: Controller Block Diagram


The Controller Block Diagram (CBD) is the system-level schematic showing connectivity of the entire CCC
System. It lays out the device-to-device hardware connections and gives device address, customer reference
number, location in the aircraft, and CCC reference for every device.

4.1.1 Sections of the CBD

The CBD is divided into sections for easy reference.

The beginning section of the document gives general information on how to address a device and general C-
Stream topologies.

The main section of most CBDs is broken into Entertainment Equipment, Audio Video Switchers, Digital
Amplifiers, CMS Controllers, On/Off Control, Dimmable Lighting Controllers, and Room-by-Room. Each device
in the system can be categorized into one of these sections.

4.1.2 How to read diagrams in the CBD

Every device in the CCC System is represented by a rectangular box with several attributes:

• Device address – This is the C-Stream address. Every device in the system has a unique C-Stream or
device address.
• Device type – Type of device and part number are listed.
• Device location – This information may or may not be provided in the CBD, based on information
provided by the completion center.
• Connectors – General pin labeling on connectors will be as follows: Connector label – Pin label (for
example connector J1, pin 37 will be denoted as J1-37). Connectors on devices are labeled as such:
o J1 – JX for D-subs and cannon plugs
o B1 – BX for BNC connectors
o P1 – PX for Ethernet/RJ-45 connectors

See Figure 4.1.2.

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Figure 4.1.2: Solid State Controller part from CBD. Note the attributes listed above.

4.1.3 When is this document needed/used?

This document is used in many stages of the CCC System’s use.

It is used by the CCC System Engineers who configure the system at the System Integration Lab (SIL) at the CCC
Facility. They use it to set proper channel assignments, touch-screen control, lighting configurations, etc.

It is used during aircraft – CCC integration, to create wiring diagrams. The wiring diagrams MUST MATCH the
CBD in order for the system to function properly.

After delivery, it is used to verify connections and cross reference with wiring diagrams to troubleshoot and
upgrade the system.

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Section 2: Switch Block Diagram
The Switch Block Diagram (SBD) is a layout diagram showing all monitors, touch-screens, switch panels and
their button layouts, with a legend that defines their button pictographs, if there are any. It also gives a parts
list which includes Switch Block Reference numbers, part numbers, quantity and names of associated
mechanical drawings which can be useful for referencing if an issue arises with one of these devices.

Switch Block References are used internally to associate parts and locations with labels. These labels include a
part reference represented by an alphabetic character, and a number which represents the part’s index in the
total number of that part in the system. For example, Switch Block References such as B1, A3 and D4 are very
useful for finding a specific part without tracking down more specific information such as CCC device address,
completion center part reference, etc.

Sometimes an SBD will come with a seat chart, so seat labels can be associated with Switch Block References
to make troubleshooting easier.

Figure 4.2.1: Example SBD

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Section 3: Acceptance Test Procedure
The Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) is an outline of the system user interface. It lists all switch panels and
touch-screens in the system and their specific individual functions.

The ATP is divided into sections and has a formatted table of contents for easy access to entries in the
document.

The introduction section contains examples of entries in the document and describes how to read and check-
off each item. Each entry is a table which contains the following:

• Key/button name – picture of switch panel key or text from touch-screen button.
• Functional description – function to be carried out by button press.
• Controlled device(s) – Listed of associated controllers and their outputs. Detailed truth tables for
relays and other outputs are included here, listed by button press.
• Checked – Does the button perform the listed functionality?

The Switch Panel section lists all switch panels by Switch Block Reference. Each switch panel entry contains an
itemized list of all keys on the device which includes the number of key presses depending on functions
requested by the customer and a detailed system response to each key press. See Figure 4.3.1 for an example
entry.

The Touch-screen section lists all touch-screens and their associated pages. Each page is listed with a full
description of each button, number of presses for each button, and a detailed system response for each
button press.

Figure 4.3.1: Example ATP entry for a switch panel.

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Refer to the ATP for a functional description of a button. Check the behavior of the associated device(s) can to
make sure the system is functioning properly.

Important Note: Use these Documents!


All of the above mentioned documents are provided with a CCC System and are required in integrating the
system into the aircraft and tracking issues, if any arise. The ATP is the best tool to assist with
troubleshooting. Find the interface with the issue, trace the system through the controlled device and use the
CBD for reference.

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Chapter Five: Troubleshooting
A good rule of thumb when beginning all troubleshooting processes is to gather as much information about
the issue as possible. Then, begin the troubleshooting process as depicted below:

Figure 5.1: Troubleshooting Flowchart

Important tip: The main idea behind troubleshooting is for each issue, choose a “known-good” location and
use it to test suspect parts. Swap suspect parts, one at a time, into this location to verify their integrity.

Note: Contact CCC before shipping any units to avoid charges for “No Trouble Found.”
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Section 1: General Issues
Issue Tip
If Err 1, check power and C-Stream connections to the device and LEDs on
face of device. If only 28VDC/115VAC is lit and nothing else, the device
will need to be repaired at the CCC Facility.
If Err 3, 5, 6, 7, 9, re-commission the device using the Recommission
button in Device Manager.
Errors in Device Manager.
If Err 8, re-commission the device using the Commission button and
pressing the LOCATE button the device.

Note: If there are excessive errors, it will be necessary to contact CCC for
an online troubleshooting session.
Access the CSNM with UltraVNC, from a laptop. Refer to Appendix,
Section 2 for a procedure on this. Test the Ethernet Switches with Device
Manager. Refer to the “Errors in Device Manager” item if there are errors
on the Ethernet Switches.

If Device Manager and/or System Manager have an Open Project dialog


showing, Refer to Appendix, Section 4, Database Recovery.

If the CSNM cannot be accessed with UltraVNC, be sure the directions in


Appendix, Section 2 have been followed, correctly. If so, be sure the
CSNM has power, a good Ethernet connection and messages are scrolling
“Network Unavailable” on ALL touch-
across the 16-character display on the top of the unit. If the CSNM has no
screens.
power or Ethernet, check and correct as necessary. If it does and no
messages scroll across the 16-character display, then the unit may need
repair.

Connect a VGA monitor to the CSNM, power cycle it and check if it boots.
Be sure the unit is not continuously rebooting.

It may be necessary, with a keyboard connected to the unit after a power


cycle, to press CTRL+ALT+F1 to switch video output to the monitor.

If black screen still persists, contact CCC.


Check the SBD for the Switch Block Reference to the suspect touch-
screen. Search for its Switch Block Reference in the CBD. Once the part is
found in the CBD, trace the connections listed on the CBD to the Ethernet
Switch.

First inspect the Ethernet Switch and be sure that the statuses of the LEDs
“Network Unavailable” on one or more are all normal.
touch-screens but not all of them.
Find out to which Ethernet port the touch-screen connects on the
Ethernet Switch, and swap that connector to a known good connector on
the Ethernet Switch. If the touch-screen begins working, then the
Ethernet Switch has a bad port.

If the issue still persists, check the Ethernet cable by using a store-bought

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one in its place. If the touch-screen works when using a store-bought
cable, get the cable re-terminated or swapped out.

Contact CCC for shipping approval of the touch-screen if all else fails.
The first thing to remember here is that when a device is repaired, it will
be returned with test software on it. It must be commissioned before it
Device does not work properly after
will work properly in the system.
return from repair.
If the issue persists after commissioning the unit, please contact CCC.
Access the CSNM with UltraVNC, from a laptop. Refer to Appendix,
Section 2 for a procedure on this.

Be sure that the address dialed-in on the unit is correct, in accordance


with the CBD and completion center wiring diagrams. Select the device in
Device Manager, press the Commission button, select the “Press the
Locate Button” radio button, check the “Force reload of device
application” checkbox and go press the locate button on the appropriate
node (A, B or C).

If the commission fails, un-check the “Locate Btn Commission” and


“Locate Btn Recommission” checkboxes at the bottom of Device
Manager, and then go press the locate button five times consecutively, to
Device will not commission. check C-Stream communication. In the Events tab toward the bottom of
the events list, all five “Service Pin” messages from that address should
be listed. If not, then check the C-Stream wire installation. Be sure that it
is not grounded or short-circuited, and that it has continuity back to the
C-Stream router for the associated C-Stream channel.

Also check the device LEDs—specifically the RESET and LOCATE for the
associated device node. If RESET and LOCATE are both flashing on and
alternating, periodically, then the device is in a reset loop. If you are able
to get a service pin message from the device to Device Manager, you
should be able to eventually commission it with several tries, using the
Recommission button.

If all else fails, contact CCC for assistance.


Device is in a reset loop. Refer to “Device will not commission” issue for
LOCATE and RESET LEDs on a device are tips. If this is happening on several devices, make sure audio is not
flashing periodically, alternating. connected in to C-Stream at ANY point. It can cause an entire channel of
C-Stream devices to behave erratically.
Access the CSNM with UltraVNC, from a laptop. Refer to Appendix,
Section 2 for a procedure on this.

Check the Events tab of Device Manager. Are the service pin messages
Device will not locate when LOCATE
coming in from pressing the locate button?
button is pressed.
If not, check the C-Stream wire installation. Be sure that it is not
grounded or short-circuited, and that it has continuity back to the C-
Stream router for the associated C-Stream channel.
Switch panel has no back light Check power to the unit.

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Access the CSNM with UltraVNC, from a laptop. Refer to Appendix,
Section 2 for a procedure on this. Check if the unit is commissioned. If
not, commission it.

If the unit is commissioned and still has no backlight, contact CCC.


Only the 28VDC/115VAC LED on a device The unit has a blown fuse. Contact CCC for shipping approval of the
is lit device.
Check circuit breaker and power connections to the device. It may be
No LEDs on a device are lit necessary to swap another device of the same part number into this
location to verify.

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Section 2: Audio/Video Issues
Issue Tip
Access the CSNM with UltraVNC, from a laptop. Refer to Appendix,
Section 2 for a procedure on this. Be sure the device is commissioned. If
so, set the volume relatively high for troubleshooting.

Within 30 minutes (to avoid the panel restoring defaults), swap the
device to a known-good location to verify the hardware is good. Do not
readdress or commission the device. If in the known-good location there
is still no audio on the panel, try readdressing the device and
commissioning it with the known-good location’s software. If after
commissioning the device and increasing the volume there is audio, then
contact CCC for a configuration update. If there is still no audio, contact
CCC for shipping approval of the device.
No audio heard from switch panel
headphone jack If there is audio in the known-good location without commissioning, then
check the audio wiring in the original location of the device from the
audio switcher. Bypass aircraft wiring by running a twisted pair patch
cable directly from the assigned audio switcher output to which the
switch panel audio is connected to the switch panel to verify the switcher
output. Also double-check all pin-outs and cross reference with the CBD
for pin assignments.

At the audio switcher, verify that the associated output changes inputs
when the switch panel source is changed. Refer to Section 2.3.1 for a
procedure on this.

If it is still unclear as to where the issue lies, contact CCC.


Access the CSNM with UltraVNC, from a laptop. Refer to Appendix,
Section 2 for a procedure on this. Be sure the amplifier for the room is
commissioned and passing. If so, then set the room volume relatively
high for troubleshooting.

Within 30 minutes (to avoid the device restoring defaults), swap the room
amplifier to a known-good location to verify the hardware is good. Do
not readdress or commission the device. If in the known-good location
there is still no audio in the known-good room, try readdressing the
amplifier and commissioning it with the known-good location’s software.
No audio heard from all overhead
Contact CCC and give information about the troubleshooting done, to get
speakers in a room
a configuration update.

If there is audio in the known-good location without commissioning, then


check the audio wiring in the original location of the amplifier from the
audio switcher. Bypass aircraft wiring by running a twisted pair patch
cable directly from the assigned audio switcher output to which the
amplifier audio is connected to the amplifier to verify the switcher
output. Also double-check all pin-outs and cross reference with the CBD
for pin assignments.

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At the audio switcher, verify that the associated output changes inputs
when the switch panel source is changed. Refer to Section 2.3.1 for a
procedure on this.

If it is still unclear as to where the issue lies, contact CCC.


There are four parameters to this issue. Amplifier hardware, amplifier
software configuration, wiring and speakers. Each of these will be tested
with this process. Determine the issue and contact CCC as necessary for
shipping approval of devices and/or software reconfiguration.

Speaker test: swap the speakers without audio into a position that has
audio, to test the speaker hardware. If no audio is heard, contact CCC for
shipping approval of the speakers.

Wiring test (keep in mind that a continuity test is never 100% adequate):
swap the known-good speakers into the position that has no audio. Next,
set a known-good amplifier to a good audible level and swap it into the
No audio heard from one or more suspect position (without re-commissioning and within 30 minutes to
speakers in a room but not all avoid restoring defaults). If no audio is heard, repair the wiring.

Amplifier software configuration test: swap amplifiers to test outputs.


Choose a known-good amplifier that uses the same outputs, re-address
and commission it in the suspect position, and test the audio. If there is
no audio on the suspect outputs after wiring has been verified, contact
CCC for software updates.

Amplifier hardware test: Take the suspect amplifier, re-address and


commission it in a known-good location that uses the same outputs. Test
audio to verify amplifier hardware.

If it is still unclear as to where the issue lies, contact CCC.


Access the CSNM with UltraVNC, from a laptop. Refer to Appendix,
Section 2 for a procedure on this. Be sure the monitors and video
switchers are commissioned and passing. If not, check the devices and
No video on any monitors make sure they are properly connected and commissioned.

If they are passing, make sure the monitors are on and contact CCC for
additional troubleshooting.
There are five parameters to this issue. Monitor hardware, monitor
software configuration, wiring, video switcher hardware, video switcher
software configuration. Each of these will be tested with this process.
Determine the issue and contact CCC as necessary for shipping approval
of devices and/or software reconfiguration.

No video on a monitor Monitor hardware test: first, check the monitor to see if its backlight is
on. Turn off the lights in the room and look at the monitor. If there is a
faint glow to it, then the backlight is on. Otherwise if it is dark, then it is
off. Make sure the backlight is on before doing the next test. If the
monitor backlight will not turn on, then conduct the monitor software
configuration test.

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The next test is to set the video source on a known-good monitor to the
same source as the suspect one, extend the video coaxial cable of the
known-good monitor position to the suspect monitor and test video. This
can also be done by moving the suspect bad monitor into a known-good
monitor position, without re-commissioning. If there is still no picture,
conduct the monitor software test on the suspect monitor.

If there is a picture on the suspect monitor after the swap, then the
monitor is good. Move to another test.

Monitor software configuration test: if the backlight is off and pressing


the monitor on/off button on the switch panel or touch-screen does not
turn the backlight on, try re-commissioning the unit.

Commission the monitor in a known-good monitor position with the


known-good monitor’s software. If there is still no video, then contact
CCC for shipping approval of the monitor. If after the commission, there
is video, then the hardware is good, but the software configuration for
the suspect monitor may not be right. Test the known-good monitor in
the suspect position by readdressing and commissioning it. The known-
good monitor should have no video if the software configuration is not
correct. Contact CCC for software configuration updates.

Wiring test (keep in mind that a continuity test is never 100% adequate):
at the video switcher, find the suspect output and a known-good output.
Refer to the CBD for assignments of monitor outputs. Swap the coaxial or
twisted pair wires at these outputs on the video switcher. Now, swap the
suspect monitor with a known-good monitor. Now that a good video
switcher output and known-good monitor is in the suspect position, the
only factor left is the wire. If there is no video, replace the wire. If there
is video, then the issue lies in the suspect video switcher output or the
suspect monitor.

Video switcher software configuration test: refer to section 2.3.1 for a


procedure on how to check if outputs are switching to the correct inputs.
Change the view on the screen to the correct output, switch the video
source on the monitor and using the CBD, check the switched inputs to be
sure they are correct. If the output is not switching inputs, then double-
check the CBD to be sure the correct output is tested before contacting
CCC for a software update of the video switcher.

Video switcher hardware test: test the video switcher suspect output by
swapping a known-good wire and monitor to the suspect output. If there
is no video on the known-good monitor after the swap, contact CCC for
shipping approval of the video switcher. If there is video on the known-
good monitor after the swap, then the video switcher output is good.

If it is still unclear as to where the issue lies, contact CCC.

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There are five parameters to this issue. Source equipment, video ADC
(video decoder for standard definition sources or digital video serializer
for high definition sources, if the source equipment is not a CCC device),
wire, video switcher software configuration and video switcher hardware.
Determine the issue and contact CCC as necessary for shipping approval
of devices and/or software reconfiguration.

Source equipment test: run wire from the source equipment, bypassing
the installed aircraft wiring, to a known-good video switcher input. If the
device is not CCC source equipment, then bypass the wire from the
source to a known-good video ADC. Switch to the source associated with
the known-good input at a monitor and if the suspect source is displayed,
then the source equipment is good. Check the wire and the decoder or
switcher input with the next few tests.

Decoder and Serializer test: check the video lock LED on the decoder or
serializer. This indicates if the device is getting a good signal from the
source; however, this is not a sufficient test. Also swap the device into a
known-good location, commission it and test. These two procedures will
test the wire from the source to the device, and the device itself.

Wiring test (keep in mind that a continuity test is never 100% adequate):
bypass the aircraft wiring with a patch coaxial or twisted pair wire,
depending on the type of equipment, from the source equipment (or if
the video source is not CCC equipment then from the video ADC) to the
No video from a source video switcher input which the source is assigned. Switch to that source
at a monitor and check for video. If there is video, then check the
installed wire.

Video switcher software configuration test: refer to section 2.3.1 for a


procedure on how to check if outputs are switching to the correct inputs.
Change the view on the screen to an output, switch the video source on
the corresponding monitor and using the CBD, check the switched inputs
to be sure they are correct. If the selected output is not switching to the
assigned input for the source, then double-check the CBD to be sure the
correct input/output is tested before contacting CCC for a software
update of the video switcher.

Video switcher hardware test: test the video switcher suspect input by
swapping it with a known-good input of the same video type. For
example, if the issue is with a standard definition source, select a known-
good standard definition source with which to swap inputs. On the
monitor which the test is conducted, switch to the suspect source and
check if video from the known-good source is displayed. If so, then the
switcher input is good. If not, then the source may need to be assigned to
a known-good input or shipping approval of the switcher may need to be
sought. Contact CCC.

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There are two parameters for this issue. Wire from source equipment,
and the video switcher input to which the source is assigned. Determine
the issue and contact CCC as necessary for shipping approval of devices
and/or software reconfiguration.

Wiring test (keep in mind that a continuity test is never 100% adequate):
swap a known-good wire from a known-good input on the video switcher
into the suspect input. Test. If the picture does not improve, test the
Picture flickers when a specific source is other end, and if all else fails, replace the wire. Picture flickering is often
selected due to low wire integrity.

Video switcher input test: if a known good wire is swapped into the
suspect position and flickering on the known-good source occurs, then
the switcher input is bad and needs attention at CCC. To avoid sending
the unit for repair in the case where a flight is scheduled soon, and if
there are unused inputs, re-assigning the input may also be necessary. A
CCC representative can reconfigure the input assignment upon request.

There are 3 parameters for this issue. The assigned video switcher
output, monitor input and wire from video switcher output to the
monitor. Determine the issue and contact CCC as necessary for shipping
approval of devices and/or software reconfiguration.

Wiring test (keep in mind that a continuity test is never 100% adequate):
swap the suspect wire to a known-good output on the video switcher and
swap a known-good monitor into the suspect monitor position. If the
picture is good, then the wire is proven good.
Picture flickers on a specific monitor for
all sources
Monitor input test: swap the suspect monitor into a known-good
monitor position. If the flickering does not continue, then the monitor
hardware is proven good.

Video switcher output test: swap a known-good wire from a known-good


output on the video switcher onto the suspect output. Test. If the
picture does not improve, then the video switcher output is bad. A CCC
representative can reconfigure the output assignment upon request.

In a system where the AVOD is stored and streamed from the Media
Client II units, video is displayed on the monitors through a DVI
connection. So, there are three parameters to this issue—the Media
Client II DVI output, the DVI cable, and the monitor or Serializer.

WARNING: Never hot swap these units! Always power down both the
No video from AVOD, in a specific
monitor and Media Client before disconnecting/reconnecting.
location, in system containing Media
Client II for AVOD.
Media Client DVI output test: swap the Media Client to a known-good
position to test video output of the suspect Media Client. If there is no
video in the known-good location, then the suspect unit will need repair.
If there is good video, then test the DVI cable, monitor or Serializer.

DVI cable test: this can be one of the most difficult items to test, because
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it requires putting known good devices on both ends to test it. Get a
known-good Media Client and a known-good monitor on both ends of the
cable to test the cable. Just make sure that the source of the known-good
monitor was switched to AVOD before doing the swap, and that the swap
is done within 30 minutes to avoid default restoration. If there is no video
with known-good units on both ends, then replace the cable. If the cable
is a CCC product, obtain approval for shipping the item to CCC.

Monitor or Serializer test: before running this test, select a known-good


monitor of the same type, and switch the video source of both the
suspect monitor and the known-good monitor to AVOD. Then, within 30
minutes, power down and swap the suspect monitor into the known-
good location. If there is no video, then obtain approval for shipping the
unit to CCC.

If the unit connects with a Serializer instead of a monitor, then the video
output of the Media Client is likely switched through the video switcher,
and distributed throughout the cabin. Swap the suspect Serializer into a
known-good location that uses the DVI input, and test video. If there is
no video, then obtain approval for shipping the Serializer unit to CCC.

In a system where the AVOD is stored and streamed from the Media
Client III units, video is displayed on the monitors through a coaxial
connection. So, there are three parameters to this issue—the Media
Client II coaxial output, the coaxial cable, and the monitor.

Media Client coaxial output test: swap the Media Client to a known-good
position to test video output of the suspect Media Client. If there is no
video in the known-good location, then the suspect unit will need repair.
If there is good video, then test the coaxial cable and monitor.

Coaxial cable test: the easiest way to test this is to run a known-good
No video from AVOD, in a specific
coaxial cable between the Media Client and the monitor. The harder but
location, in system containing Media
more conclusive way to test this is to swap known-good units into the
Client III for AVOD.
suspect location and test. Just make sure that the source of the known-
good monitor was switched to AVOD before doing the swap, and that the
swap is done within 30 minutes to avoid default restoration. If there is no
video with known-good units on both ends, then replace the cable. If the
cable is a CCC product, obtain approval for shipping the item to CCC.

Monitor test: before running this test, select a known-good monitor of


the same type, and switch the video source of both the suspect monitor
and the known-good monitor to AVOD. Then, within 30 minutes, power
down and swap the suspect monitor into the known-good location. If
there is no video, then obtain approval for shipping the unit to CCC.
In a system where the AVOD is stored on the Media Loader and IDC
monitors display it, audio is sourced from the IDC monitors. So, there are
No audio from AVOD, in a specific
three parameters to this issue—the IDC monitor audio output, the
location, in system containing IDC
twisted-pair audio wire, and the switch panel or amplifier to which the
monitors for AVOD.
audio is passed.

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IDC monitor audio output test: before conducting this test, select a
known-good monitor of the same or similar type, select AVOD on both
the known-good and the suspect monitor, and move the suspect monitor
into the known-good location. If the issue follows the suspect monitor,
then obtain approval for shipping the unit to CCC. If there is audio, run
the next two tests.

Twisted-pair audio wire test: the easiest way to test this is to run a
known-good twisted-pair between the monitor and the audio output
device. The harder but more conclusive way to test this is to swap
known-good units into the suspect location and test. Just make sure that
the source of the known-good monitor was switched to AVOD before
doing the swap, and that the swap is done within 30 minutes to avoid
default restoration. If there is no audio with known-good units on both
ends, then replaced the twisted-pair. If the cable is a CCC product, obtain
approval for shipping the item to CCC.

Switch panel or amplifier test: before conducting this test, select a


known-good audio output device (switch panel with headphone jack or
amplifier) of the same or similar type, select AVOD on both the known-
good and suspect audio output device, and move the suspect audio
output device into the known-good location. If there is no audio in the
known-good location with the suspect hardware, obtain approval for
shipping the unit to CCC.

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Section 3: Lighting Issues
Refer to Sections 2.3.3 and 2.3.4 for illustrations and procedures for checking relays and channel outputs on lighting
controllers.

Issue Tip
These lights are likely controlled by a relay on a CCC relay controller.
Press the button assigned to the light, whether it be on a switch panel or
the touch-screen, and be sure that the associated relay on the relay
controller is actuating. This can be done by first referencing the CBD for
controller address and relay assignment, then looking at the face of the
controller to see if the associated LED for the relay lights up when the
button is pressed. If the relay is actuating, check the wiring. If not, then
check to be sure the device is commissioned. Contact CCC only if the
device is commissioned AND the relay is not actuating.
On/Off type light, such as reading lights,
will not switch on or off.
If the light is controlled by a dimming module such as a Solid State
Controller (which is rare but possible), then check to be sure the channel
output assigned to the light is changing when the button is pressed. This
can be done by first referencing the CBD for controller address and
output assignment, then looking at the face of the controller to see if the
associated LED for the channel output lights up when the button is
pressed. If the output is turning on, then check the wiring. If not, then
check to be sure the device is commissioned. Contact CCC only if the
device is commissioned AND the channel output is not changing state.
Check to be sure the channel output assigned to the light is changing
Dimmable light controlled by CCC when the button is pressed. This can be done by first referencing the CBD
dimming module will not switch on or for controller address and output assignment, then looking at the face of
off. the controller to see if the associated LED for the channel output lights up
when the button is pressed. If the output is turning on, then check the
Note: this does not apply for Emteq wiring. If not, then check to be sure the device is commissioned. Contact
Quasar and CCC Can/Wash lights. CCC only if the device is commissioned AND the channel output is not
changing state.

These lights are likely controlled by combinations of two or more relays.


Press the button assigned to the light, whether it be on a switch panel or
the touch-screen, and be sure that the associated relay for on/off control
of the light on the relay controller is actuating. Keep in mind here that
there are more than one relay controlling these lights, and usually only
one of them controls the on/off behavior, while the others control the
brightness of the light.
Dimmable light controlled by CCC relay
controller will not switch on or off.
This can be done by first referencing the CBD for controller address and
relay assignment, then looking at the face of the controller to see if the
associated LED for the relay lights up when the button is pressed. If the
relay is actuating, check the wiring. If not, then check to be sure the
device is commissioned. Contact CCC only if the device is commissioned
AND the relay is not actuating.

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Check to be sure the channel output assigned to the light is changing to a
value lower than 100% when the button is pressed. This can be done by
first referencing the CBD for controller address and output assignment,
then looking at the face of the controller to see if the associated LED for
the channel output lights up when the button is pressed.
Dimmable light controlled by CCC
If the output is switching to 50% or lower, then check the wiring, because
dimming module will not dim.
the CCC controller is doing its job.
Note: this does not apply for Emteq
If the output is switching to 66% (which is a common dim level), then
Quasar and CCC Can/Wash lights.
there will be no change in the LEDs, since this value falls between 50 and
100%. In this case, it may be necessary to contact CCC and have us check
the level in software. However, before doing this, verify the wiring.

Else, check to be sure the device is commissioned. Contact CCC only if the
device is commissioned AND the channel output is not changing state.
These lights are likely controlled by combinations of two or more relays.
Press the button assigned to the light, whether it be on a switch panel or
the touch-screen, and be sure that the associated relay for bright/dim
control of the light on the relay controller is actuating. Keep in mind here
that there are more than one relay controlling these lights, and usually
only one of them controls the on/off behavior, while the others control
Dimmable light controlled by CCC relay
the bright/dim behavior of the light.
controller will not go to dim state from
bright state and/or vice versa.
This can be done by first referencing the CBD for controller address and
relay assignment, then looking at the face of the controller to see if the
associated LED for the relay lights up when the button is pressed. If the
relay is actuating, check the wiring. If not, then check to be sure the
device is commissioned. Contact CCC only if the device is commissioned
AND the relay is not actuating.
Access the CSNM with UltraVNC, from a laptop. Refer to Appendix,
Section 2 for a procedure on this. Be sure the amplifier for the room is
commissioned and passing. If so, then set the room volume relatively
CCC Can light will not switch on or
high for troubleshooting.
change color.
Be sure the light has the correct address, and passes the test in Device
Manager. If after commissioning, there is no control of the light, call CCC.
Access the CSNM with UltraVNC, from a laptop. Refer to Appendix,
Section 2 for a procedure on this. Be sure the amplifier for the room is
commissioned and passing. If so, then set the room volume relatively
high for troubleshooting.
CCC Wash lights will not turn on or
change color. Be sure the wash light controller has the correct address, and passes the
test in Device Manager. If after commissioning, check all connections. Be
sure continuity checks are done for all wires connected to the lights from
the controller. If this was all done, contact CCC for further
troubleshooting.
Individual CCC Wash light or Emteq
This can happen when continuity to segments is lost. Check the
Quasar segments will not change color
connections between the lights.
from white, while others in the chain

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seem to do so.
Section 4: Miscellaneous
Issue Tip
This issue is very roughly 90% wiring and 10% software configuration.

Be sure that the RS485 bus is wired/terminated, correctly. During


integration, the Tx and Rx wires will accidentally get swapped, and will
not allow communication between the CSNM and the RDUs.
No control of Satellite TV functions.
Swapping RDUs and testing to rule out possible issues with the RDUs may
also help with this issue.

If after all wires were checked, and Satellite TV still cannot be controlled,
contact CCC.
This issue is likely due to WiFi connection to the remote. Be sure that the
remote is connected to one of the CCC WiFi networks on the aircraft.

If this does not solve the issue, and all CCC WiFi networks have been
tested, check the CBD for the Ethernet connections of the CCC WAPs to
Remote(s) display “Network
the Ethernet Switches. There may be an issue related to the Ethernet
Unavailable.”
Switch.

If this issue appears on the aircraft’s wired touch-screens as well, then


refer to the item in Section 1 “’Network Unavailable’ on one or more
touch-screens but not all of them.”
Shade controls are connected with relays in the CCC System. Check the
CBD for address and relay assignment, gain access to the CCC unit and
Shades will not move when CCC system
check the LEDs for the associated relays assigned to the suspect shade. If
button is pressed.
the relay is actuating, then there is likely a problem with wiring to the
shade or the shade controller.
Monitor lift controls are usually connected with relays in the CCC System.
Check the CBD for address and relay assignment, gain access to the CCC
unit and check the LEDs for the associated relays assigned to the suspect
monitor lift. If the relay is actuating, then there is likely a problem with
wiring to the monitor lift, the monitor lift, or the limit switches.
Monitor lift will not go up nor down
Limit switches often tell the CCC System when the monitor is fully
deployed or fully stowed with discrete inputs. Check the CBD for discrete
input assignments, which are likely on a relay controller. Check the LEDs
for the associated inputs, and if they do not light up, then the issue lies in
the wiring.
Check the CBD for controller and discrete input assignment for this
indicator.

Touch-screen GUI indicator does not Access the CSNM with UltraVNC, from a laptop. Refer to Appendix,
light up. Section 2 for a procedure on this. Be sure the controller assigned to the
associated discrete input is commissioned and passing.

Locate the controller and check the LED for the associated discrete input.
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If the LED is lit and the touch-screen GUI indicator is still not lit, contact
CCC for software configuration updates.

If the LED is not lit, check the wiring to the unit. Some inputs accept 28V
to activate them, while others accept a GND.

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Appendix

Section 1: Determine IP address of a CSNM, Blu-Ray, SkyShow unit, IDC Touch-screen

Determine the IP address of the CSNM by starting with a “10.192.” subnet, and then add the last two octets of
the address, which are based upon the CSNMs C-Stream Address, so check the top of the unit and find out to
what address it is set. The thousands and hundreds digits determine the third octet, and the tens and ones
digits determine the fourth octet. For example:

• C-Stream Address of 0101 would have an IP address set to “10.192.1.1”


• C-Stream Address of 2341 would have an IP address set to “10.192.23.41”

Since “00” can never be in the last octet of an IP address, then a value of “100” is substituted for it.

• C-Stream Address of 0200 would have an IP address set to “10.192.2.100”


• C-Stream Address of 0100 would have an IP address set to “10.192.1.100”

The IP address of any other unit in the system including Blu-Ray Players, SkyShow units and IDC Touch-screens
is found the same way, except with a subnet of “10.197.” instead of the subnet of “10.192.” used for the
CSNM. For example:

• A Blu-Ray Player with a C-Stream Address of 1200 would have an IP address set to “10.197.12.100”
• A SkyShow unit with a C-Stream Address of 0550 would have an IP address set to “10.197.5.50”
• An IDC Touch-screen with a C-Stream Address of 0453 would have an IP address set to “10.197.4.53”

Section 2: Connect to the CSNM using UltraVNC from a laptop

1. Go to the Network Connections dialog through Network and Sharing Center.


2. If the aircraft does not have CCC WAPs on it, connect the laptop to the CCC Ethernet Switch with a
CAT5 cable, go to the Local Area Connection, right-click and go to Properties. Skip to Step 4.
3. If the CCC WAPs will be used for CSNM access, go to Wireless Network Connection, right-click the icon
and go to Properties.
4. In the Properties dialog, select Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) and click on the Properties button. If v6 and
v4 appear next to Internet Protocol, choose the v4 option.

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5. Select the radio button "Use the following IP address," set the IP Address to “10.192.99.99” and Subnet
Mask to “255.248.0.0” and click "OK." Windows will not allow the user to set more than one adapter
with the same IP address, so use “10.192.99.100” for the Local Area Connection, if needed.
6. If the aircraft has CCC WAPs, connect to the one with the strongest signal. CCC1 which has
“0000000001” as its passphrase. CCC2 has “0000000002” as its passphrase, and so on. Otherwise, skip
this step.
7. Determine the address of the CSNM. Refer to Appendix, Section 1.
8. If UltraVNC is not installed, download it from the internet; it can be found on a simple search for
“UltraVNC.”
9. To connect to the CSNM, just double click the shortcut icon provided on the desktop for UltraVNC. In
the VNC Server box, type in the IP address for the CSNM and press connect. Use the password “csnm”
when prompted. The access window for the CSNM will appear. If not, please check your connection
to the aircraft network and retry. If all else fails, read the item “’Network Unavailable’ on ALL touch-
screens” in Chapter Five: Troubleshooting or contact CCC Support.

Section 3: Connect CCC to Maintenance Laptop for upgrades and troubleshooting

10. Get an internet connection to the laptop. Do not use the wireless.
11. Teamviewer is the program to use for remote access. If it is not installed on the laptop, please install
version 7 at www.teamviewer.com. It is very important to make sure version 7 from “Downloads” and
“Previous versions” and NOT anything newer is installed. Once installed and launched, it will display a
user ID and password. Check to be sure the user ID and password displays in the application. If not,
check the internet connection. Teamviewer will not display this information when there is no internet
connection.
12. Contact CCC Support at support@custom-control.com. Provide the Teamviewer user ID and password.
13. CCC will connect to the laptop through the internet and connect to the plane through the wireless
adapter on the laptop for upgrades. Please be sure that the Wireless Access Points are online and the
plane cabin management system is powered for at least 10 minutes prior to connection.
14. Teamviewer has a chat feature.
15. The chat feature is located in the window that appeared when the connection to the connecting party
was established. The chat feature can be enabled in the list of functions when pressing on the down-
arrow icon.

Section 4: Back up the system

1. Connect to the Primary CSNM. Refer to Appendix, Section 2 for procedure.


2. Maximize CCC Device Manager.
3. Go to File, and then Backup.
4. Device Manager will run a backup and place the associated DMR file in the assigned backup folder.

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Section 5: Database recovery

1. Connect to the Primary CSNM. Refer to Appendix, Section 2 for procedure.


2. Close CCC Device Manager.
3. From the “Trained Professionals Only” folder on the Desktop, launch Device Manager Admin Mode.
Do not open the project.
4. Cancel the Open Project dialog, go to File, and then Restore.
5. In the resulting dialog, click on Browse. Sometimes a dialog stating that there are no backups to
restore will appear. Just close it and resume the process.
6. Choose the folder where the backups are stored on the CSNM. The location of the DMR file that the
Restore function needs depends on the type of CSNM. Click OK when the folder has been selected.
• For CSNM II, P/N 020-0102-0X, the DMR file will be in the path:
o C:\CCC\PRJ\<project name>\Backup
• For CSNM III, P/N 020-0102-10, the DMR file will be in the path:
o D:\Backup\DMR
7. Choose the latest DMR file and click OK. A warning that the database will be overwritten may appear.
Click OK. Another about making sure System Manager and Object Browser are closed will appear. Just
click OK.
8. Device Manager will begin restoring the database. When the restore is done, a dialog stating that the
project has been exported successfully will appear. Click OK.
9. Open the project by going to File, and Open. Click OK on the Open dialog.
10. Device Manager will open the project and begin testing devices. Please let Device Manager finish
testing all devices, and make sure all devices pass the test. Some devices may need to be re-
commissioned (and maybe with a LOCATE button).
11. After all devices in the system pass, run a backup. Refer to Appendix, Section 4, for a procedure on
this.

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Revision Information

Revision Changes Date


P1 Initial preliminary release. Needs review. 3/21/2013
- Initial release. 3/27/2013

Written by:

Jason Boline
Systems Engineer

Reviewed by:

Doug Knight
Senior Software Engineer

Bill Dalton
Director of Global Customer Support

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