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CHAPTER I

1.1 INTRODUCTION OF THE STUDY

Welfare means facing or doing well. It is a comprehensive term and refers to the
physical, mental, moral and wellbeing of an individual. Further the term welfare is a
relative concept relative in time and space. It therefore varies from time to time from
region to region and from country to country.

Labor welfare and social measures are known as labour’s service program or
fringe benefits. Labours enjoy these services (such as canteen crèches, education and
recreation facilities) without any references to the specific work done by them.

‘Welfare’ is a broad concept referring to a state of living of an individual or a


group in a desirable relationship with the total environment ecological, economic and
social Labor welfare. It includes both the social and economic content of welfare. Social
welfare is primarily concerned with the solution of various problems of the weaker
section of the society like prevention of destitution and poverty.

It aims at social development by such means as social legislation, social reform,


social action services, social work and social action. The object of economic welfare is to
promote economic development by increasing production, productivity and through
equitable distribution. The Labor welfare is a part of social welfare, conceptually and
operationally converts a broad field and connects a state of well-beings, happiness,
satisfaction conservation and development of human resources.

Labour Welfare such facilities sanitary and medical facilities arrangement for
travel to and from work for the accommodation of the workers labours at a distance from

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the homes and such other service amenities and facilities including social security
measure has contribute to and improvement in the condition under workers are employed.

Labour welfare refers to all those effects of employers, trade union, voluntary
organization and governmental agencies, which help labours, feel better and perform
better.

Labour welfare is a term, which must necessarily be elastic, somewhat different in


interpretation in one country from another, according to the different social customs, the
degree of industrialization and educational level of the workers.

Welfare Measures to Workers

The Welfare measures provided are

➢ First Aid box


➢ Bonus
➢ Increment
➢ Sufficient supply of drinking water.
Industrial progress depends on a satisfied labor force. In recognition on this fact,
the importance of labor welfare measures was accepters as early as 1931, when the royal
commission on labor states: “the benefits, which go under these women culture are of
great importance to the worker and which he is unable to secure by himself. The
schemes of labor welfare may be regarded as a wile incensement which should are
usually does bring a profitable return in the form of greater efficiency.

Labor welfare measures also have beneficial on the workers. The welfare
measures influences the sentiments of the workers are contribute to the maintenance of
industrial peace. Better housing, sickness and maternity benefits, provident funds and
pension educational facilities and entertainment etc. Creates a feeling and among the
workers that they have a state in the industry the workers become more stabilized and
committed and economically efficient, and the mental and moral health of the worker is

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improved. There is a social reason also. As pointed out by the labor investigation
committee, “the provisions of vices ; medical and entertainment rescuer the incidence of
vices ; medical and maternity and child welfare service improve the health the workers
and bring down the rates of general material and infinitive mortality; and educational
facilities increase their mental efficiency and economic productivity.

Now a day’s almost every enterprise incurs expenditure on the welfare of its
labours. The ultimate aim behind these facilities is to improve the lot of workers, the
degree of their efficiency and the quantum and quality of service. The facilities are both
the welfare measures to safe guars the health of factory. Worker within the work place
has been made statutory under the factories the Act, 1948. These provisions ensure that
conditions of work, as far as possible, so not adversely affect their health. These relates
mainly to cleanliness disposal of waste and attluent, ventilation, control of temperature,
elimination of dust and fumes, artificial water facilities, latrines, urinals and spittoons,
washing facilities, facilities for storing and drying clothes, facilities for sitting, rest
shelters, first-aid appliances, canteens, checkrooms and creates. The establishment
covered under factories Act, 1948 is statutorily required to provide all such welfare
facilities.

The welfare amenities provided outside the word places are generally no statutory
in nature are including housing recreation medical are transport facilities, etc. Twenty
years later the planning commission realized the importance of labor welfare, when it
observed that in order to get best out of worker in the matter of production, working
condition required to be include to a large extent. The should at least have the means of
facilities to keep himself in a state of health and efficiency this is primarily a question of
adequate nutrition and suitable housing conditions the working condition should be such
as to safeguard his health and protect him against occupational hazards.

The work place should provide reasonable amenities for his essential needs the
worker should also be equipped with necessary technical training and a certain level of
general education. The needs for labor welfare arise from very nature of industrial
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system which is characterized basic to the facts the condition answer which work is
carried on are not congenial for health; and second when labour joins industry he has to
work in an entire strange atmosphere creating problems of adjustment one another cal
these to facts the long arm of job and the social invasion of thefactory.

The working environment in a factory adversely affects the worker’s health


because of the excessive heat or cold, noise, odour, tumes, dust, insanitation and lack of
pure air. This leads to occupational health hazard and respiratory diseases.

Providing better service and work conditions devices and compensatory benefit in
case of accidents or injury or disablement can minimize these adverse effects. This has
been referred to as the ling arm of the job, which stretches out its adverse effects on the
worker long his normal 8 hours work Hence the need for provision welfare services
within true premises of the factory mine or a plantation.

“When a worker who is generally a rural life, come to work in a factory, he had to
work and live in unhealthy, congested factories and slum areas, with no outdoor
recreation facilities. To escape from firing conditions of tedious and tiresome job, be
absents himself becomes irregular and often indiscipline. All these changes have been
return to as the social invasion of the factory. Hence the need for providing welfare
service, for whether improves condition of work and life for labours. Whatever leads to
increasing adaptation of the worker to his task and whatever make him fully contented
lesion his desire or need to leave the factory for a time and lighten for him and the
factory.

OBJECTIVES OF LABOUR WELFARE MEASURES:

A. To win over labourers loyalty and increase their morale.


B. To combat trade unionism and social ideas.
C. To build up stable labour force, to reduce labour turnover and absenteeism.
D. To develop efficiency and productivity among workers.
E. To save oneself from heavy takes on surplus profit.
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F. To earn goodwill and enhance public image.
TYPES OF LABOUR WELFARE SERVICES:

We may classify all labour welfare services under two heads:

(a). Internal and (b).External.

Internal services are those, which are providing within the factory (such as
safety, health and counselling services).

External services are those, which are provided outside the factory (such as
education, housing, transport, recreation, etc.,)

The three important welfare services are safety, health and counselling.

SAFETY SERVICE:

Safety is prior to security. Prevention of accidents is the primary objective and it


ensures regular flow of work. This is the one in which three complete identification of
labour interests the labourers does not want to the injured.

Safety is the primary the responsibility of the management. Every labour should
pay due attention to industrial safety and tale adequate steps to prevent industrial
accidents. Safety also helps to improve the morale and productivity of workers.

HEALTH SERVICES:

The prevention of constitutes only one segment of the function of labour


maintenance. Another equally important segment is the labour’s general health, both
physical and mental. The factors, which influence the general health of the worker, can
be divided into two broad groups, namely:

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A. Those, which are associated with his/her working environment
B. Whose, which he/she shares with the rest of community.
COUNSELLING SERVICE:

It is service given to the labourers to solve his/her problem and helping his/her to
hope with their problems.

EMPLOYERS ARE REQUIRED TO PROVIDE WELFARE FACILITIES FOR


WORKERS UNDER THE FOLLOWING LAWS

FACTORIES ACT 1948:

Factories Act, 1948 provide for various labour welfare measures in India. The Act
applies to all establishment employing 10 or more workers where power is used and 20
more workers where power is not used, and where a manufacturing process is being
carried on.

The Factories act and the rules made there under impose numerous restriction on
the employer in order to secure to the workers adequate safeguards for their health,
physical well – being and secure them, safe and healthy conditions of life and work.

WELFARE OF THE WORKERS:

As opinion by Hertzberg, providing congenial atmosphere for the workers of


primary importance. Hence, the present Factories Act has provided several measures to
welfare of the workers under section 42 to 48, dealing with washing facilities, facilities
for storing and dressing. Facilities for sitting, first – aid appliances, canteen shelter, rest
rooms and crèches.

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WASHING FACILITIES:

(SECTION 42)

Suitable and adequate washing facilities, as prescribed by the state government


have to be provided separately and exclusively for male and female workers.

FACILITIES FOR STORING AND DRYING CLOTHES

SECTION (43)

The occupier to enable the workers to keep their clothes safe so that there is no
risk of theft in that place must provide suitable place. Space must be provided for drying
wet clothing.

SITTING FACILITIES

(SECTION 44):

Arrangements shall be made for workers to sit and take rest where their work
involves a standing posture.

FIRST AID APPLIANCES

(SECTION 45):

The term itself first aid signifies immediate medical help required by the affected
parties. First aid boxes containing essential medicines, including cotton must be provided
for every department with not less than 150 workers.

Where in a factory, 500 or more workers are employed, the occupier should
provide an ambulance room, and the government may provide attendants necessary
qualification, for such medical and nurses.

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CANTEEN (SECTION 46):

Factories employing 250 or more workers shall provide one or more canteens as
per the rules of the state government. A managing committee consisting of
representatives of labours and employers should manage such canteens. State government
may frame rules regarding size, accommodation, furniture and other equipment.

SHELTERS, REST ROOMS AND LUNCH ROOMS (SECTION 47):

Suitable shelters, rest rooms, lunch rooms with provision for drinking water shall
be provided for every factory employing 150 or more workers. The shelter of the lunch
room shall be provided with adequate lights and ventilation. The place shall also be kept
cool and clean.

CRÈCHES (SECTION 48):

Crèche is a room or place for accommodating children below the age of six. It has
now become mandatory that every factory employing 30 or more female workers shall
provide one or more crèches.

WELFARE OFFICER (SECTION 48):

An organization, have employing 500 or more workers shall appoint the


prescribed number of welfare officers.

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LABOUR’S INSURANCE SCHEME (ESI):

The government announced a new nationalised “SMART CARD SYSTEM” as a


amenities to the labours and his family members in this current year onwards. The ESI
department were given two number of smart cards. One of card for insured person and
another card provided for his family members. The benefit of the card is applicable if the
insured person mentioned his family members were living in other state also. It is only
applicable in the ESI hospitals and other hospital which is recommended by the ESI
hospital.

PROVIDENT FUND AND PENSION SCHEME:

The PF & PS scheme is a system of an labour gets the benefit at 24% on the basis
of on his salary or wages. The organisation was deducted at 12% wages in labour share
and 12% of labours also equal his salary. at 12% of labours share was divided into two
plans, that is at 3.67% share sent to PF & 8.33% share sent to the pension scheme. The
labour gets the benefit of PF at his retirement period. He received the amount of 12%
from his share + 3.67% from his PF share =15.67%, Including of its interests at 8.5% in
yearly. Am labour received his pension amount from pension department through out of
his life.

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1.2 OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY

PRIMARY OBJECTIVES
❖ To evaluate and measure the employees welfare measures in Paiyur Fruit
Products (P) Ltd., Krishnagiri
SECONDARY OBJECTIVES
❖ To study the demographical factors of the employees
❖ To analyse the level of satisfaction in the company
❖ To ascertain the level of satisfaction and opinion on welfare facilities in the
company
❖ To analyse the statutory welfare facilities provided for employees in the company
❖ To get the suggestions from the employees on various welfare measures

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1.3SCOPE OF THE STUDY

➢ The survey is conducted only with the employees of Paiyur Fruit Products (P)
Ltd., Krishnagiri
➢ This study is applicable only to Paiyur Fruit Products (P) Ltd., Krishnagiri
➢ This study area only confines with employees perception towards welfare
measures in the company
➢ The size of the sample is 100.
➢ The Source of information has been obtained from the employees alone.

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1.4 LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY

➢ The study restricts itself within Paiyur Fruit Products (P) Ltd., Krishnagiri
➢ The study assumes that the information was given by the employees without any
bios.
➢ The study is done based on the opinions of the sample taken at random, the size of
which is 100.
➢ The researcher found it difficult to collect the questionnaire, since some of the
respondents did not give proper response in the production point.
➢ The employees did not respond properly during peak hours.
➢ The project was only for 3 months. So there was time constraint.

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CHAPTER II

2.1 INDUSTRY PROFILE

The fruit juice market in India has been growing steadily and with the increase in
health conscious consumers, the market is expected to get a boost. Among the major
segments in the market namely fruit drinks, nectar and 100 percent fruit juice, the fruit
drinks market accounts for the maximum market share. The rising consumption of
packaged products reflects the demand for the organized juice market.

Man eats food for living in the world the different kinds of food given strength to
the man for doing work. These fruit is used as a food. Fruits have a form of nutrition
value. Fruits contain vitamins the fruits are broadly divided into two categories. Some
fruit are used as food as some others are not used as for food. The fruits develop seeds
and may aid in their propagation.

Fruits are production from flow and they are ripened very or ovaries of a plant
together with adjacent hiss fruits are hasty on pulpy in character often juice usually sweet
fragrant aromatic flowers.Fruits are also called “productive food group” it’s vital
protective nutrients protect the body against infection and disease of various kinds and
ensure physical efficiency. Fruits are in moisture, carbohydrates, protein, fiber content
and acidity and also in vitamin. More attractive and enjoyable by the variety of colors
text turns and flowers they provide.

Mango is of the important crops for the Indian farmer. Mango pulp is the main
products that we get from Mango Other products such as biogases for industrial use,
molasses for distillery, filter cake. Mud as an organic manure and green leaves with tops
for cattle feed are also available as byproducts, Because of its multi uses mango has
played crucial role in Indian economy with Rs.20, 000 crores turnover and width 450

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Mango pulp industries providing assistance to 45 million mango farmers and 1 million
mango farmers and 2 million workmen directly and indirectly.

In TN mango pulp industry is an important agro-based industry, occupying the


second position next to textile industry. The annual cultivated area is about 3.00 lakh
hectares with a yield of 209.72 lakhs of tones during 2007-08. At present, there are 36
mango pulp factories in the state and 50% of them are in co-operative sector. The Mango
pulp units in the states have been suffering due to lack of adequate cane irrigation
facilities, working capital, by-products utilization, excessive employment etc.

The Mango pulp industries which provide direct employment to about 3 lakhs
persons of sugarcane followed by Brazil & Cuba. Mango existed in India from 3000
B.C. The center place of origin of Mango regarded as northeastern India, from Mango
seems to have been to china and other places by early travelers and no mans between
1800 and 1700 B.C. Later. India as the world's largest producer of mango occupies a very
pride place in the world. In India, the cultivation of mango is 10,000 miles tones. The
average yield being 56 tones per acre of total cultivating land is occupied by mango
cultivation.

Scope of the industry:

Fruit juice are an important supplement to the human diet as they provide the
essential minerals , vitamins and fiber required for maintaining health. In India , the total
fruit juice production is about 137 million litres per year. The varied agro climatic
conditions available in our country makes it possible for us to produce several types of
tropical , subtropical and temperate fruits. It has been variously estimated that 20 to 30%
of the horticultural produce is lost before consumption which accounts for Rs.5000 crores
because of poor harvesting, handling, storage, transportation and marketing practices.
The fruit juice are highly perishable commodities and the ambient high temperature
obtained in the tropical country like ours makes them more susceptible for rapid
development of senescence, decay and rotting. Both respiratory and transpiratory rates
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are proportional to temperature increases and so that the produce quickly dries, wilts and
spoils unless properly preserved.

In India there are 4000 processing industries are functioning. But a marginal
quantity of 1.0 to 2.0 % of the produce is processed and packaged in contrast with
developed and developing countries i.e., 70 to 80% . The total annual consumption of
processed packed fruit juice products in the country is reckoned at only 5,000 crore litres
of which defence and star hotels account for 1500 crore litres and the remaining 3500
crore to the public , i.e a per capita consumption of 40 litres / year. Thus we can see an
enormous scope and potential for the expansion of fruit juice industries in India in the
future.

Fruit pulp Industries in Krishnagiri District:

In Tamil Nadu, there are 385 fruit processing units, out of which 80 per cent of
the units are under the category of small industries with an average capacity of 500tonnes
per day. The remaining units are medium scale category with an average capacity of 1000
tones per day.

The largest mango producing district is Krishnagiri district, which is a newly


created district of the state. Area under mango cultivation is 30017 hectares. The total
production is around three lakh tones annually. Nearly 6000 metric tones of different
verities of mangoes like Totapuri and Alphas a variety.

There are 30 mango pulp processing units in the district. All the industries are
privately owned. Nearly 35000 metric tones of fruit juices is extracted every year. Nearly
40,000 persons were employed in this industries, apart from this, there are 150 private
mango nursery units producing saplings in Krishnagiri district.

The district exported mango based products worth of Rs.100 cores in 2003-2003.
This is the largest export of horticultural product in the state. It is our great pleasure to
introduce ourselves Loyal Food International as one the leading manufacturer and
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exporters of mango pulp and guava pulp located at Krishnagiri, Tamilnadu, India.
Krishnagiri is the world famous for Mango Fruit and for Mango Pulp. Over 40,000
hectares are under mango cultivation, producing 3.5 lacks MT of Mango Fruits every
year Canning Factories are located right in the growing belt of Top Quality Mangoes.We
produce large quantity of mango pulp (Totapuri/Alphorns) ever year under Good
Hygienic Condition, and exporting 90% of our production to Middle East, UK, and East
Europe Countries and balance 10% of our production is consumed by domestic Market.

Mango Production in India

To increase the production several efforts have taken up by the government. The
efforts to build up the infrastructure facilities like cold storage for mango fruit and mango
pulp products will continue in the coming years. Emphasis will be on developing export
oriented mango varieties.

India stands first in mango production in the worlds but overall fruits production
stands in second. India contributes about 10% of the world’s production of fruits thus
surfacing as the second largest producer of the same. The Annual Production of the fruits
in India are about 41 million tones. The main fruits produced in India are mango,
banana, guava and apple India contributes about 60% of world mango production and
world export in fresh mangoes. The main export variety of mangoes in India is Alphonso.
It is unique due to its taste and early season.

Mango Cultivation and Krishnagiri

Mango is an important commercial crop in Krishnagiri District of Tamil Nadu


state. Krishnagiri District is well known for Horticultural crops. Because of its
geographical location, it is endowed with conductive climate to rise different kinds of
fruits like Mango, Grape, Guava Papaya, Banana and all kinds of vegetables.

In Krishnagiri District Mango is grow in the area of 38,000 has, representing 50


percent of the total area of mango is about 3 lakh tones in district, accounting 75% of the
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total production in the Tamil Nadu state, involving more than 110 core rupees in term of
monetary benefit. The important variety grown in this trace are Alphonso, Neel am,
Totapuri, Peter, Mulgova, Sendhura, Kalapad, Rumani and Banganapalli.

2.2 COMPANY PROFILE

Paiyur Fruits has been founded by Mr.E.Madhavan in 1996. This Paiyur Fruits
was a In starting faced many of issues and problems. But it was most helpful to solve this
issues in future and got well experience in this field. After did successful business of 7
years started Anandam Agro in 2005. In 2006 mango season make planning and projects
to avoid manual fruit washing and fruit cutting. At that time make machines with our
machinery suppliers automatic Fruit Washers and De-Stoners for cutting of fruits
automatically. It has been increased our production volume also. In that same time
foreign buyers are expecting nil black speck so at that time installed Decanters for
removing nano meter size of black specks.

Started

❖ Then in 2007 Maha Foods had been started and next year In 2008 Devadharshan
Foods has been started.

❖ In 2009 it is planned to avoid ripening in open places and planned to upgrade new
solutions. So panned to make automated ripening chambers. Made project and
build all units.

❖ In that time of 2010 Some middle east countries are moved Canned Product to
Aseptic Product.

❖ So in 2011 Pavithran Aseptic has been started with all advance Aseptic
machineries. Aseptic Sterilizer, Evaporator and Filler Imported from Manzini,
Italy.

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Future planning

In upcoming years it is planned to install automatic canning filler, automatic can


reformer and making some plans to produce our boiler energies from our wastages.

Secret of Paiyur Friut Products Pvt Ltd

The secret of Paiyur Friut Products Pvt Ltd., unprecedented success is


undoubtedly the superior standards of quality, total control over the supply chain and
above all, a hand-picked team of well qualified personnel, who are responsible for
delivering total quality in every functional area of the company.

Focusing on quality makes for a leaner, fitter organization and one that is better
equipped to win new opportunities in an increasingly competitive global marketplace.
Certifying our organization to ISO 22000:2005 offers proof of our commitment to quality
and, as a benchmark, allows you to measure our progress towards continual improvement
of business performance.

Food safety is a global concern. A management system based on HACCP


principles allows us to identify, document, maintain and review food hazards that occur
during the food production process.

Our Group of Companies

Paiyur Fruit Products (P) Ltd - (1996)

• Sappanipatti Vill, Karagur Po, Krishnagiri Tk & Dt, Tamilnadu - 635 111.

Anandam Agro Products P. Ltd - (2005)

• Jagadap Vill & Post, Krishnagiri Tk & Dt, Tamilnadu - 635 112.

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Maha Food Products - (2007)

• Sappanipatti Via, Karagur Po, Krishnagiri Tk & Dt, Tamilnadu - 635 111.

Devadharshan Food Products - (2009)

• Jagadap Vill & Post, Krishnagiri Tk & Dt, Tamilnadu - 635 112.

Pavithran Aseptic Fruit Product - (2011)

• Jagadap Vill & Post, Krishnagiri Tk & Dt, Tamilnadu - 635 112.

Amudha Aseptic Food Products - (2014)

• Sappanipatti Via, Karagur Po, Krishnagiri Tk & Dt, Tamilnadu - 635 111.

Amirtham Agro Industries Private Limited - (2014)

• NH-44, Salem Main Road, Paiyur Vill & Po, Krishnagiri Tk & Dt,
Tamilnadu - 635 112.

Product profile

Canned Products (Packing in A10, A12 and A2 ½ OTS Cans):-

1. Totapuri Mango Pulp

2. Alphonso Mango Pulp

3. White / Pink Guava Pulp

4. Grape / Banana / Pear / Pineapple and all other processed Pulp

Aseptic Products (Packing in 215 to 230 Kgs Aseptic Bags in Drums):-

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1. Totapuri Mango Pulp (14 Brix)

2. Alphonso Mango Pulp (14 Brix)

3. White / Pink Guava Pulp (14 Brix)

4. Totapuri Mango Concentrate (21 to 28 Brix)

5. Alphonso Mango Concentrate (28 Brix)

6. White / Pink Guava Concentrate (28 Brix)

7. Tomatto Puree (28 brix)

8. All other processed pulp and concentrate in Aseptic

Quality Policy

Quality is a way of life: - this serve to be its primary corporate philosophy which
drives the company to continuously strive to provide high quality products and services.
To achieve these standards, all materials, whether inbound, in process or outbound, are
subjected to thorough, continuous monitoring and inspection by its experienced and
dedicated personals. The company works rigorously to meet the standards in order to be
competitive and win over the customers delight.

Paiyur Friut Products Pvt Ltd.,are committed to provide customer delight and
achieve total customer satisfaction by:

• Providing quality products at competitive price as per the customer requirement.

• Create and maintain total employee's involvement.

• On time delivery every time.

• Continuous growth and improvement in our capabilities and services.


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• Always strive hard for enhancing the customer delight throughout our process.

Facilities
Well-established and equipped infrastructural unit, it is sprawling over a large
area. It has compartmentalized our infrastructure into various units that include :

• R&D Unit

• Processing Unit

• Testing Unit

• Storage Unit

• Packaging Unit

Team Support

“The Best Team Brings the Best Results” it completely justify the statement. Its
workforce comprises of :

• Procuring Managers

• Quality Auditors

• Food Experts

• Skilled Workers

• Sales Executives

• Marketing Heads

• Packaging Experts

• Logisticians
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Why Paiyur Friut Products Pvt Ltd

To bring forth the qualitative range of Food Products it makes use of latest
machines and technology with the minimum human interference. It is a reliable choice in
the industry, owing to several factors such as :

• Stringent check on Manufacturing Process

• Finest Quality of Ingredients

• Market-leading Prices

• Industrious Food Experts

• Experienced and well-trained Workers

• Maximum customer satisfaction

• Latest Machinery

• Spacious Storage area

• Time Bound delivery

• Wide Distribution Networks

• Transparent Business Deals

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CHAPTER III

3.1 REVIEW OF LITERATURE

Aquinas (2008) in the book, “Human Resource Management” explained the


intra-mural and extra-mural welfare benefits provided to labours. He stated that some
welfare benefits are provided as per legislation while some other welfare benefits are
provided voluntarily by management or as a result of bi-partite settlements between the
Management and Trade Unions.

Srivastava (2008) in his thesis, “Labour Welfare in India” detailed upon the
labour welfare measures undertaken by select public and private sector companies in
India. He found that public sector companies are far better than their private counterparts
in the provision of welfare facilities to workers and labours.

SubbaRao (2008) in his M.Phil. dissertation, “Women Welfare in Jute Industry


(A Study on Welfare Programmes in selected Jute Mills Eluru in Andhra Pradesh)”
explained the welfare facilities provided by companies such as Shri Bhajaranga Jute
Mills, Guntur, Shri Krishna Jute Mills, Eluru to their labours in detail. The study revealed
that these companies have to do a lot in the area of welfare for the betterment of women
labours.

Sambasiva Rao (2008) in his thesis, “A Study of Welfare, Health and Safety of
Workers in the Cement Industry of Guntur District” probed into the health, safety and
welfare measures provided by various cement companies in the Guntur district of Andhra
Pradesh. The study found that large cement companies provide better health, safety and
welfare measures as compared to small and medium scale cement companies.

Iswanadh (2008) in his thesis, “A Study on Welfare Facilities and its Impact on
the efficiency of labours in APSRTC found that the provision of welfare facilities has a
positive impact on the efficiency of labours

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Mr.Damu at a Seminar Held In Cochi On May 21, 2oo8: The theme for the
seminar was: ‘labour reforms and the social safety net in the context of globalization’.
India’s labor laws were intended to be friendly to labours, but they ended up being anti-
employment labor reforms is a very sensitive subject in the India context, given the
ground realities of poverty, illiteracy, diseases, deprivation, exploitation, low per-capital,
income etc. this means that whatever is taken up in the name of labour reforms, be it in
the sphere of employment, welfare or human resources, needs careful handling. This
should have started not as part of the second-generation reforms, but when the initial
economic reforms were undertaken. However better late than never a labour reforms is
not just about facilitating the closure of sick industrial unit or about lying off labours.
Neither a different management approach not trade union militancy is going to lead to
labor reform.

Srinivasan (2008), the author being a experienced executive had dealt with the
workers engaged in the Kolar Gold Mines in Karnataka. He had dealt aspects like socio
economic conditions of workers and details about the labour welfare problems in the
Mining industry and some fruitful suggestions have been delineated.

Bose (2008), the author Dr.(smt) Maitriyee Bose an M.P; has in her article
presented various problems concering the employment of women in different industries.
She has examined with more and more employment of the women workers in productive
work can be taken as the indication of progress has analyzed the question of women’s
employment un the light of its economic impact on family as well as on society.

National Commission (2008), the report of this commission was appointed in


1966 had reviewed many aspects of labour welfare in India such as exciting conditions of
labour. Legislative measures available to protect their interest level of workers earning
standard of living and various welfare facilities viz. health and medical facilities
canteens, crèches, housing, transportation, recreational provision of family planning and
adult educations etc. It had reviewed the existing welfare facilities in real areas also.

24
National Commission (2009), in conjunction with the passage in 1970 of the
Occupational Safety and Health Act Congress established a National Commission
undertake a compensation lakes in order the determine if such provide an adequate,
prompt, equitable system of compensation. The work in hand is the result of the
mandated study and evaluation.

This report contains 3 major sections:

 A presentation of objectives for a modern workmen compensation


programs.
 An evaluation of state workmen’s compensation programs and
recommendations. And
 A discussion of a future of workmen’s compensation.
Analysis and evaluation can’t take place in a vacuum; they need to be undertaken
against a backdrop of objectives. The frameworks of objectives utilized to the
commission include.

 Broad coverage of labours and work related injuries and diseases.


 Substantial protection against interruption of income
 Provision of accident medical care and rehabilitation service.

Dixon, Jr (2009), in this volume, Dixon has made a significant contribution by his
analysis of the problems of administrating the disability provisions of the Social Service
Act. He has collected and analyzed information from many sources, including court
cases, administrative hearing, and prior studies and has appeared the standards and
administrative procedures involved in this compels social insurance programme.

The author demonstrates his extensive knowledge on the subject in the chapters
dealing with the problems of processing a clain and the social security administrations
lack of clarity in outlining disablity standards, and its consistency in appling claim. The
25
relation of court action to these problems is also effictively considered in the authors
analysis. The author refers to President Rooserelt’s statement that if the old age program
were set up as insurance, it resistant to being undermined by subsequent administrations.

Sharma (2009),the study throws light on the history of labour movement, origin,
growth and development. It depicts the picture of a long historical movement of
organized labpur full strains and stresses from 1885-1980. The author also predicts
lightly fresher upon Indian Trade Unions for change and adaptability.

In the last experiments in workers participation in management and the


problems arising out of in India have been discussed, so the various articles
brought together in this book reflect appreciation of labor in Indian economic
development. The above mentioned studies have somehow covered problems of
labor welfare but their main thrust was on industrial relation, trade unionism, and
workers participation in the management.

The author has studied the problems welfare, role of trade union in labor
welfare, socio economic conditions at workers, role of administrative machinery
in labour welfare and performance evaluation of welfare, prov ision in the public
and private sector in comparative perspective.

A study conducted by (Saiyaddin, 2009) examined the purpose and cost


of non-statutory welfare activities for the organizations. Five public and six
private sector organizations were selected for the study. The study brought out an
important conclusion that the most predominant theme in the minds of
organizations when they think of the voluntary welfare measures was not only
the output and efficiency but also increasing loyalty and morale. In respect of
cost, the study revealed, that the public sector organizations spend more on
welfare activities, as compared to private sector. While public sector spends
more on transportation and recreation, private sector was found to be spending
more on housing according to the study.

26
The research work of (Misra, 2009) aimed at sociological analysis of
the labour welfare problems of sugar industry. The analysis was based on the
first hand data collected from the sugar factories of Eastern Uttar Pradesh. Th e
study concluded that the conditions of work in sugar factories of eastern region
of Uttar Pradesh were not very satisfactory particularly in the respect of safety
measures, cleanliness, sanitation, latrine facilities, drinking water, rest rooms,
etc. It also pointed out that the provisions for leaves and holidays, lighting,
housing, medical, education, are far from satisfactory.

The study of (Zacharaiah, 2009) 6 based on a sample survey of


manufacturing undertakings in Bombay, covered welfare services an d working
conditions while surveying the factors affecting industrial relations. It was
observed that better working conditions and adequate provision of welfare
services would contribute to harmonious industrial relations.

A study conducted by (Koshan, 2010) pointed out that inspite of


statutory provisions and enforcing agencies in India, the welfare facilities were
absent and the cement industry was the only one where provisions were
adequately enforced. The study suggested that need for overhauling and
tightening the machinery of inspection. Appointment of welfare inspectors for
different industries, distinguishing the duties of factory inspectors from those of
welfare inspectors to submit annual and quarterly reports and empowering the
welfare inspectors to fine in case of default, were some of the steps suggested in
this study.

A study conducted by A.M.sharma 2010 the necessity of labour welfare


is felt all the more in our country because of its developing economy aimed at
rapid economic and social development. Royal commission on labour stated the
benefits which go under this nomenclature, are of great importance to the
workers and which he is unable to secure by himself. The scheme of labour

27
welfare may be regarded as a wise investment, which should and usually
does bring a profitable return in the form of greater efficiency.

A study conducted by C.B.Mamoria and S.Mamoria 2010, twenty


years later the planning commission also realized the importance of labour
welfare, when it observed that. In order to get the best out of a worker in the
matter of production, working conditions require to be improved to a large
extent. The workers should at least have the means and facilities to keep him in a
state of health and efficiency. This is primarily a question of adequate nutrition
and suitable housing conditions. The working conditions should be such as to
safeguard his health and protect him against occupational hazard. The work place
should provide reasonable amenities for his essential needs. The worker should
also be equipped with necessary technical training and a certain level of general
education. The concept of labour welfare is flexible and elastic and differs
widely with times, regions, industry, country, customs and degree of
industrialization prevailing at particular moments.

The oxford dictionary defines labour welfare as effort to make life worth
living for workmen. Encyclopedia of social sciences defines welfare work as
voluntary efforts of the employer to establish, within the existing industrial
system working and sometimes living and cultural condition of the employers
beyond what is required by law, the customs of the country and conditions of the
market´. Labour welfare is, therefore, one of the major aspects of national
programmes towards improving the lot of labour and creating a life and work
environment of decent comfort for this class of society.

A study conducted by Tripathi, 2010 it is however, difficult to precisely


define the scope of labour welfare efforts. Different writer have defined it in
different ways. Some writers say that only voluntary efforts on the part of
employer to improve the conditions of employment in their factory. Some others

28
say it includes not only voluntary efforts but also the minimum standards
of hygiene and safety laid down in general legislation.

A study conducted by K.K.Ahuja, 2012, The state take steps by


suitable legislation or in any other way to secure participation of workers in the
development of undertakings, establishments or other organization engaged in
any industry.

Tripathi. Personnel Management &Industrial Relation, Sultan


Chand & Sons-New Delhi, 2012, ILO (international labour organization),
classify all labour welfare services under two categories, viz, intramural and
extramural. Intramural services are those, which are provided within factory.
Extramural services are those, which are provided outside the factory.

Kudchelkar (2013) in his book, “Aspects of Personnel Management and


Industrial Relations” felt that the need for labour welfare arises from the very nature of
the industrial system . He felt that employers need to provide welfare facilities to labours
as the latter are exposed to various risks and at the same time they have to work in an
entirely strange atmosphere.

Tyagi (2013) in his book, “Labour Economics and Social Welfare” discussed the
labour welfare practices in India such as the provision of intra-mural and extra-mural
welfare facilities. He also discussed the various agencies involved in labour welfare.
However, the study is totally theoretical in nature.

Ahuja (2013) in his book, “Personnel Management” emphasised the need for
labour welfare and social security in India. He felt that provision of welfare and social
security measures makes the labours satisfied with their jobs leading to their improved
performance.

Arun Monappa (2013) in his book, “Industrial Relations” discussed labour


welfare and social security measures in detail. He also explained the various problems

29
faced by the enforcement machinery in the implementation of these welfare and social
security measures.

Tripathi (2013) in his book, “Personnel Management & Industrial Relations”


explained the principles of labour welfare services, types of labour welfare services,
different legislations

and Acts. He also discussed the social security measures in terms of medical care,
sickness benefit, unemployment benefit, maternity benefit etc., besides explaining the
social security system in India.

David, A Decenzo (2013) and Stephen P. Robbins in their book, “Personnel /


Human Resource Management explained the various benefits and services provided by
the companies to their labours. According to them, the legally required benefits and
services include social security premiums, unemployment compensation, workers
compensation and state disability programs. They felt that the cost of the voluntary
benefits offered appears to be increasing.

30
3.2 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

Research Methodology is a systematic way to solve a research problem; It


includes various steps that are generally adopted by a researcher in studying the problem
along with the logic behind them. The present study was conducted at Paiyur Fruit
Products (P) Ltd., Krishnagiri.

RESEARCH DESIGN

“A Research Design is the arrangement of conditions for collection and analysis


of data in a manner that aims to combine relevance to the research purpose with the
economy in procedure”. The research design adopted for the studies is descriptive
design. The researcher has to describe the present situation in order to know the behavior
of the consumers. Hence descriptive research study is used. Descriptive research can only
report what has happened and what is happening.

DATA COLLECTION METHODS

Primary Data Collection:

The study basically uses primary and secondary data. Primary data means data
which is fresh collected data. Primary data mainly has been collected through personal
interviews, surveys etc. Secondary data means the data that are already available.
Generally speaking secondary data is collected by some organizations or agencies which
have already been processed when the researcher utilizes secondary data; the process of
secondary data collection and analysis is called desk research.

Secondary Data Collection:

Secondary data provides economy in time and cost. It is easily available and
unbiased. Secondary data may either be published data or unpublished data. For this
study secondary data were collected from the annual reports of the company and from the

31
company website. The study depends mainly on the primary data and secondary data
namely the text books, journals, newspapers, magazines and internet.

DATA PROCESSING TECHNIQUES AND QUANTITATIVE TOOLS

SAMPLING

POPULATION

The aggregate elementary units in the survey are referred to as the population.
Here it covers the entire employees of Paiyur Fruit Products (P) Ltd., Krishnagiri.

Sample Sample Size

The study based only on the opinion and expectation of employees. Total number
of sample taken for the study is 100 respondents.

Sources of data

The sources of data for the study are primary data and secondary data. The
primary data which is collected through questionnaire, which includes respondents
demographical factors and factors which is relevant to know about employees welfare.
The secondary data which is collected from books, magazines and website for the data
relevant to industry profile, company profile and review of literature and so on.

SAMPLING UNIT:

Sampling unit is in Paiyur Fruit Products (P) Ltd., Krishnagiri .

Sample design

Convenience sampling techniques were used for the study.

TOOLS USED

32
STATISTICAL TOOLS USED

Statistical tools

The commonly used statistical tools for analysis of collected data are:

1. Percentage analysis

2. Chi Square test

Percentage analysis

This method is used to compare two or more series of data, to describe the
relationship or the distribution of two or more series of data. Percentage analysis test is
done to find out the percentage of the response of the response of the respondent. In this
tool various percentage are identified in the analysis and they are presented by the way of
Bar Diagrams in order to have better understanding of the analysis.

Number of respondents

Percentage of respondents = ______________________ X 100

Total respondents

Chi-Square Test

Chi-square analysis in statistics is to test the goodness of fit to verify the


distribution of observed data with assumed theoretical distribution. Therefore it is a
measure to study the divergence of actual and expected frequencies.

The formula for computing chi-square is as follows.

Chi-square- = ∑ {(O--E) //E}E}

33
CHAPTER IV

DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATIONS

TABLE NO: 4.1

AGE OF THE RESPONDENTS

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative Percent

Valid 20-30 24 24.0 24.0 24.0

30-40 31 31.0 31.0 55.0

40-50 20 20.0 20.0 75.0

Above 50 25 25.0 25.0 100.0

Total 100 100.0 100.0

SOURCE: Primary Data

INFERENCE:
The above table shows that out of 100 respondents,24% of the respondents are in
the age group of 20-30, 31% of the respondents are in the age group of 30-40, 21% of
the respondents are in the age group of 40-50 and 25% of the respondents are in the age
group of above 50.
Thus the majority of the respondents at 31% of the respondents are in the age
group of 30-40.

34
CHART NO: 4.1

35
TABLE NO: 4.2

INCOME OF THE RESPONDENTS

Cumulative
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent

Valid Below Rs.10000 20 20.0 20.0 20.0

Rs.10001-15000 35 35.0 35.0 55.0

Rs.15001-20000 22 22.0 22.0 77.0

Above Rs.20000 23 23.0 23.0 100.0

Total 100 100.0 100.0

SOURCE: Primary Data

INFERENCE:
The above table shows that out of 100 respondents,20% of the respondents belong
to the income category of below Rs.10,000, 35% of the respondents belong to the income
category of Rs.10,001 – 15,000, 22% of the respondents belong to the income category
of Rs.15,001-20,000, 23% of the respondents belong to the income category of
Rs.20,000.
35% of the respondents belong to the income category of Rs.10,001 – 15,000

36
CHART NO: 4.2

37
TABLE NO: 4.3

EXPERIENCE OF THE RESPONDENTS

Cumulative
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent

Valid Below 5 years 66 66.0 66.0 66.0

5-10 years 18 18.0 18.0 84.0

10-20 years 13 13.0 13.0 97.0

Above 20 years 3 3.0 3.0 100.0

Total 100 100.0 100.0

SOURCE: Primary Data

INFERENCE:
The above table shows that out of 100 respondents,66% of the respondents
have work experience below 5 years, 18% of respondents have work experience for 5-
10 years, 13% of the respondents have work experience for 10-20 years and 3% of the
respondents have work experience above 20years in the company.
66% of the respondents have work experience is below 5 years.

38
CHART NO: 4.3

39
TABLE NO: 4.4

ORGANIZATION FULLFILLS EMPLOYEES' NEEDS

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative Percent

Valid Yes 64 64.0 64.0 64.0

No 36 36.0 36.0 100.0

Total 100 100.0 100.0

SOURCE: Primary Data

INFERENCE:
The above table shows that out of 100 respondents 64% of the respondents said
that organization fulfills the needs and 36% of the respondents said that organization does
not fulfill the needs.
64% of the respondents said that organization fulfill the needs.

40
CHART NO: 4.4

41
TABLE NO: 4.5

SATISFACTION WITH JOB

Cumulative
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent

Valid Highly satisfied 34 34.0 34.0 34.0

Satisfied 24 24.0 24.0 58.0

Neutral 23 23.0 23.0 81.0

Dissatisfied 10 10.0 10.0 91.0

Highly dissatisfied 9 9.0 9.0 100.0

Total 100 100.0 100.0

SOURCE: Primary Data

INFERENCE:
The above table shows that out of 100 respondents,34% of the respondents said
that they are highly satisfied, 24% of the respondents said that they are satisfied, 23% of
the respondents said that they are neutral, 10% of the respondents said that they are
dissatisfied and 9% of the respondents said that they are highly dissatisfied towards the
job.
34% of the respondents said that they are highly satisfied towards the job.

42
CHART NO: 4.5

43
TABLE NO: 4.6

SATISFACTION WITH SAFETY MEASURES

Cumulative
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent

Valid Highly satisfied 13 13.0 13.0 13.0

Satisfied 34 34.0 34.0 47.0

Neutral 30 30.0 30.0 77.0

Dissatisfied 16 16.0 16.0 93.0

Highly dissatisfied 7 7.0 7.0 100.0

Total 100 100.0 100.0

SOURCE: Primary Data

INFERENCE:
The above table shows that out of 100 respondents,13% of the respondents said
that highly satisfied, 34% of the respondents said that satisfied, 30% of the respondents
said that neutral, 16% of the respondents said that dissatisfied and 7% of the respondents
said that highly dissatisfied towards safety measures in the organization.
60% of the respondents feel satisfied towards the safety measures in the
organization.

44
CHART NO: 4.6

45
TABLE NO: 4.7

SATISFACTION WITH VENTILATION

Cumulative
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent

Valid Highly satisfied 24 24.0 24.0 24.0

Satisfied 21 21.0 21.0 45.0

Neutral 27 27.0 27.0 72.0

Dissatisfied 15 15.0 15.0 87.0

Highly dissatisfied 13 13.0 13.0 100.0

Total 100 100.0 100.0

SOURCE: Primary Data

INFERENCE:
The above table shows that out of 100 respondents,24% of the respondents said
that highly satisfied, 21% of the respondents said that satisfied, 27% of the respondents
said that neutral, 15% of the respondents said that dissatisfied and 13% of the
respondents said that highly dissatisfied towards ventilation in the organization.
27% of the respondents feel neutral towards the ventilation in the organization.

46
CHART NO: 4.7

47
TABLE NO: 4.8

SATISFACTION WITH LIGHTING FACILITY

Cumulative
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent

Valid Highly satisfied 28 28.0 28.0 28.0

Satisfied 26 26.0 26.0 54.0

Neutral 29 29.0 29.0 83.0

Dissatisfied 8 8.0 8.0 91.0

Highly dissatisfied 9 9.0 9.0 100.0

Total 100 100.0 100.0

SOURCE: Primary Data

INFERENCE:
The above table shows that out of 100 respondents,28% of the respondents said
that highly satisfied, 26% of the respondents said that satisfied, 29% of the respondents
said that neutral, 8% of the respondents said that dissatisfied and 9% of the respondents
said that highly dissatisfied towards the lighting facility in the organization.
29% of the respondents feel neutral towards the lighting facility in the
organization.

48
CHART NO: 4.8

49
TABLE NO: 4.9

SATISFACTION WITH CANTEEN FACILITY

Cumulative
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent

Valid Highly satisfied 17 17.0 17.0 17.0

Satisfied 24 24.0 24.0 41.0

Neutral 36 36.0 36.0 77.0

Dissatisfied 13 13.0 13.0 90.0

Highly dissatisfied 10 10.0 10.0 100.0

Total 100 100.0 100.0

SOURCE: Primary Data

INFERENCE:
The above table shows that out of 100 respondents, 17% of the respondents said
that highly satisfied, 24% of the respondents said that satisfied, 36% of the respondents
said that neutral, 13% of the respondents said that dissatisfied and 10% of the
respondents said that highly dissatisfied towards the canteen facility in the organization.
26% of the respondents said that neutral towards the canteen facility in the
organization.

50
CHART NO: 4.9

51
TABLE NO: 4.10

SATISFACTION WITH CLEANLINESS

Cumulative
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent

Valid Highly satisfied 20 20.0 20.0 20.0

Satisfied 22 22.0 22.0 42.0

Neutral 27 27.0 27.0 69.0

Dissatisfied 16 16.0 16.0 85.0

Highly dissatisfied 15 15.0 15.0 100.0

Total 100 100.0 100.0

SOURCE: Primary Data

INFERENCE:
The above table shows that out of 100 respondents,20% of the respondents said
that highly satisfied, 22% of the respondents said that satisfied, 27% of the respondents
said that neutral, 16% of the respondents said that dissatisfied and 15% of the
respondents said that highly dissatisfied towards the cleanliness in the organization.
35% of the respondents said that neutral towards the cleanliness in the
organization.

52
CHART NO: 4.10

53
TABLE NO: 4.11

SATISFACTION WITH WORKSHOP SANITATION

Cumulative
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent

Valid Highly satisfied 18 18.0 18.0 18.0

Satisfied 25 25.0 25.0 43.0

Neutral 35 35.0 35.0 78.0

Dissatisfied 15 15.0 15.0 93.0

Highly dissatisfied 7 7.0 7.0 100.0

Total 100 100.0 100.0

SOURCE: Primary Data

INFERENCE:
The above table shows that out of 100 respondents,18% of the respondents said
that highly satisfied, 25% of the respondents said that satisfied, 35% of the respondents
said that neutral, 15% of the respondents said that dissatisfied and 7% of the respondents
said that highly dissatisfied towards the workshop sanitation in the organization.
35% of the respondents said that neutral towards the workshop sanitation in the
organization.

54
CHART NO: 4.11

55
TABLE NO: 4.12

SATISFACTION WITH CONTROL OF EFFLUENTS

Cumulative
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent

Valid Highly satisfied 49 49.0 49.0 49.0

Satisfied 27 27.0 27.0 76.0

Neutral 8 8.0 8.0 84.0

Dissatisfied 6 6.0 6.0 90.0

Highly dissatisfied 10 10.0 10.0 100.0

Total 100 100.0 100.0

SOURCE: Primary Data

INFERENCE:
The above table shows that out of 100 respondents,49% of the respondents said
that highly satisfied, 27% of the respondents said that satisfied, 8% of the respondents
said that neutral, 6% of the respondents said that dissatisfied and 10% of the respondents
said that highly dissatisfied towards the control effluents in the organization.
49% of the respondents said that highly satisfied towards the control effluents in
the organization.

56
CHART NO: 4.12

57
TABLE NO: 4.13

SATISFACTION WITH DRINKING WATER FACILITY

Cumulative
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent

Valid Highly satisfied 23 23.0 23.0 23.0

Satisfied 35 35.0 35.0 58.0

Neutral 27 27.0 27.0 85.0

Dissatisfied 10 10.0 10.0 95.0

Highly dissatisfied 5 5.0 5.0 100.0

Total 100 100.0 100.0

SOURCE: Primary Data

INFERENCE:
The above table shows that out of 100 respondents,23% of the respondents said
that highly satisfied, 35% of the respondents said that satisfied, 27% of the respondents
said that neutral, 10% of the respondents said that dissatisfied and 5% of the respondents
said that highly dissatisfied towards the provision of drinking water.
35% of the respondents said that satisfied towards the provision of drinking water.

58
CHART NO: 4.13

59
TABLE NO: 4.14

SATISFACTION WITH FIRSTAID EQUIPMENTS

Cumulative
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent

Valid Highly satisfied 29 29.0 29.0 29.0

Satisfied 38 38.0 38.0 67.0

Neutral 17 17.0 17.0 84.0

Dissatisfied 9 9.0 9.0 93.0

Highly dissatisfied 7 7.0 7.0 100.0

Total 100 100.0 100.0

SOURCE: Primary Data

INFERENCE:
The above table shows that out of 100 respondents,29% of the respondents said
that highly satisfied, 38% of the respondents said that satisfied, 17% of the respondents
said that neutral, 9% of the respondents said that dissatisfied and 7% of the respondents
said that highly dissatisfied towards the first aid equipment in the organisation.
38% of the respondents said that satisfied towards the first aid equipment in the
organisation.

60
CHART NO: 4.14

61
TABLE NO: 4.15

OPINION ABOUT CLOAK ROOM FACILITY

Cumulative
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent

Valid Strongly agree 27 27.0 27.0 27.0

Agree 32 32.0 32.0 59.0

Neither agree nor disagree 28 28.0 28.0 87.0

Disagree 8 8.0 8.0 95.0

Strongly disagree 5 5.0 5.0 100.0

Total 100 100.0 100.0

SOURCE: Primary Data

INFERENCE:
The above table shows that out of 100 respondents,27% of the respondents said
that strongly agree , 32% of the respondents said that agree, 28% of the respondents said
that neither agree nor disagree, 8% of the respondents said that disagree and 5% of the
respondents said that strongly disagree towards the cloak room facility in the
organization.
32% of the respondents said that agree towards the cloak room facility in the
organization.

62
CHART NO: 4.15

63
TABLE NO: 4.16

OPINION ABOUT TRANSPORT FACILITY

Cumulative
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent

Valid Strongly agree 20 20.0 20.0 20.0

Agree 33 33.0 33.0 53.0

Neither agree nor disagree 26 26.0 26.0 79.0

Disagree 14 14.0 14.0 93.0

Strongly disagree 7 7.0 7.0 100.0

Total 100 100.0 100.0

SOURCE: Primary Data

INFERENCE:
The above table shows that out of 100 respondents,20% of the respondents said
that they are strongly agree , 33% of the respondents said that they are agree, 26% of the
respondents said that they are neither agree nor disagree, 14% of the respondents said that
they are disagree and 7% of the respondents said that they are strongly disagree towards
the transport facility in the organization.
33% of the respondents said that they are agree the transport facility in the
organization.

64
CHART NO: 4.16

65
TABLE NO: 4.17

OPINION ABOUT WELFARE BENEFITS PROVIDEDBY THE COMPANY

Cumulative
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent

Valid Strongly agree 37 37.0 37.0 37.0

Agree 25 25.0 25.0 62.0

Neither agree nor disagree 14 14.0 14.0 76.0

Disagree 11 11.0 11.0 87.0

Strongly disagree 13 13.0 13.0 100.0

Total 100 100.0 100.0

SOURCE: Primary Data

INFERENCE:
The above table shows that out of 100 respondents,37% of the respondents said
that strongly agree , 25% of the respondents said that agree, 14% of the respondents said
that neither agree nor disagree, 11% of the respondents said that disagree and 13% of the
respondents said that strongly disagree towards welfare benefits in the organization.
37% of the respondents feel strongly agree towards the welfare benefits in the
organization.

66
CHART NO: 4.17

67
TABLE NO: 4.18

OPINION ABOUT PROMOTIONAL POLICY

Cumulative
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent

Valid Strongly agree 35 35.0 35.0 35.0

Agree 23 23.0 23.0 58.0

Neither agree nor disagree 20 20.0 20.0 78.0

Disagree 7 7.0 7.0 85.0

Strongly disagree 15 15.0 15.0 100.0

Total 100 100.0 100.0

SOURCE: Primary Data

INFERENCE:
The above table shows that out of 100 respondents,35% of the respondents said
that strongly agree , 23% of the respondents said that agree, 20% of the respondents said
that neither agree nor disagree, 7% of the respondents said that disagree and 15% of the
respondents said that strongly disagree towards promotional policy in the organization.
35% of the respondents feel strongly agree towards the promotional policy in the
organization.

68
CHART NO: 4.18

69
TABLE NO: 4.19

OPINION ABOUT COMPANY'S ENVIRONMENT

Cumulative
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent

Valid Strongly agree 34 34.0 34.0 34.0

Agree 30 30.0 30.0 64.0

Neither agree nor disagree 16 16.0 16.0 80.0

Disagree 11 11.0 11.0 91.0

Strongly disagree 9 9.0 9.0 100.0

Total 100 100.0 100.0

SOURCE: Primary Data

INFERENCE:
The above table shows that out of 100 respondents, 34% of the respondents said
that strongly agree , 30% of the respondents said that agree, 16% of the respondents said
that neither agree nor disagree, 11% of the respondents said that disagree and 9% of the
respondents said that strongly disagree towards work environment in the organization.
34% of the respondents feel strongly agree towards the work environment in the
organization.

70
CHART NO: 4.19

71
TABLE NO: 4.20

OPINION ABOUT MEDICAL FACILITY

Cumulative
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent

Valid Strongly agree 41 41.0 41.0 41.0

Agree 31 31.0 31.0 72.0

Neither agree nor disagree 14 14.0 14.0 86.0

Disagree 9 9.0 9.0 95.0

Strongly disagree 5 5.0 5.0 100.0

Total 100 100.0 100.0

SOURCE: Primary Data

INFERENCE:
The above table shows that out of 100 respondents,41% of the respondents said
that strongly agree , 31% of the respondents said that agree, 14% of the respondents said
that neither agree nor disagree, 9% of the respondents said that disagree and 5% of the
respondents said that strongly disagree towards medical facility in the organization.
41% of the respondents feel strongly agree towards medical facility in the
organization.

72
CHART NO: 4.20

73
TABLE NO: 4.21

OPINION ABOUT ACCOMMODATION FACILITY

Cumulative
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent

Valid Strongly agree 23 23.0 23.0 23.0

Agree 34 34.0 34.0 57.0

Neither agree nor disagree 26 26.0 26.0 83.0

Disagree 6 6.0 6.0 89.0

Strongly disagree 11 11.0 11.0 100.0

Total 100 100.0 100.0

SOURCE: Primary Data

INFERENCE:
The above table shows that out of 100 respondents,23% of the respondents said
that strongly agree , 34% of the respondents said that agree, 26% of the respondents said
that neither agree nor disagree, 6% of the respondents said that disagree and 11% of the
respondents said that strongly disagree towards accommodation in the organization.
34% of the respondents feel strongly agree towards the accommodation in the
organization.

74
CHART NO: 4.21

75
TABLE NO: 4.22

OPINION ABOUT RECREATION FACILITY

Cumulative
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent

Valid Strongly agree 30 30.0 30.0 30.0

Agree 36 36.0 36.0 66.0

Neither agree nor disagree 17 17.0 17.0 83.0

Disagree 12 12.0 12.0 95.0

Strongly disagree 5 5.0 5.0 100.0

Total 100 100.0 100.0

SOURCE: Primary Data

INFERENCE:
The above table shows that out of 100 respondents,30% of the respondents said
that strongly agree , 36% of the respondents said that agree, 17% of the respondents said
that neither agree nor disagree, 12% of the respondents said that disagree and 5% of the
respondents said that strongly disagree towards the recreation facilities in the
organization.
36% of the respondents feel strongly agree towards the recreation facilities in the
organization

76
CHART NO: 4.22

77
TABLE NO: 4.23

OPINION ABOUT COMMUNICATION FACILITY

Cumulative
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent

Valid Strongly agree 25 25.0 25.0 25.0

Agree 28 28.0 28.0 53.0

Neither agree nor disagree 24 24.0 24.0 77.0

Disagree 13 13.0 13.0 90.0

Strongly disagree 10 10.0 10.0 100.0

Total 100 100.0 100.0

SOURCE: Primary Data

INFERENCE:
The above table shows that out of 100 respondents,25% of the respondents said
that strongly agree , 28% of the respondents said that agree, 24% of the respondents said
that neither agree nor disagree, 13% of the respondents said that disagree and 10% of the
respondents said that strongly disagree towards the communication in the organization.
28% of the respondents said that agree towards the communication in the
organization.

78
CHART NO: 4.23

79
TABLE NO: 4.24

OPINION ABOUT WATER DISPOSAL FACILITY

Cumulative
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent

Valid Strongly agree 37 37.0 37.0 37.0

Agree 22 22.0 22.0 59.0

Neither agree nor disagree 15 15.0 15.0 74.0

Disagree 12 12.0 12.0 86.0

Strongly disagree 14 14.0 14.0 100.0

Total 100 100.0 100.0

SOURCE: Primary Data

INFERENCE:
The above table shows that out of 100 respondents,37% of the respondents said
that strongly agree , 22% of the respondents said that agree, 15% of the respondents said
that neither agree nor disagree, 12% of the respondents said that disagree and 14% of the
respondents said that strongly disagree towards the water disposal in the company.
37% of the respondents said that strongly agree towards the water disposal in the
company.

80
CHART NO: 4.24

81
TABLE NO: 4.25

OPINION ABOUT ROAD FACILITY

Cumulative
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent

Valid Strongly agree 25 25.0 25.0 25.0

Agree 29 29.0 29.0 54.0

Neither agree nor disagree 20 20.0 20.0 74.0

Disagree 11 11.0 11.0 85.0

Strongly disagree 15 15.0 15.0 100.0

Total 100 100.0 100.0

SOURCE: Primary Data


INFERENCE:
The above table shows that out of 100 respondents,25% of the respondents said
that strongly agree , 29% of the respondents said that agree, 20% of the respondents said
that neither agree nor disagree, 11% of the respondents said that disagree and 15% of the
respondents said that strongly disagree towards the road facility in the organisation.
29% of the respondents said that agree towards the road facility in the
organisation.

82
CHART NO: 4.25

83
TABLE NO: 4.26

OPINION ABOUT EMERGENCY WARDS FACILITY

Cumulative
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent

Valid Strongly agree 23 23.0 23.0 23.0

Agree 19 19.0 19.0 42.0

Neither agree nor disagree 17 17.0 17.0 59.0

Disagree 21 21.0 21.0 80.0

Strongly disagree 20 20.0 20.0 100.0

Total 100 100.0 100.0

SOURCE: Primary Data


INFERENCE:
The above table shows that out of 100 respondents,23% of the respondents said
that strongly agree , 19% of the respondents said that agree, 17% of the respondents said
that neither agree nor disagree, 21% of the respondents said that disagree and 20% of the
respondents said that strongly disagree towards the emergency wards in the organization.
23% of the respondents said that strongly agree towards the emergency wards in
the organization.

84
CHART NO: 4.26

85
Chi-Square Analysis-2

Income of the respondents * Satisfaction with salary

Null Hypothesis H0:


There is no significant relation between income of the respondents and
satisfaction with salary.

Alternate Hypothesis H1:


There is significant relation between income of the respondents and satisfaction
with salary.

Income of the respondents * Satisfaction with salary


Crosstabulation

Count

Satisfaction with salary

Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Total


Income of the Below Rs.10000 12 8 0 0 20
respondents
Rs.10001-15000 0 22 13 0 35
Rs.15001-20000 0 0 22 0 22
Above Rs.20000 0 0 15 8 23
Total 12 30 50 8 100

86
Chi-Square Tests
Asymp. Sig. (2-
Value df sided)
Pearson Chi-Square 1.248E2a 9 .000
Likelihood Ratio 130.031 9 .000
Linear-by-Linear Association 67.579 1 .000
N of Valid Cases 100
a. 8 cells (50.0%) have expected count less than 5. The minimum expected count is 1.60.

Symmetric Measures
Value Approx. Sig.
Nominal by Nominal Contingency Coefficient .745 .000
N of Valid Cases 100

RESULT:

From the symmetric measures, contingency coefficient value is 0.745. The 8 cells
have expected count is less than 5 and the minimum expected count is 1.60. Here not
assuming null hypothesis. So we accept alternative hypothesis. There is some significant
relationship between income of the respondents and satisfaction with salary.

87
CORRELATIONS

Correlation Coefficient :

If the answer +1to -1: the interpretation is positive relationship between these 2 variables.
If the answer +1: interpretation is perfect positive linear relationship between these 2 variables.
If the answer -1: : interpretation is perfect negative linear relationship between these 2 variables.
If the answer 0 : interpretation is no linear relationship between these 2 variables.

Correlations

OPINION ABOUT
WELFARE
BENIFITS
INCOME OF THE PROVIDEDBY THE
RESPONDENTS COMPANY

INCOME OF THE RESPONDENTS Pearson Correlation 1 .093

Sig. (2-tailed) .358

N 100 100
OPINION ABOUT WELFARE Pearson Correlation .093 1
BENIFITS PROVIDEDBY THE Sig. (2-tailed) .358
COMPANY
N 100 100

INFERENCE:

The above table depicts the relationship between income of the respondents
and opinion about welfare benefits provided by the company. These two variables have high
degree of correlation i.e. 0.093. So there is a relationship between these two variables.
The value 0.093 is between +1 to -1, so the interpretation is positive relationship between
these 2 variables. Finally, these two variables have is close and positive relationship.
88
CHAPTER V

SUMMARY OF FINDINGS, SUGGESTIONS AND CONCLUSION

5.1 FINDINGS

 31% of the respondents are in the age group of 30-40.


 35% of the respondents belong to the income category of Rs.10,001 – 15,000
 66% of the respondents have work experience is below 5 years.
 64% of the respondents said that organization fulfill the needs.
 34% of the respondents said that they are highly satisfied towards the job.
 60% of the respondents feel satisfied towards the safety measures in the
organization.
 35% of the respondents said that neutral towards the workshop sanitation in the
organization.
 27% of the respondents feel neutral towards the ventilation in the organization.
 29% of the respondents feel neutral towards the lighting facility in the
organization.
 26% of the respondents said that neutral towards the canteen facility in the
organization.
 35% of the respondents said that neutral towards the cleanliness in the
organization.
 49% of the respondents said that highly satisfied towards the control effluents in
the organization.
 35% of the respondents said that satisfied towards the provision of drinking water.
 38% of the respondents said that satisfied towards the first aid equipment in the
organisation.
 32% of the respondents said that agree towards the cloak room facility in the
organization.

89
 33% of the respondents said that they are agree the transport facility in the
organization.
 37% of the respondents feel strongly agree towards the welfare benefits in the
organization.
 35% of the respondents feel strongly agree towards the promotional policy in the
organization.
 34% of the respondents feel strongly agree towards the work environment in the
organization.
 41% of the respondents feel strongly agree towards medical facility in the
organization.
 34% of the respondents feel strongly agree towards the accommodation in the
organization.
 36% of the respondents feel strongly agree towards the recreation facilities in the
organization
 28% of the respondents said that agree towards the communication in the
organization
 37% of the respondents said that strongly agree towards the water disposal in the
company.
 29% of the respondents said that agree towards the road facility in the
organisation.
 23% of the respondents said that strongly agree towards the emergency wards in
the organization.

90
5.2 SUGGESTIONS

.Safety measures must be increased to the employees to avoid injuries or to prevent risk
for the employees in the organization
COMPANY
➢ Proper ventilation must be increased since it would affect productivity of the
employees.
➢ Lighting facility can be increased. It should not be too contrast as well as it should
not be too dull.
➢ Canteen must be a dust free and ensure to avail needed foods to the employees.
➢ Cleanliness is very important in the environment since which related with health
of the employees.
➢ Effluents must be controlled as per the welfare act in the company. Air pollution
and water pollution must be reduced.
➢ Proper provision of drinking water must be provided to the employees. It must be
placed in necessary place inside of the company to the employees.
➢ First aid equipment must be fixed in proper place in order to reduce the risk of
accident for the employees.
➢ Cloak room facility must be enhanced in the company since employees needs to
keep their belongings in safe.
➢ Transport facility must be ensured to the labours who from rural areas.
➢ Accommodation must be provided for the employees to stay in the company
safely.
GOVERNMENT
➢ Recreational activities can be taken care of by the management.
91
➢ Free flow of communication between superior and subordinates must be there
without any obstacles in the company.
➢ There must be proper water disposal and waste disposal in the company as per the
labour welfare act.
➢ Cultural programmes may be conducted often for the employees in order to bring
unity among them.
➢ Salary must be fixed at reasonable rate and provided promptly on the date.
➢ Rest room must be separated and enhanced for the both male and female
employees.
EMPLOYEES
➢ Medical facility must be provided to the employees.
➢ Working time must be as per the norms. There should be any compulsion in the
shift work.
➢ The organization should improve the benefit and services provided to the
employees so that interest would be stimulated.
➢ The company can make the benefit and services to attractive the personnel.
➢ The company should plan out the welfare activities in an effective way to improve
the organization image in the eyes of the public.
➢ The compensation package must be improved further.
➢ Organization should give proper instruction to complete the job effectively
➢ There must be improvement in rewarding and awarding policies.
➢ It must be introducing of promotion policy at operation level.
➢ It needs to provide high motivation from the top management of the company.
➢ There must be mutual relationship with co workers
➢ It needs to provide special training from the company to their job during work
period.
➢ The company should discuss with the employees in taking any important decision
that makes them to involve in their work fully.
➢ Work pressure given to employees should be at the normal.
92
5.3 CONCLUSION

Welfare facilities provided to the employees was found to be satisfactory in this


company. It has been found from the study that the worker had a positive attitude towards
their job and management. The study conducted also revealed that a majority of the
employees of this company were satisfied with their job and work environment. The
relationship with the supervisors and the co-workers also provides conductive work
environment for the workers. The study therefore highlights the various aspects on
welfare facilities provided satisfaction for the employees.

93
BIBILIOGRAPHY

 Labour Welfare Measures by Schiffman Kanauk ( 9th edition)

 Research Methodology by C.R Kothari.

 Statistics by R.S.N. Pillai.

 Government of India,Report of the committee on labour Welfare,” Concept and

scope of Labour Welfare, ”Ministry of Labour, Employment and

Rehabilitation,NewDelhi,2009,Ch II p.5

 K.N. Vaid, Labour Welfare in India,New Delhi, Shri Ram Centre for Industrial

Relations,2000

 The Report of the Committee on Labour Welfare (20011)

 B.P Tyagi, “Labor Economics and Social Welfare”, Meerut, Jai Praksh Nath &

Co., 2009

 V.V Giri, “Labor Problems in Indian Industry”, Asia Publishing House, Bombay,

2011

Websites

➢ www.paiyurfruits.com
➢ www.fruitindustry.com
➢ www.industrytrends.com

94
ANNEXURE

QUESTIONNAIRE
A STUDY ON EVALUATION OF WELFARE MEASURES PROVIDED FOR

EMPLOYEES IN PAIYUR FRUIT PRODUCTS (P) LTD., KRISHNAGIRI

1. Name :

2. Age :

a) 20-30 ( ) b) 30-40 ( )

c) 40-50 ( ) d) Above 50 ( )

3. Income per month :

a) Below Rs.10000 ( ) b) Rs.10001-15000 ( )

c) Rs.15001-20000 ( ) d) Above Rs.20000 ( )

4. No of years in experience :

a) Below 5 ( ) b) 5-10 ( )

c) 10-20 ( ) d) Above 20 ( )

5. Do you agree that organization fulfill your needs?

a) Yes ( ) b) No ( )

6. Are you have satisfied with this job?

a) Highly satisfied ( ) b) Satisfied ( ) c) Neutral ( )

d) Dissatisfied ( ) e) Highly Dissatisfied ( )

95
7. What is your level of satisfaction towards Safety measures?

a) Highly satisfied ( ) b) Satisfied ( ) c) Neutral ( )

d) Dissatisfied ( ) e) Highly Dissatisfied ( )

8. What is your level of satisfaction towards Ventilation?

a) Highly satisfied ( ) b) Satisfied ( ) c) Neutral ( )

d) Dissatisfied ( ) e) Highly Dissatisfied ( )

9. What is your level of satisfaction towards Lighting facility?

a) Highly satisfied ( ) b) Satisfied ( ) c) Neutral ( )

d) Dissatisfied ( ) e) Highly Dissatisfied ( )

10. What is your level of satisfaction towards Canteen facility?

a) Highly satisfied ( ) b) Satisfied ( ) c) Neutral ( )

d) Dissatisfied ( ) e) Highly Dissatisfied ( )

11. What is your level of satisfaction towards Cleanliness in your company?

a) Highly satisfied ( ) b) Satisfied ( ) c) Neutral ( )

d) Dissatisfied ( ) e) Highly Dissatisfied ( )

12. How do you feel that Workshop sanitation in your company?

a) Highly satisfied ( ) b) Satisfied ( ) c) Neutral ( )

d) Dissatisfied ( ) e) Highly Dissatisfied ( )

13. How do you feel that Control of effluents in your company?

a) Highly satisfied ( ) b) Satisfied ( ) c) Neutral ( )

d) Dissatisfied ( ) e) Highly Dissatisfied ( )

14. How do you feel that Provision of drinking water in your company?
96
a) Highly satisfied ( ) b) Satisfied ( ) c) Neutral ( )

d) Dissatisfied ( ) e) Highly Dissatisfied ( )

15. How do you feel that First aid equipments in your company?

a) Highly satisfied ( ) b) Satisfied ( ) c) Neutral ( )

d) Dissatisfied ( ) e) Highly Dissatisfied ( )

16. How do you agree that Cloak room facility in your company?

a) Strongly agree ( ) b) Agree ( ) c) Neutral ( )

d) Disagree ( ) e) Highly Disagree ( )

17. How do you agree that Transport facility in your company?

a) Strongly agree ( ) b) Agree ( ) c) Neutral ( )

d) Disagree ( ) e) Highly Disagree ( )

18. Does welfare benefits provided by the organization play a motivational factor?

a) Strongly agree ( ) b) Agree ( ) c) Neutral ( )

d) Disagree ( ) e) Highly Disagree ( )

19. Are you agree with your promotional policy in your company?

a) Strongly agree ( ) b) Agree ( ) c) Neutral ( )

d) Disagree ( ) e) Highly Disagree ( )

20. How do you agree with your good environment in the company?

a) Strongly agree ( ) b) Agree ( ) c) Neutral ( )

d) Disagree ( ) e) Highly Disagree ( )

21. How do you agree with overall medical facilities provided by your company?

a) Strongly agree ( ) b) Agree ( ) c) Neutral ( )


97
d) Disagree ( ) e) Highly Disagree ( )

22. How do you agree with accommodation provided by your company?

a) Strongly agree ( ) b) Agree ( ) c) Neutral ( )

d) Disagree ( ) e) Highly Disagree ( )

23. How do you agree with Recreation facilities provided by your company?

a) Strongly agree ( ) b) Agree ( ) c) Neutral ( )

d) Disagree ( ) e) Highly Disagree ( )

24. How do you agree with Communication facilities provided by your company?

a) Strongly agree ( ) b) Agree ( ) c) Neutral ( )

d) Disagree ( ) e) Highly Disagree ( )

25. How do you agree with Water disposal in your company?

a) Strongly agree ( ) b) Agree ( ) c) Neutral ( )

d) Disagree ( ) e) Highly Disagree ( )

26. How do you agree with Road facility in your company?

a) Strongly agree ( ) b) Agree ( ) c) Neutral ( )

d) Disagree ( ) e) Highly Disagree ( )

27. How do you agree with Emergency wards in your company?

a) Strongly agree ( ) b) Agree ( ) c) Neutral ( )

28. Suggestions

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