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ISSUE 12 MODERN CHESS MAGAZINE Typical Tactical Ideas - Bishop Sacrifice on "h6" Alert Defence

ISSUE 12

MODERN CHESS

MAGAZINE

Typical Tactical Ideas - Bishop Sacrifice on "h6"

Alert Defence - Part 2

Endgame Series - Part 12

Master the Grunfeld Structure - Part 3

King's Indian Structures - Black Releases the Tension in the Centre - Part 2

Table of contents

Table of contents 4 Alert Defence - Part 2 (GM John van der Wiel) 7 Exercise

4 Alert Defence - Part 2 (GM John van der Wiel)

7

Exercise 1 ­ 2

7

Karpov,A. ­ Van der Wiel / SWIFT Brussels 1986

11

Training example 1 ­ 2

14 Typical Tactical Ideas - Bishop Sacrifice on "h6" (GM Nikolai Ninov)

14

Jobava,Ba (2665) ­ Ponomariov,R (2709) / 42nd Olympiad 2016 (8.2) 10.09.2016

15

Karjakin,Sergey 2772 ­ Carlsen,M 2853 / WCh 2016 New York USA (4) 15.11.2016

16

Karjakin,Sergey (2785) ­ Ivanchuk,V (2747) / World Blitz 2016 (17.2) 30.12.2016

17

Perez Ponsa,F (2585) ­ Ivanchuk,V (2747) / World Rapid 2016 (1.10) 26.12.2016

18

1) A queen on the h­file

18

Zelcic,R (2548) ­ Froewis,G (2455) / TCh­AUT 2nd West 2014­15 (6.5) 23.1.15

20

Djuric,P (2236) ­ Grbic,Br (2004) / TCh­Belgrade Premier liga 2013 (5.4)

20

2) A target on f7

20

Anand,V (2773) ­ McShane,L (2684) / 5th Classic GpA 2013 (4.1) 12.12.2013

23

Kovacevic,Bl (2449) ­ Sribar,P (2047) / 19th Bosnjaci Open 2014 (3.8) 04.01.14

25

3) Eyeing at g6

25

Postny,E (2619) ­ Mareco,S (2606) / 42nd Olympiad 2016 (7.22) 09.09.2016

26

Ramos Libon,Jean Piere 1947 ­ Meylan,A 2193 / WYCC U18 Open 2013 (10.40) 27.12.13

28

4) Queen on the c1­h6 diagonal

28

De Jong,M 2347 ­ Ypma,P 2179 / 51st Groningen Open A 2013 (9.23)

29

Mathe,Ga (2352) ­ Abramovic,Da (2109) / TCh­CRO Final 2014 (1.9) 14.05.2014

30

Fercec,N (2473) ­ Burovic,Rijad (1949) / 19th Bosnjaci Open 2014 (1.5) 03.01.2014

31

Pacher,M (2446) ­ Zwardon,V (2383) / TCh­CZE Vychod 2013­14 (3.1) 24.11.13

32

Ipatov,Alexander 2625 ­ Panjwani,R 2422 / SPICE Cup Open 2013 (5.2) 17.10.2013

32

Test 1­5

34 Master the Grunfeld Structure - Part 3 (GM Mihail Marin)

34

Karpov,Anatoly (2730) ­ Kasparov,Garry (2800) / World Championship 35th­KK5 (17)

36

Shaked,Tal (2500) ­ Kasparov,Garry (2820) / Tilburg 1997

37

Timman,Jan H (2620) ­ Ivanchuk,Vassily (2720) / Linares 1992

38

Polugaevsky,L ­ T Timman,Jan H / Tilburg 40/582, 1985

41 Endgame Series - Part 12 (GM Davorin Kuljasevic)

41

Example 1­ 6

47

Example 7 Instructive pawn endgame

54

Exercise 1­ 6

56 King's Indian Structures - Black Releases the Tension in the Centre - Part 2 (GM Petar G. Arnaudov)

56

Introduction and preview

57

Gustafsson,Jan (2629) ­ Kramnik,Vladimir (2799) / Dortmund SuperGM 40th (2) 14.07.2012

58

Lakdawala,Cyrus (2560) ­ Yermolinsky,Alex (2695) / National op Las Vegas (3) 1997

60

Tilicheev,Viacheslav (2336) ­ V Vorobiov,Evgeny E (2558) / Moscow­ch sf (6) 22.03.2011

61

Michalik,Peter (2509) ­ Zherebukh,Yaroslav (2594) / Groningen op­A 48th (3) 23.12.2011

62

Smirnov,Artem (2425) ­ Matlakov,Maxim (2663) / St Petersburg Botvinnik Memorial op (7)

63

Fier,Alexandr (2571) ­ Bologan,Viktor (2693) / Moscow Aeroflot op­A 10th (8) 15.02.11

64

Gelfand,Boris (2738) ­ Radjabov,Teimour (2788) / Wch Blitz 6th (23) 10.07.2012

65

Ragger,Markus (2644) ­ Sadorra,Julio Catalino (2590) / Tromsoe ol (Men) 41st (6.1) 2014

68

Gelfand,Boris (2753) ­ Amonatov,Farrukh (2590) / Tromsoe ol (Men) 41st (2.1) 03.08.2014

69

Test 1­5

68 Gelfand,Boris (2753) ­ Amonatov,Farrukh (2590) / Tromsoe ol (Men) 41st (2.1) 03.08.2014 69 Test 1­5
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Alert Defence - Part 2

Modern Chess Magazine 4 Alert Defence - P art 2 In Episode 1 we started working

In Episode 1 we started working on certain defensive skills. These entailed finding the way to stay out of 'trouble for the rest of the game' in difficult positions. Unfortunately there is no easy recipe to pinpoint these moments or positions in the game. In general: whenever you see or feel trouble lurking at the horizon and the position offers various choices or options, most probably this is such a moment!As advocated earlier: you then try to go for an active solution, if possible. Almost always this requires precise calculation. I still owe you solutions to 2 exercises from the first article. Let's start with them. Solution to Test 3 from Part 1

8

7

6

5

4

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2

1

a b

c

d

e

f

g

h

to Test 3 from Part 1 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 a b

a b

c

d

e

f

g

h

8

7

6

5

4

3

2

1

6 5 4 3 2 1 a b c d e f g h a b

The position after 21.hxg3 is not as simple as it might look. Can you

demonstrate your defensive skills as Black?

This may look drawish to you, but if White controls the d-file, chases the Nc5 and invades on d7, we'll speak again. How should Black avoid such a

future? Candidate moves are

f6,

Bd5,

Rfd8,

Rad8. Let's see:

1

Rad8

[ 1

Bd5

2.c4 f6 3.cxd5 ( 3.Ng4!? )

3

fxe5

4.Rd2 is possible, but

certainly not equal ]

[ 1

Kh8 4.Nxc5!; 2

4.Nxf6+ gxf6 5.c4 only make things worse. ) 3.Rxd7 Rf7 4.Rd6! Re7

5.Bc4

f6

2.Nd7 Nxd7 ( 2

Rfd8

e5

3.Bc4+

3.Rfd1 Bd5

8

7

6

5

4

3

2

1

a b

c

d

e

f

g

h

2 Rfd8 e5 3.Bc4+ 3.Rfd1 Bd5 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 a b

a b

c

d

e

f

g

h

8

7

6

5

4

3

2

1

6 5 4 3 2 1 a b c d e f g h a b

gives White everlasting pressure and

winning chances; ]

[ 1

2.Rfd1

looks like the natural move.

Rfd8

A) Unfortunately, 2

3.c4!

Rd5 runs into

A1) 3

Rxd4

4.Rxd4

A1a) 4

are difficult for Black and

f6

5.Ng4 ( 5.Nd3

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even );

A1b) 4

Kf8

5.b4 f6 6.Nd7+

Nxd7 7.Rxd7 Bc6 8.Rc7

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7

6

5

4

3

2

1

a b

c

d

e

f

g

h

6.Nd7+ Nxd7 7.Rxd7 Bc6 8.Rc7 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 a b c

a b

c

d

e

f

g

h

8

7

6

5

4

3

2

1

6 5 4 3 2 1 a b c d e f g h a b

and Black is still in trouble. But one element of this line may

lead you to the right idea

;

A2) 3

Rxe5??

B)

2

Rxd4

]

4.Rd8+;

2.Rfd1 Rd5 3.Rxd5 exd5

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7

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5

4

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a b

c

d

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2.Rfd1 Rd5 3.Rxd5 exd5 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 a b c d

a b

c

d

e

f

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5

4

3

2

1

6 5 4 3 2 1 a b c d e f g h a b

Black has sealed the d-file and his

isolated pawn is of little relevance, as he

also has the positional threat of 4

(which would still follow on 4. Nd3 4.Bb5

Na4

[ And parrying with 4.b3 Re8 5.f4 f6

6.Bb5 doesn't lose yet, but it hands

over the beautiful e4 square. ]

f6 4

5.Nd7 Rd8 6.Nxc5 bxc5

 

a b

c

d

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f

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h

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White's edge was so minuscule, that a draw was agreed upon 10 moves later.

Solution to Test 4 from Part 1

 
 

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b

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d

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8 8

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a b

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h

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Black may not be in serious trouble, but un unpleasant future is a realistic scenario. Can Black alter that? White may not have much, but he intends to force some decisions by

attacking the Bd6. 1

[ If Black defends quietly with 1 Be5

Bxa2!

2.Bb1

8

7

6

5

4

3

2

1

a b

c

d

e

f

g

h

with 1 Be5 Bxa2! 2.Bb1 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 a b c

a b

c

d

e

f

g

h

8

7

6

5

4

3

2

1

6 5 4 3 2 1 a b c d e f g h a b

and often 23. Kf3, there will be knight manoeuvres (Nf4-h4-g2 or Nf5- e7-d5). And taking on f5 doesn't guarantee an easy future: Black has several weak pawns and White's bishop and king will be active. Time to start calculating the active solution! ]

2.c4

[ not 2.Bxa6 Bb3 ]

2

Bb3

3.Ra1 Be5!

[

possible 4.Rxa6 ( 4.cxb5 c4 5.Bc2 with counterplay Bxc2 ) 4 bxc4 5.Nxd6 cxd3+ 6.Rxd3 Rxd3 looks like White's best option, but is not entirely clear. The text is most reliable for Black, though ]

3

b5

, to save the bishop, is also

4.Ne7

[ 4.Ra3 Rxd3 5.Kxd3 Rd8+

is obviously good for Black, but this

last white trump also had to be

foreseen ]

4

7.Rc1

Rge8

5.Nd5+ Rxd5! 6.cxd5 Bxd5

[ 7.Bb5 axb5 8.Rxd5 Bxb2 9.Rb1

Rxe4+ 10.Kf3 Re5 doesn't quite work

for White.] ]

Bd6 7

8.Kf3?!

To protect both c5 and f4.

[ Quite wrong is 8.b4 Bxe4 9.bxc5

f3+! ]

[ +!, but the best option would be 8.f3! intending 29. Bc4 (or Bb5) when chances should be about equal ]

Bc6 8

queenside majority and went for 9.b4 cxb4 10.Bxa6 But Black had another alert reaction b3! which prompted White to soon enter a rook ending, that was slightly better for Black! 1/2 - 1/2 in 77 moves, Van der Wiel - Nikolic, Malta Olympiad 1980. Having seen these exercises and the previous article, you may ask: "Only games by the author, is this a big ego- trip?" Sure, if you will, but the main 2 reasons for this are: A) it is easier this way to select material, knowing for sure that it fits into the theme; B) (even more practical) chances are much better, that

Now White didn't like that

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readers or trainees haven't already see n these positions in mainstream books. In this episode, too, I'll

give you one whole game with

of questions, followed by an exercise diagram from a completely differet n encounter.

a couple

Exercise 1

Now I would like to bring to yourattention two exercises which are takenfrom one of my games against Anatoly-Karpov. Before examining my commentsto the game, you are invited to think abit on some of the critical moments.

8

7

6

5

4

3

2

1

a b

c

d

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g

h

of the critical moments. 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 a b c d

a b

c

d

e

f

g

h

8

7

6

5

4

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2

1

6 5 4 3 2 1 a b c d e f g h a b

* In this case White already has a big

advantage. But what is Black's best chance of hopefully reducing that in the future?

Exercise 2

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a b

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in the future? Exercise 2 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 a b c

a b

c

d

e

f

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h

8

7

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5

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3

2

1

6 5 4 3 2 1 a b c d e f g h a b

So now Black sealed a move. Which one,

why and what result do you expect?

Karpov,A.sealed a move. Which one, why and what result do you expect? V an der Wiel

Van der Wiel an der Wiel

SWIFT Brussels

1986

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nc6 I was intent on following the Kasparov line with the famous novelty

from their Moscow World Championship match, 1985. Probably very unwise, but who can suppress curiosity? 5.Nb5 d6 6.c4 Nf6 7.N1c3 a6 8.Na3 d5 There it is, in this game not an exclamation mark anymore.] 9.cxd5 exd5 10.exd5 Nb4 11.Be2 Bc5?! [ Still in Kasparov's footsteps, but a

better move would be 11

Be7

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Nevertheless, the variation would lose most of its attraction, see for instance 12.0-0 Bf5 13.Nc4 Nfxd5 ( 13 Nc2 14.Ne3! ) 14.Bf3 Be6 15.Ne3 and White is better. ]

drive away the Qb4.] ) 19

[ 13

Bd7

Bd7 ]

14.Qxb4 The normal move, but

with hindsight I like Qb6

( 14 ( or 16

in which Karpov's technique and the value of the d-pawn will be hard to overcome; ]

Bxf2+

Bc5

) 15.Qxb6 Bxb6 16.Nc4 Bd4 17.Bf3 ) 17.Rd1 is an endgame

12.Be3!

[ In the aforementioned match game (their 16th) Black had good compensation after:

12.0-0 0-0 13.Bf3 Bf5

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7

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1

a b

c

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h

after: 12.0-0 0-0 13.Bf3 Bf5 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 a b c

a b

c

d

e

f

g

h

8

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2

1

6 5 4 3 2 1 a b c d e f g h a b

14.Qxb4 The normal move, but with hindsight I like

[ 14.fxe3 at least as much. There may

follow:

A)

threatens d5-d6 a5 17.Nc4 0-0 18.Rd4 a good multi-purpose move,

vacating d1 for the queen in case of

14

Qh4+

15.g3 Qe7 16.Rd1!

Nc5

Here Black will choose

b5

between Nc5 ( and the even more

dynamic 18

to find great activity to counterweigh

the bleak future of his Nb4. At least these positions become so tricky, that Karpov didn't want them. A

small bonus for 13

B)

b5 only move 17.Nxc5 bxa4 18.Nxd7! Bxd7 19.Rd1 and White

keeps his advantage ]

!? Still, he needs

leading to Kasparov's masterpiece. As it turns out, the Karpov team had found this (not even so difficult)

refutation during the match, but not in time to employ it anymore. Ah well,

there's always tournaments

Nd7 ?] );

14

Qb6

15.Nc4 Qc5 16.Ne4

]

12

Bxe3

13.Qa4+

Bc5 14

15.Qe4+ Kf8!?

c

d

e

f

Nd7

[ 13

b5

14.Qxb4 ( 14.Naxb5 axb5 )

14

Bb6

would be more desirable, but

can Black chase the annoying Qb4 in time? 15.0-0 Ba5 16.Bxb5+ axb5 17.Rfe1+ Kd7 18.Qxb5+ Kc7 and now what? After 19.Nc4 ( or 19.Rac1 Qd7; but 19.d6+! is a killer Qxd6 20.Rac1 and Black is lost.

a b

g

h

8

7

6

5

4

3

2

1

Qxd6 20.Rac1 and Black is lost. a b g h 8 7 6 5 4 3

a

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

8

7

6

5

4

3

2

1

Typically a variation that the Karpov

team might have worked out already! With the text Black hopes to keep the bishop pair, avoid most endings and www.modern-chess.com

have worked out already! With the text Black hopes to keep the bishop pair, avoid most
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[Objectively perhaps not better than 15 Qe7 with some hope in the endgame (although 16. Nc4 looks good), but in

general: when you are clearly worse, try

make your opponent's task more complicated! On the next phase of the

game, less important for our theme (or opening theory) I will not comment so much. 16.0-0 b5 17.Nc2 Nf6 18.Qd3 g6 19.Bf3 [ 19.Nd4 would have been stronger. ]

Bf5 19

22.Nc6! Qd6 23.Ne4 Nxe4 24.Bxe4

White has maintained his advantage.

Kg8

to

20.Qd2 h5! 21.Nd4! Bg4

[

On 24

Kg7

is unpleasant 25.Qc3+ ]

[

If 24

Re8

White plays 25.Qd3

, intending a2-a4. ] 25.Rac1 After this Black gets better co-

ordinated. Not easy to see, but the e-file and kingside were more important here.

[ 25.b4 Bb6 26.a4 bxa4 27.Rxa4

Kh7 followed by he8 would give

Black counterplay. ]

[ 25.Rfe1! Bd7 ( If 25

Bb6 27.a4 and White is better; If

Kh7 25

had kept Black unhappy. ]

Re8

26.b4

then 26.Ne5! ) 26.Qg5

Re8 25

28.g3 Qf6 White is presented with a difficult choice. 29.Rc3 better winning chances, although it is difficult. Not when he follows up with

26.Qd3 Bb6 27.Bf3 Bc7!

A) 30.Rfe1 Rxe1+ 31.Rxe1 Rh5!;

B) 30.Nb4! Bb6

B1) not 31.Rc6 Bxf2+ 32.Kg2? ( 32.Rxf2 Re1+ should lead to

equality ) 32

Qh8+ And White is mated; B2) 31.Qc3 Bd4 32.Qc6;

Rxh2+!

33.Kxh2

C) 30.Nd4 Bb6! ]

[ 29.Bxg4 hxg4 would have given

29

32.Bf3 Bh3 33.Bg2 Bg4 34.Qc3

Qd6?! Black is close to having equal chances, but with time-trouble beginning, I ruin the game in two moves! There was nothing wrong with

Bb6

30.Rb3 Bh3 31.Bg2 Bg4

34

[

35

Qxc3

35.bxc3 ( 35.Rxc3 Re2 )

Bc5

( 35

Kg7!?

) 36.Nb4 Bc8 ]

35.Re1! Rxe1+? A horrible loss of tempo.

[

35

Kh7

36.h3 Be2 37.Qd2

Black was still OK Bc4 ] 36.Qxe1 Qf6 37.h3 Bd7 38.Rf3 White is already winning Qd6 39.Qc3 Bf5 40.h4 Kh7 41.Bh3 Karpov played this move quickly, probably expecting Black's position to fall apart and not wanting to seal a move for adjournment himself.

8

7

6

5

4

3

2

1

a b

c

d

e

f

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h

for adjournment himself. 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 a b c d e

a b

c

d

e

f

g

h

8

7

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2

1

6 5 4 3 2 1 a b c d e f g h a b

41.Nd4! would have left Black without much realistic hope ] [ even 41.Rxf5!? was interesting ]

41

to find. The hard part is the correct evaluation of all the resulting positions. But anyway, there was no choice at this point. Anything else would lose such as:

b4!

The saving grace, not so difficult

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Modern Chess Magazine 10 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 a b c d

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[41

[ or 41 Qxd5

etc

Bxh3

]

42.Rxf7+

]

42.Bxf5 gxf5 43.Ne 7

42.Qe1 Not what I expected the most, but it turns out that most things are drawish. White has to choose between playing an ending a piece down and many pawns up, or keeping equal material without serious winning chances. A 'random' queen move that doesn't

control g7, e8 or g3 could be disastrous, see:

[ 42.Qd2? Bxh3 43.Rxf7+ Kg8 44.Rb7? Qxg3+ and wins. ] [ 42.Qxb4?! Qxb4 ( 42 Qxd5? 43.Rxf5! ) 43.Nxb4 Bxh3 44.Rxf7+ Kh6 is the lesser endgame version for White, as Black can quickly activate his rook, gaining at least equal chances ] [ 42.Qe5 Qxe5 43.Nxe5 Bxh3 44.Rxf7+ Kg8 forced here, because

( 44

material )

Kh6

45.Rb7 would lose more

A) 45.d6 Rh7;

B) 45.Rb7 Bc5 very important

( 45

natural, but then after 47.d6 Rh7

Bd4

46.Nc6 Bf6 may look

42

48.Ne7+! Black is suddenly in grave

danger. ) This secures a healthy

future for Black, a vital point being 46.d6?! ( 46.Nxg6 Rh6 47.Nf4

Bg4 is also fine for him; 46.Nd3 looks like White's best option )

Bxd6 46

much better; C) 45.Rf6 Bd4 46.Rxg6+ Kf8

Black will be fine with his powerful

bishops; ( 46

47.Nf7 Bc8! and Black is

Kh7

47.Rg5 )]

[ 42.Nxb4 Rc8 ( but not 42 Ba5 43.Bxf5 Bxb4 44.Bxg6+ and White wins ) 43.Nc6 Qxd5 44.Rxf5 gxf5

45.Bg2 and here Black can choose

between Qc5 ( 45

complicated future. ) 46.Qf6 Rxc6

47.Qxc6 Qxf2+ 48.Kh2 Qxb2 which leads to a draw ]

Qe6 with a more

Qxd5

43.Bg2

[ 43.Rxf5 gxf5 44.Ne7 Re8! ]

43

Qe6

[ 43

Qxe4 46.Rxf7+ ]

Be4

44.Ne7 Qe6 45.Qxe4

[

when the main line runs: 44.Nxb4 Bxb4 45.Qxb4 Be4 46.Qxe4 Qxe4 47.Rxf7+ Kg8 48.Bxe4 Kxf7 WIth a drawn ending ]

43

Bc5

indicated by Seirawan, )

44.Qxb4

[ 44.Qxe6 A clear way to a draw were Bxe6 45.Nxb4 a5 46.Nc6 Bxa2 47.Nxa5 Bxa5 48.Ra3 Be6 49.Rxa5 Rb8 But Karpov wants to try. Of course.] ]

45.Rxf5 Qc1+ 46.Kh2 gxf5

44

47.Qxb6 Qh6! Good use of the h-file! Black is now safe, especially if his

queen reaches f6. 48.Qd4 Re8 49.Bh3 f4 50.gxf4 Kg8 51.b4 Qg7 Stupid move

Qxc6

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[ Much better was: 51 Qc6! after which you might prefer Black. ] 52.Qd7 Re1 53.Qd8+ Kh7 54.Bf5+ Kh6 55.Qg5+ Qxg5 56.fxg5+ Kg7 52.Qd7 Re1 53.Qd8+ Kh7 54.Bf5+ Kh6 55.Qg5+ Qxg5 56.fxg5+ Kg7 57.Bd3 Ra1 58.Bc4 Rb1 59.a3

[ 59.Bb3

4.Rd3

[ 4.Qd3 Nf4 5.Bxf4 ( 5.Qd1 Ne2+!;

5.Qc4+ Kg6 ) 5

danger for him ]

gxf4

there is mainly

4

Rc7

5.Qd2 dxe3 6.Rxe3

[ Obviously 6.Rd7+? Ke8 loses ] [ but what about 6.Qxe3 We analyze:

Rc1+ 7.Kg2 ( 7.Kf2 Rc2+ 8.Ke1 Qxe3+ 9.Rxe3 Nf4 10.Bxf4 gxf4

11.Rd3 is slightly better for White, but Black can also choose 35 Qc6!? with complications that White might

not welcome. ) 7

Rc2+

8.Kh3 Qxe3

9.Rxe3 Nf4+ 10.Bxf4 gxf4 11.Re4 g5 And Black is not worse at all ]

6

Rc2

7.Qxc2 Qxe3+ 8.Kg2 Qxf3+!

[In mutual mild time-trouble the game remains correct.

[ 8

with the defensive resources f2 and

e4 would be much better for White. ]

Nd4?!

9.Qc7+ Kg6 10.Qxb7

Doesn't help White ]

60.Bxa6 Rxa3 61.Be2 Ra2

Ra1 59

and draw was agreed, which is obvious after: 62.Bxh5 Rxf2+ 63.Kg3 Rb2 64.Bf3 Rxb4

1/2

Alert Defence Training example 1

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Defence Training example 1 a b c d e f g h 8 7 6 5

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9.Kxf3 Nd4+ 10.Ke4 Nxc2 11.a4 Ke6 Black still had to be a little exact in the endgame (which he wasn't at first), but a

draw was reached at move 61 in Seirawan -

Van der Wiel, Wijk aan Zee 1991.

Alert Defence Training example 2

On the previous move, with the pawn on a2, White wouldn't have reaped any rewards from 28. Bc7 Qb4! 29. Ba5 Qa3, but now 29. Bc7 Qa6. 30. Ra5 is a threat.

Black can ward it off in a few ways, but usually he remains passive and clearly

slightly worse, e.g. after 28

a4 However, you naturally spotted the

alert 1

Black's counterplay is well under way.

Based on sharp calculation, of course. Don't give pawns for something vague that you can't see through! Now complicated

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2.dxe5 Ne6 3.Rc3 d4

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The final exercise. Were you wide awake?

Ng6! 1

Now White has no trace of

compensation, unless he gets what he was hoping for.

[ In analysys 1

After: 2.hxg5 hxg5 Correct is 3.Be5 ( if White decides to sacrifice some

g5

is a good move.

more with 3.Ne4 Qxb2 normally he won't be

able to prove it. ) 3

5.Rd3 Rxd3 6.Bxd3 Rd8 7.Bc4 Ng6

Qxf3

4.Rxf3 Bg4

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and at least the bishop has nowhere to go. But Black doen't win a piece and there is nothing easy about winning the game after Kg2 or a4. So should Black play the weakening pawn move, which is also a little risky in a practical sense? Only when there is no convincing alternative. There is one, though! ]

2.Rxe6?

[

2.Qe4 Rd4 ]

[

2.Bxg6 Qxg6 ]

[

2.Ne4 Qxb2 ]

fxe6 2

[Had you foreseen this, combined with

the next two moves?

3.Rxe6 Qxe6 4.Bb3 Nxf4!

[ 4

7.Nxf4+ and White has at least draw ]

Rd5

5.Nxd5 Qe1+ 6.Kg2 Nxf4+

5.gxf4

[ 5.Bxe6+ Nxe6 and the attack is failed ] [ after 5.Qxf4 Rd5! ]

Nxe6 and the attack is failed ] [ after 5.Qxf4 Rd5! ] Rd5 5 6.Nxd5 Qg6+!

Rd5 5

6.Nxd5 Qg6+!

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Rd5! ] Rd5 5 6.Nxd5 Qg6+! 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 a b

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The ultimate point of 23

cxd5 8.Qxd5+ Kf8

Ng6.

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Even this was important. After 31. Qg8+ Ke7 it's all over. So here Black was not worse, but his defensive task was to find a good reply to potential aggression of the opponent. Concluding: as a rule it is better to conduct an active defence, if possible, than staying passive. For that you need very good calculation, because normally your opponent has also seen the active option. Then again, remember that he is not

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Then again, remember that he is not God, Allah or even Carlsen. Ergo, it is still possible to outcalculate him!

5

Rd5

6.Nxd5 Qg6+!

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The ultimate point of 23
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Ng6.
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Even this was important. After 31. Qg8+ Ke7 it's all over. So here Black was not worse, but his defensive task was to find a good reply to potential aggression of the opponent. Concluding: as a rule it is better to conduct an active defence, if possible,

than staying passive. For that you need very good calculation, because normally your opponent has also seen the active option. Then again, remember that he is not God, Allah or even Carlsen. Ergo, it is still possible to outcalculate him!

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Modern Chess Magazine 14

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Typical Tactical Ideas - Bishop Sacrifice on "h6"

14 Typical Tactical Ideas - Bishop Sacrifice on "h6" Dear R eader, The current article is

Dear Reader, The current article is designed to improve your attacking skills. More precisely, we are going to focus on the attack against the opponent's castle. As the reader probably remembers, In issue 9 of Modern Chess Magazine, GM Grigor Grigorov published an article concerning the bishop sacrifice on "h7". In order to further develop topic related to the bishop sacrifices on the kingside, I have decided to examine the sacrifice on the h6-square. In general terms, the idea is the same - we are trying to destroy our opponent's pawn shelter on the kingside. Nevertheless, there are some specific ideas that you should know in order to sacrifice your bishop on the h6-square. Before diving into different thematic ideas, I would like you to show you some fresh examples in which top players sacrifice a bishop on "h6". The last Chess Olympiad had its new heroes. One of them was the Georgian GM Baadur Jobava, who won the gold medal on the top board.

Jobava,Ba2665

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Ponomariov,R2709

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10.09.2016

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The position on the diagram is taken from the game Jobava - Ponomariov. Black had concentrated most of his forces on the queenside, which gave a signal for targetting the g7-pawn by means of 15.Nf5! exf5 Black is suddenly in a need for a good advice:

[ even 15

from eliminating it with the unusual strike 16.Nh6+!! gxh6 17.Bxh6 Kh8 18.Qf4 Bxh6 19.Qxh6 Qd8 20.Re3 and there is no way to meet 21.g3 ]

[ 15

sacrifice 16.Nxg7! Kxg7 17.Bh6+ Kh8 18.Qg5 Ne8 19.Qh5 Kg8

20.Nxd5! Qc6 ( 20

beautiful finish - 21.Qg4+! Qg6 22.Bxg6 hxg6 23.Qxd7+- ) 21.Re3 exd5 22.Rg3+ Qg6 23.Bxg6 hxg6 24.Re1 Kh7 25.Qxd5 Kxh6 26.Qxf7

Bf8

does not stop White

Bd8

is strongly met by a direct

exd5 allows a

Rc6 27.Qxd7+- ] 16.Rxe7 Be6 The rook seems trapped, but

17.Bh6!!

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This spectacular sacrifice must have come as a shock for Black - his

resistence lasted for only a few moves.

17 gxh6 18.Qxh6 Rxc3

[ his position is beyond salvation even after the most stubborn defence

Bd7 18

19.Qg5+ Kf8 20.Rde1!

, preparing the typical rook lift to g3

with a decisive effect, e.g. 20

Nc4

( in case of 20

Qxd4 White has a

stunning little combination to force the queen back to the vulnerable b6- square - 21.Qh6+ Kg8 22.Nxb5! axb5 23.c3 Qb6 24.R1e3 Rc6 25.Rg3+ Ng4 26.Rxg4+ Rg6 27.Rxf7 Kxf7 28.Qxh7+; 20 Re8 21.Qh6+! Kg8 22.R1e3 Rxe7 23.Rg3+ Ng4 24.Qxb6 ) 21.Qh6+ Kg8 22.Bxc4 dxc4 23.R1e3 Rc6 24.Rg3+ Ng4 25.Qf4 , regaining the piece with a continuing attack. ] 19.Qg5+! Kf8 20.Qxf6 Rxd3

[ 20

Rc6

21.Bxf5 would be hopeless

as well ] 21.cxd3 A very impressive attack by GM Jobava! Indeed, in most of the games the pawn has already moved to h6 and is turning into a target.

Perhaps this brilliant miniature in the end

of the Olympiad deprived the Ukrainian team of a fully deserved title, but in the

last quarter of 2016 mainly players from

Ukraine were coming into the limelight.

1-0

Of course, during November the attention

of the chess fans was entirely directed towards the World Championship match.

The 4th game was the first, in which one of

the players had reasonable winning chances. The critical point of the game was closely connected with out theme:

Karjakin,Sergey2772

2772

Carlsen,M2853

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WCh 2016 New York USA (4) 15.11.2016

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15.Qf3 White created a threat of capturing the h6-pawn. However, the World Champion demonstrated that

taking in chess is not always obligatory.

15 Na5! 16.Ba2 dxe4 17.dxe4 Nc4

and the intended 18.Bxh6 was strongly

countered by 18

Qc6! , winning the

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central pawn in return and thus taking over the initiative.

1/2

The former Ukrainian lost the match, but took his revenge in the very last competition for the year by obtaining the World title in blitz. The following flashy victory contributed a lot to his overall success:

Karjakin,Sergeyflashy victory contributed a lot to his overall success: Ivanchuk,V World Blitz 2016 (17.2) 1.e4 c5

Ivanchuk,Vcontributed a lot to his overall success: Karjakin,Sergey World Blitz 2016 (17.2) 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6

World Blitz 2016 (17.2)

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 Nc6 6.Bg5 e6 7.Qd2 a6 8.0-0-0 h6 9.Nxc6 bxc6 10.Bf4 d5 11.Qe3 Bb4 12.Be2 0-0 13.e5 Nd7 14.h4 c5?!

2785

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[ The dangerous piece sacrifice had to

be anticipated and 14

looked as the best way to proceed. ]

f6!

15.Bxh6! gxh6? [ here too 15

f6

had to be preferred. ]

 15.Bxh6! gxh6? [ here too 15 f6 had to be preferred. ] 16.Qxh6+- Natural and

16.Qxh6+- Natural and strong, although White could choose 16.h3 with the same devastating effect.

16

[ 16

Nxe5

Bxc3

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17.bxc3 Nxe5 ( 17

19.Qxe6+ Kg7 20.Qxd5 Ra7 21.e6 )

18.Rh3 Bd7 ( 18

f5

18.Rd3 f4

Ra7

transposes to

the game ) 19.Rdh1!? ( White could

bring a rook to g3, while keeping te other one onh-file, also by 19.Rdd3 )

f5 19

21.h5 ) 20.Rg3+ Ng4 21.Bxg4 Kf7

22.Bh5+ Ke7 23.c4 d4 24.Re1+- ]

[ 16

( 19

Qe7

20.Rg3+ Ng6

f5

17.Rh3 f4 18.Qxe6+ Kg7

19.Qg4+ Kh8 20.Qh5+ Kg7 21.Nxd5

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Kg7 19.Qg4+ Kh8 20.Qh5+ Kg7 21.Nxd5 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 a b

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and the attack is irresistable even without the queens, for example 21 Qe8 22.Qg5+ Qg6 23.Bd3 Qxg5

24.hxg5 Rf7 ( 24

Rh8

25.Rxh8

Kxh8 26.e6 Ne5 27.Rh1+ Kg8 28.Nf6+ Kf8 29.Rh7 c4 30.g6 )

25.Rh7+ Kf8 26.Rxf7+ Kxf7 27.e6+ Kxe6 28.Nc7+ Kf7 29.Nxa8+- ]

[

Qxe5 19.Qh6+ Kg8 20.Rhh3! f5 21.Rhg3+ Kf7 22.Rde3+- ]

[

16

16

Qc7

17.Qg5+ Kh8 18.Rd3

Re8?!

17.Rh3 Nxe5 18.Ne4+- ]

17.Rh3 Bxc3 18.bxc3 Ra7 19.Rg3+ Ng6 20.h5 [ or the immediate 20.Bd3+- ]

20

Qh4

21.Rg4 Qh2 22.Bd3

1-0

Ivanchuk must be himself happy with his own triumph in the rapid event. Several days earlier he was lucky to survive in a similar position from the same opening.

Perez Ponsa,Fto survive in a similar position from the same opening. Ivanchuk,V World Rapid 2016 (1.10) 2585

Ivanchuk,Vin a similar position from the same opening. Perez Ponsa,F World Rapid 2016 (1.10) 2585 2747

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12.a3 Ba5 13.f3 0-0 14.e5 Nh5 15.Bxh6 gxh6 16.Qxh6 Ng7 17.Bd3

[ 17.Ne4 could be nicely refuted by

17 Nf5 18.Nf6+ Qxf6! ]

f5 17

blocked, so opening a file was a logical idea.

18

18.g4 the diagonal had just been

Bxc3?!

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[ Once the jump to e4 was no longer a

threat, then Black could keep the

bishop for controlling the g1-square -

Bb6! 18

with a promising position.

19.gxf5 exf5 20.Qxc6 Be6

19.bxc3 Ra7 20.Rhg1 Qa5 21.gxf5

exf5 22.Kd2 Rd8 23.Rg5 [ 23.Rg3 d4 24.Bc4+ Rd5 25.Qxc6

Qxc3+ 26.Ke2+- ]

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d4 23

24.Bc4+ Rd5 25.Qxc6??

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[ 25.Bxd5+ cxd5 26.Qc6 with clear advantage. ]

A heavy mistake. 25

Qe3+ 27.Kf1 Qxf3+ 28.Ke1 Qe3+ 29.Kf1 Qf4+ 30.Kg2 Qxg5+ 31.Kh1 Bb7 32.Bxd5+ Kh7 33.Qc5 Bxd5+ 34.Qxd5 Rc7 35.Rg1 Qf4 36.Qd6 Qe4+ 37.Rg2 Rc6

0-1

Qxc3+

26.Ke2

Rc7 35.Rg1 Qf4 36.Qd6 Qe4+ 37.Rg2 Rc6 0-1 Qxc3+ 26.Ke2 Zelcic,R 2548 Froewis,G 2455 TCh-AUT 2nd

Zelcic,R2548

2548

Froewis,G2455

2455

TCh-AUT 2nd West 2014-15 (6.5) 23.1.15

Even the examples that we have seen

so far are enough to lead us to the conclusion that the appearance of her

Majesty so close to the enemy king can

lead to a mate only when at least two more pieces are supporting the attack.

Now it's time to examine different

thematic ideas which will enable us to attack better in such kind of positions.

1) A queen on the h-file

Very often the queen founds itself on h5

in the early stage of the game, such as in

some Sicilians, etc. We have just seen

by Rh1-h3-g3) in Karjakin -Ivanchuk and

staying on their initial squares ) in the annotations to Jobava -Ponomariov.

(or directing it to g3 with kingside pawns

two typical rook(s) lifts (h2-h4, followed

many variations of the French Winawer,

It is worth mentioning that on its way to the h-file the queen can also support the threat of taking the pawn on h6. Thus from f3 a hanging position of a piece (the motif with Nf6 from Karjakin - Carlsen) can be used, while from g3 it usually creates a direct pin. Here are some more examples from the latest tournament practice:

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The diagram position is taken from the game Zelcic,R - Froewis,G played in

2015.

In the game, the move

was met by

13

c5

14.d5!

Nxd5?

[ The gift had to be declined with

Ne5 14

the most dangerous enemy pieces. ]

, aimed at eliminating one of

15.Nxd5 Bxd5 16.Bxh6!

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[ 16
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17.Bxg7! Bg5+ 18.f4! Bxf4+

19.Kb1 Kxg7 20.Nh5+ ]

[ the same crushing idea needs a small preparation after 16 Nf6 17.Qh4! Re8 18.Bxg7 Kxg7 19.Qg5+ Kf8 20.Qh6+ Kg8 21.Nh5

with an inevitable mate ]

17.Qxh6 f5 18.Qg6+ Kh8 19.Nh5

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[ Perhaps the more forcing 19.Bxf5!

exf5 20.Rxd5 would have been the most convincing and fastest way to the win ]

[ strong is also the insertion of

19.Rhe1 Rf6 20.Qh5+ Kg8 21.Bxf5

Qe8 22.Qh7+ Kf8 23.Nh5 Qf7

24.Qh8+ Qg8 25.Qxg8+ Kxg8 26.Nxf6+ Nxf6 27.Bxe6+ Bxe6

28.Rxe6 and the connected passed

pawns must decide the game ]

Bf6 19

22.Nf4 Qb5 23.b3 Ne5 24.Qxf5 Rae8

25.Ng6+!+- Kg7 26.Nxf8 Qa5 27.Rxe5

20.Bxf5 exf5 21.Rxd5 Qc6

 

[

27.Nh7!?+- ]

27

Bxe5

28.Ne6+ Rxe6 29.Qxe6 Qc3

30.Qg4+ Kf6 31.Qf3+

1-0

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Modern Chess Magazine 20 Djuric,P 2236 Grbic,Br TCh-Belgrade Premier liga 2013 (5.4) 2004 8 7 6

Djuric,P

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Grbic,BrModern Chess Magazine 20 Djuric,P 2236 TCh-Belgrade Premier liga 2013 (5.4) 2004 8 7 6 5

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Here we have another typical example in which the queen supports all the ideas connected with a bishop sacrifice on h6. The game went 21.Bxh6! gxh6

22.Rg3+!

[ White is winning after the simple

22.Qxh6 Bg7 23.Rg3 ( even stronger

than 23.Qh7+ Kf8 24.f6 Qxf6

25.Rxf6 Bxf6 26.Rf3 ) 23

is also based on weakening the d5- square - Black can defend it only by moving his knight, but then nothing can stop the manoeuvre b3-d4-f5. ]

f6

24.fxe6

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 b3-d4-f5. ] f6 24.fxe6 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 a b c

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Kh7

23.fxe6

Qxe6

[ 23

Ne5

24.exf7 Rf8 25.Qf5+ Kh8

26.Qxf6+ Qxf6 27.Rxf6+- ] 24.Nd5 Bg7 25.Rxf7 Rg8 26.Nf6+ Qxf6 27.Rxf6 Bxf6 28.Qf5+

1-0

Anand,V2773

2773

McShane,L2684

2684

5th Classic GpA 2013 (4.1)

12.12.2013

2) A target on f7

Usually a bishop on the b1-h7 diagonal

is the most dangerous supporting piece. We have just seen a case, in which it

has already been exchanged. Before

illustrating how powerful this bishop is,

let us follow two more games, in which

instead the weakened by the sacrifice squares/pawns on g6 and f7.

White did not take on h6, but attacked

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Modern Chess Magazine 21

Modern Chess Magazine

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Here is an exhibition at the highest level:

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This position was seen in the game Anand,V - McShane, L played in 2013. The e5-pawn gives White a space advantage on the kingside but it is not easy to create an attack. Maybe the reader had already noticed that since Black has a pawn on h6, a bishop sacrifice is possible. Of course, further preparations are needed. Step one - a transfer of the queen to the kingside:

20.Qe2 Qa6 21.Qg4 Kh8 22.Qh5 Kg8 23.Bxh6! gxh6 24.Ng4 Bf8 It is now time for the rook lift:

25.Re3! Rc4!

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the rook lift: 25. Re3! Rc4! 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 a b

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[ 25

28. Qg6+ Kh8 29.Qxf7 Qd3 30.Nf6 ( 30.Rc1 Bg7 31.Qxe6 Rf8)

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33.Nxg7 Qxg7 34.Rc1

Rc7

26.Rf3 Nb6 27.Rxf7! Rxf7

Bg7

31.Ne8 Qh7 32.Qxe6 Qg8

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- the knight is restricted and White has a simple plan with b3, followed by a2- a4-a5, which will most probably result in winning the d5-pawn. ]

[ 25

Qxa1+ 28.Kh2 Qb1 29.Rxd7+- ]

[ 25

28.exf6 Qd3 29.fxe7 Bg7 30.Nxh6+ Bxh6 31.Qxh6 Qxd4 32.Rc1+- ]

[ 25

27.Rf6! ) 27.Nxh6+ Bxh6 28.Qxf7+ Kh8 29.Qh5 Qxf3 30.Qxf3 Kg8 31.Qg4+ Kf7 32.f4 Rc6 33.f5]

Qb6?

Re8?

Bg7?!

26.Rf3 Qxb2 27.Rxf7!

26.Rf3 Re7 27.Rf6 Nxf6

26.Rf3 Qe2 ( 26

Rf8

The best practical opportunity compared

to: 26.Rd1!

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Modern Chess Magazine 22

Modern Chess Magazine

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Modern Chess Magazine 22 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 a b c d

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[ Instead, a complicated computer line is 26.Rf3 Rxd4 27.Nxh6+ Bxh6 28.Qxf7+! Kh8 29.Qh5 Rg4! (only thanks to this incredible resource Black is able to stay in the game) 30.Ra3 Qb6 31.Rb3 Qc6 32.Qxg4 Rf8 33.Qg6 Bg7 34.f4 Nc5/? ] A good human and practical decision. The more the engines are delving into it the more they seem to approve it! Many games of Anand are leaving a deep

aesthetic impression, for his pieces are arriving one after another at their best locations. Here we can enjoy one more

of them! 26

Qb6?!

A forced mistake.

Black insisted on pressing the central

pawn, anyway the position was already

extremely difficult for him, as shown by:

[ 26

Rxd1+ 29.Kh2 Qd3 30.Rxd7 Kh8

31.Nxh6+- ]

27.Rf3 Rc1 28.Rxf7!

Rac8?!

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29.exf6 Nxf630.Nxf6+ Kg7

31.Ng4 Rh8?! 32.Qe5+ Kg8

Bg7?!

27.Rf3 Rf8 28.Rf6! Bxf6

33.Nf6+ Kf8 34.Nh5+- ]

[ 26

[ the best chance lay in 26 Rc2

, when

Re8?!

27.Rf3 Re7 28.Rf6!+- ]

A) 27.Rf3 Qe2! 28.Qxf7+ Kh8

29.Rf1 Bg7! ( the attempt for an active counterplay 29 Rac8?!

30.Kg2 Rc1 31.Rxc1 Rxc1

does not succeed because of 32.Nh2 (the only, but sufficient

move - from now on White can pick

up the fruits of his work) 32 33.Qxe6 Bg7 34.Qd6 Qc2 35.Rf7+- Qe4+ 36.Nf3 Nxe5 37.Rf4 ) 30.Nxh6 Rf8! 31.Qh5

Rc7

Rxf3 32.Nf5+ Kg8 33.Ne7+ Kf8 34.Ng6+ Kg8=;

B) White had to come up with the

subtle prophylactic move 27.Kg2!

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