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ENGLISH PROFICIENCY OF HANUNUO MANGYAN GRADE 7 STUDENTS

A Thesis presented to the faculty of the College of Education


University of Perpetual Help System
City of Biñan, Laguna

In partial fulfilment of the requirement for the Degree of Bachelor of Science in


Secondary Education Area of Specialization ENGLISH

Durumpili, Berlin F.
Espeleta, Ronlie RJ A.
Matela, Malcolm R.
Pabalan, Isaac Leo C.
Dela Cruz, Cornelia D.
So, Jovelyn S.

March 2014
University of Perpetual Help System – JONELTA
Sto. Niño, City of Biñan, Laguna
College of Education

ENGLISH PROFICIENCY OF HANUNUO MANGYAN GRADE 7 STUDENTS

A Thesis presented to the faculty of the College of Education


University of Perpetual Help System
City of Biñan, Laguna

In partial fulfilment of the requirement for the Degree of Bachelor of Science in


Secondary Education Area of Specialization ENGLISH

Durumpili, Berlin F.
Espeleta, Ronlie RJ A.
Matela, Malcolm R.
Pabalan, Isaac Leo C.
Dela Cruz, Cornelia D.
So, Jovelyn S.
University of Perpetual Help System – JONELTA
Sto. Niño, City of Biñan, Laguna
College of Education
March 2014
RECOMMENDATION FOR ORAL EXAMINATION

This is to certify that this thesis entitled, “English Proficiency of Hanunuo Mangyan

Grade 7 Students”, prepared and submitted by Berlin F. Durumpili, Ronlie RJ A. Espeleta,

Malcolm R. Matela, Isaac Leo C. Pabalan, Cornelia D. Dela Cruz, and Jovelyn S. So, in partial

fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education

major in English, has been examined and is recommended for Oral Examination.

____________________
Dr. Adelaida G. Avalos
Adviser

THESIS COMMITTEE

________________________
Ms. Ma. Xenia Z. Bitera
Chairman

_____________________ ________________________
Engr. Araceli C. Corpuz Dr. Remedios M. dela Rosa
Panelist Panelist
University of Perpetual Help System – JONELTA
Sto. Niño, City of Biñan, Laguna
College of Education

APPROVAL BY THE PANEL OF EXAMINERS

Approved by the panel on Oral Examination with a grade of __________%

(Mertissimus, Benemeritus, Meritus, Probatus)

________________________
Ms. Ma. Xenia Z. Bitera
Chairman

_____________________ ________________________
Engr. Araceli C. Corpuz Dr. Remedios M. dela Rosa
Panelist Panelist

FINAL APPROVAL

Accepted and approved in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education – English


University of Perpetual Help System – JONELTA
Sto. Niño, City of Biñan, Laguna
College of Education
________________________
Dr. Ferdinand C. Somido
UPHSL – School Director

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

The researchers would like to express their sincerest gratitude and gratefulness to the all

those who have extended provision and inspiration in the achievement and understanding of this

study.

To the University of Perpetual Help System Laguna for providing the researchers

strong basis that will prepare them to the globally competitive.

To Dr. Ferdinand C. Somido, UPHSL School Director, for the supervision and fortitude

upon completion of the study.

To Dr. Adelaida G. Avalos, our beloved thesis adviser, for sharing her expertise,

guidance and time with the researchers.

To Dr. Nonet A. Cuy, our helpful statistician for her expertise and time spent to the

researchers.

To the Chairman and Panel of Examiners: Ms. Ma. Xenia Z. Bitera, Engr. Araceli

C. Corpuz and Dr. Remedios M. Dela Rosa, for their enlightening propositions and for giving

the researchers valuable insights for the development of this undergraduate study.

To Mr. Kevin Laurence L. Arriola and his family, for allowing the researchers to use

their home, laptops and wifi for the making of the study.
University of Perpetual Help System – JONELTA
Sto. Niño, City of Biñan, Laguna
College of Education

DEDICATION

I would like to express my everlasting and meaningful dedication to our God Almighty

for his infinite and noble guidance all throughout the voyage in achieving the aim of this

research. To my loving parents: Mr. Domingo Durumpili and Amalia Durumpili for their

support, love and understanding. They are my first teacher who though me to be an upright man

and who knows how to value education as the greatest treasure in our life. I`m very grateful and

proud son that I have parents like you. To my Tita Chit and Tito Cesar, for helping us through

our research; their support was very commendable in the way that they assisted us starting from

the pier to school and going back to Laguna. To my friend Kevin Arriola, for his support to our

group in terms of providing us the place to work on and guiding us in the making of our research

but in shaping us the place to work on and guiding us in the making of our research. To our

adviser, Dr. Adelaida G. Avalos, who thought us not only about research but in shaping us to be

better persons. We have learned that we should stand by our own feet and make our own

decision and to trust ourselves. To my thesis mates, Pards, Men, Beh, Ate Corns, and Anak, for

the effort and time that you`ve shared to us in making this study a reality. All the laughter and

knowledge that we cherish together, it`s worth treasure for. To our faculty, Dr. Elena A. Salinsa,

for giving us some insights in our thesis. To all the professors, my dearest gratitude for the facts,

motivation and professional advices.


University of Perpetual Help System – JONELTA
Sto. Niño, City of Biñan, Laguna
College of Education
Berlin F. Durumpili

I would like to express my deepest ardour, first to our God Almighty, for giving us

strength, wisdom, patience, and guidance that really help us to conduct this study. Next is to my

parents Mr. Rolando Espeleta and Mrs. Julieta Espeleta for supporting me financially, morally

and physically and for providing my needs for making this thesis. Thank you for all the love you

have given me and for all the efforts that have done for me. I love you. Moreover, I would like to

give my greatest thanks to my best friend partner in crime and brother, Mr. Kevin Lawrence

Arriola, for giving us his time and efforts to help us in making this study and for allowing us to

use his time and efforts to help us in making this study and for allowing us to use his resources

like laptops and wifi. I also love you! I would like also to give thanks to my thesis mates, Pards,

Men, Pangga, Bok and Ate Corn, for not giving up in making this study. Thank you for the

laughter and tears, time and effort that you have shared and shown. Lastly, I would like to

dedicate this thesis to my professors, especially to our thesis adviser, Dr. Adelaida G. Avalos, for

sharing their expertise and time for making our thesis better. I love you all and thank you for all

your support and guidance. Without all of you, we can never do this study better. Thank you and

God bless us all.

Ronlie RJ A. Espeleta
University of Perpetual Help System – JONELTA
Sto. Niño, City of Biñan, Laguna
College of Education

First of all I would like to thank you God for all his blessings, guidance and helping us to

achieve and deliver our thesis defence clearly and with confidence. I would like to dedicate this

appreciation of mine to my group mates; Ronlie RJ Espeleta, Belin Durumpili, Jovelyn So,

Cornelia Dela Cruz, and Isaac Pabalan for every sleepness nights, overnight stays and through

ups and downs it was such a fun experience we would not have done this thesis if we are not

together and as one. To our thesis adviser, Dr. Adelaida G. Avalos, for her guidance and

knowledge that kept us working on our thesis, the panellist and the professors, thank you to all of

you. Thank you so much this would not be possible without the help and guidance of each and

every one of you. God bless!

Malcolm R. Matela

First of all, I would like thank my Lord and Saviour, Jesus Christ. Thanks to my family

most especially for the patience and understanding during the time of our thesis making. Thanks

mom and dad for the guidance and encouragements. I would like to thank our adviser Dr.

Adelaida G. Avalos, she is really a terror professors but one thing I`ve learned about her is this

times and good times, we made it! All I can say is thank you all for this great experience that I

will cherish for the rest of my life. To God be all the glory.

Isaan Leo C.

Pabalan
University of Perpetual Help System – JONELTA
Sto. Niño, City of Biñan, Laguna
College of Education

I would like to express my sincere gratitude to all persons who supported and encourage

me through the making of our research. To my mother, Julieta So who supported me even though

she was not here beside me and working in abroad. In fact, she provided not financially and

never forget to give some advices on how will I cope with those hardship that I`ll be

encountering in life. To my father Paulino So, who never doubted me and allowing me to go in

an overnight with my group mate. To our beloved God, who never stop protecting us from any

harm or dangers that may affect us. And to our beloved adviser, who never stop challenging and

trusting us while making our thesis. I can say that we learned a lot.

Jovelyn S. So

I would like to dedicate this thesis to my late aunt who supported me financially,

physically and emotionally in making of this thesis study. I would also like to thank my thesis

mates for the time and effort that they gave our study and for accepting me in the group. Thanks

also to the professors who helped us, especially to our adviser, Dr. Adelaida G. Avalos. This all

would not be possible without all of you. Thank you and God bless.

Cornelia D. Dela Cruz


University of Perpetual Help System – JONELTA
Sto. Niño, City of Biñan, Laguna
College of Education

THESIS ABSTRACT

TITLE: ENGLISH PROFIENCY OF HANUNUO MANGYAN

GRADE 7 STUDENTS

AUTHORS: Durumpili, Berlin F

Epeleta, Ronlie RJ A.

Matela, Malcolm R.

Pabalan, Isaac Leo C.

Dela Cruz, Cornelia D.

So, Jovelyn S.

DEGREE: Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education Major in

English

SCHOOL: University of Perpetual Help System Laguna

ACADEMIC YEAR: 2013 – 2014

ADVISER: Dr. Adelaida G. Avalos

NUMBER OF PAGES: 47
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College of Education

English Proficiency is having the ability and mastery in language. In Philippines, it is the

most esteemed aptitude because it is not only considered as universal language but more

importantly, it is use in enhancement of one`s life through academics and economics status.

The undergraduate research entitled, “English Proficiency of Hanunuo Mangyan Grade 7

Students” aims at identifying the level of English proficiency of Hanunuo Mangyan Grade 7

students at San Teodoro National High School, Brgy. Lumang Bayan San Teodoro, Oriental

Mindoro and how the profile of the respondents affects their English Proficiency.

The researchers pursued to address three questions: First, what is the profile of the

respondents in the terms of age, gender, number of household members, and number of siblings?

Second, what is the level of English Language Proficiency of Hanunuo Mangyan Grade 7

students in terms of speaking, listening, reading, and writing? Lastly, is there a significant

difference in the level of English Proficiency of Hanunuo Mangyan Grade 7 Students in terms of

speaking, listening, reading, and writing when group according to profile variables?

The researchers used “Common Underlying Proficiency Theory” by Jim Cummins. The

theory focuses on the L1 of the learnings that help in learning the L2 or the second language. In

this study, common underlying proficiency refers to what they know in L1 which is associated in

learning the L2.

The researchers conducted the study to 16 respondents as the actual population size of

Hanunuo Mangyan Grade 7 Students of San Teodoro National High School A.Y. 2013 – 2014.
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For the analysis of the data, t-test was used to determine the difference in the factors

affecting the English language proficiency and the level of English proficiency of Hanunuo

Grade 7 Students. Prior to the distribution of the questionnaires and questions by the researchers,

a letter of request was given to principal of San Teodoro National High School to conduct a

survey to their Mangyan students. They informed that all the gathered information will be treated

with outmost confidentiality. At first, the researchers did a reliability test wherein 3 out 16 grade

7 Hanunuo Mangyan students undergone the test to determine the minutes or time that will be

given for the rest of respondents. The first test that was given to the respondents was a reading

proficiency test for 20 minutes, followed by the listening proficiency test for 5 minutes, writing

proficiency test for 15 minutes and speaking proficiency test for 1 minute and 30 seconds. The

questionnaires were collected right after the respondents answered them. Data were tallied,

tabulated, and interpreted.

Based on the data gathered, the researchers were able to arrive on these findings. There

were no respondents who have reached Grade 7 Proficiency which is parallel to their present

academic year level.

In the profile of the respondents, out of 16 respondents, eight (8) or 50 percent are in the

age of twelve (12) and eight (8) or 50 percent are in the age of thirteen (13). When it comes to

gender, five (5) or 31.25 percent are males and eleven (11) or 68.75 percent are females. In the

number of household members, eight (8) or 50 percent of the respondents have 3-5 household
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members and eight (8) or 50 percent of the respondents have 6-above household members. When

it comes to the number of siblings, eight (8) or 50 percent have 0-3 siblings and eight (8) or 50

percent of the respondents have 4-above siblings.

In speaking, out of the 16 respondents, one (1) or 6.25 percent reached “Grades Five-Six

Proficiency Level”. Five (5) or 31.25 percent were at “Grades Three-Four Proficiency Level”.

Five (5) or 31. 25 percent reached “Grades One-Two proficiency Level” and five (5) or 31.25

percent were at stake of “No Proficiency Level”.

In listening, out of the 16 respondents, six (6) or 37.50 percent shown to be at “Grades

Three-Four Proficiency Level”, seven (7) or 43.75 percent were at “Grades One-Two Proficiency

Level” and three (3) or 18.75 percent revealed to be at “No Proficiency Level”. It shows that

nobody has reached “Grade Five-Six Proficiency Level”.

In reading, out of the 16 respondents, seven (7) or 43.75 percent acknowledged having

“Grades Five-Six Proficiency”, and nine (9) or 56.75 percent were at “Grades 3-4 Proficiency

Level”.

In writing, out of the 16 respondents, two (2) or 12.50 percent can be classified as

“Grades Three-Four Proficiency Level”, thirteen (13) or 81.25 percent were as “Grades One-

Two Proficiency Level” and one (1) or 6.26 percent was found as “No Proficiency Level”. The

result showed that the writing proficiency of the respondents was low because nobody has

reached the appropriate level or parallel to their academic level at present.


University of Perpetual Help System – JONELTA
Sto. Niño, City of Biñan, Laguna
College of Education
University of Perpetual Help System – JONELTA
Sto. Niño, City of Biñan, Laguna
College of Education

The difference between Level of English Proficiency in speaking when grouped

according to profile variables was not significant. Of all the profiles, computed t-value of 0, 0.90,

0.55, and 0.55, which have 0.05 as the level of significance, were less than the critical value of

2.14. Thus, there was no difference regardless of age, gender, number of household members and

number of siblings of the respondents when it comes to their level of English proficiency in

Speaking.

The Profile of the respondents was not significant in Listening Proficiency of Hanunuo

Mangyan Grade 7 Students, computed t-value of 0.41, 0.79, 0.41, and 1.30 were less than the

critical value of 2.14. Thus, there was no significant differences in the level of English

proficiency in listening of the Hanunuo Mangyan Grade 7 students when grouped according to

profile variables.

The Profile of the respondents is not significant in Reading Proficiency of Hanunuo

Mangyan Grade 7 Students computed t-value of 1.89, 1.43, 0.57 and 0.19 were less than the

critical value of 2.14. Thus, there was no significant difference in the level of English proficiency

in reading of the Hanunuo Mangyan Grade 7 Students when respondents were grouped

according to profile variables.

The Profile of the respondents is not significant in Writing Proficiency of Hanunuo

Mangyan Grade 7 Students computed t-value of 1.20, 0.98, 0.49 and 0.16 were less than the

critical value of 2.14. Thus, there is no difference in the level of English Proficiency in terms of

writing regardless of the profile variables.


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The difference in the level of English proficiency of Hanunuo Grade 7 Students in terms

of speaking, listening, reading, and writing when group according to variable were not

significant because the computed t-test value was less than its critical level.

To sum up, speaking, listening, reading, and writing proficiency of the Hanunuo

Mangyan Grade 7 students had acknowledged the null hypothesis of the problem that there is no

significant difference among the Proficiency Levels in English Language of Hanunuo Mangyang

Grade 7 Students in terms of reading, listening, writing, and speaking when respondents were

grouped according to profile variables.

Based on the findings and conclusions, the following recommendations are hereby given:

Hanunuo Mangyan Grade 7 Students should be given Individualized Educational

Program (IEP) that tutors them in English subjects and enhances their level of proficiency in

English language.

The future researchers should conduct a study English Proficiency in terms of only one

macro skill (i.e. speaking, listening, reading, and writing including grammar skills) at a time to

be more focused and specific.


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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Title
Recommendation
Approval by the Panel of Examiners
Acknowledgement
Dedication
Thesis Abstract
Table of Contents
List of Figures and Tables

Chapter 1

THE PROBLEM AND ITS SETTING

Introduction 1

Theoretical/Conceptual Framework 4

Operational Framework 6

Statement of the Problem 8

Statement of the Hypothesis 9

Assumption of the Study 9

Scope and Delimitation 10

Significance of the Study 11

Definition of Terms 12
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Chapter 2

REVIEW OF THE RELATED LITERATURE AND STUDIES

State of the Art 14

Related Literature 15

Related Studies 17

Synthesis of the State of the Art 20

Gaps Bridged by the Study 22

Chapter 3

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

Research Design 23

Sources of Data 24

Population of the Study 24

Instrumentation and Validation 24

Data Gathering Procedure 28

Statistical Treatment of Data 29


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Chapter 4

PRESENTATION, ANALYSIS, AND INTERPRETATION OF DATA

Profile of the Respondents 30

Level of English Language Proficiency of


Hanunuo Mangyan Freshmen Students: Speaking 31

Level of English Language Proficiency of


Hanunuo Mangyan Freshmen Students: Listening 32

Level of English Language Proficiency of


Hanunuo Mangyan Freshmen Students: Reading 33

Level of English Language Proficiency of


Hanunuo Mangyan Freshmen Students: Writing 34

Difference in the Level of English Language Proficiency in


Speaking of Hanunuo Mangyan Freshmen when Grouped
According to Variables 35

Difference in the Level of English Language Proficiency in


Listening of Hanunuo Mangyan Freshmen when Grouped
According to Variables 36

Difference in the Level of English Language Proficiency in


Reading of Hanunuo Mangyan Freshmen when Grouped
According to Variables 37

Difference in the Level of English Language Proficiency in


Writing of Hanunuo Mangyan Freshmen when Grouped
According to Variables 38
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Chapter 5

SUMMARY OF FINDINGS, CONCLUSIONS AND


RECOMMENDATIONS

Summary of Findings 43

Conclusions 45

Recommendations 47

REFERENCES

APPENDICES

A. Editor`s Certificate

B. Statistician Certificate

C. Questionnaires

D. Curriculum Vitae
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LIST OF FIGURES AND TABLES

FIGURES

Conceptual Model 6

Operational Model 7

TABLES

Table 1: Profile of the Respondents 30

Table 2: Level of English Language Proficiency of


Hanunuo Mangyan Freshmen Students: Speaking 31

Table 3: Level of English Language Proficiency of


Hanunuo Mangyan Freshmen Students: Listening 32

Table 4: Level of English Language Proficiency of


Hanunuo Mangyan Freshmen Students: Reading 33

Table 5: Level of English Language Proficiency of


Hanunuo Mangyan Freshmen Students: Writing 34

Table 6: Difference in the Level of English Language Proficiency in


Speaking of Hanunuo Mangyan Freshmen when Grouped
According to Variables 35

Table 7: Difference in the Level of English Language Proficiency in


Listening of Hanunuo Mangyan Freshmen when Grouped
According to Variables 36
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Table 8: Difference in the Level of English Language Proficiency in


Reading of Hanunuo Mangyan Freshmen when Grouped
According to Variables 38

Table 9: Difference in the Level of English Language Proficiency in


Writing of Hanunuo Mangyan Freshmen when Grouped
According to Variables 39
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Sto. Niño, City of Biñan, Laguna
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CHAPTER 1

THE PROBLEM AND ITS SETTING

Introduction

There are more than 160 different Filipino ethnic groups and tribes. Have you ever

wondered how this can be for such a small country? It is definitely attributed to the fact that

there are 7,107 islands that comprise the Philippine Islands. The people on each big island or

group of islands speak their own dialect, follows a culture that is distinct only among them and

they even have a delicacy that they truly call as their own. Filipino ethnic groups are classified

according to the group of islands where they belong and some depending on the language

spoken. Examples of these are the Visayans, Tagalogs, Ilocanos, Bicolanos, Kapampangan and

other indigenous people (Rona J., 2012).

There are various indigenous Filipino ethnic groups and tribes in the Philippines. It is

estimated that all the groups comprise approximately 10-15% of the population in the

Philippines. These Filipino tribes have retained more of their economic, political, cultural and

religious practices than the above mentioned ethnic groups despite the long history of

colonization in the Philippines. In Visayas region, the indigenous groups mostly in Mindoro –

are called Mangyan (Rona J., 2012). There are many types of Mangyan and one of them is the

Hanunuo Mangyan.
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Hanunuo are one of the several Mangyan cultural groups indigenous to Mindoro Island,

Philippines. As lowland Filipino have migrated to Mindoro searching for arable land and other

economic opportunities, Mangyan peoples (e.g. Hanunuo Buhid and Iraya) have become ethnic

minorities. The Hanunuo of south central Mindoro have attempted to maintain their autonomy by

retreating from the coastal lowlands to the rugged forest interior of the island. No roads penetrate

in the Hanunuo area; it is accessible only by steep trails (Brown, Elaine C., 2010).

The Hanunuo Mangyan lives in a mountainous are about 800 sq.km in the southern part

og the island, mainly in Oriental Mindoro. Their territory is under the municipal jurisdiction of

Mansalay, Bulalacao, and a certain part of San Jose, which is the capital of Occidental Mindoro.

Christian lowlanders surround them on the east. To the north lie the Buhid, neighbours as the

Mangyan patag – “Mangyan of the flatlands” – to distinguish them from the former who live in

the higher hinterland of the island (Servano, 1999).

Despite their proximity to the lowland settlements of the Christians, the Hanunuo

Manyan have succeeded in insulating themselves from lowland influences, and this has helped

them preserved their basic culture. As far as the Hanunuo are concerned, human beings can be

classified into two categories: Mangyan and non – Mangyan. Thus, the Hanunuo, Buhid,

Ratagnon, and all those who wear the traditional loincloth (Miyamoto 1974:14). It is for this
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reason that the Hanunuo Manyan can speak of the Cordillera Ifugao as being Manyan too,

because their traditional wear is

the loincloth (Miyamoto 1975: 14). The term damu-ong is referring to all non-Mangyan peoples,

and to all outsiders. As used by Hanunuo mothers to hush up their babies, the term is defined

early on some kind of bogeyman of threat-object among the Hanunuo. The word kristiyano is

often used as synonym for “danu-ong” and suggests the negative image the Mangyan have their

Christian neighbours. This was observed by Miyamoto who asked several old Mangyan if they

remembered anthropologist Conklin who conducted fieldwork between 1947 and 1957. They all

remembered him fondly. One Hanunuo said that Conklin “was not a Christian” because “he was

a very kind person” (Miyamoto 1975:16).

According to Conklin (1993), when he asked what kind of Manyans they were, the

Mangyans` answer to his queries was nothing else but their claim to be true, real and genuine

Manyans. True enough because among the mangyans they have remained faithful to the

traditions of their ancestors.

Alternatively, Language proficiency or linguistic proficiency is the ability of an

individual to speak or perform in an acquired language (Twister, 2013). It is a measurement of

how well an individual has mastered a language. Proficiency is measured in terms receptive and

expressive and expressive language skills, syntax, vocabulary, semantics and other areas that
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demonstrate language abilities. There are four domains to language proficiency: reading, writing,

speaking and listening. Language proficiency is measured for an individual by each language,

such that the individual may be proficienct in English and not proficient in another language

(The Routledge Encyclopedia of Second Language Acquisition edited by Peter Robinson, 2013,

p. 522).

The researchers of this study attempt to know the level of English proficiency of

Hanunuo Mangyan Grade 7 Students in San Teodoro National High School, Barangay Lumang

Bayan, San Teodoro, Oriental Mindoro. They also want to know if there is a difference in the

level of English proficiency of Hanunuo Mangyan Grade 7 students in terms of speaking,

listening, reading and writing when the respondents are grouped according to age, gender,

number of household members and number of siblings.

Theoretical/Conceptual Framework

The Common Underlying Proficiency (CUP) Theory of Jim Cummins (1989) explains

that even through the surface aspects of different languages such as pronunciation and fluency

are separate, an underlying cognitive/academic proficiency is common across languages.

Therefore, bilingualism is possible because people have the capacity to easily store and function

in two or more languages. This common underlying proficiency allows the skill, knowledge, and
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concept learned in one subject to be assessed through different languages, making the transfer of

cognitive/academic and literacy-related skills across languages possible.


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The rationale for using the primary language in instruction is based on Cummins` theory

of the Common Underlying Proficiency. Following the principles of this theory, speaking,

listening, reading or writing either language helps to develop the whole cognitive system.

Because academic language, native language instruction strengthens ELL`s literacy in both

languages, and the primary language is helpful, not harmful, in attaining English proficiency.

Since knowledge developed in the first language (L1) transfer to the second language

(L2) and will not have to relearned when acquiring a second language, elements of literacy

common to most languages (such as concepts of print, phonological awareness, word reading,

vocabulary knowledge, and comprehension) transfer (Effective Schooling for English Language

Learners: What Elementary Principals Should Know and Do by Patricia Smiley and Trudy

Salsberry, 2007, p.79).

Briefly stated, Cummins believes that in the course of learning one language a child

acquires a set of skills and implicit metalinguistic knowledge that can be drawn upon when

working in another language. This common underlying proficiency (CUP), as he calls these

skills and knowledge, is illustrated in the diagram below. It can be seen that the CUP provides

the base for the development of both the first language (L1) and the second language (L2). It

follows that any expansions of CUP that takes place in one language will have a beneficial effect

on the other language(s). This theory also serves to explain why it becomes easier and easier to

learn additional languages.


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Surface Surface
Feature Feature
Of L1 Of L2

COMMON UNDERLYING PROFICIENCY

Fig. 1 Diagram of Cummins` Common Underlying Proficiency (CUP)

Operational Framework

Like an iceberg, what appears to be two separate pieces on the surface is actually one

solid structure beneath. L1 and L2 appear separate in the surface but are firmly blended together

on deeper levels with a base of common underlying proficiency. CUP suggests ELL students do

not need to relearn everything in their L2. Following the principles of the Common Underlying

Proficiency, speaking, listening, reading or writing in either language helps to develop the whole

cognitive system. Because academic language proficiency that is developed in the first language

transfers to the second language, native language instruction strengthens ELL`s literacy in both

languages, and the primary language is helpful, not harmful, in attaining English proficiency

(Common Underlying Proficiency, October 20, 2012).


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Independent variable or variable that can stand alone is the “Profile of the Respondents”,

the variable that cause positive or negative outcome to the dependent variable “Level of English

Proficiency of the Hanunuo Mangyan Grade 7 Students”. Level of English Proficiency is the

dependent variable that is dependent on what would be the effect of the independent variable.

Operational Model

Independent Variable Dependent Variable

Profile of the respondents Level of English Proficiency of


the Hanunuo Mangyan Grade
 Age 7 Students in terms of:
 Gender
 Number of Household Members  Speaking
 Number of Siblings  Listening
 Reading
 Writing

Fig.2 The operational model of the study showing the difference in the profile of the respondents

and the Level in English Proficiency language of the Hanunuo Mangyan grade 7 Students in

tems of speaking, listening, reading and writing.


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Statement of the Problem

This study aims to determine the levels of English proficiency in terms of speaking,

listening, reading and writing of Hanunuo Mangyan Grade 7 Students at San Teodoro National

High School, Barangay Lumang Bayan, San Jose Teodoro, Oriental Mindoro. Specially this

study attemps to answer the following:

1. What is the profile of the respondents in terms of:

a. Age

b. Gender

c. Number of household members

d. Number of siblings

2. What is the level of English Proficiency of Hanunuo Mangyan Grade 7 Students in terms

of:

a. Speaking

b. Listening

c. Reading

d. Writing
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3. Is there a significant difference in the level of English Proficiency of Hanunuo Mangyan

Grade 7 Students in terms of speaking, listening, reading and writing when the

respondents are grouped according to profile variables?

Statement of Hypothesis

For a through insight on how the problem would be treated, the researchers formulated

the hypothesis:

4. : There is no significant difference in the level of English Proficiency of Hanunuo

Mangyan Grade 7 Students in terms of speaking, listening, reading and writing when the the

respondents grouped according to profile variables.

Assumption of the Study

The developed the following assumption relative to their study:

1. English proficiency is the ability to speak, listen, read and write in English.

2. Levels of English Proficiency of Hanunuo Mangyan Grade 7 Students vary

from one another.


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3. The respondents did the task given to them answered the questions that were

asked to them.

Scope and Delimination

This study covered the Hanunuo Mangyan Grade 7 Students at San Teodoro National

High School, Barangay Lumang Bayan, San Teodoro, Oriental Mindoro. This sudy focussed on

the significant difference in the level of English Proficiency of the Hanunuo Grade 7 students in

terms of speaking, listening, reading and writing when the respondents are grouped according to

profile variables. The researchers just selected some variables under speaking and these include

pronunciation, content and appropriate use of modifiers. Same as with speaking, the researchers

just selected some variables under writing, these include content, mechanics, grammar and

organization. When it comes to reading and listening, the researchers just include grammar as the

variable. The study will use the Profile of the Respondents (age, gender, number of household

members, and number of siblings) as independent variable on levels of English Proficiency of

the Hanunuo Mangyan Grade 7 Students. Upon giving the questions and questionnaire, the

researchers did translation of some directions and questions for those respondents who really

don`t understand what the directions and questions are.


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Significance of the Study

This research would benefit the following:

Hanunuo Mangyan Tribe, this would help them to know the importance of English

language proficiency and its advantage in their everyday living. They would also be

informed and be advised with regard to their level of proficiency whether it has a

negative or positive impact to them.

Students, this would help them to have knowledge about Mangyan tribes for further

studies. This would be an eye opener for the students; this would serve as data and

document for their research and works.

Faculty, this study could be of great help to the faculty to know the teaching strategies

that they can use in teaching such indigenous people and such cases. This would help

them educate students them be knowledgeable about the respondents` and significant

relationship between classes.

Parents, this study would help them realized the importance of teaching their children

the second language.


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Future Researchers, this study could help them develop new problems that would lead a

new discoveries in line with this research. This would also serve as a reference to those

who will conduct studies that are similar or related to this.

Definition of Terms

To make this study more understandable, the researchers defined the important terms

used:

Language Proficiency or linguistic proficiency is the ability of an individual to speak or

perform in an acquired language (Twister, 2013).

Listening is communicative skill that involves sense of hearing; heed; pay attention to.

Writing is an expressive skill that shows inscription through symbols and marks.

Reading is a skill that involves the sense of sight and understanding in understanding the

thought of the text.

Speaking is an expressive skill that includes the use of voice in expressing someone`s

emotion.

Hanunuo Mangyan is one of several Mangyan cultural groups indigenous to Mindoro

Island, Philippines (Brown, Elaine C., 2012).

Grade 7 Students are students in the first year high school


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L1 pertains to the second language used by the learners.

L2 pertains to the second language used by the learners.

ELL stands for English Language Learners. It refers to the students who study English

language.

San Teodoro National High School is the school, located at Brgy. Lumang Bayan, San

Teodoro, Oriental Mindoro, wherein the researchers conducted their study.

Gender refers to the sex of the respondents.

Siblings pertain to brothers and sisters.

Household Members are the members of your family living in your house.
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CHAPTER 2

REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE AND STUDIES

This review of related literature and studies is for the researchers to conceptualize and

formalize the research title and the problems. This chapter gives the researchers ideas, concepts,

and principles from books, periodicals, magazines, newspapers, dissertations and other published

and non-published materials containing facts, laws, and theories intended for this research.

Synthesis of the studies stresses on the communicative adaptability and intercultural

communication apprehension as the subject matter reviewed.

State of the Art

This chapter presented studies that focus on the English Language Proficiency of tribal

learners, which are closely related to the present study. These literatures and studies support the

reader in relation to the topic and broaden their minds in English Language Proficiency of tribal

learners. There studies came from previous researchers, analysts, writers of literatures and

studies posted on the internet.


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Related Literature

There are many factors that can affect English Language Proficiency; some of these are

age, gender, number of household members, and number of siblings.

Recent researches (Mayberry & Lock, 2003) have recognized that certain aspects of

second language learning may be affected by the age but older learners do have certain

advantages. According to Laurianne Sumerset (2008), some people correctly herald the ease by

each younger children can adapt to a second language, especially if they`re immersed in a culture

that speaks it. Well, order learners aren`t too shabby either. According to researches done on the

topic, given the same amount of input, adults can proceed to learn a new language faster than

children. Of course, that`s assuming they`re investing the same amount of time in the process

(e.g. 1 hour a day). The truth, however is that children learning a second language usually end up

having more time to invest in their learning. Unlike their dads or moms, who need to attend to

regular responsibilities while squeezing in language learning software study in their busy

workdays, children can focus more of their energies towards it. As such, the impression that they

learn at a more impressive pace than older individuals. The general consensus in language

research is that: (1) adults learn a second language much better than children, (2) older children

learn a second language better than younger children and (3) the earlier one starts in second

language learning, the more fluent they become.


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Of three, the third one can be the most telling. While people can acquire a new language

at any age, it`s usually the ones who start young that end up with proficiency comparable to

native speakers. Those starting as adults do demonstrate an edge in the beginning, but it`s those

who start younger that develop higher levels of mastery down the line (Laurianne Sumerset,

2008).

Gender has been a controversial issue which affects the language learning process.

McNamara (1996) has proposed that there are some variables affecting second language

performance one of which is sex. In much the same way, it has been reported that gender plays a

role in the area of language testing. (Brown, 2003; Lumley & O`Sullivan, 2005; Motallebzadeh,

1993; O`Sullivan 2002).

On the other hand, the foregoing findings suggest siblings may play an mportant role as

language teachers, but other research suggests siblings may be of limited use as sources of

language-advancing input. Cutting and Dunn (1999) studied family background characteristics

including child-sibling relationships and language development and found that having siblings at

home was negative correlated with receptive vocabulary scores. Additionally, Hoff-Ginsberg and

Krueger (1991) found that a sample of monolingual English families, siblings had different and

less supportive conversational styles than mothers. However, 7- to 8-year-old siblings provided

more supportive language interactions to younger children than did the 4- to 5-year-old siblings

(Kelly Bridges & Erika Hoff, 2008).


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Related Studies

It has long been discussed that a second language learners` gender is likely to have some

effects on the process of language learning and learner`s performance in particular (Ellis, 1994;

Brown, 2000). Whether or not such an effect is positive or negative is a frequent – debated

subject for research. Knowing the possible effect of this variable might help language teacher

and examiners avoid its interference in a reliable assessment. DÖronei (2005) discusses that

gender is such a variable which has been shown to play a significant role in the success of

learners in the process of language learning and there is a considerable amount of literature on all

dimensions of SLA affected by gender (Khalil Motallebzadeh, 2011).

Knowing the possible effect of the gender of learners on the process of language learning

and testing will certainly pave the way to better strategy and method selection in both languages

learning and teaching. Furthermore, factors influencing the performance of individuals in a test

environment have been occasionally investigated. However, when it comes to the assessment of

language oral ability, the point gets even more controversial, since assessing oral abilities and

speaking in particular requires a completely different process. To support this fact, Fulcher

(2003, cited in Brown, 2005) contributes to the debates about the validity which arises in relation

to these tests. He also talks of “rater reliability and bias, how affective factors influence

performance, the importance of wash back, and the tension between linguistic competence and

communicative ability” (Khalil Motallebzadeh, 2011).


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According to the study of Khalil Motallebzadeh, (2011), research has come up with

conclusions that male and females differ significantly in terms of their test-taking abilities

(Brown, 2003; Lumley & O`Sullivan, 2005; Motallebzadeh, 1993; O`Sullivan, 2002). Chastain

(1988) talks of an unpublished study comparing achievement scores of boys and girls in each

four language skills and found that girls` scores were higher in written skills while boys` scores

were higher in oral skills. In the same regard, the UK assessment of performance unit (1986,

cited in Cook, 2001) states second language learning is more popular among girls and almost

70% percent of learners are females.

In support of this idea, Stumpf and Stanely (1998, cited in Lahey, 2001) discuss that

women perform better than men in range of language skills including “verbal and spatial

memory, perceptual speed” whereas men perform better than women in “mathematics, science

and social studies”. Over the past decade, researchers such as Barton (2002, cited in Davies,

2004) have noted, in particular, that the disparity in performance between boys and girls is

significantly greater in modern languages than in other areas of the curriculum (Khalil

Motallebzadeh, 2011).

In households were one or more people (5 years old and over) speak a language other

than English, the household language assigned to all household members is the non-English

language spoken by the first person with a non-English language in the following order:

householder, spouse, parent, sibling, child, grandchild, in-laws, other relatives, stepchild partner,
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housemate or roommate, and other nonrelatives. Thus, a person who speaks only English may

have a non-

English household language assigned to him/her in tabulations of individuals by household

language (Donald Evans, 2003).

Language use in the home is a significant factor in explaining bilingual development (De

Houwer, 2007), but the processes that influence home language use, and thus bilingual

development, have not been fully explored. Studies show that children learn from their siblings

(Dunn, Brown, Slomkowski, Tesla, & Youngblade, 1991; Furman & Lanthier, 2002; Hower

Petrakos, Rinaldi, & LeFebvre, 2005; Perner, Ruffman, & Leekam, 1994). Research indicates

that older siblings talk differently than mothers in the speech directed at younger siblings (Hoff,

2006). Zukow Goldring (2002) has studied sibling care giving features in Latino and European-

American cultures and discussed how siblings, like mothers, adjust their speech to younger

children to cohere with what is going on at that place in time, to allow for greater understanding

(Kelly Bridges & Erika Hoff, 2008).

The foregoing findings suggest siblings may play an important role as language teachers,

but other research suggests siblings may be of limited use as sources language-advancing input.

Cutting and Dunn (1999) studied family background characteristics including child-sibling

relationships and language development and found that having siblings at home was negatively
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correlated with receptive correlated with receptive vocabulary scores. Additionally, Hoff-

Ginsberg and Krueger (1991) found that in a sample of monolingual English families, siblings

had different and less supportive conversional styles than mothers. However, 7- to 8-years-old

siblings provided

more supportive language interactions to younger children than did the 4- to 5- siblings (Kelly

Bridges & Erika Hoff, 2008).

This existing evidence on sibling effects on monolingual children`s language acquisition

does not coalesce to one simple picture. Findings contradict other findings, and there does not

seem to be any firm conclusions on the effect of siblings on children`s language development. It

is thus understandable that research is severely lacking on this topic in bilingual populations,

since researchers cannot come to a consensus on the relation between sibling factors and

monolingual language acquisition. Siblings may play a particularly important role in bilingual

families because in bilingual home it is often the case (in the U.S.) that the children speak more

English than adults. Thus, for a young language-learning child, older siblings might be the

primary source of English input (Kelly Bridges & Erika Hoff, 2008).

Synthesis of the State of Art


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The researchers had given the related literatures that were insights into the resolution of

the problem of the study. This also presents the research of some foreign researchers like

Mayberry & Lock (2003) and Laurianne Sumerset (2008) who said that gender affects the

English Language Proficiency of the Learners. Older people have the ability to learn fast the new

language than the younger ones; McNamara (1996), Brown (2003), Lumley & O` Sullivan

(2005), Motalllebzadeh (1993) and O`Sullivan (2002) who said that gender has been a

controversial issue which affects

the language learning process and has been reported that gender plays a role in the area of

language testing; Cutting and Dunn (1999), who found that having siblings at home was

negatively correlated with receptive vocabulary scores, Hoff-Ginsberg and Krueger (1991), who

found that in a simple of monolingual English families, siblings had different and less supportive

controversial styles than mothers. These were cited by Kelly Bridges & Erika Hoff (2008).

The researchers had also given the related studies that were insights into the resolution of

the problem of the study. This presents the research of some foreign researchers like Ellis (1994),

Brown (2000), DÖrnyei (2005), cited by Khalil Motallebzadeh (2011), who said that gender is

such a variable which has been shown to play significant role in the success of learners in the

process of language learning and there is a considerable amount of literature on all dimensions of

SLA affected by gender; Chastain (1998), who found that girls` score were higher in written

skills while boys` scores were higher in oral skills when he gave test to learn; as cited by Cook

(2001), Coleman (1996) stated that second language learning is more popular among girls and
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almost 70% percent of learners are females; Stumpf and Staneley (1998), as cited by Lahey

(2001), discussed that women perform better than men in a range of language skills including

“verbal and spatial memory, perceptual speed” whereas men perform better than women in

mathematics, science and social studies.”; Barton (2002) as cited in Davies (2004), noted, in

particular, that the disparity in performance between boys and girls is significantly greater in

modern languages than in other areas of the curriculum; Donald Evans (2003), who said that a

person who speaks only English may have a non-English household language assigned to

him/her in tabulations of individuals by household language; De Houwer (2007); Pearson (2007);

Dunn, Brown Slomkowski, Tesla, &

Youngblade (1991); Furman, & Lanthinier (2002); Howe, Petrakos, Rinaldi, & LeFebvre (2005);

Perner, Ruffman, & Leekam (1994), who said that children learn from their siblings and Hoff

(2006), who said that older siblings talk differently than mothers in the speech directed at

younger siblings. Cutting and Dunn (1999), who found that having siblings at home was

negatively correlated with receptive vocabulary scores, and as cited by Kelly Bridges & Erika

Hoff (2008) in Hoff-Ginsberg and Krueger (1991), said that for a young language-learning child,

older siblings might be the primary source of English input.

Gap/s Bridged by the Present Study


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In the reviewed studies, there are only limited studies conducted, both foreign and local,

about the “English Proficiency of Hanunuo Mangyan Grade 7 Students”. That`s why the

researchers conducted this study which helps the students be informed and be advised with

regard to the significant difference of the study whether it has negative or positive impact to

them.
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CHAPTER 3

RESEARCH AND METHODOLOGY

This chapter presented the procedures and information that was used by the researchers in

the study of the methods that employed the collection, presentation and analysis of the data. This

chapter contained the research design, sources of data, population of the study, instrumentation

and validation, data gathering procedures, statistical treatment of the data.

Research Design

The descriptive method of research, the most useful in communicating the results of an

inquiry, particularly experiments and surveys (R. Navarro, 2013) was utilized to find the

significant difference in the Levels in English Proficiency of the Hanunuo Mangyan Grade 7

Students in terms of speaking, listening, reading and writing when respondents were grouped

according to profile variables. The levels of English proficiency of the tribal students were

gathered using a researcher-made questionnaire, analytic rubrics and standardized questionnaire

used by the Grade VI students of Biñan Elementary School.


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Sources of Data

The primary source of data is tha Hanunuo Mangyan Grade 7 Students at San Teodoro

National High School, Barangay Lumang Bayan, San Teodoro, Oriental Mindoro. The secondary

sources of data were journals books, and articles that came from the internet and libraries.

Population of the Study

The total population of this study was composed of 16 Hanunuo Mangyan Grade 7

Students of San Teodoro National High School, Barangay Lumang Bayan, San Teodoro,

Oriental Mindoro. Moreover, the actual respondents were composed of 8 males and 8 females.

Their ages ranged between 12 to 13 years old. A total of 16 students took 4 types of tests

(speaking, listening, reading and writing test). The researchers also added 3 Hanunuo Mangyan

Grade 7 students of the same school for the reliability test to determine the time that will be

given to the respondents in testing.

Instrumentation and Validation

The researchers have requested to the principal of Biñan Elementary School for the

standardized exams that they were giving to their Grade VI students. These exams were the ones

which used to measure the level of English Proficiency in terms of reading and listening that
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were focused in grammar. At the same time, the researchers have prepared a self-made

questionnaire to

measure the English proficiency in terms of writing that was focused in content, mechanics,

grammar and organization. When it comes in measuring the level of English Proficiency in terms

speaking that was focused in pronunciation, content and appropriate use of modifiers, the

researchers prepared lists of self-made questions that will be asked to the respondents. The

researchers also prepared self-made rubrics to be used in scoring speaking and writing.

The content of the questionnaire and rubrics was validated by the people who excel in

their field. These were our adviser, Dr. Adelaida G. Avalos and a professional teacher in English

Mr. Leomar Galicia.

The first test, composed of nine (9) items was a speaking test. The respondents were

asked a question which they answered according to how much they can. They were given one (1)

minute and thirty (30) seconds to answer the questions which was asked orally. Moreover, the

scores wre verbally interpreted as follows:

Total Score Verbal Interpretation

9 Grade Seven Proficiency Level

6–8 Grades Five and Six Proficiency Level


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3–5 Grades Three and Four Proficiency

Level

1–2 Grades One and Two Proficiency Level

0 No Proficiency

The second test, composed of five (5) items was a listening test wherein the students were

given a questionnaire. The researcher read two passages aloud and the students were given 5

minutes to answer the questionnaire. The scores were validated through this interpretation:

Total Score Verbal Interpretation

5 Grade Seven Proficiency Level

4 Grades Five and Six Proficiency

Level

3 Grades Three and Four Proficiency

Level

1-2 Grades One and Two Proficiency Level

0 No Proficiency

The third test was designed to assess the reading proficiency of the respondents in terms

of grammar. This test was composed of fifteen (15) items wherein the students were given a
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questionnaire. They were given 20 minutes to answer the test. There were two paragraphs that

tested their reading proficiency. Moreover, the scores were validated through this interpretation.

Total Score Verbal Interpretation

15 Grade Seven Proficiency Level

11 – 14 Grades Five and Six Proficiency Level

6 – 10 Grades Three and Four Proficiency Level

1–5 Grades One and Two Proficiency Level

0 No Proficiency

The fourth test, consisted of twelve (12) items was a writing proficiency test. The

respondents were given a picture to be described in a form of a descriptive essay. The researcher

measured variables which include content, mechanics, grammar, and organization under writing.

Moreover, the scores were verbally interpreted as follows:

Total Score Verbal Interpretaion

12 Grade Seven Proficiency Level

9 – 11 Grades Five and Six Proficiency Level


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5–8 Grades Three and Four Proficiency Level

1–4 Grades One and Two Proficiency Level

0 No Proficiency

The test for listening and reading test was standardized while in the writing and speaking,

the tests were self-made. Passages that have been used in the questionnaire undergone readability

test shows it is readable and appropriate with the present level of the respondents.

After the validation which was made by the adviser, Dr. Adelaida G. Avalos, it was

personally distributed by the researchers to the respondents and was collected right after the

respondents answered the questionnaire. The data were tallied, tabulated, analysed and

interpreted.

Data-Gathering Procedure

Prior to the distribution of the questionnaire and questions by the researchers, a letter of

request was given to Principal of San Teodoro National High School to conduct a survey to their

Mangyan students. They were informed that all the gathered information will be treated with

outmost confidentiality. At first, the researchers did a reliability tests wherein 3 Hanunuo

Mangyan Grade 7 Students undergone the tests to determine the minutes or time that will be

given for the respondents. The first test that was given to the respondent was a reading
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proficiency test for 20 minutes, followed by the listening proficiency test for 5 minutes, writing

proficiency test for 15 minutes and speaking proficiency test for 1 minute and 30 seconds. The

questionnaires were collected right after the respondents answered them. Data were tallied,

tabulated and interpreted.

Statistical Treatment of Data

The respondents` answers were carefully classified, tallied and tabulated for the

systematic and accurate presentation of the results. The researchers used the following statistical

tools in the study:

1. Frequency and percentage were used to describe the profile of the respondents.

2. T - test was used to determine the difference in the level of English proficiency of

Hanunuo Mangyan Grade 7 students in terms of speaking, listening, reading and

writing when respondents were grouped according to profile variables.


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CHAPTER 4

PRESENTATION, ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION OF DATA

This chapter presents, analysis, and intercepts the findings or results based on the specific

problems and null hypothesis that were set at the beginning of the study. The results were

discussed based on the series of the sub-problems presented in the chapter one.

Table 1

Profile of the Respondents

Profile Frequency Percentage


Age
12 8 50.00
13 8 50.00
Gender
Male 5 31.25
Female 11 68.75
Number of Household Members
3–5 8 50.00
6 – above 8 50.00
Number of Siblings
0–3 8 50.00
4 – above 8 50.00
Total Number of Respondents = 16

Table 1 presented the profile of the respondents. This includes their age, gender, number

of household members, and number of siblings.


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As seen, out of the 16 respondents, eight (8) or 50 percent are in the age of twelve (12)

and eight (8) or 50 percent are in the age of thirteen (13). When it comes to gender, five (5) or

31. 25 percent are males and eleven (11) or 68.75 percent are females. In the number of

household members, eight (8) or 50 percent of the respondents have 3-5 household members and

eight (8) or 50 percent of the respondents have 6-above household members. When it comes to

the number of siblings, eight (8) or 50 percent have 0-3 siblings and eight (8) or 50 percent of the

respondents have 4-above siblings.

Table 2

Level of English Proficiency of Hanunuo Mangyan Grade 7 Students: Speaking

Indicators Frequency Percentage


Grades Five-Six Proficiency Level 1 6.25
(6-8)
Grades Three-Four Proficiency Level 5 31.25
(3-4)
Grades One-Two Proficiency Level 5 31.25
(1-2)
No Proficiency 5 31.25
Total 16 100.00

Table 2 presented the level of English Proficiency of Hanunuo Mangyan Grade 7

students in terms of Speaking.

As revealed, out of the 16 respondents, one (1) or 6.25 percent reached “Grades Five and

Six Proficiency Level”. Five (5) or 31.25 percent is at “Grades Three-Four Proficiency Level”.
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Five (5) or 31.25 percent reached “Grades One-Two proficiency Level” and Five (5) or 31.25

percent reached “Grades One-Two Proficiency Level”.

In general, the speaking proficiency of the respondents did not reach their present

academic level. As Grade 8 students, they should be able to answer with accuracy related to

correct production of sounds, can use appropriate modifiers with a minimum of seven (7)

sentences correctly.

Table 3

Level of English Proficiency of Hanunuo Mangyan Grade 7 Students: Listening

Indicators Frequency Percentage


Grades Three-Four Proficiency Level 6 37.50
(3)
Grades One-Two Proficiency Level 7 43.75
(1-2)
No Proficiency 3 18.75
Total 16 100.00

Table 2 showed the English Proficiency of Hanunuo Mangyan Grade 7 Students in terms

of Listening.

As seen, out of the 16 respondents, six (6) or 37.50 percent shown to be at “Grades

Three-Four Proficiency Level”, seven (7) or 43.75 percent were at “Grades One-Two Proficiency

Level” and three (3) or 18.75 percent revealed to be at “No Proficiency Level”. It shows that

nobody has reached “Grades Five-Six Proficiency Level”.


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Empirically, the level of English Proficiency of Grade 7 Hanunuo Mangyan students in

terms of listening was low. They must be able to answer the given questions in the test based on

the passage that was read by the researchers.

Table 4

Level of English Proficiency of Hanunuo Mangyan Grade 7 Student: Reading

Indicators Frequency Percentage


Grade Five-Six Proficiency Level 7 43.75
(11-14)
Grade Three-Four Proficiency Level 9 56.25
(6-10)
Total 16 100.00

Table 4 showed the Level of English Proficiency of Hanunuo Mangyan Grade 7 Students

in terms of Reading.

As shown, out of 16 respondents, seven (7) or 43. 75 percent acknowledged having

“Grades Five-Six Proficiency Level”, and nine (9) or 56.25 percent were at “Grades 3-4

Proficiency Level”. It was derived that no respondents were able to reach Grade 7 Proficiency

Level.
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Table 5

Level of English Proficiency of Hanunuo Mangyan Grade 7 Students: Writing

Indicators Frequency Percentage


Grades Three-Four Proficiency Level 2 12.50
(5-6)
Grades One-Two Proficiency Level 13 81.25
(1-4)
No Proficiency (0) 1 6.25
Total 16 100.00

Table 5 showed the Level of English Proficiency of Hanunuo Mangyan Grade 7 in terms

of Writing.

As exemplified in the table, out of 16 respondents, two (2) or 12.50 percent can be

classified as “Grades Three-Four Proficiency Level”. Thirteen (13) or 81.25 percent were as

“Grades One-Two Proficiency Level” and one (1) or 6.26 percent was found as “No Proficiency

Level”. The result showed that the writing proficiency of the respondents was low because

nobody had reached the appropriate level parallel to their academic level at present.

As inferred from the table, the respondents` level of English proficiency in terms of

writing was low. As Grade 7 students, they must be able to describe the given picture with

correct modifiers and can formulate five (5) sentences out of it.
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Table 6

Difference in the Level of English Proficiency in Speaking of Hanunuo Mangyan

Grade 7 Students when Grouped According to Profile to Variables

Profile Mean Score Test Statistics Interpretation


Computed Critical
Age
12 2.00 t=0 Not Significant
13 2.00
Gender
Male 2.60 t=0.90 2.14 Not Significant
Female 1.73
Number of Household Members
3-5 1.75 t=0.55 Not Significant
6-above 2.25
Number of Siblings
0-3 1.75 t=0.55 Not Significant
4-above 2.25

Table 6 showed the difference in the Level of English Proficiency in Speaking of

Hanunuo Mangyan Grade 7 students when grouped according to profile variables.

As noted in the table, the difference in the level of English Proficiency in speaking of the

respondents when grouped according to age, gender, number of household members and number

of siblings was not significant. Of all the profiles above, computed t-value of 0, 0.90, 0.55 and

0.55, which has 0.05 as a level of significance, were less than the critical value of 2.14. Thus,
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there was no significant difference in the level English Proficiency in speaking of the Hanunuo

Grade 7 studetns when grouped according to profile variables. Hence, regardless of age, gender,

number of household members and number of siblings, the level of English proficiency in terms

of speaking of the Hanunuo Mangyan Grade 7 students were the same.

The results showed contrast to the studies and literatures of Mayberry and Lock (2003),

and Laurianne Sumerset (2008), who said that age affects the level of proficiency; Brown (2003),

Lumley & O`Sullivan (2005), and Motallebzadeh (1993), who said that gender affects the level

of proficiency, Donald Evans (2003), and Kelly Bridges and Erika Hoff (2008), who said that

number of households affects the level of proficiency; and Cutting and Dunn (1999), who said

that number of siblings affects the level of proficiency.

Table 7

Difference in the Level of English Proficiency in Listening of Hanunuo Mangyan

Grade 7 Students when Grouped According to Profile to Variables

Profile Mean Score Test Statistics Interpretation


Computed Critical
Age
12 1.88 t=0.41 Not Significant
13 1.63
Gender
Male 1.40 t=0.79 2.14 Not Significant
Female 1.91
Number of Household Members
3-5 1.63 t=0.41 Not Significant
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6-above 1.88
Number of Siblings
0-3 1.38 t=1.30 Not Significant
4-above 2.13

Table 7 showed the difference in the Level of English Proficiency in Listening of

Hanunuo Mangyan Grade 7 when grouped according to profile variables.

As illustrated in the table, of all the profiles above, computed t-value of 0.41, 0.79, 0.41,

and 1.30, which has 0.05 as the level of significance, were less than the critical value 2.14. Thus,

there was no significant difference in the level of English proficiency in listening of the Hanunuo

Mangyan Grade 7 studetns when grouped according to profile variables. Hence, regardless of

age gender, number of household members and number of siblings, the level of English

proficiency in terms of listening of the Hanunuo Mangyan Grade 7 Students were the same.

In contrary to the studies and literatures of Mayberry and Lock (2003), and Laurianne

Sumerset (2008), who said that age affects the level of proficiency; Brown (2003), Lumley &

O`Sullivan (2005), and Motallebzadeh (1993), who said that gender affects the level of

proficiency, Donald Evans (2003), and Kelly Bridges and Erika Hoff (2008), who said that

number of households affects the level of proficiency; and Cunning and Dunn (1999), who said

that number of siblings affects the level proficiency; the results showed that the profile variables

of the respondents had no effect on the level of English proficiency in terms of listening.
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Table 8

Difference in the Level of English Proficiency in Reading of Hanunuo Mangyan

Grade 7 Students when Grouped According to Profile to Variables

Profile Mean Score Test Statistics Interpretation


Computed Critical
Age
12 10.62 t=1.89 Not Significant
13 9.50
Gender
Male 9.40 t=1.43 Not Significant
Female 10.36 2.14
Number of Household Members
3-5 10.25 t=0.57 Not Significant
6-above 9.88
Number of Siblings
0-3 10.13 t=0.19 Not Significant
4-above 10.00

Table 8 shows the difference in the Level of English Proficiency in Reading of Hanunuo

Mangyan Grade 7 students when when grouped according to profile variables.

As shown in the table, the profiles, computed t of 1.89, 1.43, 0.57 and 0.19, which has

0.05 as the level of significance, were less than the critical value of 2.14. Thus, there was no

significant difference in the level of English proficiency in reading of the Hanunuo Mangyan

Grade 7 students when grouped according to profile variables. Hanunuo Mangyan Grade 7

students when grouped according to profile variables. Hence, regardless of age, gender, number
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of household members and number of siblings, the level of English proficiency in terms of

reading of the Hanunuo Mangyan Grade 7 students were the same.

The results showed contrast to the studies and literatures of Mayberry and Lock (2003),

and Laurianne Sumerset (2008), who said that age affect the level of proficiency; Brown (2003),

Lumley & O`Sullivan (2005), and Montallebzadeh (1993), who said that gender affects the level

of proficiency, Donald Evans (2003), and Kelly Bridges and Erika Hoff (2008), who said that

number of siblings affects the level of proficiency.

Table 9

Difference in the Level of English Proficiency in Writing of Hanunuo Mangyan

Grade 7 Students when Grouped According to Profile to Variables

Profile Mean Score Test Statistics Interpretation


Computed Critical
Age
12 2.50 t=1.20 Not Significant
13 16.3
Gender
Male 2.60 t=0.98 Not Significant
Female 1.82 2.14
Number of Household Members
3-5 2.25 t=0.49 Not Significant
6-above 1.88
Number of Siblings
0-3 2.13 t=0.16 Not Significant
4-above 2.00
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Table 9 shows the difference in the Level of English Proficiency in Writing of Hanunuo

Mangyan Grade 7 students when grouped according to profile variables.


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As revealed in the table, the profiles, computed t of 1.20, 0.98, 0.49 and 0.16, which has

0.05 as the level of significance, was less than the critical value of 2.14. Thus, there was no

significant difference in the level of English proficiency in writing of the Hanunuo Mangyan

Grade 7 students when grouped according to profile variables.

Hence, regardless of age, gender, number of household members and number of siblings,

the level English proficiency in terms of writing of the Hanunuo Mangyan Grade 7 students were

the same.

In contrary to the studies and literatures of Mayberry and Lock (2003), and Laurianne

Sumerset (2008), who said that age affects the level of proficiency; Brown (2003), Lumley &

O`Sullivan (2005), and Motallebzadeh (1993), who said that gender affects the level of

proficiency, Donald Evans (2003), and Kelly Bridges and Erika Hoff (2008), who said that

number of households affects the level of proficiency; and Cunning and Dunn (1999), who said

that number of siblings affects the level proficiency; the results showed that age, gender, number

of household members and number of siblings had no effect on the level of English proficiency

in terms of reading.

To sum up, the level of English proficiency of the Hanunuo Mangyan Grade 7 students

had no significant difference in terms of speaking, listening, reading and writing when the

respondents were grouped according to profile variables.


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As a result, the level of English proficiency of Hanunuo Mangyan Grade 7 students

diverged regardless of age, gender, number of household members, and number of siblings.
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CHAPTER 5

SUMMARY OF FINDINGS, CONCLUSSION AND RECOMMENDATIONS

This chapter summarized all the findings of the study and presents the conclusion and

recommendations on the results discussed in the previous chapter.

This study aims to determine the levels of English proficiency in terms of speaking,

listening, reading and writing of Hanunuo Mangyan Grade 7 Students at San Teodoro National

High School, Barangay Lumang Bayan, San Teodoro, Oriental Mindoro. Specially, this study

attemps to answer the following:

1. What is the profile of the respondents in terms of:

a. Age

b. Gender

c. Number of household members

d. Number of sibling

2. What is the level of English Proficiency of Hanunuo Mangyan Grade 7 Students in terms

of:

a. Speaking

b. Listening

c. Reading
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d. Writing

3. Is there a significant difference in the level of English Proficiency of Hanunuo Mangyan

Grade 7 Students in terms of speaking, listening, reading and writing when the

respondents are grouped according to profile variables?

Summary of Findings

Based on the data assessed, the researchers were able to reach at the following findings:

1. Profile of the Respondents

Out of the 16 respondents, eight (8) or 50 percent are in the age of twelve (12) and

eight (8) or 50 percent are in the age of thirteen (13). When it comes to gender, five (5) or

31.25 percent are males and eleven (11) or 68.75 percent are females. In the number of

household members, eight (8) or 50 percent of the respondents have 3-5 household

members and eight (8) or 50 percent of the respondents have 6-above household

members. When it comes to the number of siblings, eight (8) or 50 percent have 0-3

siblings and eight (8) or 50 percent of the respondents have 4-above siblings.
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2. The Level of English Language Proficiency of the Hanunuo Mangyan Freshmen Students in

terms of speaking, listening, reading, and writing.

2.1. Speaking

Out of the 16 respondents, one (1) or 6.25 percent reached “Grades Five-Six

Proficiency level”. Five (5) or 31.25 percent is at “Grades Three-Four Proficiency level”.

Five (5) or 31.25 percent reached “Grades One-Two Proficiency Level” and five (5) or 31.25

percent is at stake of “No Proficiency Level”.

2.2. Listening

Out the 16 respondents, six (6) or 37.50 percent shown to be at “Grades Three-

Four Proficiency Level”, seven (7) or 43.75 percent were at “Grade One-Two Proficiency

Level” and three (3) or 18.75 percent revealed to be at “No Proficiency Level”. It shows that

nobody has reached “Grades Five-Six Proficiency”.

2.3 Reading

Out of the 16 respondents, seven (7) or 43.75 percent acknowledged having

“Grades Five-Six Proficiency Level”, and nine (9) or 56.25 percent were at “Grades Three-

Four Proficiency Level”.

2.4 Writing

Out of the 16 respondents, two (2) or 12.50 percent can be classified as “Grade

Three-Four Proficiency Level”, thirteen (13) or 81.25 percent were as “Grades One-Two

Proficiency Level” and one (1) or 6.26 percent was found as “No Proficiency Level”.
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3. The difference in the Levels of English Proficiency of Hanunuo Mangyan Grade 7 Students

in terms of reading, listening, writing and speaking when the respondents were grouped

according to profile variables.

The level of English Proficiency of the Hanunuo Mangyan Grade 7 students had

no significant difference in terms of speaking, listening, reading, and writing when the

respondents were grouped according to profile variables. As a result, the level English

proficiency of Hanunuo Mangyan Grade 7 Students diverged regardless of age, gender,

number of household members and number of siblings.

Conclusions

Based on the collected data, the researchers were able to arrive at the following

conclusions:

1. Only one of the respondents reached “Grades Five-Six Proficiency Level” and fifteen (15) of

the respondents were in the lower levels in terms of speaking. There were no respondents

who had reached “Grades Five-Six Proficiency Level” in terms of listening but they were

classified into “Grades One-Two Proficiency Level”, “Grades Three-Four Proficiency Level”

and “No Proficiency”. In reading proficiency, there were seven of the respondents at “Grade
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Five-Six Proficiency Level” and the rest were at lower levels. In terms writing proficiency,

thirteen of

the respondents were at “Grade One-Two Proficiency level”, two (2) of the respondents was

at “Grades Three-Four Proficiency Level” and one of the respondents was at “No Proficiency

Level”.

2. There were no respondents who had reached “Grades Seven Proficiency level” in terms of

speaking proficiency, listening proficiency, reading proficiency and writing proficiency.

3. It is revealed in the tables that some were good in reading or speaking, but not in writing or

listening; vice versa.

4. There is no significant difference in the Proficiency Levels of English Language Proficiency

of Hanunuo Mangyan Grade 7 Students in terms of reading, listening, writing and speaking

when grouped according to profile variables.


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Recommendations

The researchers highly recommended that future studies be commenced as a follow up to

this study. Based on the findings, the researchers recommended the following:

1. Hanunuo Mangyan Grade 7 Students should be given Individualized Educational Program

(IEP) that tutors them English subjects and enhances their level of proficiency in English

language.

2. The future researchers should conduct a study of English Language Proficiency in terms of

only one macro skill (i.e. speaking, listening, reading, and writing including grammar skills)

at time to be more focused and specific.


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REFERENCES

Books:

Evans, Donald (2003), U.S. Virgin Islands: 2000 Social, Economic, and Housing

Characteristics, Diane Publishing, U.S. Virgin Island, p.118.

Robinson, Peter (2013), The Routledge Encyclopedia of Second Language Acquisition,

Routledge Publishing, U.S.A., p.522.

Smiley, Patricia and Salsberry, Trudy (2007), Effective Schooling for English Language

Learners: What Elementary Principals Should Know and Do, Eye on Education,Inc. 6

Depot Way West, Suite 106, Larchmont, N.Y. 10538, p.79.

Journal:

Azizi, Yahaya, Noordin Yahaya, Ooi Choon Lean, Abdul Talib Bon and Sharifuddin Ismail 2

(2011), Factors Contributing to Proficiency in English as a Second Language among

Chinese students in Johor Bahru, Elixir Journals, China, p.5837.

Summerset, L. (2010, April 8), How Does Age Affect Language Learning? SparkNet, Los

Angeles, California.
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Cummins, Jim (1989), Common Underlying Proficiency Theory

http://esltechnologyblog.wordpress.com/2012/10/20common-underlying-proficiency/

Conklin, J. (1993), The Mangyans of Mindoro

http://showbizandstyle.inquirer.net/lifestyle/lifestyle/view/20070326-56935/The-

Mangyans-of-Mindoro

Rona, J. (2012, Filipino Ethnic Groups

http://www.filipinoplanet.com/filipino-ethnic-groups.html

Servano, A. (1999), Hanunuo Mangyan

http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?sea=a.192939728768.126748.192212273768

Twister, J. (2013), Language Proficiency

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Language_proficiency
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Thesis and Dissertation

Kelly Bridges & Erika Hoff (2011), The Role of Siblings in the English Language Development

of Bilingual Toddlers in the U.S. Florida Atlantic University, Florida Atlantic University,

p. 3-4

Sa A. Bui (2010), How do Limited English Proficient Students Affect Each Other`s Educational

Outcome? Evidence from Student Panel Data, Job Market Paper, University of Houston,

p.1.

Khalil Montallebzadeh, Does Gender Play a Role in the Assessment of Oral Proficiency?

Department of English, Torbat-e-Heydareih Branch, Islamic Azad University P.O. Box

140, Torbat-e-Heydareih, Iran, p. 165-166.

Electronic Reference

Brown, Elaine C. (2010) and Miyamoto (1975:14), Mangyan Cultural Groups

http://www.culturalsurvival.org/publications/cultural-

survivalquarterly/philippines/pundasyon-hanunuo-mangyan-school-participatory

Cummins, J. (1989), Common Underlying Proficiency

http://esi.fis.edu/teachers/support/cummin.html
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APPENDICES
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EDITOR`s CERTIFICATION

This is to certify that this thesis entitled, “English Proficiency of Hanunuo Mangyan

Grade 7 Students”, prepared and submitted by Berlin F. Durumpili, Ronlie RJ A. Espeleta,

Malcolm R. Matela, Isaac Leo C. Pabalan, Cornelia D. Dela Cruz and Jovelyn S. So, has

been edited by the undersigned.

____________________
Dr. Adelaida G. Avalos
Editors/Adviser

STATISTICIAN`s CERTIFICATION

This is to certify that this entitled, “English Proficiency of Hanunuo Mangyan Grade 7

Students”, prepared and submitted by Berlin F. Durumpili, Ronlie RJ A. Espeleta, Malcolm

R. Matela, Isaac Leo C. Pabalan, Cornelia D. Dela Cruz and Jovelyn S. So, has been

reviewed by the undersigned.

__________________
Dr. Nonet A. Cuy
Statistician
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SAMPLE QUESTIONAIRE
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Direction: Read the selection silently. Record your reading time as soon as you finish reading.
Read the questions and encircle the letter of your answer.

Kakawate: A Wonder Tree

When one says “A Wonder Tree”, what comes to mind is the coconut tree. But
Edwin C. Villar of the Prhilippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Research and
Development is referring to another tree.

He calls the fast growing “Kakawate” or “made cacao” a “wonder tree”.

He writes about the wonders of Kakawate. The tree has a lot of uses. It is used as
live fence to surround property boundaries. It is also used as shade trees, wind breakers and
as food resource for livestock raiser.

Some farmers use the leaves of Kakawate as fertilizers in fields and gardens. Folk
medicine practitioners in remote areas use the juice of the Kakawate leaves, bark and root
to cure itches and wound.

In a survey conducted in the Philippines, 72% of farmers said they put Kakawate
branches in their rice field to keep bugs and other pests away.

Kakawate leaves are also used to help ripen the banana. In Davao and other places,
farmers store unripe bananas in a box with Kakawate leaves. Doing so shortens the ripening
period. The tree on the other hand is well adapted to humid areas and infertile soil. It can be
grown easily together with other grasses. It can also be used for controlling weed species
and soil conservation.

Questions:

1. What is the fast growing “Kakawate” or “madre cacao” called?


a. A herbal tree
b. A wonder tree
c. A medicinal tree
d. A wonderful tree
2. What do farmers use as fertilizers?
a. Bark of Kakawate
b. Stem of Kakawate
c. Leaves of Kakawate
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d. Brach of Kakawate

3. The following are uses of Kakawate tree except one. Which one is it?
a. As land fill
b. As medicine
c. As fertilizers
d. As food source
4. Why does the author call the Kakawate a wonder tree?
a. Because it has plenty of juices
b. Because its leaves can kill pests
c. Because it has a fruit bearing tree
d. Because it has many different uses
5. How is the ripening period of bananas shortened?
a. By storing unripe bananas in a box with Kakawate bark
b. By storing unripe bananas in a box with Kakawate stem
c. By storing unripe bananas in a box with Kakawate leaves
d. By storing unripe bananas in a box with Kakawate brach
6. Why Kakawate trees are called live fence for properties?
a. They are fences that talk
b. They are fences that grow
c. They are fences that hurt
d. They are fences that survive
7. The Kakawate trees have many uses. In what way can we conserve them?
a. Cut the trees
b. Burn the trees
c. Plant the trees
d. Destroy the trees
8. Why did the writer begin with statement “what comes to mind is the coconut tree?”
a. The Coconut tree is a tree of life
b. The Coconut tree is strong and useful
c. The Coconut tree is important to Filipinos
d. The Coconut tree is more popular than Kakawate
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Grade Level Passage Rating Scale

Prompt: How the colors affect a person`s mood? Find out in the selection.

Mood and Colors

Colors can affect people`s mood. Cool colors are relaxing. Pleasant colors make people work better.
Warm colors make people active.

If you feel low, wear red and you will come to life. If you are over excited, wear something light and
you will simmer down.

Athletes consider this when choosing their uniforms. Surely, it is not the color that makes them win,
but it is a big help.

Questions:

1. What can affect the mood of people?______________


a. Colors
b. Attitude
c. Shapes
d. Flowers
2. What kind of colors make people work better?______________
a. Unpleasant colors
b. Bright colors
c. Dim colors
d. Pleasant colors
3. What will you do when you feel low?______________
a. Wear blue
b. Wear black
c. Wear white
d. Wear red
4. Why is the choice important?_______________
a. It can affect people`s attitude
b. It can change people`s mood
c. It can do a lot of work
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d. It can affect people`s mood
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5. What does simmer down mean in paragraph 2?_______________


a. Control over sad feeling
b. Control over happy feeling
c. Control over excited feeling
d. Control over tired feeling

Applied: 6. What advice will you give the sports team of your school in choosing their uniform?

____________________________________________________________________________.

a. Choose red or bright colors for their uniform


b. Choose black of dim colors for their uniform
c. Choose white or light colors for their uniform
d. None of the above.

6. What is the message of the selection to you?_____________

a. Colors affect my mood


b. Colors has no impact on my feeling
c. Colors did not affect my mood
d. Colors affect not my feeling but my look
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DIRECTIONS: Listen as the teacher reads the story. Answer the questions that follow. Write the
letter correct answer in your answer sheet.

1. What do you think will happen next?


a. Martin will leave his friend
b. Martin`s bike will get a flat tire
c. Martin will race his friend
d. Martin will continue biking
2. Which clues helped you decide what would happen next in the previous question?
a. He looked back
b. Martin was riding his bike
c. He heard the crunching of the broken glass
d. He rode through glass and his tire began to wobble.
3. What do you predict Robert will do?
a. Choose a movie time that is later
b. Ask his boss if he can leave early
c. Choose a different movie to see
d. Ask the manager to hold the movie until he gets there.

DIRECTIONS: Listen to the selection your teacher reads. Write the letter of the word that
expresses the mood conveyed.

4. A. Dismay B. Depressing C. Liveliness D. Furious


5. A. Discontentment B. Ignorance C. Apologetic D. Longing
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CURRICULUM VITAE
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Berlin Fajardo Durumpili


9338 J.M Loyolas Street, Barangay Maduya, Carmona, Cavite
Mobile Number: 09358874679
Email: emperium_tol089@yahoo.com

PERSONAL INFORMATION
Birthday : May 14, 1994
Birthplace : San Pedro, Laguna
Citizenship : Filipino
Gender : Male
Age : 19 years old
Height : 5`6”
Weight : 80 kg.
Civil Status : Single
Religion : Catholic

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND

COLLEGE : University of Perpetual Help System Laguna


BS in Secondary Education
3rd year undergraduate
SECONDARY : Carmona National High School
Brgy. 8, Carmona Cavite
2010-2011
ELEMENTARY : Maduya Elementary School
Brgy. Maduya, Carmona Cavite
2006-2007
AFFILIATIONS

Freshmen Council – Auditor


Sophomore Council - PRO
English Altus Societas 2011-2012 – Auditor
English Altus Societas 2013-2014 – Vice President - Internal
Educare Alpha Omicron 2012-2013 – Business Manager
Educare Alpha Omicron 2013-2014 – Secretary
World Council for Curriculum and Instruction – Student Chapter – Chairman of Community
Development
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Volunteer Teacher - Bank Street Child Learning Center

Ronlie RJ A. Espeleta
3014 Borja St. Malaban, City of Biñan Laguna
Mobile Number: 09059125737
Email: rjespeleta@yahoo.com

PERSONAL INFORMATION
Birthday : December 17, 1994
Birthplace : Provincial Hospital, Sta. Cruz Laguna
Citizenship : Filipino
Gender : Male
Age : 19 years old
Height : 5`8”
Weight : 75kg
Civil Status : Single
Religion : Roman Catholic

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND

COLLEGE : University of Perpetual Help System Laguna


BS in Secondary Education
3rd year undergraduate
SECONDARY : Jacobo Z. Gonzales Memorial National High
Brgy. San Antonio, City of Biñan Laguna
2007-2011
ELEMENTARY : Malaban Elementary School
Brgy. Malaban, City of Biñan Laguna
2001-2007
AFFILIATIONS

Iskolar ng Biñan (2011-present)


Vice President for Internal – Iskolar ng Biñan Council UPHSL Chapter (2012-present)
President – Freshmen Council (2011-2012)
Business Manager – English Altus Societas (2012-2013)
President – Sophomore Council (2012-2013)
Vice President – English Altus Societas (2012-2013)
Auditor – Educare Alpha Omicron (2012-2013)
President – Junior Council (2013-2014)
Vice President – English Altus Societas (2013-2014)
University of Perpetual Help System – JONELTA
Sto. Niño, City of Biñan, Laguna
College of Education
Special Interest Group Chairman, Peace Group – World Council for Curriculum and
Instruction Philippine Students` Chapter (2013-2014)

Malcolm Ross Matela


14 Adams Street Filinvest Homes South, Biñan City Laguna
Mobile Number: 09264676977
E-mail: Malcolm_matela@yahoo.com

PERSONAL INFORMATION
Birthday : December 20, 1993
Birthplace : Biñan City, Laguna
Citizenship : Filipino
Gender : Male
Age : 20 years old
Height : 5`5”
Weight : 70kg
Civil Status : Filipino
Religion : Roman Catholic

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND

COLLEGE : University of Perpetual Help System Laguna


BS in Secondary Education
3rd year undergraduate
SECONDARY : Holy Spirit School
South City Home Biñan Laguna
2007-2011
ELEMENTARY : Holy Spirit School
South City Home Biñan Laguna
2001-2007

AFFILIATIONA

Assistant Treasurer – English Altus Societas (2013-2014)


University of Perpetual Help System – JONELTA
Sto. Niño, City of Biñan, Laguna
College of Education

Isaac Leo C. Pabalan


Brgy. Aplya Sta. Rosa Laguna
Mobile Number: 09056095377
E-mail: none

PERSONAL INFORMATION
Birthday : April 8, 1995
Birthplace : Sta. Rosa, Laguna
Citizenship : Filipino
Gender : Male
Age : 19 years old
Height : 5`6”
Weight : 150lbs.
Civil Status : Single
Religion : Born Again

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND

COLLEGE : University of Perpetual Help System Laguna


BS in Secondary Education
3rd year under graduate
SECONDARY : Laguna Eastern Academy of Sta. Rosa Inc.

ELEMENTARY : Child Formation Centre of Sta. Rosa

AFFILIATIONS

Servi Dei Vocal Ensemble (UPHSL CHORALE)


University of Perpetual Help System – JONELTA
Sto. Niño, City of Biñan, Laguna
College of Education

Cornelia D. Dela Cruz


Blk. 20 lot 21 Southville 5, Timbao Biñan Laguna
Mobile Number: 09331328768

PERSONAL INFORMATION
Birthday : February 3, 1965
Birthplace : Nueva Ecija
Citizenship : Filipino
Gender : Female
Age : 49 years old
Height : 5`3”
Weight : 128lbs
Civil Status : Single
Religion : Roman Catholic

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND

COLLEGE : University of Perpetual Help System Laguna


BS in Secondary Education
3rd year undergraduate
SECONDARY : General Tinio High School
Nueva Ecija
1982-1985
ELEMENTARY : East Central Elementary School
Nueva Ecija
1978-1981

AFFILIATIONS

Third Year Student Officer – Business Manager


University of Perpetual Help System – JONELTA
Sto. Niño, City of Biñan, Laguna
College of Education

Jovelyn S. So
Phase 4 blk 67 lot 21 Brgy. Ipil-Ipil Bulihan, Silang, Cavite
Mobile Number: 09066928476
E-mail: jovelynso@yahoo.com

PERSONAL INFORMATION
Birthday : April 2, 1993
Birthplace : Virac, Catanduanes
Citizenship : Filipino
Gender : Female
Age : 21 years old
Height : 5`5”
Weight : 75kg
Civil Status : Single
Religion : Born Again

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND

COLLEGE : University of Perpetual Help System Laguna


BS in Secondary Education
3rd year undergraduate
SECONDARY : Victorious Christian Montessori School
2007-2010
ELEMENTARY : Bulihan Sites and Project Elementary School
Bulihan, Silang, Cavite
2000-2006

AFFILIATIONS

Volunteer Teacher – Bankstreet Child Learning Center

English Altus Societas - Member