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The project aims to use the design of buildings and environment to motivate, influence, and attract

minds of high ambitions and creative thinking to come together to create a momentum of creative
business thinking and applications.
Architecture demands a certain responsibility to the changing environments of today’s world and
the sustainable practices that can support it. Overtime, this responsibility has only become more
important as habitat loss, pollution, over-exploitation, and species introduction are increasingly
affecting the diversity of landscapes and resources of today’s world.
How can a research facility could educate and promote change for ecological significance and
biodiversity?
aims to use architecture to make a societal change and create an environment that inspire people
to think and innovate, the architectural design is purposely shaped to raise expectations and break
the norms of how material can perform beyond its traditional norms. this is where large spans has
been achieved by using the building framing (columns and beams) to perform as a truss-beam to
enable parts of the building to cantilever for large distances. Transparent spaces are used in the
project for the same reason of breaking the norms and raise expectations, this is aimed to inspire
the users to think and aim high
How can architecture nurture inspiration and ideas in creative thinking?
This project aims to produce an architectural design solution which generates an environment
that nurtures creative thinking where inspiration and ideas seem to happen more easily.
. Using architecture as a mechanism to expand public ecological literacy, by providing an
educated sensory experience that informs an emotional connection with wildlife, and therefore a
desire to protect.
How can an architectural proposition enhance and promote ecological conservation, while
facilitating an educated interaction between wildlife and humans?
This project addresses a limitation in current thinking about the environment within the human
race. Existing flora and fauna play a fundamental role in society in terms of biodiversity, without
which humans as a race would no longer survive. As the effects of climate change and the rapid
increase in global population continue to rise, initiatives aimed at the restoration and conservation
of native ecologies are becoming increasingly important. This project is an exploration, analysis
and evaluation of architecture in the development of new approaches to ecological conservation
and the extent to which it can facilitate public engagement
The focus of this project is to produce a sustainable responsive design solution that raises
awareness on New Zealand wildlife. This can be achieved by engaging the public on how New
Zealand’s landscape has changed as a result of human interventions and what needs to be done
in order to redress the balance. The design must be sensitive to the ecologies and conditions of
the site. The challenge is to not destroy the very ecology we are trying to protect. If the
architectural intention fails to engage people appropriately, the wildlife it is trying to enhance will
too be forgotten and therefore be at threat.
The following goals to achieve this are:
• Raise awareness on ecological conservation through interactive learning by using architectural
techniques as a means to entice senses
• Assimilate ecological conservation into architectural built form.
• Provide educational programs on the importance of biodiversity to encourage stronger
relationships between humans and wildlife.
• Integrate the design into the sites landscape.
• Investigate the use of sustainable design, such as self-sufficiency in conjunction with local
materials, for minimal impact on the immediate context and the environment.

Children and nature, two words that are meeting less. Typically, when defining childhood, one
would describe it as endless explorations and opportunities for adventure. Unfortunately, a new
generation is being raised in New Zealand, and world wide; a generation that is being brought up
without the appreciation and understanding about the relationship of our built societies to its
natural surroundings. Today, children are exposed to technology prematurely, given little
opportunity to be immersed with their environment. Yet when given the opportunity to explore
their habitat children are fascinated with the natural world, seeing it not just as a backdrop, but
something to be interacted with. They want to touch, dig, poke, shake, pound, pour, smell, taste,
and “muck around”. Consequently, educating children on New Zealand’s environment is the best
hope for raising ‘awareness’ of why and how one can preserve and protect the earth and the
future of humanity.

How can lessons from natural systems be utilized to create a building that incorporates and
functions like nature?
successfully integrate living nature into the building
• show that the presence and integration of living nature in the building results in increased
resource efficiency
• show that the proposed design is a truly biophilic environment and is one that creates and
enhances well-being, creativity and attractiveness.
Working with nature, rather than against it, can further pave the way towards a more resource
efficient, competitive and greener economy.

 Lack of awareness of the importance and role of mangroves in ecosystem


 Only certain mangrove species are being cultivated and given importance
 Increasing habitat and mangrove resource over-exploitation and destruction
 Inclusion of mangroves as one of the critical habitats that must be maintained in Bataan
coastal areas
 Alarming loss of mangrove resources which causes deterioration of sea grass and coral
reef ecosystem and on the productivity of coastal fisheries
 Lack of proper monitoring facilities for mangrove forests

Innovation is a concept that most organizations aspire towards, but haven’t formally embraced.
The rewards can be immense, but most organizations have no clear path towards innovating.

 To provide spaces that will cater different types of research that will contribute to the
advancement of mangrove research in the province and in the country
 To create spaces and facilities that will allow studies of a much diverse species of
mangroves
 To produce an architectural design solution which generates an environment that nurtures
creative thinking where inspiration and ideas seem to happen more easily
 To be able to engage and educate the public about the diversity of mangroves and their
role in protecting these species
 To discover and apply new solutions and innovations regarding mangrove cultivation and
preservation
 To conserve other coastal marine species dependent on mangrove forest and promote
ecological balance among them
 To provide facilities for regular monitoring and accounting of mangrove population in the
province

 How can a research facility could educate and promote change for ecological significance
and biodiversity of mangroves?
 How can architecture nurture inspiration and ideas in creative thinking?
 How can an architectural proposition enhance and promote ecological conservation, while
facilitating an educated interaction between nature and humans?
 How can lessons from natural systems be utilized to create a building that incorporates
and functions like nature?
 Perry and Marty Granoff Center for the Creative Arts
Diller Scofidio + Renfro
Source: www.fda-online.com

This creative arts center designed by Diller Diller Scofidio + Renfro at Brown University
provides performance spaces, exhibitions, installations, and an outdoor amphitheater. Its goal
was to stimulate a collaborative environment with flexibility. It envisioned the advancement of
innovative directions for research, teaching, and production across the range of art disciplines.

“In creating the design for the Granoff Center, we needed structural elements that would stimulate
the creative process from virtually every aspect of the building. The Granoff Center is a merger of
architecture gesture and academic pedagogy. Our strategy was to encourage and illustrate
collaboration across every level.”

The main formal characteristic of this center was the use of the split-level structure creating
six half-levels allowing and maintaining visual connection between the various program spaces.
Split levels provide the opportunity for visual connections to happen between 3 spaces, rather
than having a single level which limits visual connectivity to a single plane.

Visual connection is a key component and the first step into making collaboration between
disciplines happen. For example, an artist might find inspiration through the movement of a
dancer, or the dancer may be inspired through the artist’s movement.

It maximizes the opportunity for inspiration. The ability to inspire can happen anywhere and
through anything. And it is important to be able to at least provide a type of environment to prepare
these sorts of “eureka” moments and this creative arts center shows that.

 Longbush Ecosanctuary Welcome Shelter

Architect: Sarosh Mulla


Gisborne, New Zealand 2015
The Welcome Shelter is an environmental education space that promotes community
engagement in conservation for the protection of New Zealand wildlife. Located just nine
kilometers out of Gisborne on the East Coast of the North Island, Longbush is home to some of
the country’s most treasured and endangered flora and fauna. Access to the Welcome Shelter is
open to all visitors, attracting conservationist, school groups, and general public in increasing
numbers.

Sarosh Mulla, together with 88 volunteers, constructed the shelter from sponsored materials,
utilizing simple construction techniques. The Welcome Shelter is designed to be immersed with
nature, with a viewing tower to enable visitors to observe Longbush from a bird’s eye perspective.
The design is based around a large steel and fabric canopy that provides shelter from the
elements for an outdoor classroom setting. Below are three wooden enclosures, each providing
a different service, including the ablution facilities, storage for teaching material and a workshop
for the site ecologist. The workshop unfolds to the exterior by a large drawbridge, creating a level
platform to the outdoors on teaching and demonstration days. The design of separate pods forces
people to the outdoors as they move between the structures, with the main communal space
outside, sheltered by the sculptural roof visually uniting the structures as one.

Circulation

Visitors approach the Welcome Shelter from a distance, prolonging the arrival, catching
differing glimpses of the structure through the trees as one gets closer. Upon reaching the shelter,
there is no defined entrance, instead the orientation of the clustered forms suggests the entrance
is the outdoor space that the buildings overlook.

Form

The project’s program is evident through its architecture. The organization of pods clustered
around an outdoor congregation area suggests an interactive approach towards conservation
education. The floating roof acts as a unifying device, tying the three separate entities together
and creating an outdoor classroom. The simple building typology, combined with the use of
recycled materials, demonstrates a sensitive approach to the landscape, providing shelter without
removing the very qualities of the environment that are the reason for the ecosanctuary’s
existence.