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Nirmal Bhartia School

Project Deadlines
Class 11

S. no. Subject Date of Submission


1. English ----------------
2. Maths 20th September
3. History 5th July
4. Political Science 18th July
5. Geography 10th July Prscticsl File
,no draft and ongoing
work
6. Economics 15th July
7. Physics-Project and File 8July
8. Chemistry- Project and 12 July
File
9. Biology- Project and File 12 July
10. Home Science 11 July
11. Computer Science 10th January
12. Psychology 12th July
13. Commercial Arts 12 th July(five
activities)
14. Business Studies 5th July
15. Accounts 8 th October
English Holiday Homework- XI
Prepare an info graphic chart depicting the condition of the elderly in India.

o Sixty-eight-year-old Lakhan Singh fondly remembers the days when he was in


“service”. The best thing about those days, he feels, was that he “was in control
of his own life”.These days he sells plastic goods by the roadside and lives in
miserable conditions to make ends meet for his wife and him. He is forced to hand
over his entire pension to his grandson, who threatens to stop his diabetic wife’s
treatment.
o According to a latest study conducted by Agewell Foundation, 65 per cent of old
people are poor with no source of known income. Good news is that 35 per cent
still have money, properties, savings, investments, inheritance and above all
supportive children. However, when put up against facts like India has a
population of 100 million old people and that the number will touch 324 million
by 2050, the good news fizzles out.
o What is more important is that irrespective of their financial status, most old
people face abuse in one form or the other, states the report, released to
commemorate the United Nations’ World Elder Abuse Awareness Day, which is
observed on June 15.
o Infographics (a clipped compound of "information" and "graphics") are graphic
visual representations of information, data or knowledge intended to present
information quickly and clearly.

Korean Cultural Centre, Embassy of the Republic of Korea is organizing “All India 7th
Korea-India Friendship Essay Competition 2019”.

Every student will get a Participation Certificate. There is NO ENTRY FEE or any other fee
of any kind for students during any stage of the activity.

Senior Group only (Class 10th to 12th): "South Korea - My Favourite Destination" (300 to
500 words in English only)

Guidelines - What to do?

Write an Essay on the topic mentioned above .


Essay must be in English - Typed and mailed to the respective English teacher on a Word
Document.
SETS
Very Important Questions
1. If A = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6}, B = {2, 4, 6, 8}, then find A – B.
2. Let A and B be two sets containing 3 and 6 elements respectively. Find the
maximum and minimum number of elements in A U B.
3. In a town of 10,000 families it was found that 40% families buy newspaper A, 20%
families buy newspaper B, 10% families buy newspaper C, 5% families buy A and B,
3% of families buy B and C and 4% buy A and C. If 2% of families buy all the three
newspapers, find :
(a) the number of families which buy newspaper A only.
(b) the number of families which buy none of A, B and C.
4. Write the power set of the set {1, 2}.
5. If U = {1, 2, 3, 4, ......., 10} is the universal set for the sets A = {2, 3, 4, 5} and B = {1, 2,
3, 4, 5, 6}, then verify that ( A U B)  A I B.
6. A college awarded 38 medals in football, 15 in basket ball and 20 in cricket. In these
medals went to a total of 58 men and only three men got medals in all the three
sports.
(i) how many received medals in exactly one sport ?
(ii) how many received medals in exactly two sports ?
7. What is the number of elements in power set of set A = {1, 2, 3}?
8. In a survey of 25 students, it was found that 15 had taken Mathematics, 12 had
taken Physics and 11 had taken Chemistry, 5 had taken Mathematics and
Chemistry, 9 had taken Mathematics and Physics, 4 had taken Physics and
Chemistry and 3 had taken all the subjects. Find the number of students that had
taken
(i) only Chemistry (ii) only Mathematics
(iii) only Physics
(iv) Physics and Chemistry but not Mathematics
(v) Mathematics and Physics but not Chemistry
(vi) only one of the subjects.
9. A and B are mutually exclusive events of an experiment. If P(A) = 0.4 and P(B) = 0.5,
find P ( A I B).
10. In a survey of 100 persons it was found that 28 read magazine A, 30 read magazine
B, 42 read magazine C, 28 read magazines A and B, 10 red magazines A and C, 5
read magazines B and C and 3 read all the three magazines. Find how many read
none of the three magazines and also find how many read magazine C only ?
11. Let A = {p, q} and B = {3, 4}. Write A × B. How many subsets will A × B have ?
12. In a survey it was found that 21 people liked product A, 26 liked product B and 29
liked product C. If 14 people liked products A and B, 12 people liked products C and
A, 14 people liked products B and C and 8 liked all the three products. Find how
many liked (i) product C only (ii) products A and C but not product B (iii) at least one
of three products.
13. Let U = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8}, A = {2, 3, 4}, B = {3, 4, 5}. Show that ( A U B)  A I B and
( A I B)  A U B.
14. Write the following set in Roaster form :
A  {an : n  N , an1  3an and a1  1}
15. In a survey of 5000 people in a town, 2250 were listed as reading English newspaper,
1750 as reading Hindi newspaper and 875 were listed as reading both Hindi as well
as English. Find how many people do not read Hindi or English Newspaper. Find
how many people read only English Newspaper.
16. If U = {x : x  10, x  N}, A = {x : x  N, x is prime}, B = {x : x  N, x is even}.
Write A I B in roaster form.
17. In a survey it is found that 105 people take pan-masala, 130 take gutka and 145 take
opium. If 70 people take pan-masala as well as gutka, 75 take gutka as well as
opium, 60 take pan-masala as well as opium and 40 take all the three, find how
many people are surveyed ? How many take opium only ?
All the three are dangerous for health. What should be done to get rid of such
harmful products ?
18. Let A = {1, 2, 3}, B = {3, 4} and C = {4, 5, 6}. Find
(i) A  ( B I C ) (ii) ( A  B) I ( A  C )
19. In a survey of 100 students, if was found that 60 had taken Mathematics, 48 had
taken Commerce and 44 had taken Economics, 20 had taken Mathematics and
Economics, 36 had taken Mathematics and Commerce, 16 had taken Commerce and
Economics and 12 had taken all the three subjects. Find the number of students that
had
(i) only Economics (ii) only Mathematics
(iii) Commerce and Economics but not Mathematics
(iv) only one of the subjects (v) at least one of the three subjects
(vi) none of the subjects.
20. If X and Y are two sets such that n(X) = 17, n(Y) = 23 and n( X UY ) = 38, find
n( X I Y ).
21. A survey of 200 television viewers produced the following information; 114 watch
football, 78 watch hockey, 46 watch basketball, 18 watch football and basketball, 28
watch football and hockey, 20 which hockey and basketball, 20 do not watch any of
the three games. How many watch all the three games ? How many watch exactly
one of the three games ?
22. If A and B two sets such that n(A) = 15, n(B) = 25 and n( A I B)  5, find n( A U B).
23. A market research group conducted a survey of 1000 consumers and reported that
720 consumers like product A and 450 consumers like product B. What is the least
number that must have liked both products ?
24. In a survey of 180 people, it was found that 75 people read newspaper H, 78 read
newspaper T, 78 read newspaper I, 24 read both H and I, 33 read both H and T, 27
read both T and I, 9 read all the three newspapers. Find :
(a) the number of people who read at least one of the newspaper.
(b) the number of people who read exactly one of the newspaper.
25. If A = {x : x = 2n, n Z}, B = {x : x = 3n, n  Z}, then find A I B.
26. Let A = {1, 2}, B = {1, 2, 3, 4}, C = {5, 6} and D = {5, 6, 7, 8}.
Verify that : (a) A × ( B I C ) = ( A  B) I ( A  C )
(b) A × B is a subset of B × D.
27. In a survey of 300 students, the number of students studying the various languages
were found to be :
English only 54, English but not Hindi 69, English and Sanskrit 24, English 78,
Sanskrit 144, Sanskrit and Hindi 24, No language 72. Find :
(i) How many students were studying Hindi ?
(ii) How many students were studying English and Hindi ?
28. If U = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9}, A = {1, 2, 3, 4}, B = {2, 4, 6, 8}. Find (A – B).
29. In an examination, 80% students passed in Mathematics, 72% passed in Science and
13% failed in both the subjects. If 312 students passed in both the subjects, find the
total number of students who appeared in the examination.
30. There are 200 individuals with a skin disorder, 120 had been exposed to the chemical
C1, 50 to chemical C2 and 30 to both chemical C1 and C2. Find number of individuals
exposed to
(a) chemical C1 or chemical C2.
(b) chemical C1 but not chemical C2.
(c) chemical C2 but not chemical C1.

ANSWER KEY
1. {1, 3, 5} 17. 215, 50
2. max. = 6, min. = 9 18. (i) {(1, 4), (2, 4), (3, 4)}, (ii) {(1, 4), (2,
3. (a) 3,300 (b) 4000 4), (3, 4)}
4. [ , {1}, {2}, {1, 2}] 19. (i) 20 (ii) 16 (iii) 4 (iv) 44 (v) 92
5. (vi) 8
6. (i) 46, (ii) 9 20. 2
7. [, {1}, {2}, {3}, {12}, {2, 3}, {1, 3}, {1, 21. 8, 130
2, 3}] 22. 35
8. (i) 5, (ii) 4, (iii) 2, (iv) 1, (v) 6, (vi) 11 23. 170
9. 0.1 24. (a) 156 (b) 90
10. 20, 30 25. {x : x = 6n, n  Z}
11. 24 26.
12. (i) 11 (ii) 4 (iii) 54 27. 54, 9
13. 28. {2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9}
14. {1, 3, 32, 33, ...} 29. 480
15. 1875, 1375 30. (a) 140 (b) 90 (c) 20
16. {3, 5, 7}
PRINCIPAL MATHEMATICS INDUCTIONS
Very Important Questions
1. Using principle of mathematical induction for all n  N, prove that:
(2n  1)  3n1  3
1.3  2.32  3.33  ....  n.3n  .
4
2. Using principle of mathematical induction, prove that :
 1  1  1   1  n 1
1  22 1  32 1  42  .... 1  n2   2n ,  n  2, where n is a natural number.
     
3. Prove by using the principle of mathematical induction for all n Î N :
1 1 1 1 n(n  3)
   .....   .
123 234 34 5 n(n  1)(n  2) 4(n  1)(n  2)
4. Use the principle of mathematical induction to prove that n(n + 1)(2n + 1) is divisible
by 6, where n is a natural number.
5. Prove the following by using the principle of Mathematical Induction for all n N
that x 2n  y2n is divisible by x + y.
6. Using principle of mathematical induction, prove that :
1 1 1 1 n
     
13 3 5 5 7 (2n  1)(2n  1) 2n  1
7. Prove the following by using the principle of mathematical induction :
1 1 1 1 n
      for n  N .
3 5 5 7 7  9 (2n  1)(2n  3) 3(2n  3)
8. Prove that 32n  2  8n  9 is divisible by 8.
9. Using principle of mathematical induction. Prove that :
n(2n  1)(2n  1)
12  32  52  ...  (2n  1)2  , n  N.
3
10. Using principle of mathematical induction, prove that 41n  14n is multiple of 27.
11. Prove that following by using the principle of mathematical induction :
32n2  8n  9 is divisible by 8.
12. Prove by using the principle of mathematical induction for all n  N.
13. 102n1  1 is divisible by 11.
14. Using principle of mathematical induction, prove that :
(2n  1)  3n1  3
1.3 + 2.32 + 3.33 + ... + n.3n   n  N.
4
15. Using principle of mathematical induction. Prove that :
(1  x )n  (1  nx )  n  N ; x  1
16. Prove by using the principle of mathematical induction for all n  N.
2
3 3 3  n(n  1) 
3
1  2  3  ......  n    .
 2 
17. Prove by using the principle of Mathematical Induction for all n  N that
x 2n  y2n is divisible by x + y.

18. Show that 2n4  15n  16, where n  N is divisible by 225.


19. Using principle of mathematical induction, prove that :
 3  5  7   2n  1  2
1  1 1  4 1  9  .... 1  n2   (n  1) for all n  N.
     
n3
20. Prove that : 12  22  ....  n2  , n  N.
3
21. Show that 9n1  8n  9 is divisible by 64, whenever n is a positive integer.
LINEAR INEQUALITIES
Very Important Questions
1. Solve the following system of inequalities graphically :
x  y  1, 3x  4 y  12, x  2 y  2, x  0, y  0
2. Solve the following systems of inequalities graphically :
x  2 y  10
x  2y  1
xy0
x  0, y  0.
3. A manufacture has 600 litres of a 12% solution of acid. How many litres of a 30%
acid solution must be added to it so that acid content in the resulting mixture will be
more than 15% but less than 18% ?
4. Solve the following system of inequalities graphically :
x – 2y  3
3x + 4y  12
x0
y1
5. Find the pairs of consecutive odd positive integers, both of which are smaller than
10, such that their sum is more than 11.
5  2x x
6. Solve   5, x  R.
3 6
7. Solve the following system of inequations graphically :
x + 2y  6; 2x + y 6;
x  1; y  –1.
8. A milkman has 80% milk in his stock of 800 litres of adulterated milk. How much
100% pure milk is to be added to it so that purity is between 90% and 95% ? How
much pure milk he should add to his stock to obtain 99% pure milk ?
What should be done to stop adulteration in foods ? Write your views.
4  2x x
9. Solve   3.
3 2
10. Solve the following system of inequalities graphically :
3x + 2y  24
3x + y 15
x  4.
11. How many litres of water will have to be added to 2250 litres of the 45% solution of
acid so that the resulting mixture will contain more than 25% but less than 30% acid
content ?
12. Solve the following system of inequalities graphically :
2x – y > 1, x – 2y < – 1.
13. Solve the following system of inequalities graphically :
2x + y  4, x + y  3, 2x – y  6,
14. Solve the system of inequalities graphically :
x + 2y  10
x + 2y 1
x–y0
x  0, y  0
15. Solve the following system of inequations graphically :
3 y  2x  4, x  3 y  3, x  y  5, y  4.
16. How many litres of water will have to be added to 1125 litres of the 45% solution of
acid so that the resulting mixture will contain more than 25% but less than 30% acid
content ?

ANSWER KEY
1.
2.
3. 120 < x < 300
4.
5. (5, 7), (7, 9)
6. x 8
7.
8. 300 < x < 2400, x = 15200
9. x  26
10.
11. 1125 < x < 1800 ‘OR’
12. pg-186
13. pg-187 (graph)
14. Graph pg -204
15. 562.5x  9010
3D GEOMETRY TO INTRODUCTION
Very Important Questions
1. Find the coordinate of the point R which divide the join of the points P(0, 0, 0) and
Q(4, –1, –2) in the ratio 1 : 2 externally and verify that P is the mid-point of RQ.
2. Show that the plane ax + by + cz + d = 0 divides the line joining the points ( x1 , y1 , z1 )
( ax1  by1  cz1  d )
and ( x2 , y2 , z2 ) in the ratio  .
( ax2  by2  cz2  d )
3. Find the slope of a line which passes through the origin, and the mid-point of the line
segment joining the points (0, –4) and (8, 0).
4. Determine the point in yz-plane which is equidistant from three points A(1, –1, 0),
B(2, 1, 2) and C(3, 2, –1).
5. Find the coordinates of the foot of perpendicular form origin to the line passing
through the points P(–9, 4, 5) and Q(11, 0, –1). Also find the coordinates of the image
of origin in the line PQ.
6. The mid-points of the sides of a triangle are (1, 5, –1), (0, 4, –2) and (2, 3, 4). Find its
vertices.
7. A bird-lover at P(x, y, z) from a house watches two birds sitting on the branches of
another tree at A(2, 5, 8) and B(3, 7, 2) such that AP = BP. Show that 2x + 4y – 2z +
31 = 0.
8. Show that the three points P(3, 2, –4), Q(5, 4, –6) and R(9, 8, –10) are collinear. Also,
find the ratio in which Q divides PR.
9. Show that the plane ax + by + cz + d = 0 divides the line joining the points ( x1 , y1 , z1 )
ax1  by1  cz1  d
and ( x2 , y2 , z2 ) in the ratio – .
ax2  by2  cz2  d
10. Find the equation of the set of the points P such that its distances from the points
A(3, 4, –5) and B(–2, 1, 4) are equal.
ANSWER KEY
1. (–4, 1, 2)
2.
3. –1/2
 31 3 
4.  0, 16 , 16 
 
5. (1, 2, 2), (2, 4, 4)
6. A(1, 2, 3), B(3, 4, 5), C(–1, 6, –7)
7.
8. 1:2
9.
10. 10x  6 y  18z  29  0
NIRMAL BHARTIA SCHOOL
Political Science
Class XI

Project Guidelines:

Political Science weighs of 100 Marks out of which 80 marks are for theory exams and
20 marks for project.
Out of 20 marks, 10 marks are to be allotted to viva voce and 10 marks for project work.
The project can be individual/pair/group of 4-5 each. The Project can be made on any of
the topics given in the syllabus of a particular class.
Project must be an interdisciplinary research i.e. the topic should be connected to all the
disciplines such as historical, geographical, economic, social and cultural aspects.
The project must correlate with the present scenario.
The suggestive list of activities for project work is as follows: Role Play, Skit,
Presentation, Model, Field Survey, Mock Drills/Mock Event etc.
The students will have to make a handmade project file using A4 sheets, pictures, graphs,
newspaper articles, etc. The students will present their research with the help of a
presentation in class. Students can either make a power point presentation or a short film
to aid their presentation.
Students can refer to books, journal articles, newspaper articles, movies and poetry to
conduct their research.
Students are also free to conduct interviews for the purposes of the research.
The files should be handwritten.
The file should not exceed more than 22-25 pages.
The slides of the PPT should not be more than 15 in number.
The topic chosen should be easy and simple. The research must be authentic.
You are allowed to use the internet to collect information but DO NOT copy. Plagiarism
will lead to a zero. Do include interesting information or anecdotes, if any then please do
mention the source.
Do not submit ill-researched work. Use available resources and your textbooks
prudently. You are encouraged to visit the school library, American Library, British
Council Library, Museums, Monuments or any such source for gathering information.
Please feel free to get in touch with your teacher at: anjali@nirmalbhartia.org

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Section Wise Division of the project File

Section 1: (Title of the Project) catchy and interesting


Section 2: Certificate of authenticity (To be pasted)
Section 3: Index
Section 4: Acknowledgement (Acknowledging the institution, the place visited and the
person who has helped.)
Section 5: Preface: Synopsis/ Problem Statement/Objective of the project.
Section 6: Introduction ((Objective/learning outcomes of the project. Introduce the
selected topic by giving some historical background)
Section 7:Detailed study of the selected topic (This will include maps, statistical data,
pictures, articles etc.)
Section 8:Observations and Analysis (use of a primary source or book report on any text
read on the basis of the topic,interviews, Questionnaires etc.)
Section 9:Conclusion
Section 10:Bibliography: Books, Websites, Articles, Films/ Television referred.

Distribution of Marks: (Total 20 Marks)

S. No. Category Marks


1. Research 5
2. Presentation 2
3. Neatness and Creativity 2
4. Time 1
Project 10 Marks
Viva 10 Marks
Total 20 Marks

Do the following worksheet in your register-

CH- CONSTITUTION
1. What is meant by the term Constitution? Why do we need one? (1)
2. Describe the composition of the Constituent Assembly? (2)
3. “Do you think we are a truly a democracy with a first class constitution “Give your views looking at
incidents happening in the last two decades? (6)
4. Why is it said that the Constitution of India was non-Indian and wholly borrowed? Analyse.(6)

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HHW /2019-20/Political Science/Anjali B. Acharya


5. What were the main objectives of the Indian National movement? How did they influence the Indian
Constitution? (6)
6. Making a constitution effective depends on factors like” balanced institutional design and also
institutional arrangements” How far has this proved true where the success of the Indian constitution is
concerned ? (5)
7. Give examples to support the following conclusions: (4*3=12)
i. The constitution was made by credible leaders who commanded the people’s respect.
ii. The constitution has distributed power in such as to make it difficult to subvert it.
iii. The constitution is the focus on the hopes and aspiration of the people.

8. State the different types of amendments to the Constitution.(6)

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NIRMAL BHARTIA SCHOOL

PSYCHOLOGY
Class XI
Project Guidelines:

Psychology weighs 100 Marks out of which 70 marks are for theory exams and 30 marks
for project.
Out of 30 marks, 10 marks are to be allotted to the project file (including viva) and 05
marks for practical file and 15 marks for conduction of one experiment.
Students need to undertake one project which would involve the use of different methods
of enquiry and related skills.
Project must be an interdisciplinary research i.e. the topic should be connected to all the
disciplines such as psychological, physiological, physical, social and cultural aspects.
The project must correlate with the present scenario.
The suggestive list of method of data collection for project work is as follows: Case
study, interview, questionnaire, observation, experiment and psychological tests.
The students will have to make a handmade project file using A4 sheets, pictures,
newspaper articles, etc. The students will present their research in class.
Students can refer to books, journal articles, newspaper articles, published research
papers to conduct their research.
Students are also free to conduct interviews/ surveys for the purposes of the research.
The files should be handwritten.
The file should not exceed more than 22-25 pages.
The topic chosen should be easy and simple. The research must be authentic.
You are allowed to use the internet to collect information but DO NOT copy. Plagiarism
will lead to a zero. Do include interesting information or anecdotes, if any then please do
mention the source.
Do not submit ill-researched work. Use available resources and your textbooks
prudently. You are encouraged to visit the school library, American Library, British
Council Library, Museums, Monuments or any such source for gathering information.
Please feel free to get in touch with your teacher at: shrutisridhar@nirmalbhartia.org
Section Wise Division of the project File

Section 1: (Title of the Project) catchy and interesting


Section 2: Certificate of authenticity (To be pasted)
Section 3: Index
Section 4: Acknowledgement (Acknowledging the institution, the place visited and the
person who has helped.)
Section 5: Preface: Synopsis/ Problem Statement/Objective of the project.
Section 6: Introduction ((Objective/learning outcomes of the project. Introduce the
selected topic by giving some historical background)
Section 7: Detailed study of the selected topic (This will include review of literature,
statistical data, pictures, articles etc.)
Section 8: Observations and Analysis (use of a primary source or book report on any text
read on the basis of the topic: interviews, questionnaires etc.)
Section 9:Conclusion
Section 10: Bibliography: Books, Websites, Articles, Films/ Television referred.

Distribution of Marks

S. No. Category Marks


1. Research 05
2. Presentation 2
3. Neatness and Creativity 2
4. Time 1
Project 10 Marks
Class-11th, Business Studies
Guidelines for Project Report, Session- 2019-20
Submission date- 5thJuly, 2019
Topic: Business and its nature
Product/ Service: E- Commerce
You are required to make a project on the above said product/service keeping in mind the following:

1. Evolution of e- Commerce as a business platform.


2. Identify the important characteristics of an e- Commerce business.
3. Growth of e-commerce platforms past 5 years
4. Types of e-commerce business developed.
5. What ‘Aids of commerce’ are mostly used by e- commerce business operators.
6. What are the major objectives of E- commerce business.
7. Range of products offered.
8. What are the legal compliances required to start an e- business.
9. Make an Outline of the operating procedure of supply chain of goods traded in e- commerce business.
10.Methods adopted for promotion of their business.

PRESENTATION AND SUBMISSION OF PROJECT REPORT.


At the end of the stipulated term, each student will prepare and submit his/her project report.
Following essentials are required to be fulfilled for its preparation and submission.

1. The total project will be in a file format, consisting of the recordings of the value of shares and the graphs.
2. The project will be handwritten.
3. The project will be presented in a neat folder.
4. The project report will be developed in the following sequence-
Cover page should project the title, student information, school and year.
List of contents.
Acknowledgements and preface (acknowledging the institution, the news papers read, T.V. channels viewed,
places visited and persons who have helped).
Introduction.
Topic with suitable heading.
Planning and activities done during the project, if any.
Observations and findings while conducting the project.
News paper clippings to reflect the changes of share prices.
Conclusions (summarised suggestions or findings, future scope of study).
Appendix (if needed).
Teachers report.
Teachers will initial preface page.
At the completion of the evaluation of the project, it will be punched in the centre so that the report cannot be
reused but is available for reference only.
The projects will be returned after evaluation. The school may keep the best projects.
Guidelines of project Work (History)
Class 11 and 12

General Instructions:
1. All work must be authentic, creative and well-researched.
2. Project must include Cover Page, Index, Acknowledgment and Bibliography.
3. Each student needs to submit their individual files. Minimum page limit is 30.
4. Along with the written file the projects need to be presented with the help of a PPT.
5. All the projects should be handwritten on A4 sheets. The projects must include pictures, maps,
articles, etc. Special weight age shall be given to files that include pictures relevant to the topic,
statistical data, newspaper articles and interesting unknown facts, etc.
6. You are allowed to use the internet to collect information but DO NOT copy. Plagiarism will
lead to a zero. Do include interesting information or anecdotes, if any then please do mention the
source.
Note: Mentioning the sources of research/ pictures/ articles/ maps is a must and shall be included
in the bibliography.
7. Students are expected to apply the Social Science concepts that they have learnt over the years
in order to prepare the project report.

Section Wise Division of the project File

Section 1: (Title of the Project) catchy and interesting


Section 2: Certificate of authenticity (To be pasted)
Section 3: Index
Section 4: Acknowledgement (Acknowledging the institution, the place visited and the person
who has helped.)
Section 5: Preface: Synopsis/ Problem Statement/Objective of the project.
Section 6: Introduction ((Objective/learning outcomes of the project. Introduce the selected topic
by giving some historical background)
Section 7: Detailed study of the selected topic (This will include maps, statistical data, pictures,
articles etc.)

Ownership/Integrity/Collaboration/excellence, Holiday
Homework/2019-20/History/Ritika Page 1|2
Section 8: Observations and Analysis (use of a primary source or book report on any text read on
the basis of the topic
Section 9: Conclusion
Section 10: Bibliography: Books, Websites, Articles, Films/ Television referred.

Ownership/Integrity/Collaboration/excellence, Holiday
Homework/2019-20/History/Ritika Page 2|2
HOLIDAY HOME WORK
CLASS XI, COMPUTER SCIENCE, 2019-20

Be a Wired Safety Volunteer…..

“There is a hero in all of us that gives us strength and makes us noble”. Here is an opportunity for you
to become an Internet Superhero. Your task is to educate your peers on “Staying Safe in Cyber Space”
once you join back. You need to make your peers aware of the potential threats and measures to stay safe.
Carry out research that must cover the following aspects of the topic of cyber security: Safely browsing
the Web, Identity Protection, Confidentiality, Social Networks, Cyber Trolls and Bullying, Appropriate
use of Social Networks, Preventing the spread of rumours, Safely accessing web sites (adware,
malware,viruses, Trojans), Safely communicationg data( secure connections, eavesdropping, phishing and
identity verification ). Then, prepare an e-safety manual and submit it at the end of your vacations.

Encode and Decode….

Now that you are aware of the ASCII encoding scheme, encode our theme of this year “Heroes and
Sheroes” using the ASCII binary codes for the characters.

Heroes and Sheroes….

Create a poster ( the size of an A4 size sheet ) on any hero or shero who according to you has
revolutionized the computing world.

Bits and Bytes……

Hexadecimal is the base 16 number system. Thus, numbers in this system are made up using 16 symbols (
0 -9 and A to F , where A represents decimal 10, B represents 11 and so on ).
1. Convert the following binary numbers into hexadecimal.
10010011

10101000

111011

10101100

1111.11

2. Convert the following hexadecimal numbers into binary.


1A

35
BC

AD

1F.2

Octal is the base 8 number system. Thus, numbers in this system are made up using 8 symbols ( 0 -7).
Convert the following binary numbers into octal.
10010011

10101000

111011

10101100

111111

Convert the following octal numbers into binary.


12

35

713

173

25
Holiday Homework Project

Class 11

Commercial Art
Study the time period from pre-history to Indus valley civilization (from syllabus book)
and write note on -
A. The roaring animal
B. Wizard’s dance (150 words each)

Study the Indus valley civilization( from syllabus book) and write notes on any two
discovered artefacts of Indus valley civilization (150 words)

Visit the National Museum during summer vacations and do the following-

a) Study and draw sketch of “Dancing Girl” in museum light on half chart size sheet.
b) Study the seals discovered in Indus valley civilization and draw any one seal on half
chart size sheet with oil pastel resist technique.
CLASS – XI CHEMISTRY HHW

Q1. Do the investigatory project on the topic assigned to you.

CBSE GUIDELINES TO PREPARE A GOOD


CHEMISTRY PROJECT

CBSE organises science exhibition every year with the vision to develop scientific temper
and 21st century skills that are mandatory is today’s world. CBSE is a stepping-stone to the
JNNSMEE organised by NCERT as well as to the Intel Science Exhibitions.

This is an exhibition organised at national Level and hence it is essential that the projects
submitted by students adhere to certain standards, and have global benchmarks. It is
expected that projects prepared by students must reflect quality and be innovative, original
and follow scientific methodology.

It is important to prepare project under the guidance of a guide - He/she could be


a teacher or parent/guardian or may even be a research scholar / scientist.

How to Select a Topic

Choosing a sub – theme for your project

Select a sub-theme based on CBSE’s circular. Choose a topic for your project which
completely justifies / maps with the sub – theme under which the project will be presented.
Never select a topic which cannot be completely mapped to any sub-theme.

Research-based projects qualify to participate at the National Fair. Hence, your


project must be original in content and should be substantiated with data collected
from experimentation, if appropriate. As far as possible it should be a working
model.

10 steps to prepare a Research Based Project:

Choose your topic carefully and start working on it as early as possible. Do not change sub -
themes or topic selected under a sub - theme. This will enable you to organize your project
in the correct format, with sufficient data and results of the experiment. Follow the steps
mentioned below to prepare your research based project.

1. Select your topic under a sub – theme which completely maps with the
sub– theme:
The first step, selecting a project idea, is the most important. This is the first question or
dilemma a student faces when starting a science project, because it can make a big
difference between a good and an excellent project. Keep three important things in mind
while selecting your topic.

Second, while you are choosing a topic, check all the resources around you. This will help
you in doing your project with ease. e.g. - If you are working on medicinal plants, make
sure that you have access to at least some medicinal plants in the surrounding region;

Third, have conviction in the project idea selected and don’t change it half way through.

2. Source information on your project:

It is important to source information very carefully. After selecting the project topic, try
to learn everything about it. Search for good books in your school library and other
libraries in your city. Become member of some local library in your city and try to buy
some good books on your topic from the bookstore. You can access Internet and visit
various search engines available to find information. You may also try various science
related sites on the internet, however be careful with the information available on
Internet. You must learn to collect only meaningful data from Internet and also try to
check its validity and authenticity of its source. Internet is flooded with information, and
hence, filter the information as per your requirement. Do not put anything and
everything available on various website while recoding your observation. Also try to
source any related work done before, so that you may take that as background and may
start from there.

3. Work plan:

Make a complete work plan as to how you will conduct your experiment or prepare
your model. Your plan should include the following:

The purpose, aim of your experiment and the scientific principle involved;

The variable or the things that you are going to change during the experiment
to evolve a new concept;
Outcome of the project;

Detailed procedure outlining as how you will conduct the experiment;

Material you will require at each stage.

Prepare a Time frame and allot sufficient time for all stages. Also make sure that
time allotted is realistic and deadlines strictly adhered.

With the assistance of your guide/ teacher prepare a work flow / flowchart for preparing the
complete project, allocate work and fix responsibilities within team.

4. Make and test your hypothesis - design experiments to test your hypothesis:
As in any research based experiment it is most important to think, identify and
determine the variables that may be involved, think about ways to change one at a time.
Never change more than one at a time, as you will not know what variable is causing
your observation. Sometimes variables are linked and work together hence, first, try to
choose variables that you think act independent of each other.

Hypothesis is a tentative theory that can be proved or disproved through further


investigation and analysis. Once you are able to determine variables you will be able to
formulate questions. You can now formulate hypothesis. There is usually one hypothesis
for each question. You must at least design one experiment to test each hypothesis.

Design experiments to test your hypothesis

Define a complete procedure for each experiment. To draw a conclusion from any
experiment, it is mandatory to have a neutral “reference point” for comparison. This
neutral “reference point” allows you to see what changing a variable does by comparing
it to not changing anything. Experiments are usually conducted in all research
laboratories in this way and they are called “controlled experiments”.

Experiments are usually repeated to validate results and to make sure they are
reproducible. Reproducibility is a crucial requirement as without it, you cannot trust your
results.
results. It is desirous in any experiment to think of possible errors and record them, and
as far as possible correct them. Your results should be predictable, i.e. the same results
should be obtained when the experiment is repeated. This will ensure that your results
are not due to mere chance but are scientific in nature.

5. Recording your data and observations:

In any experiment recording the observations is the most important part of the
experiment. You must measure to what extent the variable affects the system under
study and what different responses this change produces in the system. It is mandatory
for any experiment that this data is recorded very carefully may be in a tabular form so
that it can be retrieved as and when required. This is called “raw data” since it has not
yet interpreted. When raw data is processed it becomes result.

Observations can be written descriptions of what you noticed during an experiment or


problems encountered. These observations are valuable when drawing conclusions and
useful for locating experimental errors and therefore should carefully note in a data-log
book. You may also take photographs at various stages or video record an experimental
procedure performed.

6. Consult your guide (teacher / parent):

As a first step, even before you select a topic appoint a guide. Your science teacher or

your parent or any research scholar you might know may be selected as a guide. It is a
good practice to discuss everything and anything related to your project with your guide
and should be an ongoing activity. The guidance will ensure that you are working in the
right direction and the methodology being used by is correct besides you will also get a
complete clarity about several concepts which you might study in senior classes at later
stage of your life. However don’t feel shy in getting your queries solved and listen to their
suggestions. Be inquisitive!!

7. Calculations to draw conclusions:

Use your raw data to calculate and arrive at conclusions. It is very important to
process raw data carefully else you may arrive at a wrong conclusion.

For example, you weighed a container. This weight is recorded in your raw data table as
'wt. of container'. You then added some liquid to the container and weighed it again.
This would be entered as 'wt. of container + wt. of liquid'.

In the calculation section, do the calculations to find out how much liquid was used in
this experimental run:

(wt. of container + wt. of liquid) - (wt. of container) = wt. of liquid.

Each calculated answer is entered into a table in a 'Results' section using proper units.
8. Summarize results and derive conclusions:

Summarization of result is very important. Summarisation may be written paragraph or


can be in the form of a table of processed numerical data or graphs. Mathematical
equations can be made from graphs. These equations allow you to predict how a change
will affect the system without the need to do additional experiments. Based on summary,
you can draw conclusions about the system under study. These conclusions help to
confirm or deny the original hypothesis.

Based on summary and your experimental data and your experimental observations, try
to answer your initial questions. Is your hypothesis correct? This is the time to reflect
and access your experiment. It is possible that your observations lead you to conclude
something different from your starting hypothesis. Never ever alter results to fit a
theory. If your results do not support your hypothesis, it does not matter. You still have
done successful scientific research. The spirit of scientific inquiry requires an open mind.
Q2. Solve the given assignments of chapter 1.

Unit 1 Some basic Concepts of Chemistry

Assignment # 1
1. Define law of multiple proportions with example.
2. Calculate the molecular mass of C12H22O11
3. Calculate the no. of moles of 5.68 gm. of iron.
4. Express these in terms of 4 significant figures: a) 6000 b) 0.0002
5. What is the effect of temperature on molality and molarity?
6. What are limiting and excess reagents? Explain with example.

7. Differentiate between molarity and molality. Which one out of them is better and
why?

8. 1.82 g. of glucose (molar mass-180) is dissolved in 25g of water. Calculate (a) the
molality (b) mole fraction of glucose and water.
9. The molecular mass of an organic compound is 90 and its %age composition is C-
26.6%; O=71.1% and H=2.2%. Determine the molecular formula of the compound.
10. Commercially available sulphuric acid contains 91% acid by mass and has a density
of 1.83g mL-1 (i) Calculate the molarity of the solution (ii) volume of concentrated
acid required to prepare 3.5L of 0.50 M H2SO4

Assignment- 2
Problem #1: Phosphoric acid is usually obtained as an 87.0% phosphoric acid solution. If it

is 13.0 M, what is the density of this solution? What is its molality?

Problem #2: Concentrated hydrochloric acid is usually available at a concentration of 37.7%

by mass. What is its molar concentration?

(The density of the solution is 1.19 g/mL)

Problem #3: I have a bottle of NH3. Its strength is 32.0% and its density is 0.89 g/mL. How

do I figure out the molarity?

Problem #4: An aqueous solution of hydrofluoric acid is 30.0% HF, by mass, and has a

density of 1.101 g cm-3. What are the molality and molarity of HF in this solution?
Problem #5: Concentrated nitric acid is a solution that is 70.4% HNO3 by mass. The density

of this acid is 1.42 g/mL. What is the molarity and the molality of the acid? what is the mole

fraction of HNO3?

Problem #6: The density of toluene (C7H8) is 0.867 g/mL, and the density of thiophene

(C4H4S) is 1.065 g/mL. A solution is made by dissolving 9.660 g of thiophene in 260.0 mL of

toluene.

a) Calculate the molality of thiophene in the solution.

b) Assuming that the volumes of the solute and solvent are additive, determine the molarity

of thiophene in the solution.

Problem #7: What is the density (in g/mL) of a 3.60 M aqueous sulfuric acid solution that is

29.0% H2SO4 by mass?

Problem #8: A bottle of commercial sulphuric acid (density 1.787 g/cc) is labeled as 86% by

weight. What is the molarity of acid?

Problem #9: 0.100 mole of NaCl is dissolved into 100.0 grams of pure H2O. What is the

mole fraction of NaCl?

Problem #10: A solution is prepared by mixing 25.0 g of water, H2O, and 25.0 g of ethanol,

C2H5OH. Determine the mole fractions of each substance.

Problem #12: A solution contains 10.0 g pentane, 10.0 g hexane and 10.0 g benzene. What is

the mole fraction of hexane?

Problem 13 : Find emperical and molcular formula if a compound has

(a) C = 82.8%, H= 17.2 %, Molcular mass=58

(b) C = 24%, H= 6.4 %, Molcular mass=94

(c) C = 40%, H= 6.67 %, Molcular mass=60

(d) P = 38.27%, H= 2.47 %, O = 59.26% , Molcular mass= 162

Problem #14: Calculate no. of H-atoms in 52 g urea (NH2CONH2).


Problem #15: Calculate no. of Fe-atoms present in its 2.5 g.

Problem #16: What is the mass of .06 mol of NaHCO3?

Problem #17: How many CO2 molecule are present in its 12 g?

Problem #18: How much quicklime can be obtained by heating 25g CaCO3?

Problem #19: 14 g N2 reacts with 38 g O2 to produce NO2 gas. Identify the limiting reagent,

amount of leftover reagent and amount of SO2 produced.

Problem #20: How many moles of CO2 will be produced on heating 14 g C with 50g O2?

What is the LR?


Nirmal Bhartia School

Summer Holiday H.W

Biology – Class – XI

‘Come forth into the light of things, let nature be your teacher.’- Willam Wordworth

Visit a nearby nursery , park or garden to identify and study the following :
a) Root and its modifications
b) Stem and its modifications
c) Leaf and its modifications
d) Types of inflorescence

Take pictures, collect information about each of them and record it in a scrap book.

Make a herbarium specimen, collect different types of plants based on variety of morphological
characteristic characteristics. Press them until dry between blotters and mount onto a herbarium
sheet with a suitable label. For more information refer to the given websites.
http://www.botany.unimelb.edu.au/herbarium/files/MakeHerbSpec.pdf

http://herbarium.desu.edu/pfk/page23/page24/files/herbariummaking.pdf

http://www.manxbiodiversity.org/Flora/PDF/Herbarium%20specimens%20guidelines.pdf

http://www.slideshare.net/ibelmonte.comenius/preparing-the-herbarium-10108726

Complete the given practicals in your practical files. Draw the following diagrams in your practical
notebook and write the notes on the following.

a) The regions of the root tip


b) Modifications of root
c) Modification of stem
d) Modification of leaves
e) Simple and compound leaves
f) Position of floral parts on thalamus
g) Types of aestivation in corolla
h) Type of placentation
i) Structure of Dicot and Monocot seed
j) Study of flowering plants
k) Histology in plants
l) Osmosis
m) Plasmolysis
n) Rat of transpiration
o) Detection of carbohydrates , fats and proteins
p) Chromatography
q) Spotting plants
r) Spotting animals
s) Mitosis
Class-11 th - Accountancy- Holiday homework

Q1. On April 01, 2016 Anees started business with Rs. 100,000 and other transactions for the

month are:

2. Purchase Furniture for Cash Rs. 7,000.

8. Purchase Goods for Cash Rs. 2,000 and for Credit Rs. 1,000 from Khalid Retail Store.

14. Sold Goods to Khan Brothers Rs. 12,000 and Cash Sales Rs. 5,000.

18. Owner withdrew of worth Rs. 2,000 for personal use.

22. Paid Khalid Retail Store Rs. 500.

26. Received Rs. 10,000 from Khan Brothers.

30. Paid Salaries Expense Rs. 2,000

Q2. Prepare general journal entries for the following transactions of a business called Pose for

Pics in 2016:

Aug. 1: Hashim Khan, the owner, invested Rs. 57,500 cash and Rs. 32,500 of photography

equipment in the business.

04: Paid Rs. 3,000 cash for an insurance policy covering the next 24 months.

07: Services are performed and clients are billed for Rs. 10,000.
Q3. On March 2017, Farhan Rahim, starts wholesaling business. Following transactions as
follows:

1. He started business with capital of Rs. 15,000 and Land worth Rs. 10,000.

8. Bought goods from Bilal and Friends Rs. 1,000 and by cash from XYZ Co. Rs 2,000.

13. Sold goods to Rehman & sons Rs. 1,500 and sale by cash Rs. 5,000.

17. Gave away charity of cash Rs. 50 and merchandising worth Rs. 30.

21. Paid Bilal and Friends cash Rs. 975; discount received Rs. 25.

28. Received cash from Rehman & Sons Rs. 1,450; allowed him discount of Rs. 50.

Q4.Shah Sauood Marine is a boat repair yard. During August 2016, its transactions
included the following:

03. Loan taken from Habib Bank Ltd. of Rs. 25,000. Rs. 20,000 withdrawn for business and

remaining in the bank a/c.

06. Paid rent for the month of August Rs. 4,400 and accrued rent expenses was Rs. 600.

12. At request of Kiwi Insurance, Inc, made repairs on boat of Jon Seaways. Sent bill for Rs.

5,620 for services rendered to Kiwi Insurance Inc. (credit Repair Service Revenue).

18. Made repairs to boat of Dennis Copper and collected in full the charge of Rs. 2,830.

20. Placed Advertisement in The Dawn of Rs. 165, payment to be made within 30 days.

25. Received a check for 5,620 from Kiwi Insurance Inc representing collection of the receivable

of August 12.
30. Sent check to The Dawn in payment of the liability incurred on August 20.

Q5.1 st January, 2017, Saeed Ahmad started business other transactions for the
month of June as follows:

02. Purchased from Kareem goods of list price of Rs. 6,000 subject to 10% trade discount by

cash.

04. Sold goods to Din Muhammad Rs. 800 and cash sales of Rs. 200.

10. Distributed goods worth Rs. 200 as free samples and goods taken away by the proprietor for

personal use Rs. 100.

12. Received discount Rs 20 and Commission Rs 500.

17. Goods returned by Din Muhammad Rs. 200 and payment other outstanding amount.

24. Furniture lost by fire of worth Rs. 500.

30. Bad Debts during the period was Rs.100.

Q6. Write journal entries in the books of Chikky & Bros.

10th June : Paid wages 12,000


11th June : paid rent by cheque 10,000
13th June : Paid salary to Mr. Charan 12,000
14th June : Purchased stationery from Kagaz & Co. and paid by cheque 5,000
15th June : Received interest 14,000
17th June : Received commission by cheque 6,000
18th June : Rent received from Mr. Mody 8,000
19th June : Interest received from Mr.Bijju by cheque 10,000
20th June : Carriage paid on purchase of goods 3,000
22nd June : Carriage paid on sale of goods 2,000

Q7. Journalise the following transactions in the books of Rama & Sons

3rd May : Cash deposited into bank 60,000


4th May : Loan given to Bhuvan 20,000
4th May : Paid cash to Veeru 20,000
5th May : Paid to Veeru by cheque 15,000
5th May : Cash received from Tarun 12,000
5th May : Took loan from Anush 15,000
6th May : Cheque received from Pranav 15,000
6th May : Paid to Intel Computers by cheque 17,000
6th May : Withdrew from bank 5,000
7th May : Withdrew from bank for office use 8,000
7th May : Cash received from Bhuvan on loan account 10,000
8th May : Withdrew from bank for personal use 1,000
8th May : Cash taken by proprietor for personal use 3,000
9th May : Bought furniture and paid by cheque 15,000
9th May : Paid to Anush by cheque on loan account 5,000
9th May : Brought additional capital of 25,000

Q8. Mr Robert commenced business on 1st January, 2011 with a capital of $100,000 in
cash. On the same date he opened the bank account in ADCB and deposited $20,000.
During the month of January 2011 the following transactions took place:

Jan 1 Bought goods for cash 70,000

2 Sold goods to Steve Co. (Credit) 38,000

15 Sold goods for cash 9,000

21 Steve Co. paid by cheque 35,000


22 Stationery bill paid by cheque 2,000

22 Telephone bill by cash 500

31 Paid rent by cash 2,000

Paid salaries by cash 3,000

Withdrew cash personal use 5,000


Complete the project work as per CBSE guidelines.

Guidelines for Project Work in Economics (Class and XII)

The objectives of the project work are to enable learners to:

probe deeper into theoretical concepts learnt in classes and XII


analyse and evaluate real world economic scenarios using theoretical constructs and
arguments
demonstrate the learning of economic theory
follow up aspects of economics in which learners have interest
develop the communication skills to argue logically

The expectations of the project work are that:

learners will complete only ONE project in each academic session


project should be of 3,500-4,000 words (excluding diagrams & graphs), preferably hand-
written
it will be an independent, self-directed piece of study

Scope of the project:

Learners may work upon the following lines as a suggested flow chart:

Expected Checklist:
Introduction of topic/title
Identifying the causes, consequences and/or remedies
Various stakeholders and effect on each of them
Advantages and disadvantages of situations or issues identified
Short-term and long-term implications of economic strategies suggested in the course of
research
Validity, reliability, appropriateness and relevance of data used for research work and for
presentation in the project file
Presentation and writing that is succinct and coherent in project file
Citation of the materials referred to, in the file in footnotes, resources section,
bibliography etc.
Mode of presentation/submission of the Project:

At the end of the stipulated term, each learner will present the research work in the Project File
to the External and Internal examiner. The questions should be asked from the Research
Work/ Project File of the learner. The Internal Examiner should ensure that the study
submitted by the learner is his/her own original work. In case of any doubt, authenticity
should be checked and verified.

Marking Scheme:

Marks are suggested to be given as –

S. No. Heading Marks Alloted

1. Relevance of the topic 3

2. Knowledge Content/Research Work 6

3. Presentation Technique 3

4. Viva-voce 8

Total 20 Marks

Suggestive List of Projects:

Micro and Small Scale Industries Food Supply Channel in India


Contemporary Employment situation in India Disinvestment policy of the government

Goods and Services Tax Act and its Impact on


Health Expenditure (of any state)
GDP

Human Development Index Inclusive Growth Strategy

Self-help group Trends in Credit availability in India

Monetary policy committee and its functions Role of RBI in Control of Credit

Government Budget & its Components Trends in budgetary condition of India

Exchange Rate determination – Methods and


Currency War – reasons and repercussions
Techniques

Livestock – Backbone of Rural India Alternate fuel – types and importance

Sarwa Siksha Abhiyan – Cost Ratio Benefits Golden Quadrilateral- Cost ratio benefit

Relation between Stock Price Index and


Minimum Support Prices
Economics Health of Nation

Minimum Wage Rate – approach and


Waste Management in India – Need of the hour
Application

Rain Water Harvesting – a solution to water


Digital India- Step towards the future
crises

Vertical Farming – an alternate way Silk Route- Revival of the past

Bumper Production- Boon or Bane for the


Make in India – The way ahead
farmer

Rise of Concrete Jungle- Trend Analysis Organic Farming – Back to the Nature

Any other newspaper article and its evaluation on


Any other topic
basis of economic principles

Do the following questions in your notebook-

Q1.Explain three Economic problems.

Q2.Why do economic problems arise?

Q3. What do you understand by growth of resources and fall in resources ?

Q4. Explain three types of consumer’s equilibrium, use table and diagram.
HOME SCIENCE HOLIDAY HOMEWORK – XI

1. Practical Files
To complete the following practicals in the practical files.
 Leaflet making
 Slogan writing
 Poster making

2. Recipe Files
To complete all the given recipes in the recipe file and paste their respective pictures.
CBSE Guidelines to Prepare a Good Project

CBSE organises science exhibition every year with the vision to develop scientific temper and
21st century skills that are mandatory is today’s world. CBSE is a stepping-stone to the
JNNSMEE organised by NCERT as well as to the Intel Science Exhibitions.

This is an exhibition organised at national Level and hence it is essential that the projects
submitted by students adhere to certain standards, and have global benchmarks. It is
expected that projects prepared by students must reflect quality and be innovative, original
and follow scientific methodology.

It is important to prepare project under the guidance of a guide - He/she could be


a teacher or parent/guardian or may even be a research scholar / scientist.

While working on a model / project each student / team is requested to follow these
guidelines:

 How to select a topic


 10 steps to a Prepare a Prize Winning Research Based Project
 What is NOT accepted as a CBSE Project?
 Important Do's and Don'ts
 Project set up and display
 How to present your exhibit for judgement?
 Tips on writing a Synopsis
 Tips for teachers / Guides / Parents / Project Mentors
 What should be the essential elements of your project?

How to Select a Topic


Choosing a sub – theme for your project

Select a sub-theme based on CBSE’s circular. Choose a topic for your project which
completely justifies / maps with the sub – theme under which the project will be presented.
Never select a topic which cannot be completely mapped to any sub-theme.

Research-based projects qualify to participate at the National Fair. Hence, your


project must be original in content and should be substantiated with data collected
from experimentation, if appropriate. As far as possible it should be a working
model.

10 steps to prepare a Research Based Project:


Choose your topic carefully and start working on it as early as possible. Do not change sub -
themes or topic selected under a sub - theme. This will enable you to organize your project
in the correct format, with sufficient data and results of the experiment. Follow the steps
mentioned below to prepare your research based project.

1. Select your topic under a sub – theme which completely maps with the sub–
theme:

The first step, selecting a project idea, is the most important. This is the first question or
dilemma a student faces when starting a science project, because it can make a big
difference between a good and an excellent project. Keep three important things in mind
while selecting your topic.

First, choose a topic that interests you;


Second, while you are choosing a topic, check all the resources around you. This will help
you in doing your project with ease. e.g. - If you are working on medicinal plants, make
sure that you have access to at least some medicinal plants in the surrounding region;

Third, have conviction in the project idea selected and don’t change it half way through.

2. Source information on your project:

It is important to source information very carefully. After selecting the project topic, try
to learn everything about it. Search for good books in your school library and other
libraries in your city. Become member of some local library in your city and try to buy
some good books on your topic from the bookstore. You can access Internet and visit
various search engines available to find information. You may also try various science
related sites on the internet, however be careful with the information available on
Internet. You must learn to collect only meaningful data from Internet and also try to
check its validity and authenticity of its source. Internet is flooded with information, and
hence, filter the information as per your requirement. Do not put anything and
everything available on various website while recoding your observation. Also try to
source any related work done before, so that you may take that as background and may
start from there.

3. Work plan:

Make a complete work plan as to how you will conduct your experiment or prepare your
model. Your plan should include the following:

 The purpose, aim of your experiment and the scientific principle involved;
 The variable or the things that you are going to change during the experiment to
evolve a new concept;
 Outcome of the project;
 Detailed procedure outlining as how you will conduct the experiment;
 Material you will require at each stage.

Prepare a Time frame and allot sufficient time for all stages. Also make sure that time
allotted is realistic and deadlines strictly adhered.

With the assistance of your guide/ teacher prepare a work flow / flowchart for preparing the
complete project, allocate work and fix responsibilities within team.

4. Make and test your hypothesis - design experiments to test your hypothesis:

As in any research based experiment it is most important to think, identify and determine
the variables that may be involved, think about ways to change one at a time. Never
change more than one at a time, as you will not know what variable is causing your
observation. Sometimes variables are linked and work together hence, first, try to
choose variables that you think act independent of each other.

Hypothesis is a tentative theory that can be proved or disproved through further


investigation and analysis. Once you are able to determine variables you will be able to
formulate questions. You can now formulate hypothesis. There is usually one hypothesis
for each question. You must at least design one experiment to test each hypothesis.

Design experiments to test your hypothesis

Define a complete procedure for each experiment. To draw a conclusion from any
experiment, it is mandatory to have a neutral “reference point” for comparison. This
neutral “reference point” allows you to see what changing a variable does by comparing
it to not changing anything. Experiments are usually conducted in all research
laboratories in this way and they are called “controlled experiments”.

Experiments are usually repeated to validate results and to make sure they are
reproducible. Reproducibility is a crucial requirement as without it, you cannot trust your
results. It is desirous in any experiment to think of possible errors and record them, and
as far as possible correct them. Your results should be predictable, i.e. the same results
should be obtained when the experiment is repeated. This will ensure that your results
are not due to mere chance but are scientific in nature.

5. Recording your data and observations:

In any experiment recording the observations is the most important part of the
experiment. You must measure to what extent the variable affects the system under
study and what different responses this change produces in the system. It is mandatory
for any experiment that this data is recorded very carefully may be in a tabular form so
that it can be retrieved as and when required. This is called “raw data” since it has not
yet interpreted. When raw data is processed it becomes result.

Observations can be written descriptions of what you noticed during an experiment or


problems encountered. These observations are valuable when drawing conclusions and
useful for locating experimental errors and therefore should carefully note in a data-log
book. You may also take photographs at various stages or video record an experimental
procedure performed.

6. Consult your guide (teacher / parent/ research scholar):

As a first step, even before you select a topic appoint a guide. Your science teacher or
your parent or any research scholar you might know may be selected as a guide. It is a
good practice to discuss everything and anything related to your project with your guide
and should be an ongoing activity. The guidance will ensure that you are working in the
right direction and the methodology being used by is correct besides you will also get a
complete clarity about several concepts which you might study in senior classes at later
stage of your life. However don’t feel shy in getting your queries solved and listen to
their suggestions. Be inquisitive!!

7. Calculations to draw conclusions:

Use your raw data to calculate and arrive at conclusions. It is very important to process
raw data carefully else you may arrive at a wrong conclusion.

For example, you weighed a container. This weight is recorded in your raw data table as
'wt. of container'. You then added some liquid to the container and weighed it again. This
would be entered as 'wt. of container + wt. of liquid'.

In the calculation section, do the calculations to find out how much liquid was used in this
experimental run:
(wt. of container + wt. of liquid) - (wt. of container) = wt. of liquid.

Each calculated answer is entered into a table in a 'Results' section using proper units.

8. Summarize results and derive conclusions:

Summarization of result is very important. Summarisation may be written paragraph or


can be in the form of a table of processed numerical data or graphs. Mathematical
equations can be made from graphs. These equations allow you to predict how a change
will affect the system without the need to do additional experiments. Based on summary,
you can draw conclusions about the system under study. These conclusions help to
confirm or deny the original hypothesis.

Based on summary and your experimental data and your experimental observations, try
to answer your initial questions. Is your hypothesis correct? This is the time to reflect
and access your experiment. It is possible that your observations lead you to conclude
something different from your starting hypothesis. Never ever alter results to fit a
theory. If your results do not support your hypothesis, it does not matter. You still have
done successful scientific research. The spirit of scientific inquiry requires an open mind.
9. Define utility and further scope of Project

It is very important to determine utility of the project. Utility and further scope also
determines cost viability and encourages inventors to explore further. Investors are
willing to invest money in any project if it has futuristic value. Whenever you decide to
take up a project it’s very important to determine its future prospects.

10. Cost feasibility:

It is very important to put down the actual cost incurred in preparing the dummy model
as well as calculating and arriving at the estimated cost of the actual device. You must do
a cost comparison with the existing products, if applicable. You should also state the
source from which these components can be obtained.

What is NOT accepted as a CBSE Project?


Any project that you take up must follow the scientific method and should be a research
project. It is very important that it should be as per the sub-theme under which it is
presented.

Thousands of exhibits are displayed at regional level but only few make it to national level.
Typical examples of projects that are not selected are:

 Merely repeating an experiment in your science textbook, e.g. germination of seeds,


forest farming etc.
 Making a wild hypothesis without personally doing any experiment or showing proof
to support the concept, e.g. generating electricity from speed breakers, feeding
animals in forest.
 Making unsubstantiated claims that violate known laws and principles of science, e.g.
generating energy out of nothing.
 Simple posters, thermocol or wood models explaining science/technology principles,
e.g. model of digestive system, model illustrating soil erosion, model of a
hydroelectric power station, models illustrating pollution control etc.
 Merely presenting ideas and concepts which are already well established and used or
were used in various countries without doing proper research about its viability and
applicability in current situation e.g. generation of electricity using sea water.
 Presenting an idea based on information available on websites without doing any
proper research.
 Presenting an idea which cannot be presented in class room conditions hence
adapting unfair means to make it work.

Important Do's and Don'ts


 Follow the Mentor / Guide: You may take guidance from your teachers, parents,
research scholars or any qualified person who is capable of guiding your research
project.
 Follow the display rules for displaying the project. Make sure your project’s
dimensions are as per specifications given by the Board.
 Using unfair means: Do not adapt unfair means while presenting the project.
 Follow display rules and do not display prohibited banned objects.

Project set up and display


Main objective of presenting the project is to attract and inform judges and visitors hence it
is important that your project should be easy to access.

Display of Exhibit
 Make the effective use of the space provided by using clear and concise displays. The
display is what shows the judges and public what you did. It should look organized,
neat and attractive.

 Do not distract with a lot of decoration or distracting features. The prime focus is the
work; the display board is just to display the work.

 Think carefully what should go on display Board or charts. Do not put everything and
anything on the display. Do not clutter information as it will confuse your target
audience.

 Make sure your display is logically presented, well organised and easy to read. A
glance should enable anyone (particularly the judges) to locate the title, experiments,
results, and conclusions quickly. When you arrange your display, imagine that you
are seeing it for the first time.

 Make sure your display stands out. Use neat, colourful headings, charts, and graphs
to present your project. Pay special attention to the labelling of charts and diagrams.
Each item must have a clear descriptive and distinctive title. As far as possible all
items on chart may be typed or should be written in very neat and legible
handwriting.

 Languages are an important means of communication, and hence, present your


project using good language. Watch your grammar, spelling and wording. Again, all
sections should be TYPED and computer generated.

 You must make sure that your exhibit should not require more than 6'X3' of space
for display. Maximum project sizes include all project materials, supports, and
demonstrations for public and judges.

 Strictly adhere to the size limitations and safety rules while preparing your
display.

 Make sure your display is portable and sturdy, as it will need to remain intact for
quite a while.

 Select a good and simple title for your exhibit. Your title must accurately
represent your exhibit.

 Take photographs, make videos of the supporting activities undertaken by you


while working on this project. You may take photographs/videos of important parts/
phases of your experiment to use in your display.

Display / Safety Rules

Following item are prohibited for display and should not be used while working on
project:

 Living organisms.

 Specimens / Preserved vertebrate or invertebrate animals.

 Human / animal parts or body fluids (e.g., blood, urine). For the purpose of student
research, all body fluids, including saliva and urine (excluding hair), are not to be
considered tissues. (Exceptions: teeth, hair, nails, dried animal bones, histological dry
mount sections and completely sealed wet mount tissue slides).

 Laboratory / household chemicals.

 Poisons, drugs, controlled substances, hazardous substances, or devices (e.g.,


firearms, weapons, ammunition, reloading devices)

 Flames or highly flammable display materials.


 Gas cylinders, Generators.

 Batteries with open top cells.

 Dry ice or other sublimating solids.

 Pressurized tanks that contain non-combustibles may be allowed if properly secured.

 Sharp items (for example syringes, saw blades, needles, pipettes, knives etc.)

 Any apparatus with unshielded belts, pulleys, chains, or moving parts with tension or
pinch points may not be operated.

 Any apparatus producing temperatures that will cause physical burns must be
properly insulated.

 Heavy electrical machinery such as large compressors, electric hot plates etc. may
not be used.

 Any Banned object if displayed will be removed by the authorities and the project will
be summarily disqualified.

Electrical power

 220 Volt single-phase AC power will be available at the supply hence all gadgets
should be compatible (especially for international participants).
 All open ends of electrical wires, sharp objects, edges to be properly insulated/sealed.
 It may be noted that wire connectivity without proper plug at power source is not
permitted

Computer facilities

You need to bring your own laptop.

Explaining exhibit to the visitors and at the


time of Judgement?
Well explained exhibit makes all the difference. Presentation of exhibit to judges as well as
to visitors is most important and crucial part of exhibition. You should keep following points
in mind while presenting your exhibit:

a) Make sure you are audible and clear.


b) Speak in clear language and do not use accent.
c) Explain in language in which you are most comfortable. You may use your native
language if judges are comfortable with it.
d) Speak confidently! Rehearse in front of your family, friends and classmates.
e) Do not feel offended with cross-questioning.
f) Do not merely collect and mug up data and information but try to understand the
concept.
g) Make sure you are explaining the concept which you completely understands and
comfortable with. Ask you guide to explain the details.
h) Explaining with a cheerful smile and good body language is a good gesture.
i) Do show respect to all visitors as well as judges.
j) Listening to others view points, suggestions and ideas is a good option. A scientist
should be open to ideas.
k) It is very important to present your exhibit in allotted time span. As per rule each
team will be given 10 minutes for explanation.
l) Rehearsing explanation within stipulated time limit will help you in including essential
points. Do not include everything and anything in your explanation. Explanation
should be to the point.
m) Do not try to influence judges with your knowledge.
n) Do not argue with your visitors.
o) Exhibitions provide good platform to learn and exchange ideas. Do take time to visit
all exhibits and learn from others. Do not make fun of their exhibit or be
judgemental.

Tips on writing a Synopsis


A synopsis gives the essence of the project in brief. Ideally, a synopsis should not exceed
250 words. It is important that synopsis must provide fairly accurate idea of the project.
While writing a synopsis one must focus on the current research and previous work should
be given minimal reference. Acknowledgement should not be included in the synopsis.

The following should be the elements of synopsis:

 Aim of the experiment - An introductory statement which clearly and completely


defines the objective of taking up the experiment. Aim may be defined as a
statement of the problem and/or the hypothesis being studied.
 Procedures used - A summary of the key points and an overview of how the
investigation was conducted. A synopsis does not give details about the materials
used unless they greatly influenced the procedure or had to be developed to conduct
the investigation. A synopsis should only include procedures done by the student.
 Data - This section should provide key results that lead directly to the conclusions
you have drawn. It should not give too many details about the results nor include
tables or graphs.
 Logbook - The calculations made during experiments, other rough work done along
with date and place details are recorded in a logbook, which could be a rough
booklet.
 Conclusion - Conclusions from the investigation should be described briefly. The
summary paragraph should reflect on the process and possibly state some
applications and extensions of the investigation.

Tips for Guides / Teachers / Parents


 Encourage, support, and guide your student
 He / She should be encouraged to research on the topic selected
 Students should be motivated to work independently as well as team
 Make them realize the main goal of Science Exhibition. Science exhibition is a
platform to strengthen the skills he/she has learned and develop higher-level skills
besides exchange of ideas. The main goal should never be wining the prize
 As a school provide transportation to libraries, research laboratories , or universities
that can help your child find project information
 Provide Internet access, either at home or at a school or library
 Supervise the project and guide/ mentor them as and when required
 Keep all safety norms in mind and also adhere to all rules so that no rework is
required
 Work on mutually agreed timeline to prevent a last minute project. Also start early
 It is suggested you allow at least 12 weeks conducting an experiment and preparing
the presentation
 Try to inculcate scientific skills
 Discourage any mal-practices such as copying data from net
 Teach the process of observation, recording of results, drawing conclusion during
experimentation
 Teach the art of surfing internet to collect data. Students must be guided to learn to
check the authenticity and relevance of data collected
 Most important, guide them not to worry or get upset if they are not able to win a
prize at the Science Exhibition. The skills they have gained are worth all the effort
 Discourage all unfair means and practices. Inculcate values a scientist should be
honest and fair to his findings.
What should be the essential elements of your
project?
Ideally, your project should have the following elements:

 Synopsis - This is a summary of your idea and should include the purpose of the
experiment, procedure used, data, and conclusion
 Research paper - A research paper should be prepared and must be available along
with the project data book with relevant written material. A research paper helps
organize data as well as thoughts. A good paper includes the following sections:
 Title page: Centre the project title, and put your name, address and school
 Aim / Objective: The introduction sets the stage for your report. The aim includes
your hypothesis, an explanation of what prompted your research and what you hoped
to achieve.
 Scientific Principle Involved: In this section describe the principal involved.
 Material Used: List all the items used here this will help you in working out the final
cost.
 Method: This section describes how you did the study. Describe in detail the
methodology used to collect your data or make your observations. Your report should
be detailed enough for someone to be able to repeat the experiment. Include
photographs or drawings of self-designed equipment. The research work conducted
by you may have taken more than a year. In such case, include this year's work only.
 Discussion: This is the essence of your paper. The results and conclusions should
flow smoothly and logically from your data. Be thorough. This should let the reader
know exactly what you did, compare your results with theoretical values, published
data and expected results. Include a section of possible errors. How did the data vary
between repeated observations of a similar event? How were your results affected by
uncontrolled events? What would you do differently if you were to repeat this project?
What other experiments should be conducted?
 Conclusion: This section describes the findings and conclusion of the project. Briefly
summarize your results. Be specific, do not generalize. Never introduce anything in
the conclusion that has not been discussed.
 Further scope of project: This is a step further; here you describe the future scope
of your experiment.
 Acknowledgement: You should always give credit to those who assisted you; they
may be individuals, educational or research institutions.
 Reference list: Your reference list should include any documentation that is not your
own (i.e. books, journal articles, include specific internet url’s).
Class 11 holiday home work

Make an activity file (interleaf copy ) and write the following 5 activities in it: -

(a) To make a paper scale of given least count. e.g. 0.2 cm, 0.5 cm.
(b) To study the variation in range of a projectile with angle of projection.
(c) To study the conservation of energy of a ball rolling down on an inclined plane (using double
inclined plane.)
(d) To observe change of state and plot a cooling curve for molten wax.
(e) To study the effect of detergent on surface tension of water by observing capillary rise.

NCERT Physics Exemplar problems (Chapter 3) Q.12- 26 to be done in the HW register.

The following practical to be written in the experiment file with diagrams:-

(a) To determine radius of curvature of a given spherical surface by a spherometer.

(b) To find the weight of a given body using parallelogram law of vectors.

(c) Using a simple pendulum, plot its L-T2 graph and use it to find the effective length of second's
pendulum.

(d) To study the relationship between force of limiting friction and normal reaction and to find the co-
efficient of friction between a block and a horizontal surface.

(e) To find the downward force, along an inclined plane, acting on a roller due to gravitational pull of
the earth and study its relationship with the angle of inclination θ by plotting graph between force
and sin θ .