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One particular part of the movie which made me grasp the essence of “guilt” was at

the very beginning; Joey Velasco’s contribution of his life story, and how he had drowned on

excessive pride. It is indeed very difficult to tuck away one’s ego, and this was demonstrated

by Joey Velasco when he was once at the prime of his career as a businessman. Evidently, he

was very prideful, and he saw himself to be superior over others. However, everything

changed when an illness caught Joey in its nest. In his depression, he lost hope of ever

returning to how he was to the point that he made friends with shadows in his room. In his

long time of thinking, he sought understanding about his current condition, as well as how

he would have to turn everything over and live on; this particular scene gave a striking

impression of guilt or the feeling of being responsible of one’s wrongdoings. He had learned

to eventually, he had found a newfound hope, and vowed to move on with his life by

accepting his dreadful condition. And thus, he grasped the truth about his state – which he

is as vulnerable as everybody else in this world; that he is not immortal – and learned to live

a humble life. From this, I saw the spectacle of a person’s change, a holistic transformation

of one’s being brought upon by guilt.

Guilt works best to help us grow and mature when our behavior has been offensive

or hurtful to others or ourselves. But how do we tell that our action is hurtful to another

person? After thinking it over, I realized that this can only be achieved at the end, when one

regrets one’s wrongdoings. This was the same feeling that Rebecca had when she dealt with

great envy over a neighbor. She admitted making gossips about her, and these gossips led to

the degradation of her neighbor. After all was said and done, she also felt a hint of regret on

what she had done where she thought that she was indeed the reason the woman she
made gossips on and her husband separated. Envy is like a double-edged sword; it cuts

through another’s life and at the same time, it inflicts great damage on one’s own life, and

Rebecca learned this in a very hard way.

Another scene made its way on getting my attention. The reason it did is that I can

reflect to it so much, but I believe that we all do. Don’t we all wish for a better state of life?

This is a common desire that we all share, no doubt. But we all wish to have “enough”, while

some others wish to have more than “enough”, and become swallowed up by greed. Beth

Corral’s experience with greed is one example. In order to escape poverty, she became

aggressive and ran through many jobs, and landed in an illegal recruitment business. She

took advantage of many people just to satiate her desire for a high level of success. But in

due time, she was jailed for it. At this point, she was at rock-bottom, and she was ready to

give in to her fate. But in her commitment to returning home, time in prison went by fast,

and she was freed.

In all these events, the people involved grasped on the chance for a new life, and

gave in to their guilt feeling responsible for their actions, regretted doing them, and wished

to make amends. But above all, they all admitted to being enlightened by learning from

their wrongdoings with the help from God as they sought for solutions and redemption.
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As a person of great significance in this society, and the world as a whole, I am

vulnerable and fragile. But at some point, I will have to realize my weaknesses, learn from

them, and become an exemplary human being. The documentary was filled with many

inspiring messages of renewal, regret, acceptance, and many others. In this abundance, I

absorbed plenty, and learned from them. Firstly and in entirety, I learned that our actions

can be a blessing for others, or breed catastrophe in our lives or theirs. We must be wary of

the consequences that they may bring. We are subject to the seven vices and the

wrongdoings that branch out from them and it is inevitable that we commit one or two, and

for god-knows how many times. In this awareness, I hold on to the positivity in my life. The

vices that we commit can bring us down, but after everything’s said and done, it’s always

our decision to rise up with the resolve to start anew. In the moment that my ego (pride)

speaks louder than my self-justice, I learned to be humble by appreciating another person’s

work, and not just my own. I will give way for their opinions and judgment to fashion a

decision that would bring equal benefits among my co-workers and I. As for the times I feel

envious of my neighbors, colleagues, friends, and co-workers, I learned the essence of

selflessness; to be selfless and to rejoice at the goodness on other people’s lives and be

inspired by it. Surely, God will honor me the privilege to step on their footing, and as see far

from where they stand as they have. And should the moment that I desire for more than

what is enough, I learned to endure, and be contented with what is adequate for me. But in

the moment that I acquire blessings, sometimes excessive at that, I learned to share and gift

them to others rather than keep it for myself. And in learning all these things, I choose to
live a virtuous life; a life that breeds goodness for me, my fellowmen, and my nation as a

whole.

Now I am aware that all these vices that are “clawing” on us are inevitable, and we

are their juiciest targets because of how vulnerable and fragile of a being we all are.

However, there is always a high road for redemption from these sins and vices. Many

people, if not most, choose to live a life filled with virtues; filled with all the goodness of life.

It has come to my awareness that these virtues of life are what we need to counter the vices

that lead to every evil act conceivable. Only by understanding the nature of the seven

capital sins, as well as the virtues’ can we determine a better way of living. I have been

made aware of the existence of our conscience; the morality that we were given at birth,

rather than learned or earned from exterior influences. This is by far the greatest tool to

best the temptation of sin. We, who had been made wary of this, should make use of our

conscience and try to avoid the vices. Therefore, we must choose to live with virtues in our

core – as social beings that we are, we should choose to bring goodness to other people’s

lives.