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Name: Vyanah Lethbridge

Unit Planner for Learning in Religious Education


Level of schooling: 2
Key Idea 7: Religious Authority for Ethics
Crossways Unit Outcome: 1.7 – Identifies values in the words and actions of Jesus and applies these values to his/her life
in the home, school and community.

Unit title: Living in the footsteps of Jesus

Specific Unit Outcomes: Students will …


1. Identify and understand values in the words and actions of Jesus.
2. Identify and demonstrate how and when they can use Jesus’ teachings within their life to make positive decisions that
help shape the world the God desires.
3. Engage with a range of texts including scripture and story books that can help them make good decisions.
4. Articulate their own personal values and extend their evolving personal religious identity through identifying ways
that they can live like Jesus.

Assessment Tasks:
1. Task Sheet that requires students to recognize the values of Jesus within different biblical stories and identify how
they can follow these values throughout their daily lives (Lessons 10-12)
2. Student Pledge (Lesson13)
3.Drama performance (Lesson 14)

Student Dispositions:
Year 2 Students are beginning to develop their own moral principles. They can recognise unfairness and understand
ways that they can help others around them. They understand that the choices they make have consequences whether
that be positive or negative. Year 2 students are familiar with biblical stories and have brief understanding about the life
of Jesus and his teachings.

According to James Fowler’s stages of faith, year 2 students are still primarily in stage 2, ‘Intuitive faith’. In this stage
students have a strong imagination where reality and fantasy are not different. Student faith is constructed from stories
and concrete symbols that surround them (Grajczonek, 2014, p.25).

Meaning and Relevance of the Key Idea:


The primary goal of religious education is to increase the knowledge and understanding of students about the Catholic
faith. At the same time, religious education is to complement catechesis and evangelization (Rymarz, 2014, p.6).

“Evangelization is the mission of bringing the Gospel to the world” (Rymarz, 2014, p.7). Evidently, the key idea
‘Religious Authority for Ethics’ has a strong focus of evangelization and how we can implement messages and values
found within the bible into our everyday lives, actions and ethical decisions.

The origins, sources and principles of ethical codes are at the identity of contemporary Catholic schools. Each individual
creates and adapts their own moral principles that govern their behavioural choices. Through teaching ethics and
morals within a Religious program at a Catholic School, students can establish an understanding for Jesus’ life and his
teachings. Students can then incorporate these good choices within their own lives. This Key Idea can teach children: to
love and care for others, make positive choices, develop good moral habits and develop skills for getting along with all
people they come across.

©Planning for learning in mathematics and science, 2018 drafted by B.O.P.


How will you know what the students have learnt? (Assessment)
Assessment tasks: How will you assess? When will it be worked on? How will you What forms of feedback will you
When will you assess? & Who record your provide?
leads the assessment? assessments?
Summative Assessment This assessment will be
The written response completed in the Explore Written • Written feedback on
Individual task-sheet to the text will be and Explain phase of the Feedback students work and
that requires students formatively assessed learning experience over rubric.
to recognize the values in their workbooks. three consecutive
of Jesus within different lessons. Checklist • Any misconceptions or
biblical stories and misunderstandings will
identify how they can This will be assessed after be documented and
follow these values all three stories have Simple rubric addressed through
throughout their daily been read and questions (Appendix 9) conversation with
lives. answered. individuals or the
whole class.
Teacher-led assessment.

Formative Assessment
Written • Written feedback on
Student Pledge The students written This assessment will be and/or students work.
Students will decide on and illustrated completed in the Explore verbal • Any misconceptions or
one or more ways that pledge will be and Explain phase of the feedback misunderstandings will
they can live out the formatively assessed learning experience. be documented and
values of Jesus’ and in their workbooks. addressed through
create a ‘pledge’ show Teacher-led assessment conversation with
how they will attempt individuals or the
to do more of this in whole class.
their home, school or
community.

Summative Assessment
Planned and practicing
Drama performance The performance, will take place in the Rubric Immediate verbal feedback
As a group, students will discussion and Elaboration phase. The (Appendix after presentation.
be planning and group/self- final presentation will be 13)
presenting a creative evaluation will be conducted in the Written feedback on
drama performance assessed against a Evaluation phase along student evaluation and
that communicates how checklist and a with the group/self- Checklist rubric.
they can demonstrate rubric. evaluation. (Appendix
the actions of Jesus 14)
within either their Student-led assessment
home, school or
community.

©Planning for learning in mathematics and science, 2018 drafted by B.O.P.


My Philosophy of Teaching and learning in Religious Education
I believe that teachers are the most powerful facilitators influencing the learning outcomes of children and young
people. As an educator of Religious education, I aspire to be passionate about the content I teach whilst making
learning experiences fun, engaging and meaningful to the lives and interest of the students (Lessons 1-17 are made
relevant to students’ home, school and community lives and implement a variety of teaching strategies and resources
to make the learning experience engaging). To promote children’s learning of religious education involves “building and
nurturing relationships, curriculum decision-making, teaching and learning” (Grajczonek, 2014, p.109).

To ensure successful building and nurturing of relationships, I aspire to create an environment that is safe and secure,
whereby students feel confident in sharing their spiritual and religious experiences; develop a sense of belonging and
construct their own personal identity (whole class discussions are structured so that all students feel confident in
sharing their experiences and opinions).

As a teacher of religious education, I am persistent in setting high standards through successfully identifying and setting
goals and working together, with children, to achieve them. I will facilitate the teaching and learning process through
allowing students opportunities to investigate, explore and discover, whilst inspiring them to learn (Refer to learning
experiences 1-17). For this to be successful I will utilise James Fowler’s ‘stages of faith’ to support my religious
curriculum planning ensuring that learning experiences are appropriate to the students age and level of understanding
(Grajczonek, 2014, p.25).

A diverse range of pedagogical approaches will be implemented within my religion program to ensure an effective
curriculum design and application. Firstly, a holistic approach will take place by paying attention to children’s physical,
social, emotional and spiritual wellbeing as well as cognitive aspects of their learning (Grajczonek, 2014, p.110). To cater
for the diverse learning needs, a combination of procedural and transformational approaches will be evident ensuring
the learning environment is adaptable (this unit plan is easily flexible, lessons can extend over a longer period of time
and further lessons can be added as a response to the students’ needs) (Grajczonek, 2014, p.149).

I will ensure that the curriculum design is created to nurture young children’s spiritual and religious development in a
way that is meaningful, purposeful and hands-on. Through utilising children’s innate spirituality as a starting point for
the religious programme allows all students the opportunity to engage and contribute to the learning experience.
Activities that activate students’ imagination and creativity, their sense of awe and wonder, identity and belonging and
connectedness will help assist developing their innate spirituality (Learning experience 1-17) (Grajczonek, 2014, p.141).

Pedagogical strategies will be implemented to ensure a rich understanding is obtained, these include: formal and
informal discussions (Refer to lesson 1), collaboration (Refer to lesson 14), appropriate use of stories and storytelling
(Refer to lesson 1), inquiry and creative tasks (Refer to lesson 14) (Petersen, 2014, pp.161-176). Rich, challenging and
inviting resources and materials will be offered to students to ignite their imagination and creativity through
environment and play (Refer to lesson 2 & 6). These meaningful, purposeful and hands-on activities will allow students
to be actively involved in their learning and deepen their understanding of concepts and build their creative thinking
and inquiry processes that are necessary for lifelong learning (Learning experiences 1-17).

Social and cultural dimensions will be considered and scaffolded to allow students to go beyond their current level of
understanding (Grajczonek, 2014, p.112). This will be implemented into the learning phase through purposeful and
planned, shared thinking experiences, allowing flexible and organised periods for communication and interactions
between students and the teacher (Refer to lesson 1) (Grajczonek, 2014, p.149). These discussions will foster
collaboration and allow students to share ideas, listen to others, ask questions and reflect on other ideas, attitudes and
values (Petersen, 2014, p.164). Through listening attentively to students’ comments and questions, I will further
facilitate the conversation to provoke deeper thinking and responses (Refer to lesson 1).

Authentic assessment will cultivate children’s higher-order thinking and problem-solving capacities whilst
demonstrating their rich learning and understanding (Refer to lesson 14) (Grajczonek, 2014, p.201). Assessment will be

©Planning for learning in mathematics and science, 2018 drafted by B.O.P.


utilised and presented in a variety of ways throughout the learning experiences as a means of assessment for, as and of
learning (Refer to lessons 10, 13 & 14) (Grajczonek, 2014, p.195).
How will the students engage with this learning?
Prior Knowledge/Engagement Learning Experiences (s):

*In the Engage phase, do not provide any formal definitions or correct students’ answers as the purpose is to elicit students’ prior knowledge*

Lesson 1: ‘If Jesus lived inside my heart’


Learning Intention:

o Students will identify how and when they can use Jesus’ teachings within their life to make positive decisions that
helps shape the world that God desires.
o Students will reflect on their own personal values and extend their evolving personal religious identity through
identifying ways that they can be more like Jesus within their everyday lives.
Description of Learning Experience:
o Using the think, pair, share strategy; allow students to reflect on Jesus through probing questions.
“What do we know about Jesus?” and more specifically “What values did Jesus teach us about the World God
desires?”
o View the storybook 'If Jesus lived inside my heart' (Appendix 1).
o Pause at different questions and allow students to reflect briefly.
o Reflect on the book and some of the questions that arose
o Discuss and make connections between the story book and how we today can live like God desires.
o Students use the template provided (Appendix 2) to record how they today can live like Jesus.
o Share student responses as a whole class.

Links to literature and philosophy statement:


o Story telling is an approach that will be implemented in both formal and informal ways throughout the unit.
o Stories and Gospels of Jesus will be shared throughout the unit to ensure that students critically understand his
values and teachings (Refer to lessons: 3-12).
o This caters for Quadrant C learners according to Julia Atkins ‘Thinking and learning styles profile’.
o This approach creates meaningful connections to each individuals’ life experiences and allows them to participate
and enjoy, engaging, educational and transformational literature (Petersen, 2014, p.169).
o Stories are a fantastic tool in developing students’ general; capabilities of literacy, critical and creative thinking,
ethical understanding and personal and social capability (Petersen, 2014, 169)
o Stories can be interpreted at different levels, which is a great advantage in accommodating students’ needs
(Rymarz, 2014, p.44).

o Whole class discussions are located throughout the whole unit (Refer to lessons 1-17).
o This caters for Quadrant C learners according to Julia Atkins ‘Thinking and learning styles profile’.
o These purposefully and planned, shared thinking experiences, allow for communication and interactions between
students and the teacher.
o Discussions allow opportunities for students to express their thoughts, feelings and opinions in a safe
environment.
o Students will be able to share ideas, listen to others, ask questions and reflect on other ideas, attitudes and values
(Petersen, 2014, p.164).
o These discussions will allow the teacher to respond to students and provoke deeper thinking and responses.
o Strategies such as think-pair-share (lesson 1), six thinking hats (lessons 10-12) and mind-maps (lesson 13) will be
implemented to prompt discussions (Petersen, 2014, p.165)

©Planning for learning in mathematics and science, 2018 drafted by B.O.P.


Lesson 2: Values
Learning Intention: Students will …
o Engage in critical reflection on what values and how they are taught.
o Make connections with their own feelings, actions and experiences
Description of Learning Experience:
o This lesson will have an individual and reflective approach
o Allow students to find a seat around the class (chair or floor)
o Inform students that this is a time for individual reflecting but they can document their thoughts if they wish.
o Once the room is quiet pose the first question:
What is a value?
o Give students time to reflect.
o Students quietly share with the person closest to them.
o Have a couple of students share their response to the question. The teacher is to document responses on the
board.
o In the same structure as above continue posing questions for the students to reflect:
When do we use our values?
What do you value?
Where do our values get formed? And who has taught you these values?
How do we know right from wrong?
Do we always do what is right? And how do we know?
o Once all questions have been posed and responses heard get the students to draw an image of one of their values.
o Once finished have a group sharing circle on the mat where students can share their value and explain how they
formed this value and why.
Links to literature:
o A constructivist learning environment will encourage children to engage in critical reflection, use imagination and
make connections with their own feelings, actions and experiences whilst considering what they are being asked
(CESA, 2014, p.10).
o Students will be able to construct new ideas and personal meaning based on their current and past
understandings of particular situations and concepts.
o Teachers need to recognise and acknowledge that Catholic schools comprise of people who come from a variety of
different religious backgrounds (CESA, 2014, p,6). Through providing reflective activities and identifying individual
spiritualties teachers are able to initiate an inclusive program where everyone can reflect and/or contribute.
o This reflection and discussion task caters for Quadrant C learners according to Julia Atkins ‘Thinking and learning
styles profile’.

Lesson 3: Scenarios
Learning Intention: Students will …
o Identify how and when they can use Jesus’ teachings within different scenarios to make positive decisions that
helps shape the world that God desires.
o Explore role playing skills for exploring values.
Description of Learning Experience:
o Reflect and discuss the learning experience and outcomes from lesson 1 and 2 specifically focusing on our own
values.
o Prompt Question: Does anyone know how Jesus lived? – Discuss positive choices he made.
o In small groups students are given a few scenarios (Appendix 3)
o Students read and recreate each scenario through a drama performance. Students may choose to implement
flexible materials to enhance their understanding and performance.
o Students must identify how they can implement Jesus’ teachings within these scenarios to make positive decisions
that help shape the world that God desires.
o Groups will perform their favourite scenario in front of the class.
o Reflect and discuss as a class after each performance:
a) Who lived like Jesus and how?
b) Emotions of each character throughout the performance (before and after being helped)

©Planning for learning in mathematics and science, 2018 drafted by B.O.P.


Links to literature and philosophy statement:
o Children can learn through context of the environment and play wherein their imagination and creativity must be
stimulated with rich, challenging and inviting resources and materials.
o Flexible materials invite student’s curiosity, investigation and manipulation and activate their creativity and
imagination (Grajczonek, 2014, p.117)
o Play can expand children’s thinking and enhance their desire to know and to learn (Grajczonek, 2014, p.117)
o For more examples of play refer to lessons 6 and 8.
o This drama task caters for Quadrant C learners according to Julia Atkins ‘Thinking and learning styles profile’.

Exploratory /Explore & Explain Learning Experiences:


Lesson 4: Sayings of Jesus
Learning Intention: Students will …
o Explore sayings of Jesus located within the bible and understand the contemporary meaning.
o Explain the importance of these quotes in their own daily lives.
Description of Learning Experience:
o Whole class learning experience
o Start with prompting question: “What do we know about Jesus?” and “What did Jesus teach us?”
o Display and explore sayings of Jesus and discuss what they mean to us today.
o As a class re-word the words of Jesus to make it relevant to our lives and easy to understand – write these on the
board.
o Examples of quotes include:
“Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you” (Mt 5:44)
“But many that are first will be last and the last first” (Mk 10:31)
“If anyone strikes you on the right check, turn to him on the other also; and if anyone would sue you and take your coat,
let him have your cloak as well; and if anyone forces you to go one mile, go with him two miles” (Mt 5:39-41)

o After discussion, students will pick one of the reworded statements and write and illustrate the importance of this
in their own lives.

Links to literature and philosophy statement:


o Biblical literature is presented to students in lessons 3-12 and is a form of formal story telling (for more
information refer to lesson 1).
o The bible is often referend to as a library of books that contains a range of literacy genres and religious viewpoints
(Ryan, 2014, p.178) different genres will be explored over the course of the unit to identify the values in the words
and actions of Jesus.
o To help students to understand the nature of the bible as a sacred text and deepen their understanding of the
meaning behind individual texts and passages, teachers must ensure the teaching and learning is engaging and
meaningful.
o When implementing biblical literature throughout this unit the ‘rules of engagement when presenting biblical text
to children’ were closely followed (Ryan, 2014, p.179) such as:
-The written biblical text was read as soon as possible
-When not reading directly from the bible any inadequacies were identified to the students and the story was
followed closely.
-A range of teaching and learning activities were implemented to facilitate the learning experience.
o This task caters for Quadrant D and C learners according to Julia Atkins ‘Thinking and learning styles profile’.

©Planning for learning in mathematics and science, 2018 drafted by B.O.P.


Lesson 5: Introducing parables
Learning Intention: Students will …
o identify and understand values in the words of Jesus through listen attentively to the parable ‘The Mustard Seed’
(Mt 13:31-32).
o Discuss the parable to understand the relevant meaning.
Description of Learning Experience:
o Introduce parables by asking: “Does anyone know what a parable is?”
o Go on to tell Students that a parable is:
- A brief story that is true to life, comparing the point of commonality between two unlike things, given for the
purpose of teaching a spiritual truth.
- A story to illustrate a truth or lesson.
-Typically told by Jesus.
o Tell students that to understand parables, we need to discover the deeper meaning and underlying messages and
vales of Jesus being portrayed.
o Read them the parable of the Mustard Seed (Mt 13:31-32)

Jesus told them another parable: “The kingdom of Heaven is like this. A person takes a mustard seed and sows it in the
field. It is the smallest of all seed, but when it grows up, it is the biggest of all plants. It becomes a tree, so that birds come
and make their nest in its branches.”

o * The parable of the Lost Sheep (Lk 15:3-7) could also be used for this activity.
o Discuss the parable and as a class uncover the message of the text and what it means to the students.
o Discuss how Jesus’ values are evident within this story and how we can use these values in our own lives.

POSE INDIVIDUAL REFLECTION QUESTION TO END THE LESSON (Allow 2-5 minutes for quiet reflection):
After listening to the parable and identifying the values of Jesus within the text, how can you use these values in your own
lives?

Links to literature and philosophy statement:


o This lesson includes discussion (refer to lesson 1) and story-telling (refer to lesson 1) of a biblical text (refer to
lesson 3).
o This task caters for Quadrant D and C learners according to Julia Atkins ‘Thinking and learning styles profile’.

Lesson 6: Godly Play – The Good Samaritan


Learning Intention: Students will …
o Engage with the parable ‘The Good Samaritan’.
o Reflect on the messages and values within the story in a personal and creative manner.
Description of Learning Experience:
o Students gather in a semi-circle facing the teacher
o Teacher uses a quiet voice to encourage concentration and encourage a calm atmosphere
o Tell story using simple but well-made materials.
o Prompt wondering questions throughout.
o Invite students to reflect on the story through creative arts. For this to be successful a range of arts and craft
materials (paper, paint, pencils ect) will be provided to allow students to participate in individual reflection and
response. Students may choose to retell the story or identify the part that stood out to them the most.
o Return back to the circle. Students share their creative reflective piece and the story is put away.
Links to literature and philosophy statement:
o Godly play is an interactive and engaging way to allow students to explore the theological meaning within biblical
texts’.
o Godly play is an imaginative approach to religious storytelling that allows students the opportunity to participate
in the wonder and meaning found in biblical text and encourages students to reflect, to discover and to value
stories from our Christian tradition (Hemmings, 2011, p.41).
o This task caters for Quadrant D and C learners according to Julia Atkins ‘Thinking and learning styles profile’.

©Planning for learning in mathematics and science, 2018 drafted by B.O.P.


Lesson 7 & 8: The Good Samaritan
Learning Intention: Students will …
o Listen to the story of the Good Samaritan and highlight key parts of the story.
o Accurately retell the story of the Good Samaritan in their own words.
o Empathise with the story and appreciate the importance of this story in their own lives.
Description of Learning Experience:
o Read the story from Luke 10:25-37 ‘The Good Samaritan’ (Clarify new/unfamiliar language).
o Reflect and share the key parts of the story.
o Give students a copy of the text.
o Read the story again. As a class highlight key parts (names of people, towns ect)

o Students work individually or in pairs to re-tell the story of the Good Samaritan
- Using the materials provided (eg. wooden people, toy animals, rocks, clay, ect)
- Implementing a rich vocabulary from the text especially the words they highlighted previously.
o During this time, the teacher is to ensure that students are on the right through observing and listening to the
students.
o Students retell the story with the people closest to them.
o Once completed: students will then split their page into half diagonally.
On the top half they answer the questions: “Why did Jesus tell this story to his friends?” and “Who are your
‘neighbours’? “How can we be a good Samaritan?”
On the bottom half, they draw an image of the Good Samaritan helping the man.
POSE INDIVIDUAL REFLECTION QUESTION TO END THE LESSON (Allow 2-5 minutes for quiet reflection):
Has there ever been a time that you have helped someone in need? If so, what values were you displaying?

Links to literature and philosophy statement:


o Through allowing students to respond to the story through play invites them to explore the meaning within the
text and to make relevant connections between the religious story and their own experiences, this will in turn
support students’ spiritual growth (Hemmings, 2011, p.42).
o Explorations into the scared nature of the text encourages children’s curiosity, wonder and imagination
(Grajczonek, 2014, p.117)
o Refer to lesson 2 for more information on learning through play.
o This task caters for learners in all quadrants according to Julia Atkins ‘Thinking and learning styles profile’

Lesson 9: The story of Zacchaeus


Learning Intention: Students will …
o Engage with the big storybook, ‘When Zacchaeus Met Jesus’ (Appendix 4).
o Retell the story in their own words using a range of different hands on materials.
Description of Learning Experience:
o Tell the story ‘When Zacchaeus Met Jesus’ by Penny Frank (Appendix 4)
o Discuss the story as a whole class – prompting questions may include:
-What were the key points of the story?
-What stood out to you the most?
-Was there anything that you were unsure about when listening to the story?

o Students work individually or in pairs to re-tell the story of Zacchaeus using the materials provided (eg. wooden
people, rocks, clay, toy trees, sticks, paper).
o Students will be given a vocabulary card that will prompt them to use appropriate and rich vocabulary from the
text (Appendix 5)
o During this time, the teacher is to ensure that students are on the right through observing and listening to the
students while they use play to retell the story.
o Students will retell the story with the people closest to them.
Links to literature and philosophy statement:
o This lesson includes discussion (refer to lesson 1), story-telling (refer to lesson 1) of a recounted biblical text (refer
to lesson 3) and learning through play (refer to lessons 2 and 6).

©Planning for learning in mathematics and science, 2018 drafted by B.O.P.


o This task caters for learners in all quadrants according to Julia Atkins ‘Thinking and learning styles profile’

Lesson 10: The story of Zacchaeus (continued)


Learning Intention: Students will …
o Engage with the biblical version of the story, ‘When Zacchaeus Met Jesus’ (Luke 19:1-10)
o Reflect on the biblical story through the use of wondering questions.
o Visually retell the story using a story board template.
Description of Learning Experience:
o Provide students background knowledge needed to understand the literature (discuss: outcast)
o Read the biblical version of ‘Zacchaeus’ (Luke 19:1-10)
o Discuss differences between the text and explain words that are unfamiliar
o Pose wondering questions:
I wonder what Jesus said to Zacchaeus when they were alone?
I wonder how their conversation affect Zacchaeus’ decisions?
o Students then go and use the story board template provided to retell the parable (Appendix 6).
POSE INDIVIDUAL REFLECTION QUESTION TO END THE LESSON (Allow 2-5 minutes for quiet reflection):
o Has there ever been a time in your life where someone has said something that made you re-think what you were
doing? Where you able to make a positive choice because of this?
Links to literature and philosophy statement:
o Reflection time is used to nurture students’ spirituality and develop their own power within – “the strength a
person has in him/herself, and the ability to control his/her own feelings/thoughts and use them in positive ways”
(Dillen, 2014, p.35).
o This lesson includes discussion (refer to lesson 1), story-telling (refer to lesson 1) of a biblical verse (refer to lesson
3)
Lesson 11: Cleansing a Leaper (Mk 1:40-45)
Learning Intention: Students will …
o Engage with the biblical text ‘Cleansing a Leaper’ (Mk 1:40-45)
o Identify and understand values in the words and actions of Jesus
o Identify and demonstrate how they can use Jesus’ values and teachings in their own lives to make positive choices.
Description of Learning Experience:
o Begin lesson by asking children – “What is a healing story?” – write responses on the board
o Explain that the structure of the next couple of lessons will be the same but based on different biblical stories.
o Give students background knowledge needed to understand the literature (discuss: outcast)
o Read the story – Cleansing a Leaper (Mk 1:40-45)
o Hand out different coloured ‘hats’ (paper cut out) (Appendix 7) – Assuming that we have already used this
teaching strategy in the class. This caters specifically for learners in Quadrant A and C (Julia Atkins).
o Explain that we are going to listen to the story again but with a different ‘thinking hat’ on.

Six thinking hats strategy


Red Hat: emotional reactions to the characters
Yellow Hat: Positive actions and words of a character
Black Hat: Negative actions and words of a character
Green Hat: another way of looking at the story, a different ending
White hat: Information and facts from the story
Blue Hat: Walking in the shoes of the character – What were you thinking?

o Group the hats together and allow them to share their thoughts.
o During discussion, teacher facilities conversation.
o Whole class conversation
o Present students ongoing task sheet (Appendix 8) – Students will illustrate and explain what they believe this story
tells us about Jesus and identify how we can follow Jesus’ values in our lives.
Links to literature and philosophy statement:
o Lessons 10-12 include discussion (refer to lesson 1) and story-telling (refer to lesson 1) of a biblical verse (refer to
lesson 3).
o This task sheet will be used as an assessment for and of learning.

©Planning for learning in mathematics and science, 2018 drafted by B.O.P.


o It will inform the teacher what the students understand on the topic. This information will then inform the
planning, teaching and learning cycle of the rest of the unit (Grajczonek, 2014, p.195).
o These tasks cater for learners in all quadrants according to Julia Atkins ‘Thinking and learning styles profile’.
Lesson 12: Healing of a Crippled Man (Mk 2:1-12)
Learning Intention: Students will …
o Engage with the biblical text ‘Healing of a Crippled Man’ (Mk 2:1-12)
o Identify and understand values in the words and actions of Jesus
o Identify and demonstrate how they can use Jesus’ values and teachings in their own lives to make positive choices.
Description of Learning Experience:
o The structure of this lesson will follow the structure in lesson 10.
o Teacher will read the story ‘Healing of a Crippled Man’ (Mk 2:1-12)
o Hand out different coloured ‘hats’ (Six thinking hats strategy)
o Reread the biblical story.
o Group students, based on coloured hats and allow students to engage in conversations.
o Whole class conversation.
o Students complete the next section of their task sheet.

Lesson 13: Jesus calls the children (Luke 18:15-17)


Learning Intention: Students will …
o Engage with the biblical text ‘Jesus calls the children’ (Luke 18:15-17)
o Identify and understand values in the words and actions of Jesus
o Identify and demonstrate how they can use Jesus’ values and teachings in their own lives to make positive choices.
Description of Learning Experience:
o The structure of this lesson will follow the structure in lesson 10 and 11.
o Teacher will read the story ‘Jesus calls the children’ (Luke 18:15-17)
o Hand out different coloured ‘hats’ (Six thinking hats strategy)
o Reread the biblical story.
o Group students, based on coloured hats and allow students to engage in conversations.
o Whole class conversation.
o Students complete the last section of their task sheet.
o Have a whole class discussion based on what we have learnt about Jesus through listening to the biblical stories
and parables throughout the unit.

Lesson 14: How can we live like Jesus mind map and pledge
Learning Intention: Students will …
o Identify how they can use Jesus’ values and teachings in their own lives to make positive choices.
o Create a pledge to demonstrate that they can implement Jesus’ values into their lives.
Description of Learning Experience:
o Display on the board and read to the children the text ‘how to live like Jesus’ (Appendix 10)
o As a class create a mind map of ways that we can live like Jesus – Break the mind map into 3 sections labelled;
home, school and community.
o Through this learning experience, prompt discussion about the variety of text we have been looking at through the
unit (scripture, story book, parables, ect).
o Once the mind map is complete, students decide on at least one of the ways that we can live like Jesus and make a
‘pledge’ to do more of this (eg. help clean up around the school yard or stop bullying ect).
o Students will write their pledge in their workbooks and identify ways they can effectively do this within their
home, school or community. They will illustrate their pledge.
o Group sharing will take place.
Links to literature and philosophy statement:
o This task sheet will be used as an assessment for learning.
o It will inform the teacher what the students understand on the topic. This information will then inform the
planning, teaching and learning cycle of the rest of the unit (Grajczonek, 2014, p.195).

©Planning for learning in mathematics and science, 2018 drafted by B.O.P.


Investigations /Problem solving/Elaboration Learning Experiences:
Lesson 15: Creative drama performance – Planning Phase
Learning Intention: Students will …
o Work as a group to plan a creative drama performance
o Decide on ways that they can communicate how they can demonstrate the actions and values of Jesus in their
daily lives.
Description of Learning Experience:
o Present them their assessment task.

Task: As a group, you will be planning and presenting a creative drama performance that communicates how you can
demonstrate the actions of Jesus within either your home, school or community.

o Discuss what this might look like. As a class create a list of possible ideas for their performance
o Put students into small groups of three and four.
o Present and explain the group planning sheet (Appendix 11) – On this sheet students can write and illustrate how
they are going to plan and present what they have learnt throughout the unit.
o Teacher will facilitate the planning process through conversations.

Links to literature and philosophy statement:


o Lessons 14-17 is the planning and execution of their summative assessment which allows the teacher to establish
to what extent students have achieved the learning outcomes for the unit (Grajczonek, 2014, p.193)
o These assessment tasks cater for learners in quadrants B, C &D according to Julia Atkins ‘Thinking and learning
styles profile’.
o “If an assessment task is set in a way that only requires surface learning, then students will not be given the
opportunity to demonstrate higher order thinking (Grajczonek, 2014, p.201). Therefore, through this open, inquiry
task students are able to demonstrate what they have learnt in a creative and meaningful way which
demonstrates their understanding.
o Fosters critical and creative thinking skills (Petersen, 2014, p.171)
o Students are invited to construct a role play that reflects their interests and understandings (Rymarz, 2014, p.49)
o Student-centred learning
o Collaboration is implemented throughput the unit (lessons 1-17) in different ways but it is very dominate in this
final assessment piece as students’ must work together, in small groups to complete the learning task and
outcome.
o This collaborative task will allow students to work together and assist each other towards deeper learning whilst
allowing students to learn content more comprehensively (Petersen, 2014, p.166)
o This final assessment piece will also allow; discussion (refer to lesson 1), learning through environment and play
(refer to lessons 2 & 6),

Lesson 16 & 17:


Learning Intention: Students will …
o Work as a group to plan and practice their creative drama performance
o Decide on ways that they can communicate how they can demonstrate the actions and values of Jesus in their
daily lives.
Description of Learning Experience:
o During these lessons, students will finalise their planning. Once completed, they will show and explain their
planning to the teacher.
o Students will then practice their drama performance and make important changes to their planning (if applicable).
Links to literature and philosophy statement:
A transformational approach will be evident throughout this assignment as; I will be flexible in response to the students’
needs and allow more time if required; I will ensure the space is loosely structured to allow students to follow their own
direction (Grajczonek, 214, p,149).

©Planning for learning in mathematics and science, 2018 drafted by B.O.P.


After views & reflection/ Evaluation learning Experience
Lesson 18: Presenting drama performance
Learning Intention: Students will …
o Present their creative drama performance
o Identify and demonstrate how and when they can use Jesus’ teachings within their life to make positive decisions
that help shape the world the God desires.
o Promote their own personal values and extend their evolving personal religious identity through identifying ways
that they can live like Jesus.
Description of Learning Experience:
o At this stage, the planning and creating phases will be finalised.
o Students will present their performance to the whole class.
o Students will be required to explain how they are able to demonstrate the actions of Jesus within their everyday
lives and how they know that by doing this they are following Jesus’ footsteps.
o After each presentation, students in the audience will be able to ask questions or make comment about the
presentation.

o After all groups have presented student will be asked to fill out a group/self-evaluation (Appendix 12).

BIBLIOGRAPHY :
Dillen, A 2014, ‘Empowering Children in Religious Education’, in Grajczonek, J and Ryan, M, Growing in Wisdom,
Religious Education in Catholic Primary Schools and Early Childcare, Lumino Press, Hamilton QLD, pp. 35-44.

Catholic Education South Australia (CESA). Crossways: religious education supporting the integration of faith, life and
culture. Catholic Education South Australia. Retrieved (20/2/2019), from
https://online.cesa.catholic.edu.au/docushare/dsweb/View/Collection-3281

Grajczonek, J 2014, ‘Assessment and Reporting in the Religion Classroom’, in Grajczonek, J and Ryan, M, Growing in
Wisdom, Religious Education in Catholic Primary Schools and Early Childcare, Lumino Press, Hamilton QLD, pp. 193-208

Grajczonek, J 2014, ‘Nurturing Young Children’s Spiritual and Religious Development’, in Grajczonek, J and Ryan, M,
Growing in Wisdom, Religious Education in Catholic Primary Schools and Early Childcare, Lumino Press, Hamilton QLD,
pp.133-144

Grajczonek, J 2014, ‘Planning the Religion Program’, in Grajczonek, J and Ryan, M, Growing in Wisdom, Religious
Education in Catholic Primary Schools and Early Childcare, Lumino Press, Hamilton QLD, pp. 145-160

Grajczonek, J 2014, ‘The Spiritual and Religious Development of Children’, in Grajczonek, J and Ryan, M, Growing in
Wisdom, Religious Education in Catholic Primary Schools and Early Childcare, Lumino Press, Hamilton QLD, pp. 23-34

Grajczonek, J 2014, ‘Young Children’s Learning in the Early Years Religion Program’, in Grajczonek, J and Ryan, M,
Growing in Wisdom, Religious Education in Catholic Primary Schools and Early Childcare, Lumino Press, Hamilton QLD,
pp. 109-121

Hemmings, M 2011, ‘Telling Stories Using Godly Play’, Religious Education Journal of Australia, vol. 27, no. 1, pp. 42–43.

Petersen, J 2014, ‘Teaching and Learning Strategies in the Primary School’, in Grajczonek, J and Ryan, M, Growing in
Wisdom, Religious Education in Catholic Primary Schools and Early Childcare, Lumino Press, Hamilton QLD, pp. 161-176

Ryan, M 2014, ‘Teaching the Bible in Primary Schools’, in Grajczonek, J and Ryan, M, Growing in Wisdom, Religious
Education in Catholic Primary Schools and Early Childcare, Lumino Press, Hamilton QLD, pp. 193-208

©Planning for learning in mathematics and science, 2018 drafted by B.O.P.


Rymarz, R 2014, ‘So you’re Teaching Religion! Some Strategies for the Beginner’, Novalis, Canada pp.6-7, 44, 48.

APPENDIX 1:

©Planning for learning in mathematics and science, 2018 drafted by B.O.P.


APPENDIX 2:
Task: View the storybook 'If Jesus lived inside my heart'. Reflect and discuss how we
today can live like Jesus desires. Use the template provided to record how you today
can live like Jesus in our school.
Learning Intention: To write and illustrate the ways that Jesus can shine through me in
my school community.
Success Criteria: I can identify how and when I can use Jesus’ teachings within
my school community to make positive decisions that can help shape the world that
God desires.

I can live like Jesus by


______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

©Planning for learning in mathematics and science, 2018 drafted by B.O.P.


APPENDIX 3:

Scenario 1: Scenario 2:

You see someone fall over You see someone sitting


whilst playing a game of by themselves at lunch
soccer. time.

What do you do? What do you do?


Scenario 3: Scenario 4:

You hear someone being You go to sit down at


mean to a younger lunch time but your seat is
student. already taken by someone.
What do you do?
What do you do? What do
Scenario 5: Scenario 6:

You know how to do your Someone in your class has


school work but your lost their ball.
friend Sally doesn’t.
What do you do? What do you do?
What do you do?

©Planning for learning in mathematics and science, 2018 drafted by B.O.P.


APPENDIX 4:

APPENDIX 5:

Jesus
Passing through
Jericho
Zacchaeus
Tax collector
Climbed up a tree

©Planning for learning in mathematics and science, 2018 drafted by B.O.P.


APPENDIX 6:

©Planning for learning in mathematics and science, 2018 drafted by B.O.P.


The story of Zacchaeus (Luke 19:1-
10)
Task: Retell the story of Zacchaeus through
illustrations

Jesus entered Jericho.

In Jericho, there was a man


named Zacchaeus; he was a
chief tax collector and was
very wealthy.

He wanted to see who Jesus


was, but because he was
short he could not see over
the crowd.

So, he ran ahead and climbed


a tree to see him.

Jesus looked up and said to


him, “Zacchaeus, come down
immediately. I must stay at
your house today.”

©Planning for learning in mathematics and science, 2018 drafted by B.O.P.


When Jesus and Zacchaeus
returned, Zacchaeus said
“Look, Lord! Here and now I
give half of my possessions to
the poor, and if I have
cheated anybody out of
anything, I will pay back four
times the amount.”
APPENDIX 7:

©Planning for learning in mathematics and science, 2018 drafted by B.O.P.


Task: Explain what each of the biblical stories tell us about Jesus and his values and identify
how we can use these values in our own lives.
Learning Intentions:
o Identify and understand values in the words and actions of Jesus
o Identify and demonstrate how you can use Jesus’ values and teachings in their own
lives to make positive choices.
What does this story How can we live out
tell us about Jesus’ Jesus’ values in our
values? own lives?
Cleansing a Leper
(Mk 1:40-45)

Healing of a Crippled Man


(Mk 2:1-12)

©Planning for learning in mathematics and science, 2018 drafted by B.O.P.


Jesus calls the children
(Luke 18:15-17)

APPENDIX 8:
APPENDIX 9:
Student Name:
Distinguished Proficient Apprentice Novice
Cleansing a Leper
Writing explains what Writing had quality Writing had many Writing had few Writing had no details
each story tells us details which details that explained details that explained about Jesus’ values
about Jesus’ values. explained Jesus’ Jesus’ values evident Jesus’ values evident within the text.
values evident within within the text. within the text.
the text.
Writing explains how Writing had quality Writing explained 1-2 Writing explained 1 Writing had no links
we can live out Jesus’ details which ways that we can live way that we can live to Jesus’ values.
values in our own explained numerous out Jesus’ values in out Jesus’ values in
lives. ways that we can live our own lives. our own lives.
out Jesus’ values in
our own lives.

Text is interpreted Students interpreted Students interpreted Students interpreted No illustrations for
through illustrations the text through the text through the text through any text.
detailed illustrations. illustrations. simple illustrations.

Healing of a Crippled Man


Writing explains what Writing had quality Writing had many Writing had few Writing had no details
each story tells us details which details that explained details that explained about Jesus’ values
about Jesus’ values. explained Jesus’ Jesus’ values evident Jesus’ values evident within the text.
values evident within within the text. within the text.
the text.
Writing explains how Writing had quality Writing explained 1-2 Writing explained 1 Writing had no links
we can live out Jesus’ details which ways that we can live way that we can live to Jesus’ values.
values in our own explained numerous out Jesus’ values in out Jesus’ values in
lives. ways that we can live our own lives. our own lives.
out Jesus’ values in
our own lives.

Text is interpreted Students interpreted Students interpreted Students interpreted No illustrations for
through illustrations the text through the text through the text through any text.
detailed illustrations. illustrations. simple illustrations.

Jesus calls the children

©Planning for learning in mathematics and science, 2018 drafted by B.O.P.


Writing explains what Writing had quality Writing had many Writing had few Writing had no details
each story tells us details which details that explained details that explained about Jesus’ values
about Jesus’ values. explained Jesus’ Jesus’ values evident Jesus’ values evident within the text.
values evident within within the text. within the text.
the text.
Writing explains how Writing had quality Writing explained 1-2 Writing explained 1 Writing had no links
we can live out Jesus’ details which ways that we can live way that we can live to Jesus’ values.
values in our own explained numerous out Jesus’ values in out Jesus’ values in
lives. ways that we can live our own lives. our own lives.
out Jesus’ values in
our own lives.

Text is interpreted Students interpreted Students interpreted Students interpreted No illustrations for
through illustrations the text through the text through the text through any text.
detailed illustrations. illustrations. simple illustrations.

APPENDIX 10:

©Planning for learning in mathematics and science, 2018 drafted by B.O.P.


©Planning for learning in mathematics and science, 2018 drafted by B.O.P.
APPENDIX 11:

Planning Document
Task: As a group, you will be planning and presenting a creative drama performance that
communicates how you can demonstrate the actions of Jesus within either your home, school
or community.

Learning Intention:
o Work as a group to plan a creative drama performance
o Decide on ways that you can communicate how you can demonstrate the actions and
values of Jesus in your daily lives.

Group members: _________________


_________________
_________________

Possible ideas for your drama performance:

©Planning for learning in mathematics and science, 2018 drafted by B.O.P.


©Planning for learning in mathematics and science, 2018 drafted by B.O.P.
Once you have thought of possible performance ideas, pick one or two that you would like
to present to the class. Think about, write and illustrate how this is going to look and what
props you will need. Identify how you are using the teachings and values of Jesus in your
performance.

What is your performance going to be about?


_____________________________________
_____________________________________
_____________________________________
_____________________________________
_____________________________________
Draw what your performance is going to look like:

How will your performance use the teachings and values of Jesus?
_____________________________________
_____________________________________
_____________________________________
_____________________________________
_____________________________________

©Planning for learning in mathematics and science, 2018 drafted by B.O.P.


APPENDIX 12

Self and Group Evaluation


What was your creative performance about?
______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________
What did you learn by creating and presenting your performance?
______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________
How was your group able to demonstrate the values and teachings of Jesus
throughout your presentation?
______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________
How do you think your group worked together? And why?
______________________________________
______________________________________
If you could do this performance again, what would you do differently?
______________________________________
______________________________________
©Planning for learning in mathematics and science, 2018 drafted by B.O.P.
APPENDIX 13:

Demonstrating Jesus’ values through our own words and actions.


Student Name:
Exceeding Proficient Satisfactory Unsatisfactory
Planning
Quality of Provides work of the Provides high Provides work that Provides work that
planning highest quality. quality work. occasionally needs to usually needs to be
be checked/redone by checked/redone by
other group members others to ensure
to ensure quality. quality.
Almost always listens Usually listens to, Often listens to, shares Rarely listens to,
Teamwork to, shares with, and shares, with, and with, and supports the shares with, and
supports the efforts of supports the efforts efforts of others, but supports the efforts of
others. Tries to keep of others. Does not sometimes is not a others. Often is not a
people working well cause "waves" in the good team member. good team player.
together. group.
Presenting
Successfully Communicates and Demonstrates and Demonstrates acts of
communicates in detail demonstrates how touches on how they kindness but doesn’t
Identifies and actively they can implement can implement the make direct links to
Values of demonstrates how they the actions of Jesus actions of Jesus within Jesus’ values and
Jesus can implement the within their home, their home, school or teachings throughout
actions of Jesus within school or community throughout the drama
their home, school or community the drama performance.
community throughout throughout the performance.
the drama drama performance.
performance.
Uses consistent voices, Often uses voices, Tries to use voices, Tells the story but does
Engaging facial expressions and facial expressions facial expressions and not use voices, facial
the movements to make and movements to movements to make expressions or
audience the characters more make the characters the characters more movement to make the
believable and the more believable and believable and the storytelling more
story more easily the story more story more easily interesting or clear.
understood. easily understood. understood.
Always speaks loudly, Usually speaks Usually speaks loudly Speaks too softly or
Voice slowly and clearly. Is loudly, slowly and and clearly. Speaks so mumbles. The
easily understood by clearly. Is easily fast sometimes that audience often has
all audience members understood by all audience has trouble trouble understanding.
all the time audience members understanding.
almost all the time.
Evaluating
In detail, successfully Successfully Identifies 1 way they Can’t link performance
identifies and describes identifies and demonstrated the to the values of Jesus.
Identifies 3 or more ways they describes 2 or more values of Jesus.
Values of demonstrated the ways they
Jesus values of Jesus. demonstrated the
values of Jesus.

©Planning for learning in mathematics and science, 2018 drafted by B.O.P.


APPENDIX 14:
STUDENT NAME

Contributed to planning
phase

Can give written and verbal


explanations of the groups
planning

©Planning for learning in mathematics and science, 2018 drafted by B.O.P.


Participates in drama
performance

Completed the individual,


group evaluation task
comments
observations
*Student made
*Teacher made
Written comments