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EOI NAVARRA

B1 ENGLISH

INTERACTION AND MEDIATION

Preparation 4 minutes

TRAVELLING: Weekend getaway

Candidate A

Situation: You are planning to spend a long weekend with your friends Peter and Sue in Valencia.

Discuss the aspects below with your partner to reach an agreement. When you discuss accommodation, explain the two options in detail to your partner and answer the questions s/he may have.

Three-star hotel

Rented flat

the questions s/he may have. Three-star hotel Rented flat Double bedroom 120€ per night Bed and

Double bedroom 120€ per night Bed and Breakfast Spa and outdoor swimming pool

1 Bedroom (+ 1 sofa bed), 1 bathroom 60 € per night In the city centre

CANDIDATE A (starts the conversation)

Reach an agreement with your partner about:

accommodation

means of transport

activities during the weekend

time to go and come back
………………

EOI NAVARRA

B1 ENGLISH

INTERACTION AND MEDIATION

Preparation 4 minutes

TRAVELLING: Weekend getaway

Candidate B

Situation: You are planning to spend a long weekend with your friends Peter and Sue in Valencia.

Discuss the aspects below with your partner to reach an agreement. When you discuss means of transport, explain the two options in detail to your partner and answer the questions s/he may have.

Coach

Train

partner and answer the questions s/he may have. Coach Train 42 € per person 8-hour journey

42 € per person 8-hour journey Departures at 7:00 am/10am/13:00 pm/4:30 pm

65 € per person 6-hour journey Station on the outskirt

CANDIDATE B (finishes the conversation)

Reach an agreement with your partner about:

accommodation

means of transport

activities during the weekend

time to go and come back
………………

EOI NAVARRA

B2

ENGLISH

TASK 1: SPEAKING & MEDIATING

Preparation time: 20 minutes Speaking time: 4-5 minutes

Instructions:

Read the text attached and prepare a presentation (as if it was to present in class) reporting the relevant information (main ideas and relevant details). Then prepare an answer to the questions below.

Happiness

Notes:

Use the space below to take notes. You may refer to your notes during the presentation but you must not read them word-for-word.

Do you think you live among happy people?

To what extent can money add to your level of happiness?

According to you, what factors influence the most on personal happiness?

What is Happiness, Anyway?

By Acacia Parks, PhD.

What is happiness? People have agonized over this question for centuries, but only recently has science begun to weigh in on the debate. Before I get into what the science has concluded, let me start by giving some answers to a somewhat easier question: what isn’t happiness?

Happiness is Not: Feeling Good All The Time

Skeptics have often asked whether a person who uses cocaine every day is “happy.” If feeling good all the time were our only requirement, then the answer would be “yes.” However, recent research suggests that an even- keeled mood is more psychologically healthy than a mood in which you achieve great heights of happiness regularlyafter all, what goes up must come down. Furthermore, when you ask people what makes their lives worth living, they rarely say anything about their mood. They are more likely to cite things that they find meaningful, such as their work or relationships. Recent research even suggests that if you focus too much on trying to feel good all the time, you’ll actually undermine your ability to feel good at allin other words, no amount of feeling good will be satisfying to you, since what you expect (all the time) isn’t physically possible for most people.

Happiness is Not: Being Rich or Affording Everything You Want

While living below the poverty line certainly makes it hard to be happy, beyond that, money does not appear to buy happiness. Imagine you unexpectedly get a $10,000/year raise. While you would certainly be excited in the short term, it would only be a matter of time before your expectations change to fit your new budget. Before you know it, you’re just as happy as you were before the raise! This holds true for new houses, new cars, new gadgets, and all of the other material goods that people spend so much time pining for. The only exception to this rule is when you spend your money on experiences with other people so if you took that extra $10,000/year and spent it on some weekend getaways to new and exciting places with your friends or family, then you might get happier. However, this is rarely how people choose to spend windfalls.

Happiness is Not: A Final Destination

The old adage, “Are we there yet?” is often applied to discussions of happiness, as if a person works towards happiness and one day “arrives.” Contrary to popular belief, however, unless you are one of the few who won the genetic lottery and are naturally happy, it takes regular effort to maintain happiness. Most established techniques for becoming happierkeeping a gratitude journal, for exampleare habits, not one-shot events, and most life events that make us happy in the short-term, like getting married or being promoted, fade over time as we adapt to them.

So, What IS Happiness?

The research suggests that happiness is a combination of how satisfied you are with your life (for example, finding meaning in your work) and how good you feel on a day-to-day basis. Both of these are relatively stablethat is, our life changes, and our mood fluctuates, but our general happiness is more genetically determined than anything else. The good news is, with consistent effort, this can be offset. Think of it like you think about weight: if you eat how you want to and are as active as you want to be, your body will settle at a certain weight. But if you eat less than you'd like or exercise more, your weight will adjust accordingly. If that new diet or exercise regimen becomes part of your everyday life, then you'll stay at this new weight. If you go back to eating and exercising the way you used to, your weight will return to where it started. So it goes, too, with happiness.

In other words, you have the ability to control how you feeland with consistent practice, you can form life-long habits for a more satisfying and fulfilling life.

https://www.happify.com

with consistent practice, you can form life-long habits for a more satisfying and fulfilling life. https://www.happify.com

EOI NAVARRA

C1

ENGLISH

TASK 1: SPEAKING AND MEDIATING

Preparation time: 20 minutes Speaking time: 4-5 minutes

Instructions:

Read the texts attached and prepare a presentation about the topic a presentation (as if it was to present in class) reporting the relevant information (main ideas and relevant details) from the three texts. Then prepare an answer to the questions below.

Plastic, a lost battle?

Notes:

Use the space below to take notes. You may refer to your notes during the presentation but you must not read them word-for-word.

Do you think people around you are worried about plastic use?

 

Do you try to reduce your plastic use? How?

Do you agree that the fight against plastic is a lost battle?

A Seventh Continent Called Pacific Trash Vortex

There is an island where no one wants to live. Yet it is in the middle of the Pacific Ocean, not too far from beautiful Hawaii. And it’s really pure and wild, an atoll with bright colors that, given its geographical location, is just as good as Bora Bora or the Cook Islands. So why so much revulsion?

Imagine a huge pile of plastic waste of all kinds that had been accumulating since the fifties, undisturbed, in the sea, to the point where it has become a continent made of trash. A large island that is not there because it is not marked on the maps. It is not even visible from satellites, as it is located just below the sea surface, 10 meters deep.

Pacific Trash Vortex, also known as a large patch of garbage in the Pacific, however, does exist. It was discovered in the late ’80s by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). It was formed due to the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre, a slow ocean current that moves in a clockwise spiral, produced by a system of currents at high pressure. This current collects the garbage and gathers it into two major groups: one at about 500 nautical miles off the coast of California, and one off of the Japanese coast.

It must be said that this big blob silently disintegrates into fragments and smaller pieces. These tiny bits are the result of a photo degradation, as crazy as it is harmful. Although they are not visible, they are present and mix with the marine plankton that fish and jellyfish eat. This leads to poison that is entering the food chain.

https://theglobaloyster.com/

is entering the food chain. https://theglobaloyster.com/ Plastics and the environment Plastics are inexpensive,

Plastics and the environment

Plastics are inexpensive, lightweight, strong, durable, corrosion-resistant materials, with high thermal and electrical insulation properties. The diversity of polymers and the versatility of their properties are used to make a vast array of products that bring medical and technological advances, energy savings and numerous other societal benefits. As a consequence, the production of plastics has increased substantially over the last 60 years from around 0.5 million tonnes in 1950 to over 260 million tonnes today. In Europe alone the plastics industry has a turnover in excess of 300 million euros and employs 1.6 million people. Almost all aspects of daily life involve plastics, in transport, telecommunications, clothing, footwear and as packaging materials that facilitate the transport of a wide range of food, drink and other goods. […]

of a wide range of food, drink and other goods. […] However, there is considerable concern

However, there is considerable concern about the adverse effects of these chemicals on wildlife and humans. In addition to the reliance on finite resources for plastic production, and concerns about additive effects of different chemicals, current patterns of usage are generating global waste management problems. Some researches show that plastic wastes, including packaging, electrical equipment and plastics from end-of-life vehicles, are major components of both household and industrial wastes; our capacity for disposal of waste to landfill is finite and in some locations landfills are at, or are rapidly approaching, capacity. Accumulation of plastic debris in the environment and the associated consequences are largely avoidable. Considerable immediate reductions in the quantity of waste entering natural environments, as opposed to landfill, could be achieved by better waste disposal and material handling. Littering is a behavioural issue and some have suggested that it has increased in parallel with our use of disposable products and packaging. Perhaps increasing the capacity to recycle will help to reverse this trend such that we start to regard end-of-life materials as valuable feedstocks for new production rather than waste. To achieve this will require better education, engagement, enforcement and recycling capacity.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov