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CHAPTER

6: FINDINGS, SUGGESTIONS AND CONCLUSION

The extent and degree of favorableness of the employee’s towards their job is called job
satisfaction.

It is the satisfaction that an employee derives from his job that affects his working positively or
negatively. Furthermore, the quality of work produced also depends upon the satisfaction level of
the employees. It is many a times seen that more satisfied employees are more creative and
enthusiastic towards their work.

In the earlier chapters, detailed examination of various variables affecting job satisfaction of
operational level bank employees working in public and private sector banks have been done.
The findings of the study have been mentioned earlier, but so as to further throw light on the
interpretations, the following concluding observations were found to be important.

The present chapter is divided into three parts findings, suggestions and conclusion.

PART I: FINDINGS

1. Majority of the employees 88 (44 percent) working in SBI bank were found to be in the
age-group of 31 – 40 years with 56 (28 percent) and 48 (24 percent) falling in the age-
groups of 41 – 50 and 21 – 30 respectively whereas 44 (22 percent) employees from
ICICI were falling in the age-group of 31 – 40 with 60 each in 41 – 50 and 21 – 30
category. Thus, no specific pattern was seen as far as age is concerned.

2. It was observed that more males 124 (62 percent) were working in SBI as compared to 76
females (38 percent). Whereas, a different trend was seen in ICICI with more number of
female employees i.e. 120 (60 percent) and only 80 (40 percent) male employees.

3. In both the banks, the number of married employees was higher than
unmarried/divorced/separated/widowed employees.

4. Although majority of employees from SBI, 144 (72 percent) and 180 (90 percent) from
ICICI belonged to the general category. Yet, it was observed that among the SC/ST/OBC
employees SBI had higher number 56 (28 percent) as compared to 20 (10 percent) from
ICICI. This variation was due to the quota fixed for SC/ST/OBC employees in public
sector banks.

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5. As far as the number of dependents is considered, almost similar trend was observed in
both the banks with 88 (44 percent) from SBI and 84 (42 percent) from ICICI having
dependents less than four. 60 (30 percent) from SBI and 76 (38 percent) employees had
4–6 dependents. 52 (26 employees) from SBI and 36 (18 percent) employees had 7 – 9
dependents.

6. More number of employees from both the banks i.e. 76 (38 percent) and 84 (42 percent)
from SBI an ICICI respectively were found to reside in urban areas as compared to those
living in rural areas. Those living in rural areas from both the banks were 60 (30 percent)
and 48 (24 percent), 64 (32 percent) and 68 (34 percent) resided in semi-urban areas from
SBI and ICICI respectively.

7. On analyzing, it was found that most of the employees from both the banks lived in the
range of 10 – 20 kilometers with 84 (42 percent) from SBI and 72 (36 percent) from
ICICI. Same number of employees lived within 10 kilometers distance from their
respective branches (60 (30 percent) from each bank). 44 (22 percent) and 52 (26 percent)
from SBI and ICICI respectively resided 20 – 30 kilometers away from their branches
with just 12 (6 percent) from SBI and 16 (8 percent) from ICICI having accommodation
far i.e. more than 30 kilometers from their branch.

8. In both the banks, when observed about the dwelling status of the employees, it was
found that more employees from both the banks had owned houses than those living in
rented accommodation. In SBI, 124 (64 percent) lived in their own houses and in ICICI
the number was 108 (52 percent). Those living in rented accommodation from SBI were
76 (38 percent) and from ICICI were 92 (46 percent).

9. More graduates i.e. 112 (56 percent) from SBI and 124 (62 percent) from ICICI were
found as compared to 60 (30 percent) post-graduate employees from each of the two
banks. Very less 28 (14 percent) and 16 (8 percent) employees were undergraduates in
SBI and ICICI respectively.

10. In SBI, the maximum number i.e. 72 (36 percent) of employees were found to have 5 –
10 years experience with just 40 (20 percent) from ICICI having the same level of
experience. In ICICI 56 (28 percent) had 10 – 15 years experience with 40 (20 percent)
from SBI. More freshers with 0 – 5 years of experiences were found in ICICI i.e. 28 (14

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percent) as compared to just 16 (8 percent) from SBI. 44 (22 percent) from each bank had
an experience of 15 – 20 years. With 28 (14 percent) from SBI and 32 (16 percent) from
ICICI having experience of more than 20 years.

11. Almost 30 percent 60 employees from SBI had a handsome salary of above 40000 with
just 18 percent (36 employees) from ICICI having similar salary band. An interesting
aspect observed was 34 percent (68 employees) from ICICI and 20 percent from SBI fell
under the income category of 10000. 26 percent 52 employees from SBI and 16 percent
32 from ICICI had salary between Rs. 10001–20000. Remaining employees had a pay
structure between Rs. 20001 –30000 and Rs. 30001 – 40000.

12. A very interesting observation was made as far as the status of the spouse of the
employees was concerned. In both the banks almost a similar number of employees had
working spouse with 92 (46 percent) from SBI and 96 (48 percent) from ICICI. Similarly
the number employees with unemployed spouse were also almost same with 68 (34
percent) from SBI and 56 (28 percent) from ICICI. 40 (20 percent) from SBI and
48 (24 percent) from ICICI marked NA as their response.

13. It was observed that 92 employees (46 percent) from SBI and 86 employees (43 percent)
from ICICI had very high influence on job satisfaction as far as their social status was
concerned. 64 employees (32 percent) and 74 employees (73 percent) from SBI and
ICICI had high influence of their social status on job satisfaction. Interesting aspect was
none/very less number of employees had no or negative influence on job satisfaction
level.

14. A very interesting observation made was that as far as monetary benefits and job
satisfaction are concerned more employees had high influence than those having very
high influence. 142 employees (71 percent) from SBI and 108 employees (54 percent)
from ICICI had high influence of monetary benefits on job satisfaction. 12 employees (6
percent) from ICICI said to have no influence of monetary benefits.

15. As compared to monetary benefits employees had more influence of non-monetary


benefits on their job satisfaction level. 36 employees (68 percent) from SBI and 100
employees (50 percent) had a very high influence of non-monetary benefits given by their
organizations. This shows that money is not the only motivator; the other benefits also

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have a crucial role to play. 32 employees (16 percent), 12 employees (6 percent) and 20
employees (10 percent) from SBI and 48 employees (24 percent), 16 employees (8
percent), 36 employees (18 percent) from ICICI had high, moderate and no influence
from non-monetary benefits.

16. Unexpectedly job rotation had a moderate influence on 148 (74 percent) employees
working in SBI with 80 (40 percent) employees from ICICI. 16 (8 percent) employees
SBI and 56 (28 percent) employees from ICICI had high influence with 32 (16 percent)
and 60 (30 percent) employees from both the banks having no influence of job rotation on
their satisfaction level.

17. In was observed that 92 (46 percent) employees from SBI and 128 (64 percent)
employees from ICCI had high influence of getting opportunities to use their skills and
abilities in performing their job with 104 (52 percent) employees and 56 (28 percent)
employees from both the banks had a moderate influence of the same and interesting
observation was none of the employees had no or negative influence of the above stated
factor.

18. Job security had an important role to play in both the banks. 120 (60 percent) employees,
68 (34 percent) employees from SBI and 32 (16 percent) employees, 20 (10 percent)
employees from ICICI had very high and high influence of job security on their
satisfaction level. A very less number i.e.12 (6 percent) employees from SBI in contrast
to a high number 72 (32 percent) employees from ICICI had a moderate influence on job
satisfaction due to job security.

19. Sharing of responsibility was considered to be highly influential by 108 (54 percent)
employees from SBI 120 (60 percent) employees from ICICI whereas 68 (34 percent)
employees from SBI and 72 (36 percent) employees from ICICI had moderate influence.
An interesting observation was 12 (6 percent) employees from SBI and 4 (2 percent)
employees had very high influence and no influence whereas none of the employees had
negative influence, from both the banks. (percent) employees (percent) employees

20. 72 (36 percent) employees from SBI 100 (50 percent) employees from ICICI had a
influence of having scope for personal growth and development on level of job
satisfaction. 92 (46 percent) employees from ICICI had moderate influence of above

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variable. Very less number of employees had either very high or no influence of having
the scope for personal growth and development on job satisfaction.

21. Recognition had on important role to play in both the banks with 116 (58 percent)
employees from ICICI and 48 (24 percent) employees from SBI high influence in contrast
with 112 (56 percent) employees from SBI and 76 (38 percent) employees from ICICI
had moderate influence of getting recognition for a deserved task.

22. Congenial work environment had a very high influence on 16 (8 percent) employees
from ICICI and none from SBI. It had a high influence on 52 (26 percent) employees
from SBI and 140 (70 percent) employees from ICICI. 132 (66 percent) employees from
SBI moderate influence of a harmonious work place with 44 (22 percent) employees from
ICICI.

23. In this study, it was found that creativity had a high influence on ICICI staff and moderate
on SBI staff 116 employees (58 percent) from ICICI and 24 employees (12 percent) from
SBI had a high influence of creativity on their level of job satisfaction whereas 128
employees (64 percent) from SBI an 64 employees (32 percent) from ICICI had a
moderate influence of creativity very less i.e. 4 (2 percent) and 16 (8 percent) had very
high influence with none having negative influence.

24. The present study revealed that installation of updated equipment had very high influence
on 4 (2 percent) employees of SBI in contrast with 84 (42 percent) employees from
ICICI. Similar trend was observed with those having high influence 28 (14 percent)
employees from SBI and 108 (54 percent) employees from SBI and just 8 (4 percent)
employees from ICICI. The trend reversed with those having either moderate or no
influence. 84 (42 percent) employees from SBI and just 8 (4 percent) employees from
ICICI had moderate influence. 12 (6 percent) employees had negative influence of having
updated equipments at work place and considered this to increase their workload and
from SBI and with none form ICICI.

25. The result of this study showed that a fair promotion opportunity had a very high
influence on 48 (24 percent) employees from SBI and 12 (6 percent) employees from
ICICI. More number of employees from SBI i.e. 100 (50 percent) employees as compared

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to 32 (16 percent) employees from ICICI had high influence from employees having
moderate influence i.e. 132 (66 percent) from ICICI ad 48 (24 percent) from SBI.

26. The study showed that majority of employees i.e., 96 (48 percent) from SBI and 116 (58
percent) from ICICI had a moderate influence of transfer practices, norms and on job
satisfaction. 48 employees (24 percent) from SBI and 52 employees (26 percent) from
ICICI had high influence on job satisfaction due to the same. Approximately the same
number of employees from both banks i.e. 48 (22 percent) from SBI and 32
(16 percent) from ICICI had no influence of transfer practices on job satisfaction.

27. The findings of the present study showed an interesting aspect of job satisfaction. None of
the employees from either of the banks had a very high influence of trade various on job
satisfaction. 156 (78 percent) employees from SBI and 108 (54 percent) employees from
ICICI had no influence of trade various on their satisfaction from jobs. But 72
(36 percent) employees from ICICI and only 4 (2 percent) employees from SBI
considered presence of trade various to have a negative impact jog satisfaction.

28. Most of respondents from SBI 84 (42 percent) said that benefits after retirement have a
high influence have a high influence on job satisfaction, whereas from ICICI employees
with a similar mind set were just 8 (4 percent). Those having a moderate influence form
this were 56 (28 percent) from SBI and 92 (46 percent) from ICICI. A substantial number
i.e. 100 (50 employees) from ICICI had influence from the above variable and only 8 (4
percent) from SBI said the same.

29. A very different perspective was seen among the employees both the banks when
disciplinary procedures practiced in their organizations were discussed 124 (62 percent)
employees from SBI and just 12 (6 percent) employees from ICICI had moderate
influence of disciplinary procedures on their job satisfaction level, in contrast to 40 (20
percent) employees from SBI and 176 (88 percent) employees from ICICI having high
influence of the same. 36 (18 percent) employees from SBI and 4 (2 percent) from ICICI
had no influence of disciplinary procedures on their job satisfaction level.

30. In the present study it was observed that no employees from SBI had a very high
influence of training programs conducted in their organization but 68 (34 percent) from
ICICI said this factor to be very highly influential. 60 (30 percent) employees from SBI

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and 120 (60 percent) from ICICI had a high influence of these programs. 84 (percent)
employees and 56 (28 percent) employees from had moderate and no influence of training
on job satisfaction with just 8 (4 percent) employees and 4 (2 percent) employees from
ICICI had the same views.

31. The present study revealed that work load had a very high influence on 84 (42 percent)
employees from SBI and 120 (60 percent) employees from ICICI whereas 80 (40 percent)
from SBI and 16 (8 percent) from ICICI had moderate influence of work load. 12 (6
percent) employees from SBI 64 (32 percent) employees from ICICI had very high
influence. 24 (12 percent) employees from SBI and no employees from ICICI had no
influence of work load whereas none of the employees had negative influence from both
the banks.

32. In this study, it was found that recreational facilities had very high influence on 20 (10
percent) employees from ICICI and no employees from SBI falling in the same category.
Majority of the employees 104 (52 percent) employees from SBI in contrast to 4 (2
percent) employees from ICICI had no influence recreational facilities. Whereas 12
(6 percent) employees from SBI and 88 (44 percent) employees had high influence
whereas 84 (42 percent) employees from SBI 88 (44 percent) employees had moderate
influence with none having negating from above influence variable.

33. The present study revealed that organizations policies towards workers had high influence
on 72 (36 percent) from SBI and 152 (76 percent) employees from ICICI similar trend
was observed with those having moderate influence 108 (54 percent) employees from
SBI and 28 (14 percent) employees from ICICI the trend reversed with those having
either very high or no influence no employees from SBI and 20 (10 percent) employees
from ICICI had very high influence. 20 (10 percent) employees from SBI and no
employee from ICICI had negative influence of organizations policies towards workers
whereas none of the employees had negative influence from both the banks.

34. In this study, it was found that 88 (44 percent) employees from SBI and 140 (70 percent)
employees from ICICI had high influence on superior subordinate relate on ship whereas
96 (48 percent) employees from SBI 4 (2 percent) employees from ICICI had moderate
influence from above variable. 4 (2 percent) employees from SBI and 52 (26 percent)

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employees from ICICI had very high influence whereas 12 (6 percent) employees from
SBI and 4 (2 percent) employees from ICICI had no influence in the category and one of
the banks had negative influence.

35. The present study revealed that 4 (2 percent) employees from SBI and 24 (12 percent)
employees from ICICI had very high influence on work and frustration whereas 20 (10
percent) employees from SBI 52 (26 percent) employees had high influence whereas 108
(54 percent) employees from SBI 36 (18 percent) employees from ICICI had moderate
influence from above variable. 52 (26 percent) employees from SBI 76 (38 percent)
employees had no influence of the same 16 (8 percent) employees from SBI and 12 (6
percent) employees had negative influence on work and frustration.

36. The result of this study showed that fairness of Grievance Redressed mechanism was 144
(72 percent) employees from SBI and 68 (34 percent) employees from ICICI had
moderate influence. Whereas none of the employees had very high and negative influence
from both the banks. 16 (8 percent) employees from SBI 124 (62 percent) employees
from ICICI had high influence whereas 40 (20 percent) employees from SBI 8 (4 percent)
employees had no influence from above variable.

37. Sharing of responsibility was considered to be highly influential by 88 (44 percent)


employees from SBI and 76 (38 percent) employees from ICICI 80 (40 percent)
employees from ICICI had moderate influence. An interesting observation was 8 (4
percent) employees from ICICI had no influence whereas 36 (18 percent) employees
from SBI and no employees from ICICI had educational qualification and none of the
employees had negative influence from both the bank.

38. It was observed that gender did not play a very significant role in determination of job
satisfaction level of employees working in both the banks with p value > 0·05 for both the
banks.

39. As far as age is concerned, the p value for SBI was 0·651 and for ICICI was 0·180 which
is greater than 0·05. Thus, showing on significant association between age and job
satisfaction.

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40. In the present study, the p values for experience in respect to job satisfaction from both
the banks, i.e., SBI and ICICI are 0·640 and 0·243 respectively, showing no association
between experience and job satisfaction.

41. Educational qualification was observed to have no association with job satisfaction with p
value 0·920 in SBI and 0·411 in ICICI.

42. It was seen that income, although being a major motivator had no strong association with
job satisfaction in SBI was 0·688 and in ICICI was a source of motivation with p value
less than 0·05 i.e. 0·002.

43. Being married or unmarried, divorced or separated did not had any association with job
satisfaction with p value > 0·05 from both the banks.

44. It was observed that social status had no association with job satisfaction in both the
banks with p values greater than 0·05.

45. A significant association between the number of dependents and job satisfaction was
observed among the employees working in SBI with a p value of 0·000 whereas no
association was found among the number of dependents and job satisfaction of ICICI
employees.

46. Distance from workplace had a significant association with job satisfaction among the
employees working in both the banks with a p value, 0·000 for both banks.

47. Employees of SBI were found to have no association between their dwelling status and
job satisfaction with a p value, 0·431, but those working in ICICI had a strong association
for the same with p value = 0·018.

48. Spouse being employed or unemployed had an association with job satisfaction of
employees working in SBI (p value = 0·019) but not with those working in ICICI (p value
= 0·592).

49. All the variables considered for the study had the value of Cronbach alpha > 0·7, and thus
were included while framing the questionnaire.

50. The overall goodness of fit was 34·656 with df = 1 and p value = 0·000.

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PART II: SUGGESTIONS

On the basis of above findings of the study, a few suggestions are put forward, and if
followed by both the banks, may help in enhancing job satisfaction among its employees.

• The ICICI bank should suitably reward initiatives and contributions of employees.
They must be recognized given adequate incentives to outstanding employees.
• Promotion involves higher responsibilities and therefore promotion policies
should be effectively implemented as this forms an effective reward for
commitment, loyalty and long service.
• Working conditions in terms of flexibility, workload and working hours should be
tuned in such a way that they do not serve as barriers in maintaining work life
balance which is essential for individual and social development.
• Seniors should inculcate positive attitude towards their subordinates in helping
them to perform assigned tasks with increased efficiency and in turn learn
comfortably with cooperation of others.
• The ICICI bank should further strengthen team building and team work backed by
proper communication channel.
• To encourage competitive culture in SBI, seniority based promotion
policies should be revised.
• SBI bank needs to increase employees’ pay satisfaction by introducing a
differential pay system based on one’s merit and effort.
• To maintain satisfied and dedicated work force, performance based compensation
package should be introduced in SBI banks.
• Job security has long been one of the most positive aspects of SBI; hence ICICI
bank needs to introduce special schemes related to pension, gratuity, retirement,
and other related benefits to enhance the employee's sense of security as well as
satisfaction.

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The attitude of employees is a reflection of the moral of an organization. Happy and satisfied
employees are the most important asset of an organization. One major aspect to understand in
this regard is that job satisfaction does not solely depend upon compensation. Although, money
is a major motivator but it enhances employee contentment for a short duration, small and minor
but long term inexpensive up of employee’s moral, motivation and satisfaction level. In this
chapter an attempt is made to give certain specific and a few general suggestions for improving
job satisfaction level of employees working in public and private sector banks. These suggestions
were given after analyzing the conclusions and after a lot of discussions with the employees
regarding satisfiers and dissatisfiers.

Following are a few suggestions to improve job satisfaction level of employees:

• More number of employees from SBI were found to have a high influence of monetary
benefits on their level of job satisfaction as compared to the employees of ICICI. Thus, it
is suggested that more emphasis should be paid on monetary benefits of private sector
employees.
• Private sector bank employees (ICICI) were found to be comparatively unsatisfied as far
as job rotation is concerned. The frequency of job rotation in private sector banks should
be reduced.
• More autonomy to use skills and ability was found in ICICI bank employees as compared
to SBI employees.
• SBI employees should be given more opportunities to use their skills and abilities to
perform their routine tasks.
• Job security plays a very crucial role in the work life of an employee. SBI being a public
sector bank provides more secured jobs , whereas the employees of ICICI lack this
feeling. Thus, private sector banks should provide more secured job to their employees.
• The motivation level of an employee enhances if the scope for personal growth and
development is provided to the employees. This should always be there irrespective of the
sector in which they are working.
• Undoubtedly every employee wants to get recognition for the work performed by them.
Private sector does this very often. The public sector banks should also motivate their
employees by the same way.

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• A congenial work environment increases both motivation and satisfaction. In order to
bring positive results, both the sectors should develop an environment of harmony and
peace.
• ICICI provides more scope for getting recognition for creative work which should also be
there in SBI.
• As far as installation of updated equipments is concerned, ICICI employees were found to
be more satisfied as compared to SBI. Thus, even the public sector enterprises should
have a better access to a work environment with updated instruments installed in their
offices.
• SBI employees were found to be much more relaxed than ICICI employees as they had a
clear mind set about promotional opportunities. Even the private sector should work on
providing a fair promotional policy.
• Public sector employees were found to be more satisfied when asked about monetary and
non-monetary benefits after retirement. This increased their motivation to a considerable
extent. The private sector employees should also be given such benefits.
• In order to develop organizational commitment among the employees ,appropriate
discrepancy procedures should be practiced. This was found to be lacking in the public
sector and it is suggested to be taken care of.
• Private sector banks were found to conduct more frequent trainings for their employees
which changed their perspective to work. Although public sector employees also undergo
such trainings but their frequency needs to be altered.
• ICICI bank employees were found to be over burdened with high work load. This reduces
their interest in work. Measures should be taken for the same.
• Recreational facilities should be provided in both the sectors so as to reduce the stress
level and tiredness among the employees and to provide them with a relaxed work place.
• A fair grievance redressal mechanism should be provided to the employees so that their
problems can be heard out and they are satisfied with the justified decisions taken by the
management.
• The organizations should emphasize on providing overall benefits rather than providing
specific benefits based on either the posts or position of the employee or due to his
educational qualification an experience.

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• An environment of trust should be created whereas the employee and the employer both
feel safe and secured and thus develop a sense of accomplishment.

PART III: CONCLUSION

An attempt has been made in the earlier chapters to minutely observe the details of various
aspects affecting job satisfaction of operational level employees working in public and private
sector banks of Jaipur, during the period under study. Although a thorough analysis has been
done on the various aspects under study yet in order to throw further light on them, there
concluding observations are helpful.
The determination of the factors affecting jobs satisfaction and the important role they play in
service sector, especially banks is very important. Employee performance has a crucial role to
play in the banks. Satisfied employees improve the quality and efficiency of the banking activity.
In view of the fact that the number of banks is increasing day by day, it becomes inevitable for
the researchers, administrators and the policy makers to pay attention to the various aspects
affecting job satisfaction.
The study has highlighted certain variables and aspects that affect job satisfaction of employees
working in public and private sector banks. The common areas/factors where the employees of
both the sectors were generally found to be satisfied were the promotional policy, training
practices, their social status due to their present job, congenial work environment, updated
equipments and organisational policies, whereas the major dissatisfies noticed were lack of
recognition, workload and lack of benefits like insurance policies, mediclaim etc.
In particular, the employees of public sector were found to be more satisfied than the private
sector employees in terms of monetary benefits, job rotation, job security, promotional
opportunities, benefits after retirement and congenial work environment whereas the private
sector employees were found to be motivated towards their work with the amount of autonomy
they get to use their skills and abilities in performing their duties, scope for recognition,
availability of updated equipments , disciplinary procedures practiced , trainings program
conducted and provision of recreational facilities to their employees.

It is thus concluded that an organization, be it public sector or private sector should emphasis on
providing overall benefits, a congenial work environment, a proper grievance redressal

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mechanism , opportunities to use skills and abilities , better super superior-subordinate
relationship and provide encouragement to perform better.

PART IV: SCOPE FOR FUTURE RESEARCH

1) One of the limitations of the present study is that the data collection was restricted
to only two banks. It is suggested that in order to generalise the findings to the
banking industry in India, the study should be expanded to include other private
and public sector banks along with foreign and co-operative banks.
2) Future studies could further test the possible inclusion of additional factors that
affect employee motivation and satisfaction.
3) Future studies may try to access a single bank to deeply examine related research
topics.
4) Additional research should be carried out to gain a continuous view, insight and
knowledge of what motivates employees to perform best on their job.
5) The questionnaire designed for this study determined how satisfied employees are
with certain factors such as the work environment. However, it did not identify the
reasons for this. This kind of information might be useful and therefore a
qualitative study which can combine with statistical analysis to provide a
triangulation approach is recommended.

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• Rajendra Kumar N, Total Quality Management in the Context of HRM, Thesis, O.U, 2002.

• Rajeswari, A. “A Comparative Study on Job Satisfaction of WomenEmployees of Public

Sector Banks and LIC in Tirunelveli District”,2000.

• Rama, A., “Job satisfaction of Bank Employees - A Study with Reference to Kamarajar District”,

Madurai Kamaraj University, 1994.

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Study, Thesis, O.U, 2005.

WEBSITES

• http://humanresources.abo

• http://humanresources.about.com/od/glossarye/g/employee.htm

• http://shodhganga.inflibnet.ac.in/bitstream/10603/2299/10/10_chapter%201.pdf

• http://terrifictrading.com/_bpost_419/The_3_Dimensions_of_Job_Satisfaction

• http://www.academia.edu/4066547/Research_Project_Employee_Job_Satisfaction

• http://www.dol.govt.nz/er/starting/typesofemployment

• http://www.gktoday.in/blog/brief-history-of-banking-in-india/

• http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-the-role-of-banks-in-economic-development.htm

• http://www.yourarticlelibrary.com/banking/banking-the-evolution-origin-and-growth-of-

banking/10998/

• https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banking_in_India

• https://www.sbi.co.in/portal/web/about-us/evolution-of-sbi

• www.iloveindia.com/finance/bank/nationalised-banks/state-bank-of-india.html

• http://www.icicibank.com/

• http://www.icicibank.com/aboutus/history.page

• http://www.banknetindia.com/issues/merge.htm

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ANNEXURE I: QUESTIONNAIRE I

JOB SATISFACTION: A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SECTOR BANK

EMPLOYEES” (WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO SBI AND ICICI, RAJASTHAN)

[Tick the appropriate box]

1) Name:

2) Name of the branch:

3) Age (in years): 21-30 31-40 41-50 Above 50

4) Gender : Male Female

5) Marital status: Married Unmarried Widow(er) Separated/Divorced

6) Social status: General SC/ST/OBC

7) Number of dependents : Below 4 4-6 7-9 Above 9

8) Place of residence: Rural Urban Semi Urban

9) Distance from work place: Up to 10 km 11-20km 21-30 km Above 30km

10) Dwelling status: Owned Rented

11) Educational qualification: Under-Graduate Graduate Post-Graduate

12) Present position: Officer Clerk Sub-Staff

13) Experience in years: Below 5 5-10 10-15 15-20 Above 20

14) Monthly income: Upto 10000 10001-20000 20001-30000

30001-40000 Above 40001

15) Status of the spouse: Employed Unemployed

16) Type of branch: Rural Urban

17) Are you a member of any trade union: Yes No

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ANNEXURE II: QUESTIONNAIRE II

Following are some of the statements which may have contributed to your feeling of satisfaction
in this job. Please encircle in the boxes given below showing to what extent each statement
contributes to your job satisfaction. Highest number represents maximum level of job satisfaction
and lowest number represents minimum level of job satisfaction.

1 The present job enhances your social status in the society 5 4 3 2 1

2 The fairness of monetary benefit in your organization 5 4 3 2 1

3 The fairness of non-monetary benefit in your organization 5 4 3 2 1

4 The effect of job rotation in your job on your level of job satisfaction 5 4 3 2 1

5 Opportunity to use skills and abilities in your job 5 4 3 2 1

6 The feeling of security in your organization 5 4 3 2 1

7 Responsibility among employees in your organization 5 4 3 2 1

8 The scope for personal growth and development in your organization 5 4 3 2 1

9 The recognition for a well done job 5 4 3 2 1

10 The existence of congenial work environment in your organization 5 4 3 2 1

11 Recognition for creativity in your organization 5 4 3 2 1

12 Installation of updated equipments in your organization 5 4 3 2 1

13 Promotion opportunities in your organization 5 4 3 2 1

14 Transfer practices, norms and rules in your organization 5 4 3 2 1

15 Trade union activities in your organization 5 4 3 2 1

16 The fairness of monetary and non-monetary benefits after retirement 5 4 3 2 1

17 Disciplinary procedures practiced in your organization 5 4 3 2 1

18 Training programs conducted in your organization 5 4 3 2 1

19 Work load assigned on you in your organization 5 4 3 2 1

20 Recreational facilities(rest-rooms, canteen, etc) in your organization 5 4 3 2 1

21 Organizational policies towards work environment 5 4 3 2 1

22 Superior-subordinate relationship in your organization 5 4 3 2 1

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23 The effect of work-stress and frustration on your level of job satisfaction 5 4 3 2 1

24 The fairness of grievance redressal mechanism in your organization 5 4 3 2 1

25 The sense of job satisfaction in relation to your educational qualification 5 4 3 2 1

26 The level of overall job satisfaction 5 4 3 2 1

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